Tagged: Will Rogers Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Will Rogers, , , Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , birth certificate, Cabaret, , illegal aliens, Joel Grey, Kardashians, , , , Paul the apostle, , , the buck stops here, Will Rogers   

    THINKING OUTSIDE THE BUCKS 

    Money is the root of all evil.

    Some people–especially the biblically grounded–say the above admonition dates back to the apostle Paul’s first letter to the Kardashians….specifically, Timothy (Kardashian). But said name (“Tim” for short) was changed to “Kim” early on because Tim wasn’t Tiny for long (plus, “Tim” was obviously an inappropriate name for someone of her gender). Or maybe “Kimothy” was misspelled “Timothy” on the birth certificate, and the error went unnoticed until the day they had to furnish proof she wasn’t an illegal alien. Whatever.

    But if we can’t believe the bible, what then? For the record, my sources have uncovered this more likely origin for MONEY IS THE ROOT OF ALL EVIL, first recorded by The Andrews Sisters and sung on the 1940s Blue (radio) Network (other researchers put their money on the Green Network, but that’s a source of a different color):

    I must admit the song isn’t nitpickingly accurate. The correct admonition is The love of money is the root of all evil. This does put a whole different spin on the sin, the point being that you can screw who you will for wealth, and, so long as you don’t love it–so long as you can say, “Up yours!”, your affairs are strictly money business.

    And so we come to the point in the proceedings where, having run out of my own pearls of profundity to pad the post, I turn to what others have to say (and sing) on the subject:

    Business is the art of extracting money from another man’s pocket without resorting to violence. –Max Amsterdam

    It’s money. I remember it from when I was single. –Billy Crystal

    A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money. –Everett Dirksen, former U.S. Senator

    It may be hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven, but it’s easy for him to get on the church board of trustees. –Evan Esar

    Women prefer men who have something tender about them — especially the legal kind. –Kay Ingram

    A fool and his money are soon elected. –Will Rogers

    Cocaine is God’s way of saying you’re making too much money. –Robin Williams

    And with that, the buck stops here.

     
    • Paul Sunstone 12:22 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Give me control of a nation’s money, and I care not who makes its laws.” Whether or not Nathan Rothschild actually said that is disputed, but what cannot be disputed is that whoever controls a nation’s money is positioned to rule that nation.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:51 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Now that you mention it, I think you’re right — our nation’s wives do control the money (not to mention their husbands).

        Liked by 2 people

    • scifihammy 3:33 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      haha An entertaining post. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:50 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Boy, do I love the Andrews sisters. First spotted them in the Abbott and Costello movies. The big blonde is my favorite…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:00 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I do remember the Andrews in an A & C movie, but (without looking it up) I don’t remember which one (maybe more). The blond Andrews was Patti, the lead singer who, as I recall, continued to sing on her own after the sister act disbanded. I have a number of their old 78 rpm records in my collection.

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 8:11 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink

          Well, just to fill in that one gap in your knowledge: The movie was called “Buck Privates”. They did both “Boogie Woogie Bugle-boy” and “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree”. I love the choreography of “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy”…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 12:44 pm on August 1, 2018 Permalink

          Thanks, Charlie. It’s been a long time since I saw that movie, but I do have both those songs on record.

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 6:35 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      If money is the cause of all evil then why do churches keep asking for it? But love your quotes …. am expecting payment for this praise 😉
      The Andrew sisters isn’t playing for me … might be an issue this end.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:17 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I offer this payment–another quote, this one by Freud:
        “When someone criticizes me, I can defend myself, but against praise I am defenseless.”
        I trust you’ll accept it, because you wouldn’t want to take advantage of a poor defenseless muse, now, would you, Kate?

        Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 11:16 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love money. I love everything about it. I bought some pretty good stuff. Got me a $300 pair of socks. Got a fur sink. An electric dog polisher. A gasoline powered turtleneck sweater. And, of course, I bought some dumb stuff, too. –Steve Martin

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:55 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Love the quote, Ricardo. Who doesn’t want a fur sink, an electric dog polisher, and a gasoline powered turtleneck sweater? But I think Steve could’ve done a lot better than a $300 pair of socks — in fact, I have a $600 pair of socks I’d be willing to sell him for $1,200 just to let him feel like he got his money’s worth.

        P.S. And, if he acts now, I’ll wear them for a week and ship them unwashed so they smell good.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 4:50 pm on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, I may be wrong but I thought Paul wrote his letters to these guys.

      Like

      • mistermuse 7:01 pm on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, scholars say Paul wrote letters to the Romans, Corinthians, Galatians, Colossians, Philippians, Thessalonians, and of course the Kardashians, but they don’t mention The Coronets. If Paul did write to The Coronets, the letters must have got lost in the mail.

        Like

    • chattykerry 2:43 pm on August 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Gosh, I love the way you wound the bible around the Kardashians, the Andrews Sisters and Robin Williams. Excellent post – there should be award for this type of thinking!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:48 pm on August 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, Kerry — comments like yours are my award. 🙂

      By the way, I had to work “Timothy” into the post as well, because “money is the root of all evil” is actually from Paul’s first letter to Timothy (though I can’t say for sure that Timothy’s last name was Kardashian). 🙂 🙂

      Like

    • ESP 1:47 am on August 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      came here from potato blog, and find this as entertaining as it was claimed to be. following for more.

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 1:43 pm on August 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Nice!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 5:43 pm on August 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, it’s the “love of money” not the dinero itself. Creepy, amoral and wordy Any Rand misquoted that Scripture passage to justify her weirdness. She had Frisco blabbing on for pages and pages about it in Atlas Shrugged. As if everyone at a party is going to stand around and listen to anyone that long. OK, the guy was supposed to be handsome and rich. Still no excuse to cram her twisted philosophy into melodramatic narrative. My poly sic sister called Rand a social monster. Gee, who does that remind me of…orange and has never read the constitution he vowed to protect.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:33 pm on August 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        If Rand and Trump are alike (except that Trump couldn’t write a coherent thought, much less a novel), it’s a good thing only one of them is still alive.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Brigham Young, , , , , men, , , , , , Solomon, Will Rogers, ,   

    HUSBAND APPRECIATION DAY 

    The third Saturday in April, which happens to be today, is HUSBAND APPRECIATION DAY. Unfortunately (or fortunately, as the case may be), I have but one wife to appreciate me. Not that I’m greedy, you understand, but I can’t help wondering what it would be like having many wives appreciate me — like in such open-minded countries as Afghanistan, where polygamy is a common practice. Speaking of practice, practice may make perfect, but prudence dictates that such things should be checked out before one plunges into it.

    Luckily, one has only to turn to Googlepedia to find pertinent reports. For example, a well-educated Imam of Islam, Mohammed Bello Abubakar, was quoted in The Christian Science Monitor and the BBC as saying, “I married 86 women and there is peace in the house — if there is peace, how can this be wrong? A man with ten wives would collapse and die, but my own power is given by Allah. That is why I have been able to control 86 of them.” By the time of his death on January 28 at 92 (years, not wives), he actually had not 86, not 92, but 120 wives, and had fathered 203 children. And I thought I was busy.

    But Bello Abubakar was a piker at polygamy compared to that wisest of Old Testament wife hoarders, King Solomon, who is said to have had up to 1,000 wives….not to mention 300 concubines on the side. Apparently, it helps to get religion if one hopes to honey-up and handle hives of wives. Bee that as it may, the problem is that one can’t grab unto just any religion in order to have one’s fill of mates. For example, I was raised Catholic, which is not the most reasonable religion in the world when it comes to conjugal largesse. On top of that — though I am now free of such doctrinaire prohibition — the secular powers-that-be in America maintain equally unenlightened views in marital matters. So you can see what we poor, monogamous men are up against in so-called liberal democracies.

    Of course, we could resort to bigamy, but at what cost? It’s a sad state of affairs when you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t. But never let it be said that I’m not a broad-minded guy — thus, I call on the following sexpert testimony, which unfortunately (or fortunately, as the case may be) includes no female witnesses:

    Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same. –Oscar Wilde

    The best argument against bigamy is that it leaves a man no place to hang his clothes. –Evan Esar

    Bigamy is the only crime where two rites make a wrong. –Bob Hope

    Why a man would want a wife is a mystery to bachelors; why a man would want two wives is a bigamystery. –Evan Esar

    Polygamy, n. A house of atonement, fitted with several stools of repentance, as distinguished from monogamy, which has but one.–Ambrose Bierce (The Devil’s Dictionary)

    Brigham Young originated mass production [in America], but Henry Ford was the one who improved on it. –Will Rogers

    Polygamy: an endeavor to get more out of life than there is in it. –Elbert Hubbard

    Every man should have four wives: a Persian, with whom he can converse; a woman from Khorasan, for the housework; a Hindu woman to raise the children; and one from Transoxiana, whom he can beat as a warning to the others. –Mirza Aziz Koka

    That last quote seems a bit over the top, I must admit. How could the average person be expected to know where the hell Khorasan and Transoxiana are?

     

     
    • linnetmoss 7:13 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Groucho: “Well whadaya say girls? Are we all gonna get married?” Woman: “All of us? But that’s bigamy!” Groucho: “Yes, and it’s big-a-me too.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:47 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I remember that joke, but I’m not sure if Groucho was the first to say it. No matter — no one ever said it better!

        P.S. For the benefit of those not up on their Marx (Brothers), Groucho said it in ANIMAL CRACKERS (1930).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 10:20 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never heard any women saying they’d like to have multiple husbands. . Hmmm. . . Wonder why? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:47 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Carmen, I can only speak for myself: when a wife has me for a husband, she thinks….

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 11:14 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink

          I’m laughing.

          But since it’s Hubby Appreciation day, I will save my deprecatory comments. 🙂
          (and don’t tell me, you think that song is about you)

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 11:36 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink

          Carmen, I trust that you are giving your hubby the appreciation he is due today! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 11:44 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink

          Always! (in fact, he really is quite spoiled – just ask our daughters!)

          Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:42 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Transoxiana was easy for Google to find, Sr. Muse, and it turns out to be modern Uzbekistan, approximately. Apparently its natives have always preferred to live in a nearly unpronounceable land.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:33 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I clicked “Like” but I meant “Don’t like.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:24 pm on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      This brings up images of monogamy and or memories of Mr & Mrs Bundy but then there is nothing to suggest that Cahn and Van Heusen were talking about only one marriage. Just that you need love.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:39 pm on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, as it happens, one of the books I bought at that library book sale several months ago was Sammy Cahn’s autobiography titled I SHOULD CARE….and one of the chapters is titled LOVE AND MARRIAGE. I haven’t gotten around to reading the book yet, but I can tell you that he was married more than once (but not at the same time, because that would’ve been bigamy — or rather, biga-him).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 7:09 pm on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I thought you made this up. Just took a ‘stroll’ through Noseybook and indeed, it’s true! (I mean, it HAS to be if it’s on FB!)

      I should know better than to doubt you, mister muse. . .

      Liked by 2 people

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:14 am on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      SO sorry I missed Husband Appreciation Day, but since I am no longer so encumbered, I hope I may be forgiven. I hope you enjoyed your day.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:23 am on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Madelyn. I got a big kick out of Husband Appreciation Day because my wife waited on me hand and foot (a hand grabbing unto my ear and a foot launched at my rear end). It’s good to know she still loves me after all these years.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 5:14 pm on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ha ha ha. Great post. I love the Wilde and Esar quotes. I hope Koka was a bachelor.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lavinia Ross 7:42 pm on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Have you seen the 2009 Woody Allen movie “Whatever Works”? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • heidi ruckriegel 12:26 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That whole thing of one guy having 100 wives always seemed a bit selfish to me. Wouldn’t there be 99 guys who have to stay single?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:40 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Possibly….but 50 of them might WANT to stay single (just kidding — I’d make a quip of almost every single reply if I could!). 🙂

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Tina Fey, Virginia Woolf, , Will Rogers   

    FOR YOU, MORE HUMOR 

    N’yuk-n’yuk-n’yuk! –Curly Howard, The Three Stooges

    April being NATIONAL HUMOR MONTH, I thought I’d humor you with humor-us woids of wisdom from some of my favorite humor-ists. I’d have begun with a self-sample, but thought it best to start on a higher plane — and who in comedic history soared higher than Curly when it comes to debonair comedy? So it is written that I must take second place in my own post (third, if you count comedienne Joan Rivers’ intro to my poem):

    THE DIVINE COMEDY CLUB

    Humor is God’s gift to all of us.
    –Joan Rivers

    Thank God for funny
    because seriously
    we could be
    dying out there.

    Being a comedian is a lonely occupation; you stand on the stage talking to yourself, being overheard by audiences. –Fred Allen

    Humor is merely tragedy standing on its head with its pants torn. –Irvin S. Cobb

    Humor is just another defense against the universe. –Mel Brooks

    When humor works, it works because it’s clarifying what people already feel. It has to come from someplace real. –Tina Fey

    Humor is the first of the gifts to perish in a foreign tongue. –Virginia Woolf

    Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. –W. C. Fields

    The secret source of humor is not joy but sorrow; there is no humor in Heaven. –Mark Twain

    Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is. –Francis Bacon

    I don’t want to run for office; there’s already too many comedians in Washington. –Will Rogers

    Without a sense of humor, I don’t know how people make it. –Marlo Thomas

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    We close on an upbeat note from this laughing-at-life jazz great whose birthday is April 7:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:13 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love Will Rogers – and his is my fav among the quotes above. I clicked here expecting funnies, but finding the quotes was even better. Thanks for sharing.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to transform a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for commenting, Madelyn. When searching for good quotes, it usually pays to look in Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mél@nie 3:22 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      MERCI, Mr Muse: you’ve made my mornin’… 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • linnetmoss 7:05 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      If there is no humor in heaven, I hope at least there is wit…

      Liked by 3 people

    • Garfield Hug 9:11 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      👍👍👍

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:15 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As a dabbler in the humor field for some years now, Sr. Muse, the mystery of it to me is how nobody laughs at the same jokes. Some people love clever puns, others refuse to laugh unless they are watching an old lady being pushed down the stairs.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:40 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Will Rogers always cracks me up. The Twain one is pretty evocative too. Thanks for the smiles. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:31 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Some of the quotes (like Twain’s) aren’t exactly humorous, but are just as pungent (such as Bacon’s). Needless to say (so why am I saying it?), I like them all. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 4:30 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Look at yourself if you had a sense of humor..”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:23 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the clip, Don. Until I checked, I didn’t realize (or had forgotten) that this is a Rodgers & Hart song. In all honesty, though, Billie sounds to me like she was past her prime when she sang this. Too bad she didn’t record it when R & H wrote it back in 1937.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 9:30 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      FINALLY was home long enough to insert a link here from the Friday Funnies about writers.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:59 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the Friday Funnies link, Madelyn. I hope to get the work week off to a funny Monday start with my next post.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 11:30 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink

          I shall look forward to it – and you are most welcome for the link. Next time, drop it with your comment and I’ll move it up – meanwhile it will be there for anybody wanting a bit more humorous inspiration.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 12:08 am on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      These are some insightful quotes on humor.

      Lately I’ve been looking at the political humor of Saturday Night Live and some of the other shows and thinking of them as court fools of old who spoke truth to power.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:17 am on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Nowadays we might think of them as speaking truth to TOWER (Trump Tower). 😦

        Like

    • Lavinia Ross 12:08 pm on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That is a great Billie Holiday song!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:43 pm on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed! Billie recorded that song (LAUGHING AT LIFE) June 1940, accompanied by such jazz greats as Teddy Wilson on piano and Lester Young on tenor sax.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Edgar Guest, , , , ONE TOUCH OF VENUS, , , , Will Rogers   

    BE MY GUEST 

    I’d rather be a great bad poet than a bad good poet. –Ogden Nash

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Today is the birthday, not of Ogden Nash, but of Edgar Guest (Aug. 20, 1881). And who, you might ask, was Mr. Guest, and why is he my special Guest for this post? (Sorry about that, but to paraphrase Will Rogers, I never met a pun I didn’t like.) Though he is all but forgotten today, in his day Guest was a poet so popular that he was known as the People’s Poet. Unfortunately for him, this lofty regard was not shared by more discriminating appraisers such as Dorothy Parker, who is reported to have declared:

    I’d rather flunk my Wassermann test*
    than read a poem by Edgar Guest.”

    *a test for syphilis

    Were his poems really that bad? Here are a few examples; you be the judge:

    Home ain’t a place that gold can buy or get up in a minute;
    Afore it’s home there’s got t’ be a heap o’ living in it.
    –from his most famous poem, titled “Home”

    When you’re up against a trouble,
    Meet it squarely, face to face,
    Lift your chin, and set your shoulders,
    Plant your feet and take a brace.
    –from “See It Through”

    Now, I’m not saying I’d rather flunk a syphilis test than read a poem by Edgar Guest, but August 18 was/is BAD POETRY DAY, and one wonders why that date was chosen rather than August 20, which would have coincided perfectly with the birth date of the critics’ poetaster child for BAD POETRY DAY. Of course, it’s possible there are worse poets than Guest, so perhaps neglected candidates for the honor would have raised a stink (as opposed to raising a stinker, like the parents of a certain GOP candidate for President).

    But I digress (the devil made me do it). Back on message, your humble host is more than capable of vying for the honor; as proof, he submits the following for your disapproval:

    RAINED ALL NIGHT THE DAY I LEFT

    It was a dark and stormy night
    On the day I left to stay.
    The sun was shining brightly
    On yon shadows afar away.

    I be starting on a journey
    Just as soon as I know where.
    I’ve packed a lot of nothing
    To unpack when I get there.

    They say the spirit’s willing,
    But the flesh is weak as sin;
    The former is my future —
    The latter is where I’ve been.

    So come, sweet spirit, raise me
    From the heap o’ living dead.
    I surrender — set me free from
    My behind to look ahead.

    And should I meet up with trouble,
    I’ll meet it squarely and not duck;
    I’ll shoulder my chin, a face lift face,
    And just show all-around pluck.

    And if that doesn’t take me
    Beyond that unbending bend,
    I’ll just declare this is where
    Both journey and poem end.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Back to Mr. Nash. I opened this opus with his “great bad poet/bad good poet” quote. There was a method to my badness: he was America’s preeminent writer of humorous light verse from 1931 until his death in 1971, a favorite of mine, and, apropos to this post’s focus on an August 18-20 time frame, he was born Aug. 19 (1902). So Happy Birthday, Ogden Nash — a wit as a light versifier and, I might add, no twit as a lyricist; witness his words to this tune composed by Kurt Weill, as sung by Eileen Wilson (lip synced by Ava Gardner) and Dick Haymes in the 1948 Hollywooden film version of the play ONE TOUCH OF VENUS:

     

     

     
    • renxkyoko 12:11 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like it.

      I like poems that are direct and to the point, thus , easy to understand and appreciate.

      Liked by 1 person

    • painkills2 12:20 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Poetry is in the eye of the beholder. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Michaeline Montezinos 12:31 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I also like your poem. It reminds me of the one I wrote as Artemus Bumpkin on SWI.

      Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 2:41 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think people can be snobs about poetry like they can about art. If you like something, does it matter if the critics think it is good or not?
      I like your poem, and you’re amusing as always. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:07 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks (to all four of you) for your comments. My take on the excellent points about the kinds of poetry you (or anyone, for that matter) like and poetry being “in the eye of the beholder,” is that this is TRUE OF MANY THINGS, but is internalized by too few people. Being unable to accept and appreciate that we all see things from our own vantage point (based on our upbringing, culture, religion, maturity, etc.) is, in my opinion, the primary reason why this is such a violent, “my way or the highway” world. Antagonism is no substitute for empathy and gets us nowhere but where we are. We need to get to a better place.

        Liked by 2 people

    • linnetmoss 7:45 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “Set me free from my behind”? I am going to be laughing all day over this one. I also like “Hollywooden.” But Dick Haymes actually had a good voice.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:21 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It may be hard to believe now, but in the 1940s, Dick Haymes was Frank Sinatra’s biggest rival as the bobbysoxers’ favorite crooner. In my opinion, Haymes had a better voice than Sinatra at that time, although of course Frank went on to reach the heights, while Haymes slid into near-oblivion. His story is a sad one in many ways, and makes for interesting reading for anyone interested.

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 9:12 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sounds like that particular dark and stormy night—of all dark and stormy nights—was a most auspicious one, and whether you have a bandage or a banjo on your knee in future, things are looking good for your liberation from your behind. And since your poem is a delight, neitherr I nor Susannah will cry for you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:54 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always liked Stephen Foster’s songs such as OH! SUSANNA (from which I borrowed the title of my poem), CAMPTOWN RACES, BEAUTIFUL DREAMER and JEANIE WITH THE LIGHT BROWN HAIR. For those who aren’t familiar with OH! SUSANNA, it goes like this:

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 12:05 pm on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think your poem is too clever to qualify as bad. 🙂 Loved it!

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 12:13 pm on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you (I only hope Stephen Foster isn’t turning over in his grave)!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 6:43 pm on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like the way Guest sets his chin up. It would make it real easy to land a left hook or a right cross or both. He may not be the worst poet but he’s got to be pretty close.

      Is Dick Haymes trying to sound like Sinatra or is that his natural voice? I know from comments Sinatra made that he couldn’t stand the guy.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:00 pm on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, that Haymes’ natural voice, but I think he shows it to better effect in the DON’T THROW COLD WATER ON THE FLAME OF LOVE clip in my previous post (SAY WHAT AGAIN?).
      Also, both his voice and his acting ability are better displayed in the 1945 version of the film STATE FAIR, with great Rodgers and Hammerstein songs like IT MIGHT AS WELL BE SPRING and IT’S A GRAND NIGHT FOR SINGING.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 9:15 pm on August 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy birthday to Ogden Nash! I say great bad poets have a lot of soul.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:47 pm on August 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      His body of work isn’t bad either! 🙂

      Like

    • arekhill1 12:26 am on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Both my parents would quote Guest when Mom made one of her cherry pies. “As I wend my way to Heaven, I’ll be full of cherry pie,” they would laugh between forkfuls. Didn’t make me like them any better, but I didn’t let it destroy my taste for cherry pie.

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:34 am on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Neither of my parents had any interest in poetry, so I wasn’t subjected to similar experiences at an early age. If there’s a creative writing gene in my family background, it must come from my mother’s Irish ancestors.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , commercialization, , , , Napoleon Bonaparte, , , , , , , Will Rogers,   

    HUMOR INCORPORATED 

    Humor must both teach and preach if it would live forever; by forever, I mean 30 years.
    –Mark Twain

    If Webster’s definition of humor as the “quality of imagination quick to perceive the ludicrous or express itself in an amusing way” is on the mark, Twain underestimated the staying power of his humor by nigh onto 100 years (and counting). But “staying” is just one of humor’s possible powers, and because (as Lord Acton famously observed) power tends to corrupt, humor cannot absolutely avoid Acton’s axiom.

    My musing on this subject is occasioned by April being National Humor Month — so proclaimed in 1976 by Larry Wilde, Founder/Director of The Carmel Institute of Humor: http://www.larrywilde.com/

    As you might expect, The Carmel Institute of Humor is not without serious competition. A similar entity I’ve come across is The Humor Project, Inc., founded by Joel Goodman in 1977 “as the first organization in the world to focus full-time on the positive power of humor” — a claim that suggests a merger of Norman Vincent Peale’s “The Power of Positive Thinking” with funny business. And, from such appealing funny businesses as Goodman’s, have big businesses grown (judging by their “power” promotions): https://www.humorproject.com/

    Now, far be it from me to regard the corporatizing of humor as a phony business — hey, there are worse things to make of humor than a commodity, and worse ways to earn a buck than to commercialize the process. But, purist that I am, I see making humor in the same light as making love: much to be preferred on a human level than as an industry (the virtues of consumer capitalism notwithstanding). Nonetheless, I’m not so doctrinaire as to deny either humor or sex to potential customers when free(?) enterprise comes a-courting.

    Unlike Larry Wilde and Joel Goodman, mistermuse does not have a Speaker’s Bureau, a three-day Annual Conference (discounted fee for early registration), a five-point humor program, seminars or workshops. But mistermuse does offer an every-five-days discourse on subjects of interest (his, if not yours) — usually with tongue in cheek, and never with hat in hand. Dis course today concludes with ten humorous quotes, which come with a funny-back guarantee if he doesn’t think they’re priceless:

    Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same.Oscar Wilde (not to be confused with Larry – or Curly or Moe, for that matter)
    Conference: a meeting held to decide when the next meeting will take place. –Evan Esar
    You can’t study comedy; it’s within you. –Don Rickles (the Donald Trump of insult-comics)
    Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. –W.C. Fields
    Everything is funny, as long as it’s happening to somebody else. –Will Rogers
    Culture is roughly anything we do and monkeys don’t. –Lord Raglan
    In politics, an absurdity is not a handicap. –Napoleon Bonesapart (I’ve been waiting a long time for the opportunity to butcher that name)
    Politicians do more funny things naturally than I can think of doing purposely. –Will Rogers
    Humor is just another defense against the universe. –Mel Brooks
    Wit – the salt with which the American humorist spoils his intellectual cookery by leaving it out. –Ambrose Bierce

    Over, and out.

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 9:52 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Why do some people have to ruin the best things in life by turning them into a National Month or an institution/organization of some sort? I thoroughly enjoyed this post, and being partial to the more sardonic (sarcastic? satirical?) edges of humor, was glad to see some of my favorites featured…Oscar Wilde, W.C. Fields, Ambrose Bierce, and of course, Mark Twain.
      On the distaff side, one of my favorites is Dorothy Parker. I offer this bon mot of hers when she was hanging out with her fellow wits challenging each other to compose a funny sentence using the word “horticulture”….Parker’s contribution was: “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:28 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I love Dorothy Parker’s wit and probably should have included a Parker quote, but I’d set myself a limit of ten and liked the ten I’d chosen (plus, I think I already used that great quote before, though it certainly would’ve fit well here, and I thank you for offering it).

      To me, the quote that surprised me the most (in that I didn’t expect such profundity from the likes of Mel Brooks – what’s more, in so few words) was his “Humor is just another defense against the universe.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:03 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like the Rickles quote. Well, I like all of them, but that one has always struck me as true. I would love to be funny, but just don’t have the gene. Fortunately, we don’t have to be funny ourselves to enjoy good wit and a belly laugh 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Fat people take heart – the bigger the belly, the more capacity to laugh! No wonder Santa Claus is so jolly! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:09 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Humor is what separates humans from animals. That, and making tools. And not being afraid of vacuum cleaners.

      Like

      • mistermuse 12:21 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Such separation is fortunate indeed, otherwise animals would be laughing themselves silly at what fools we humans be.

        Like

    • Garfield Hug 11:26 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great share 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:23 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Share and share a like, I always say. 🙂

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 8:42 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      One good belly laugh extends human life by one year ( My daughter the nurse .)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Todd Duffey Writes on Things 11:21 am on April 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Why do witticisms always come from people at least two generations before ours? Those people were way ahead of their time…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:06 pm on April 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      As one of those people born more than two generations before this one, I thank you for the tribute. 🙂 Seriously, though, I think there still are such people – they just don’t get the recognition they did in the days before mass instant gratification “re-conditioned” us and became the norm. Wit demands at least a bit of reflection. Who does that anymore?

      Like

    • Don Frankel 11:30 am on April 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.” Mark Twain. My hero.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:30 pm on April 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I would stand corrected if I didn’t happen to agree (well, except for politicians – they’ve been withstanding the assault of laughter since most of them evolved from baboons).

      Like

    • Don Frankel 7:03 am on April 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No Muse you’re right. Laughing at elected officials is actually a healthy sign of a society and poking fun is a good thing too. But when they are cooked and ushered off the stage laughter is the last thing they hear. Think Anthony Weiner here and Nixon too.

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:42 am on April 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Good point, Don. We in the West take our freedom to laugh at politicians for granted. Any North Korean who dared so much as think about laughing at President Kim Jung-un wouldn’t live to think again.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , clocks, , Helen Forrest, , , , , , , , , spring forward, , Will Rogers   

    IT’S ABOUT TIME 

    Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life trying to save. –Will Rogers

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Daylight Saving Time arrives on March 13, when, under penalty of painful death or being forced to watch GOP debate videos every day for the rest of your life (you may find death preferable), by law you must arise at 2 a.m. to set clocks ahead one hour….or, if you don’t wish to get up at 2 a.m., you can simply stay up, which many all-night carousers among my readers do anyway (not naming names, of course, but you know who you are).

    As a retiree, I have neither caroused nor set an alarm clock for years, so this presents a problem. On the one hand — which, by the way, many timepieces no longer have, much less two hands (they now have digitalis or some such new-fangled technology) — I may just ignore Big Bro and risk the consequences. On the other hand, I could drink a gallon of coffee, stay up, and when the time comes, set my clocks ahead –or is it back — one hour?

    Last year, my wife reminded me of an easy way to remember which is which: in spring, spring forward; in fall, fall back….to which I said, “Fine — if it’s so easy, you get up and do it.” Unfortunately, my wife has no sense of humor and cleaned my clock. By the time I came to, it was too past two, so I thought to hell with it, and fell back to sleep. Who needs Daylight Saving Time anyway? If there must be a Saving Time, there ought to be a

    To my fellow earth-and-time-sharing fellow Americans, Mexicans, Franciscans, Anglicans, Wiccans, pelicans, toucans of Cannes who can cancan as too few can….and even Republicans: as you know, these are mean times we’re in. It’s enough to drive you cuckoo. I say it’s time to tune out, take a break, and enjoy some timeless old time songs:

    A note on There’ll Come A Time, played by Frank Trumbauer’s Orchestra featuring the great and legendary 1920s cornetist Bix Beiderbecke: Bix was born on this day, March 10, 1903 (less than two years after his friend, Louis Armstrong), and died tragically young of alcoholism/pneumonia at age 28. Actually, Bix Beiderbecke never died….he just ran out of time. His sound was so transcendent, remembered guitarist Eddie Condon, it hit you where you lived, “like a girl saying yes.”

    I see by ye olde clock on yawnder wall that it’s past midnight. Time to Hit the Road to Dreamland* — but that’s another song for another day.

    *by Harold Arlen & Johnny Mercer, 1942

     

     

     

     
    • Midwestern Plant Girl 6:27 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Losing an hours sleep is a huge deal for my body. My brain thinks its just got sent to another continent with the jet lag I get 😴😩
      I’ll be back to normal in a few weeks. …

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:13 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Never let it be said that mistermuse won’t help a damsel in distress. Here’s a list of countries that have & don’t have Daylight Saving Time:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_by_country

        As you can see, to escape DST, you could move to Hawaii (but then, who would want to live in paradise? 🙂 ), or even some parts of Canada (if you don’t mind freezing your plants off!). Or you could just stay put and get back to normal in a few weeks (unlike mistermuse, who will never be normal). 😦

        Liked by 1 person

        • Midwestern Plant Girl 8:44 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink

          Normal is sooooo overrated!
          Let’s enjoy our quirkiness 😍😉

          Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 6:35 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I do love my Chevalier! What a great song 🙂 Now MisterMuse, I’m sure Monsieur would agree with me that as a retiree, you ought to be carousing!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:27 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, that depends on whether you mean Monsieur Chevalier or Monsieur Muse who would agree. If it’s the latter, Mademoiselle Muse might not only clean my clock, but make my remaining time on earth a lot shorter than I was hoping for. 😦 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 9:57 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      While a lot of my clocks are computerized and they switch automatically some are still in the 20th Century and well the next day I never quite know what time is, it as it goes by…

      Which of course leads me to this one and no musical rendition of time would be complete without it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:07 pm on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, Don – but as much as I dig As Time Goes By (and get pretty tired doing it, ha ha), there are time songs I like even more, including this one:

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:38 am on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Some idiot politician out here wants to eliminate DST out here, on the grounds that the one hour life-lag it induces is too dangerous for Californians to endure. The nanny state would rather the sun start streaming through the blinds at 5 AM in San Diego in June.

      Like

    • mistermuse 2:31 pm on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think it’s safe to say that most Californians (& Americans) would find it much more dangerous if voters don’t eliminate DJT (Donald J. Trump) from becoming Pres. Nonetheless, if that idiot politician wants more daylight, maybe he should get behind a Sunshine Law to make the political process more transparent.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:05 pm on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great recording Muse and well she’s just the best.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:56 pm on March 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, when you have a great song (written by Vincent Youmans, Harold Adamson & Mack Gordon) sung by a great vocalist (Billie Holiday) accompanied by great musicians (including Lester Young, Roy Eldridge & Teddy Wilson), it’s time to say it doesn’t get any better than this.

      Like

    • Jane 8:02 am on March 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I love the Will Rogers quote. I often reflect on how many time saving devices we have and yet our days seem so, so busy still! Now that we have email and mobile phones, people expect immediate responses. So while I am very thankful that I’m not slaving over a fire to cook or having to grind and bake my own bread by hand (or am dying of infection from lack of antibiotics), I do wonder why we seem to still be filling up our days with stuff meant to make our lives more efficient but that in reality don’t. That’s why I love walking in the wild – it’s peaceful and being disconnected from the modern world is soothing to the mind. I end up being more productive mentally. In this way, slowing down help me work better in the end. Am I making sense? As for daylight saving, we don’t have it in Queensland. I prefer not to have it, but I guess I am influenced by all the years living on farms where the animals have their own routine based on when the sun rises, not on an artificial time piece. We have plenty of daylight hours here though. I expect it is more useful for people in other parts of the world, who don’t? I always enjoy your posts, even if I don’t get the chance to comment. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:02 am on March 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Jane, if anyone ever calls you “Plain Jane,” take it as a compliment, because you know how to lead the good life….and thank you for the kind words at the end. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tomorrowdefinitely 5:13 pm on March 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      timely musings and great comments as always 🙂 I have to add my own favourite time song:

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:45 pm on March 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I thought I had a few Charles Aznavour records in my collection, but in checking, I do not (though I do own a number of Jean Sablon & other French male vocalists). In any case, I like the song and thank you very much for the clip.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 6:15 pm on March 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Look forward to DST! Nice to have tunes to accompany it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 2:52 am on March 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      We could write a book about time or the lack of, couldn’t we? Thanks for the smiles 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:38 am on March 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Columnist Kathleen Parker, divided America, , , , , , , Mitt Romney, , , , , Will Rogers   

    ALAS, SHRUGGED 

    Political elections are a good deal like marriages–there’s no accounting for anyone’s taste. –Will Rogers

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    In a March 2 Cincinnati newspaper article (titled ROAD TRIPPIN’ TO COLUMBUS FOR TRUMP), a reporter writes of accompanying four Trump backers on a drive to Columbus (Ohio) for a DONALD TRUMP FOR PRESIDENT rally: “They’re serious about their support for Trump. They shrug off his bombastic speech.”

    Alas, what they also “shrug off” is any suggestion that Trump is a big-talking combination of P.T. Barnum, bully, and simplistic-solutions artist who can order away the causes of Americans’ discontent as easily as he fires ‘losers’. Shrug–the perfect word to describe the casualness with which Trump supporters dismiss his “bombastic speech.” Bombastic? More like conveniently ignorant (Trump: “I don’t know anything about [white supremacist] David Duke”), or demeaning (“Would anyone vote for that [Carly Fiorina’s] face?”), or pathetic (“He [John McCain] is not a war hero”), or despicable (mocking a reporter, named Serge Kovaleski, who has a disability). Etc. Etc. Etc. But what do his followers care, because they think he “tells it like it is.”

    Here’s how columnist Kathleen Parker saw it in a recent piece titled “The GOP may get what it deserves”: “The challenge for those of us in the observation business [lest you forget, this blog is called THE OBSERVATION POST] is to illuminate what’s plainly obvious without offending those who prefer not to see. But there’s no winning once passions are engaged, and hating the messenger [aka blaming the media] is a time-honored tradition.” Such a business.

    One would expect sensible people to realize that Trump is no cure for the uncompromising dogmatism that plagues our politics. So, how to account for the gullibility (or “taste,” as Will Rogers put it) of those who’ve been seduced by their beloved’s dubious charms. Perhaps some see that rivals like Ted Cruz would only deepen the dogmatic ditch that divides us. But that gives them credit for more sophistication than is their due, in my estimation. Most of them simply don’t see Trump for the humbug he is, and dogmatism is a fancy word that doesn’t pay their bills or kick butt.

    But Mitt Romney knows better:

    Just between us, I find myself hoping that Trump wins the GOP nomination, in the belief (promulgated by Romney and other Republican leaders) that he would lose big to Hillary….and take down with him enough right wing candidates to lose control of the Senate (and hopefully loosen political and tribalistic gridlock in the process). Not that I’m a huge fan of Hillary, but at worst, she is the lesser of two evils, and in any case, more mature, warts and all. Or I may vote for Rabbit Hash Mayor/Presidential candidate Lucy Lou, who may be a dog, but not a dog who tears people apart. Nor, oddly enough, is she the least bit(e) dogmatic.

    What is so hard about understanding that working together is the most reasonable and timely way to get things done in a democracy? Hillary’s jingoistic rejoinder to Trump’s jingoistic ‘Make America great again’ campaign slogan is, at least, a starting point: “America never stopped being great. We have to make America whole.” Or at least as whole as is relatively possible in a country divided against itself.

     

     
    • carmen 5:57 am on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      We shake our heads in disbelief every time we see another tRumpinanigan on the news – but then again, we’ve been incredulous for awhile now.
      Great post, mistermuse! It’s cold here in the frozen north but the sap is running!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:23 am on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      There has been so much said and written of Trump that I was concerned this post would seem like overkill, but Trump is far from dead in the GOP horse race, so, as long as “the sap is running,” I decided to throw in my two cents worth.

      Like

    • linnetmoss 9:39 am on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think it will be Donald vs. Hillary. I just hope she actually wins. The alternative is terrifying.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:28 am on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If Ohio governor John Kasich can win his home state on March 15, that could end up denying Trump the number of delegates he needs to eventually cinch the GOP nomination, leading to a brokered convention in Cleveland with Kasich having a chance to come out on top. I do think he is the most broadly acceptable of the remaining GOP contenders, but he probably lost some respect among independents because of this:
      http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/03/the-40-seconds-john-kasich-will-think-about-for-the-rest-of-his-life/472341/

      Like

    • arekhill1 1:26 pm on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Republicans have carefully massaged the egos of America’s idiots for the last fifty years, Sr. Muse, because that was the only way they could win elections. Now that the OFB has gotten out in front of them, they are merely reaping what they sowed.

      Like

      • mistermuse 5:22 pm on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Kathleen Parker, the moderate conservative whose column I quoted in my post, said in the same column that John McCain’s choice of Sarah Palin as his VP running mate in 2008 “foretold a dumbing down of the GOP that eight years later may prove irreversible.” Whether it’s been eight or fifty years, Republicans are indeed reaping what they’ve sowed.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Mél@nie 1:49 am on March 9, 2016 Permalink

          holy, Molly!!! THE Sarah Palin choice… she used to wave to Putin from her patio and to hunt in helicopter!!! long story, short: she hasn’t invented hot water or the butter slicing thread!!!(French expression translated mot-à-mot…) 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 3:32 pm on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I see after your article there is an advertisement for some heart medication. Is this a subliminal message that we’ll need it?

      I don’t get too excited over Presidential candidates or Presidents. It doesn’t end well for any of them. But that doesn’t discourage a new batch every four years. Kind of amazing if you stop to think about it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:48 pm on March 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know about heart medication, Don, but after Lucy Lou wins the election, the White House is going to need a four to eight year supply of dog food.

      As for getting too excited, these every-four-year spectacles make great theatre (if nothing else), but this latest re-staging combines drama, comedy and farce like never before (and could turn into a tragedy if Trump is actually elected).

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:49 pm on March 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great title! And I love Colbert’s video.

      Must admit that I’m kind of hoping Trump will get the nomination for the same reason you are — although I’m a bit scared since in 1980 the Democrats thought no one would vote for Ronald Reagan.

      If Mitt Romney’s plan were to go into effect, and they chose someone other than Donald Trump, that could alienate a lot of voters. (Yay, Hillary!)

      Their best hope is convincing Republicans that the Donald is a con artist. Still, where would Trump voters go? They’re starting to smarten up — see that the establishment isn’t for their interests.

      Could be a good year for Hillary.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:31 pm on March 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      This could play out in a number of different ways. If Trump doesn’t win Ohio and Florida, it will probably go to a brokered convention in which most of the Republican “establishment” will go all out to convince delegates to nominate someone other than Trump. As for the Dems, Hillary’s nomination seems assured, barring a bombshell revelation emerging from the investigation of her emails. Time will tell.

      Like

    • RMW 2:07 pm on March 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Bring back the monarchy!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 3:42 pm on March 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Like they say, be careful what you wish for. If Trump (or even Cruz) becomes Pres, a monarchy is likely to be very close to what you’ll get.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mél@nie 1:54 am on March 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Monsieur Colbert is sooo smart, cultured, intelligent, wise… oh, yeah, I do recall the mm=moron mormon… 🙂 btw, I also visited Salt Lake City a few years ago: you have to see it, to believe it…
      https://myvirtualplayground.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/salt-lake-city-utah-mormon-vatican/

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:12 am on March 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I knew some of what you wrote about Mormonism, but not all – thanks for the link to your post.
      As for Sarah Palin (mentioned in your earlier comment), John McCain will never admit it, but I’m sure he realizes that he made the stupidest mistake of his life when he chose her as his VP running mate eight years ago.

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 12:26 pm on March 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It looks to me like Trump will win Ohio and Florida. Hillary’s losses in Colorado and Michigan are a wake-up call for those of us who don’t want Trump to win. Right now, I think he would. Unfortunately, a lot of people still like the “strong man” (think of Russia and Israel). This is also a setback for the Conservatives who’ve been pushing an ideology all these years. They let the vitriol flow, hoping it would sweep them into power, and now they’re being swept away by the same vitriol!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:52 pm on March 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think you’re right about Florida, but there’s still hope for Kasich in Ohio, where he has been a pretty popular governor. He’s close behind Trump in Ohio polls and seems to be gaining ground, but if Trump wins, his path to the nomination gets a lot easier.
      Frankly, between Trump and Cruz, the fundamentalist Conservative, I see little to choose (in terms of who would be worse for the good of this country).

      Like

    • JosieHolford 8:23 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Wondering how you feel about this post now a few years on. Don’t know about you but my views have “evolved” – meaning new horrors about tRump emerge making things even more crystal clear. The fact that we now have two unacceptable extremes – Sanders and Bloomberg – vying to be the Democratic nominee when so many terrific candidates are/ have been shoved aside – Booker, Castro, Harris Warren – is borderline tragic.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:26 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well, I was certainly wrong (as were many others) in believing that Trump “would lose big to Hillary.” But I wasn’t wrong about Trump — if anything, I underestimated what a sick human being he is.

        As for Sanders and Bloomberg: Bernie is too much of a demagogue for my taste, but — “taste” aside — there’s no way a self-proclaimed socialist will carry the swing states the Dems need to beat Trump. I have mixed feelings about Bloomberg. I don’t fault him for spending billions of his own money on his campaign. Does anyone truly believe that if any other candidates had his money, they wouldn’t spend it in the same manner? I know I would! Beyond that, I need to believe he’s sincere in regretting his “stop and frisk” policy as NYC mayor and past statements he has made which appear racist, so I’ll be watching him in tomorrow night’s debate to get a better feel for the man.

        Like

  • mistermuse 2:59 pm on April 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: baccarat, blackjack, cards, , casinos, gambling, , , , , poker, , Steve Allen, , Will Rogers   

    WHEEL OF MISFORTUNE 

    Do you know what day it is today? Of course you do — April 5 is GO FOR BROKE DAY. “Going for broke,” I suppose, could be spun several ways, but as the subject of this post, it’s a day for the (w)ages. I’m putting my hard-earned money on gambling, and I’m betting that you”ll treasure these quotes on the subject. If not, they come with a funny-back guarantee, so what have you got to lose?

    There is an easy way to return from a casino with a small fortune: go there with a large one. -Jack Yelton

    I like to play blackjack. I’m not addicted to gambling, I’m addicted to sitting in a semi-circle. -Mitch Hedberg

    Lottery: A tax on people who are bad at math. -Unknown

    Last night I stayed up late playing poker with Tarot cards. I got a full house and four people died. -Steven Wright

    I used to be a heavy gambler. But now I just make mental bets. That’s how I lost my mind. -Steve Allen

    I bet on a horse at ten-to-one. It didn’t come in until half-past five. -Henny Youngman

    I don’t gamble, because winning $100 doesn’t give me great pleasure. But losing $100 pisses me off. -Alex Trebeck

    Nobody has ever bet enough on a winning horse. -Richard Sasuly

    You know horses are smarter than people. You never heard of a horse going broke betting on people. -Will Rogers

    Someone once asked me why women don’t gamble as much as men and I gave the commonsensical reply that we don’t have as much money. That was a true but incomplete answer. In fact, women’s total instinct for gambling is satisfied by marriage. -Gloria Steinem

    Money can be lost in more ways than won. -Evan Esar

    Baccarat is a game whereby the croupier gathers in money with a flexible sculling oar, then rakes it home. If I could have borrowed his oar, I would have stayed. -Mark Twain

    Of course, no discourse on gambling would be complete without this:

     
    • Don Frankel 5:23 pm on April 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      “Oh Monsieur Rick, Monsieur Rick.” The girl from Bulgaria.
      “He’s just a lucky guy.”

      Like

      • mistermuse 8:14 pm on April 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Love that scene, Don….and the previous one, and the next one, and every one..

        Like

    • arekhill1 7:33 pm on April 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Duly noted, Sr. Muse. Do you happen to know when it will be “Go for Baroque Day?”

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:24 pm on April 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      If you’re referring to Barack’s older brother, Baroque Obama, I think his day is long past. Come to think of it, Barack’s days are dwindling down to a precious few too. Maybe Hillary will return the favor when she’s elected President and appoint him Secretary of State.

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 9:06 am on April 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      The one thing I learned in Las Vegas was how to roll quarters into the slot machines. This skill helped me when vending machines used to take small change. Now the soda pop and snack vendors only collect the green stuff. No fun trying to roll dollar bills into the slots and those darn macines won’t give you your change anyway.
      I am also waiting for a Baroque Day. I nominate April 20. Which is also the birthday of Adolph Hitler, who absolutely went Baroque trying to conquer Russia.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:58 am on April 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Now that you mention Hitler, I can’t think of one time in CASABLANCA that his name was mentioned. I wonder if that was a deliberate decision by the writers, not to pay him that “honor.”

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 6:38 pm on April 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      If I remember correctly mistermuse, I think that the mention of Hitler or any referemce to Nazism was deliberately omitted from the film CASABLANCA. One of my favorites also.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:42 pm on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Michaeline, I’ve just watched CASABLANCA again, and I was mistaken about Hitler’s name not being mentioned. Near the beginning of the film, when Major Strasser arrives in Casablanca and is greeted by Captain Louis Renault, they exchange “Heil Hitler”s. But that is the only time, so I was close but no cigar.

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 5:48 pm on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      That was a long reach since the heil to Hitler was just a greeting. The film was finally released to theaters after many delays. It seems the beginning of World War II coincided with the making of CASABLANCA. I think Hollywood did not want to make create a movie that relied on the timeline of that war. which now makes the film fit in with any generation. It is timeless. Good attempt to correct your misgivings but no still cigar for you, mistermuse. 🙂

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:17 pm on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Well, I already said “close but no cigar” – so I’m not sure what you meant by that, Michaeline. In any case, the story of the making of CASABLANCA is interesting in itself, and no matter how many times I see the film, I never tire of watching it

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 7:20 pm on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I meant no harm and no foul, mistermuse. However, I did feel a bit overlooked when I wrote about “Hitler going for Baroque in trying to conquer Russia.” So, now I guess we are even and you were very close in deed by mentioning “Heil Hitler.” Most of us probably missed that greeting but you did catch it, so kudos to you! By the way I must admit that my birthday is also on April 20th. Hopefully I turned out better than aforementioned dictator.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:59 pm on April 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Michaeline, I often don’t congratulate readers like Ricardo & others on their witticisms (and vice versa) because I think there’s an understood appreciation of each other’s writing ability, and explicit praise seems unnecessary…even embarrassing or awkward. So take it as a compliment that I think your writing has reached a point where your “gems” no longer need (ap)praising. 🙂

        Like

    • Mélanie 10:55 am on April 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Bogie and Claude Rains… “o tempora, o mores!” I still watch “Casablanca” called in French “film-culte”, each time it’s on a TV channel…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:39 pm on April 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      In America, a cult film is generally regarded as a film with an extremely enthusiastic, but relatively limited, following. By that definition, CASABLANCA is too broadly popular to be considered “film-culte.” Personally, I like the term and think it suits almost any truly classic film, regardless of its mass appeal.

      Speaking of classic films, “o tempora, o mores” is spoken by the reporter (according to Wikipedia) in INHERIT THE WIND, the Spencer Tracy/Fredric March-starring drama based on the Scopes MonkeyTrial. I’ve seen that movie a few times but don’t recall hearing that classic phrase, so I’ll have to watch/listen for it the next time it’s on TV.

      Like

  • mistermuse 6:10 pm on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , lame ducks, Pekin ducks, , , , , Will Rogers   

    TODAY IS LAME DUCK DAY 

    With Congress – every time they make a joke it’s a law. And every time they make a law it’s a joke.
    –Will Rogers

    I don’t know who comes up with these “holidays,” but February 6 is LAME DUCK DAY, which might just as well be called LAME JOKE DAY because it recognizes incumbent politicians (and other potentates) whose term in power will soon expire. Now you may reason from the above quote that, like me, Will Rogers would think honoring Lame Ducks is a lame joke. But he also famously said he never met a man he didn’t like….and I assume he’d already met at least a few politicians when he said it. So, as much as I respect Mr. Rogers, we’re probably not in the same neighborhood on the subject of lame ducks. But that’s an easy fix — let’s change the subject. Let’s talk about healthy ducks.

    As it happens, since I was a boy, I’ve had a soft spot in my heart for ducks. I’ve had several as pets, the last of which was named Gussie. Gussie not only wasn’t lame, she wasn’t fussy….but she did have one thing in common with politicians: she laid many an egg during her tenure and never let it faze her. So here’s to Gussie and her Pekin predecessors, who inspired this poem I wrote many years ago (slightly updated):

    LORD LOVE A DUCK

    Lord love a duck
    And so do I….
    If you were me,
    That’s what I’d buy.

    But since you’re not
    Myself today,
    Let me put it
    To you this way:

    From wee duckling,
    Downy yellow,
    He’ll fast become
    White big fellow….

    Unless, of course,
    He lays an egg —
    In which case, you’ll
    Her pardon, beg.

    Oh, by the way,
    Friend, if you please,
    I hope that you
    Speak Pekin-ese.

    But seriously,
    Folks, as they say,
    That’s enough wise
    Quacks for today.

    You can search the Web,
    Even ask a vet —
    You won’t find a
    Better pet.

    They’ll stay outdoors
    In weather fowl,
    And not want in
    Or bark or howl.

    Their needs are few,
    As pet needs go —
    A cache of feed….
    Some H2O.

    And, best of all,
    A place to swim:
    No better treat
    For her or him.

    Before you know it,
    To me you’ll say,
    “Friend, have you hugged
    A duck today?”

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • Michaeline Montezinos 8:06 pm on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      THE DUCKS BY THE LAKE

      No, I have not hugged a duck today
      but I did watch them as they lay
      on the banks of Crescent Lake,
      as a journey I did take
      In my scooter named Spitfire,
      bought for me by my Squire.
      It has a horn that goes Beep! Beep!
      loud enough to wake a sheep;
      the ducks come in many shades
      and do not live in the Everglades.
      The funny mud hens are ducks, too,
      they come in tints of black and blue.
      When they hear my scooter go bonking by
      the ducks sound off with a honking cry,
      As my horn goes beeping and tooting
      Ducks come to visit or run scooting
      to the quiet shade of the banyan tree
      whose gnarled limbs are a wild melee.

      By Michaeline Montezinos, Copyright February 6, 2015

      (Inspired by a poem about “Ducks” written by mistermuse.)

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:46 pm on February 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Very nice, Michaeline. The last two lines well describe a banyan tree – at least, as I remember a tree-mendous one I saw in Hawaii over 30 years ago.

      Like

    • arekhill1 1:01 pm on February 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I had a traumatic childhood, like everybody else, and part of it revolved around two ducks I had for a few weeks as pets. They were busted for eating my mother’s crocuses, and I was told they were being taken away from me and going to a ‘big farm’ where they would quack their days away happily. It wasn’t for several years that Mom admitted they were instead eaten almost immediately by the “farmer.”

      Haven’t berated her for that in years. Better give her a call. Thanks for reminding me, guys.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:08 pm on February 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      “Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned” – or (apparently) like a woman whose eaten crocuses are mourned. But you’re right, Ricardo – such childhood experiences never leave us. We forgive but can’t forget.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 3:17 pm on February 9, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      There’s a baseball expression “ducks on the pond” which mean you’re up and there are runners in scoring position. That never made any sense to me. I mean if I get a hit the ducks will swim in? Are they on base or something?

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:02 pm on February 9, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, l’ve heard the expression, but never stopped to consider the origin, so I Googled it. It apparently goes back to the 1940s, but there’s no clear “bases” for it. Sorry, I struck out.

      Like

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