Tagged: Louis Armstrong Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Charles Schulz, Erma Bombeck, , , , , John Lewis, Louis Armstrong, , , Saint Augustine   

    DON’T ASK 

    You Asked For It (according to my previous post) — but this post is a different story, so….

     

    By a weird coincidence, ASK ME NO QUESTIONS AND I’LL TELL YOU NO LIES (a quote attributed to 18th century Irish novelist, playwright and poet Oliver Goldsmith) is my springboard for this post of “Don’t Ask” quotes — thus sparing you the fate of my last post, which subjected you to some questionable poems.

    Let’s plunge right in with perhaps the most famous DON’T ASK quote (at least in America):

    “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” –John F. Kennedy

    Here’s another famous one (in jazz circles), leveled at squares:

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis Armstrong

    If you have a humorous bone in your body, the next three should bring a smile to your face:

    “Sometimes I lie awake at night and ask, Why me? Then a voice answers, Nothing personal, your name just happened to come up.” –Charles M. Schulz

    “Some people see things that are and ask, Why? Some people see things that never were and ask, Why not? Some people have to go to work and don’t have time for all that.” –George Carlin

    “When your mother asks, “Do you want a piece of advice?’, it is a mere formality. It doesn’t matter if you answer yes or no. You’re going to get it anyway.” –Erma Bombeck

    Now for some serious stuff:

    “What then is time? If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know.” –Saint Augustine

    “If you ask me whether the election of Barack Obama is the fulfillment of Dr. King’s dream, I say, ‘No, it’s just a down payment.” –John Lewis

    To close, here’s a quote I like which is a stretch to fit the category, but since it’s the birthday of the author, don’t ask me to re-think its inclusion here:

    “Thinkers think and doers do. But until the thinkers do and the doers think, progress will be just another word in the already overburdened vocabulary.” –Francois de La Rochefoucauld (9/15/1613–3/17/1680)

    I think that does it for now. How’s that for progress?

     

     

     
    • rawgod 2:39 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If you don’t want to know the answer, please, don’t ask the question.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:51 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That would seem to be the badge of honor for Trump followers: you don’t want to know the answers because he already has them all.

        Liked by 2 people

        • rawgod 7:58 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          Pretty much.
          I just completed a musical rewrite of an old song. I’m not publishing it yet, but if you send me an email I will let you be the first to tell me what you think of it. g-e-w-c-o-l-o-@-g-m-a-i-l-.-c-o-m. I think they call them parodies.

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 2:45 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol left me scratching my head, good one … love the song with the accordion!

      Now what is jazz? and what is time?
      must be the cue for a new rhyme …

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 7:21 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Lawrence Welk must be turning over in his grave at such accordion blasphemy!

        This DON’T ASK post means mistermuse needn’t address such questions….
        However & nonetheless, Kate, if in distress, I’m open to readers’ suggestions.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:36 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          Well not being one to miss opportunities … the best female jazz artists? thank Mr M

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 6:56 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink

          Kate, when it comes to “best female jazz artists,” I’ll start with a name almost all jazz lovers agree on: ELLA FITZGERALD. The rest of my (personal opinion) list will be names you’ve probably never heard of, belonging as they do to the long-past Golden Age of Popular Music: Mildred Bailey, The Boswell Sisters, Bea Wain, Midge Williams, Helen Forrest, Ethel Waters, Martha Tilton and of course, Billie Holiday (who you probably have heard of). A bit later (but still ancient history to those under 60), Peggy Lee and Dinah Washington were probably my post-WWII favorites.

          I sure I’ve left out a few names I should include, but the above will have to do for now..

          Like

    • JosieHolford 7:18 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice haunting bit of accordion there.

      And then there’s this from Alice. B.Toklas on the last words of Gertrude Stein:
      In a letter she wrote about those last words

      “She said upon waking from a sleep—What is the question. And I didn’t answer thinking she was not completely awakened. Then she said again—What is the question and before I could speak she went on—If there is no question then there is no answer.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:47 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for that thought-provoking comment, Josie. I’m thinking there is no answer, question or no question. Perhaps that’s why my favorite quote in the post is that of Charles M. Schulz (of PEANUTS fame).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 7:56 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent selection. The down payment Lewis quote is sadly relevant again.

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 8:47 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I see you’ve mastered the new interface…

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:36 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The answer to Kennedy has been rendered simple by recent history–what you can do for your country is vote Trump and all his enablers out of office.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 3:15 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        If there’s any justice left in this world, nothing less than “out of office” and into prison will suffice (but I’ll settle for just “out of office”).

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:55 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love the video! And the quotes!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:23 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, mm. I wasn’t looking for that video — I stumbled across it while looking for something else, so it was a ‘happy accident.’

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 1:39 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes Another answer to Charlie Brown: Because there’s just something about you that pisses me off.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:33 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyed your post 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:12 am on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, my friend. 😉

      Like

    • Elizabeth 7:05 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “Ask not what you can do for your country, ask what your country can do for you,” attributed to Jared Kushner(probably apocryphal)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:57 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know if Jared Kushner was quoted correctly, but we know that JFK was:

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 12:09 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink

          Yup. I remember that speech. I am that old.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:48 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink

          Likewise, Elizabeth. At our age, it’s like humorist Fred Allen (remember him?) once said: “I always have trouble remembering three things: faces, names, and — I can’t remember what the third thing is.”

          Like

    • annieasksyou 5:00 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I think the Jared Kushner quote was “Ask not what your country can do for you because it’s not your country; it belongs to us.”

      I found the video chilling but enjoyable.

      The John Lewis quote made me teary.

      A very thought-provoking post, mistermuse! And a VERY belated happy birthday to your friend Francois (I’m too lazy to type his full name, but I’m pondering his thought).

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:21 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think the John Lewis quote is even more chilling (than the video) in the context of the Trump presidency, because Trump is doing his best to take back the “down payment.”

        Like

  • mistermuse 9:46 am on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , consolation, , , Louis Armstrong, , problems,   

    A CONSOLATION OF STARS 

    What with all the problems in this crazy world of ours, my fellow earthlings, is there consolation in knowing that my previously-posted problems don’t amount to a proverbial hill of beans by comparison? After all, everyone in Casablanca has problems — mine may work out:

    In fact, I think mine will work out — help is on the way (by beautiful way of my tech-angel daughter) on Father’s Day. But until then, I’ll seek my consolation in the Stardust of a song (or two):

    If we could clear the dust from our eyes, friends, aren’t we all more or less lost in the stars? Maybe most of us just don’t see it: little stars, BIG STARS, blowing through the night….and we’re lost out here in the stars….

     

     
    • Carmen 10:02 am on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just wanted to add that I think you’re a ROCK star!! I’m looking after six of the grandchildren right now – I’ll get to hear the selections later, when I can relax and appreciate them! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:28 am on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And you’re obviously a rock star of a grandma, Carmen….but looking after only six grandchildfren? Unless your children are hiding some, tell them to get back to work. Haven’t they heard that they’re….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 1:31 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great selections!

      Liked by 1 person

      • waywardsparkles 3:47 pm on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Okay, I’m not used to this format, but here goes nutin’! Love Louis but I’ve never seen Casablanca. I KNOW!!! Myrna Loy is one of my all time favs, though, and I love Cheaper by the Dozen, both the book and the movie. It seems like there was a second book, too, maybe? Or am I remembering wrong? Anyway, in life, it’s all about the systems you have in place to deal with whatever you have to deal with. And a lot of luck! 🙂 Mona

        Liked by 3 people

        • mistermuse 7:01 pm on June 5, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the comment. I’m not used to a lot of formats, so welcome to the club!
          Never seen Casablanca? You are indeed wayward! 😉
          As for Cheaper By The Dozen, I don’t know if there was a second book, but there was a sequel to the movie two years later called Belles On Their Toes. I think I saw it decades ago, but I don’t remember it, so either it’s not very memorable or I’m losing my memory.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 2:05 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Casablanca and Satchmo. It doesn’t get much better than that!

      Like

      • mistermuse 2:58 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Unsurpassed performances, an unsurpassed film, and unsurpassed music = “it doesn’t get much better than that.” 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:37 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So glad that your beautiful tech-angel daughter is helping you to resolve your problems with WordPress 🙂 Enjoyed the Casablanca video clip.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Rosaliene. That clip is a classic example of why Casablanca is one of the greatest films of all time: exquisite Dialogue, fine Acting, and superb Direction: a DAD for the ages — not unlike mistermuse, who is a well(?) aged dad.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:29 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink

          I can’t believe it — all of a sudden, “Loading” has mysteriously disappeared and “Likes” have reappeared since the last time I was here a few hours ago. It’s a miracle (and I wasn’t even praying to the computer gods for one)!

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 7:46 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      aha souds like you two might be each others biggest fans!

      First two clips were supremo, third one didn’t work … a dozen, his poor wife!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:18 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Kate, Carmen and I are not only each other’s biggest, but each other’s oldest, fans — would you believe we go back to the days when she sang and danced with fruit on her head:

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 7:58 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My favorite version of Stardust…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:13 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Likewise. Louis was at the top of his game in 1931 when he recorded Stardust.

      Liked by 1 person

      • masercot 8:18 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That’s about the time he recorded I’ll Be Glad When You’re Dead You Rascal You, right?

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:28 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink

          Right. He also recorded Rascal again in 1941, by which time he was past his peak (as a trumpeter, not as an entertainer).

          Liked by 2 people

    • annieasksyou 1:53 pm on June 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve visited Rick’s Place many times over the years but never tire of it. This time, the emphasis on kindness TO strangers seemed most appropriate.
      And the great Satchmo: immediately following Stardust was his rendition of We Shall Overcome. I was overcome by it.
      Then Lotte Lenya singing of the stars in all their manifestations reminded me of the peaceful demonstrators. All told, this was a meaningful and emotional journey.

      Thank you, mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:45 pm on June 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I anticipate doing a follow-up to this post in a few days, Annie….provided I can overcome some issues I’m having with my outdated browser before my techie daughter comes to my rescue on Father’s Day. The follow-up will probably be my last post until after Father’s Day, as it’s too time-consuming and too much of a hassle trying to work around the problems.

      Meanwhile, I’m glad this post (and hopefully the next one) were, and will be, to your liking. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 12:22 am on June 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Fathers Day; enjoy your well-earned break. I hope you’ll visit my blog again soon, mistermuse. Haven’t been doing much punning and rhyming of late, but I do have a little political acrostic posted today. Cheers!

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 3:57 am on June 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I so enjoyed that excerpt from Casablanca. A little escapism on a Sunday morning. Thank you! 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:11 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love, LOVE the way you began this post. Brilliant.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:25 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, SS (I would also have accepted semi-brilliant, luminous, superb, or ingenious). 😉

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ball Of Fire, , Dixieland jazz, , Firehouse 5 + 2, Hotter Than That, , International Jazz Day, , Louis Armstrong, Old MacDonald Had A Farm, ,   

    INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY 

    April 30 is INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY. Mistermuse could write a book about jazz, but many books have already been authored by jazz writers more authoritative than he, so mistermuse will settle for doing a post — and on this post, he has a chick who can sing a lick here, scat a lick there, wing a lick everywhere:

    You may think that’s hotter than a chicken wing or a pig on a spit — but here’s a cat who can scat too, and when he blows his bugle, he’s even….

    Is your computer smoking yet? We don’t want to alarm the Firehouse brigade, so before your pc bursts into a

    ….let’s do one number more and stop at four, because….

     

     

     
    • calmkate 2:25 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      ah you managed to warm my heart on a cold wet winters day!
      Thanks Mr M … everyday should be jazz day 😎

      Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 3:37 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 12:05 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 2:59 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the link. Haven’t heard that version, but I know the song — it was recorded by the great Bessie Smith in 1928. I love the vocal on your clip — who is the vocalist?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 12:22 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      gives me an excuse to play my jazz collection, as if I needed an excuse. Bit of trivia – Firehouse 5 had a day job. The were animators for Disney.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:18 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Don. Actually, I did know about the Disney connection. I own a few of their record albums, and the notes on one of them say that band founder trombonist Ward Kimball and tin whistle player Walt Kelly (of Pogo fame) first met at Disney Studios in 1934. They’re not my fav Dixieland band, but I still enjoy listening to them.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 7:32 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Who says that’s a plenty? I wouldn’t my have minded several more. And a Happy International Jazz Day to you, mistermuse. Sure glad I got to this today; otherwise it wouldn’t have had the same cachet.

      And that chick Ella (my feathers were a little ruffled by your so naming her til the song began): anyone who can elevate a children’s nursery rhyme to art…well, she’s one cool scat.
      Such delight!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:51 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        it was a feather in my cap, not only to have found the Ella clip, but the clip which is my favorite of the four: HOTTER THAN THAT. The “cat who can scat” in that recording is of course Louis Armstrong, and I’ve never heard him scat better than he does starting one minute and twenty seconds into the clip. It doesn’t get any hotter than that!

        Liked by 1 person

        • annieasksyou 8:15 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink

          At a high school reunion years ago, I was talking with the guy who was my senior prom date. He insisted that after the dance, we went into New York and saw Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. I was appalled at myself: how could I have NO recollection of such a significant event? Just months ago, I found an old scrapbook I’d made (we did that in those days), and I’d written how awful my date was and noted the performers we’d seen: much lesser lights than those two musical giants.
          I shall revisit your Satch video to see if I’ll be further tickled by his scats.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:54 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for that interesting remembrance.

          For decades, I’ve owned well over a dozen Louis LPs, at least one of which includes HOTTER THAN THAT….and I’M appalled at myself that I didn’t recollect how great his scatting was on that 1920s recording (until I found the video). Of course, he was at the peak of his creative power (both playing and scatting) back then, and that was only one of many unbelievable performances, so I suppose I should forgive myself for forgetting one of them.

          Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:01 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Right—I think we both have to stop being appalled at ourselves…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:32 pm on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It would have been wonderful to have had Ella as a grandmother entertaining us with that version. I wonder what she could do with the other standard nursery rhymes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:11 am on May 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Wonder no more, Elizabeth. As a matter of fact, her first big hit record was a song she co-wrote in 1938 based on the nursery rhyme A-TISKET A-TASKET. Here, she sings it in a clip from the 1942 Abbot & Costello film RIDE ‘EM COWBOY:

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 9:19 pm on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:14 am on May 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Moorezart for more jazz, and more jazz for moorezart. I dig it!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 10:14 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for including that great scene from Ball of Fire! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:28 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Any scene with Barbara Stanwyck is a pleasure to watch — though I must say (when it comes to screwball comedies) that I liked THE LADY EVE (with her and Henry Fonda) better than BALL OF FIRE.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Silver Screenings 8:39 am on May 5, 2020 Permalink

          Agreed. I prefer The Lady Eve, too. Stanwyck is perfectly cast in that film – I can’t imagine anyone else in that role.

          Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 8:49 pm on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love jazz covers today which are going in many directions and genre incorporations. I wonder too,if Scat is the grandparent of rap…🤔

      Like

    • lorraineanne 11:10 am on May 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      this is amazing~ thank you for sharing.
      If you get a chance, I’d really appreciate if you can check out my music/ art blog.
      It would mean a lot!
      https://thehighsnlows.com

      lo

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:47 pm on May 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment. I read your latest (Jazz Festivals) post, but currently have too much on my plate to read more. At this point, I can only say I liked what I saw and will try to check out a few more of your posts when I have time.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bunk Johnson, Dyngus Day, , I'm A Ding Dong Daddy From Dumas, , Louis Armstrong, Lowdown Blues, Mississippi John Hurt, Monday Morning Blues, New Orleans jazz, ,   

    LOWDOWN MONDAY MORNING BLUES 

    I don’t know how many jazz fans I have among my readers — or, for that matter, how many blues buffs I have among my jazz fans — but just between me and you (no matter how few), today I’m in a LOWDOWN and BLUE musical mood. To my non-jazz followers tried and true, you’re welcome to listen in too….with no apologies due if you decide to bid me adieu ’til my next post’s in view.

    So, without further ado, here’s the LOWDOWN — BLUES, that is, played by a legendary New Orleans jazz man….and that’s no Bunk (I beg your pardon: it is Bunk) :

    For my next selection this Monday morning, what else but the….

    Some blues songs are a bit dirty, but I offer one that will leave you cleaner than a flushed toilet with a clogged drain….and, it’s conveniently in the same room:

    Today is Easter Monday which, I’m sure you’re aware, is also DYNGUS DAY, which is big in Poland. Other than that, I don’t know a dang thingus about Dyngus, so I checked it out and found that it’s celebrated like St. Patrick’s Day is in Ireland, with drinking, parades, drinking, parties, drinking, dancing, and drinking. Of course, the Poles are open all night on Dyngus Day, so I’d like to close with a song apropos for the occasion — but unlike St. Patrick’s Day, I can’t show a Dyngus song because I don’t know a Dyngus song. Luckily, a melodious American opus will serve the purpose if we substitute DYNGUS for DUMAS:

    Just between us, I thinkest that’s the dangest Dyngus/Dumas anyone could sing us to bring us to the finus. Thank goodness for Louis.

     
    • Garfield Hug 1:11 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I learnt something new from your mistermuse – Dyngus! I did not know you are in Poland. I am sorry you are feeling blue. Cheer up….Garfield, my inanimate furball send you the “highs” to blow away the Monday blues!! Take care and stay safe.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:02 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry if I gave you the impression I’m in Poland, G.H. — I’m not. There are a few towns named Poland here in the USA, but I’m not in any of those either. One of those towns is in the state of Maine, where a certain follower of this blog lives, but probably not in that town….and it wouldn’t be Pole-ite to ask.

        Take care, and give Garfield a “high-five” for me.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Garfield Hug 6:39 am on April 16, 2020 Permalink

          Garfield gave a “high-five” back at you. I appreciated the advice you gave me for my dad. It does seem to be vertigo, although his blood pressure was really high. He is back in hospital again. Sigh.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:39 am on April 16, 2020 Permalink

          Over the years, I’ve lost my mom, dad, and only (and younger) sibling, so I can relate to what you’re going through, GH. If people can’t have empathy for each other in times like this, when can they?

          Take care.

          Like

    • calmkate 2:44 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      not feelin blue coz the sun is shinin … but any jazz is acceptable! Great selection Mr M 🙂

      How can anyone feel blue jivin to that ❤

      Liked by 3 people

    • blindzanygirl 3:14 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ah! Wonderful.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:20 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love the blues, especially on scratchy old records. Excellent choices… I was unfamiliar with the bath water, fun!
      It is wrong to say Happy Dyngus? It seems like it should be.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not sure what Dyngus is, RG, but it sounds like a word one shouldn’t use in Pole-ite company. Anyone who has a dyngus is probably well advised to keep it private except on special occasions.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:42 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi. The Armstrong recording is funny. Somewhere he mentions that he forgot the words. Hardly matters!

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re right, Neil — but just for the “record,” the words are scrolled across the bottom of this clip, starting about 35 seconds in:

        There are additional lyrics and many other renditions of this song on youtube, in case anyone’s interested.

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:24 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Dyngus Day, although no partying and parading outside the house. Thanks for the musical Monday. Stay well and have a lovely week. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:55 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re welcome, Diana. Take care, and don’t do anything I wouldn’t do (especially since I’m getting too old to do much anyway). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • summerhilllane 11:46 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for sharing this incredible music. I enjoyed it and this surprises me because I don’t usually like Jazz music. I like Blues sometimes. Guess I have the Monday morning blues. Much love.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:30 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for your comment, which I approved hours ago, but it disappeared into cyberspace until suddenly appearing here a little while ago. Glad you enjoyed the music.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 2:02 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I thoroughly enjoyed this bluesy quartet, especially because it’s a rainy, blowsy day outside. Tuba Skinny (an oxymoron?) was unknown to me, so a special thank you for that.

      As a lover—and occasionally shameless creator of—bad puns, I am most appreciative of your narration/responses as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 2:52 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You got us all a-foot tapping here, Mr Muse! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:45 pm on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t know about Dyngus Day, but it sure reminded me of “My Ding-a-Ling” with Chuck Berry who I had the delight of seeing perform it in Harlem in 1966.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 8:00 pm on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I thought the first “can” was deliberate, so I riffed on a fine Presidential slogan.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:30 pm on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Annie — I didn’t even notice it until you pointed it out….but now that you mention it, I can(‘t) honestly say that my “can” was an improvement over the “can’t” I’d intended to say.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:02 am on April 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      John Hurt’s piece shows that fifties rock and roll was taken from blues guitar…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:02 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, it’s been too long since I’ve listened to the blues. Thanks for this!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , Louis Armstrong, , , , , , , , Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 7:11 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Fine and Dandy, , Kay Swift, Louis Armstrong,   

    SWIFT, UP AMONG THE CHIMNEY POTS 

    chimney pot, a pipe of earthenware or metal fitted on top of a chimney to increase the draft and carry off the smoke. –The World Book Dictionary

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Today I’d like to tell you about a classy dame by the name of KAY SWIFT, who was the first woman to write the complete score for an American musical (FINE AND DANDY, in 1930). To be honest, though, that wasn’t what prompted me to write this post — the real trigger was that, although I’ve long been a fan of her music, today I came across a song of hers I hadn’t heard before, and I liked it so much that I’d like to share it with you (along, while I’m at it, with two other Swift favorites).

    The song I hadn’t heard before (with the curious title UP AMONG THE CHIMNEY POTS) is sung here by jazz vocalist Louise Carlyle, with the composer at the piano:

    SWIFT was born in NYC in 1897. She trained as a classical musician and composer at what is now called the Julliard School, but was a great fan of popular songwriter Irving Berlin and, later, George Gershwin, with whom she became intimately involved (for more, go to this link, then click BIOGRAPHY (upper left below the word SWIFT):

    http://www.kayswift.com/

    Swift married her first husband, banker James Warburg, in 1918. A banker might be the last person you think of as a writer of lyrics to romantic songs, but’s that’s exactly what he was (under the name Paul James) to the music of his composer wife….until they divorced in 1934 — the same year he resigned as financial advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt.

    I turn now to the first-written (1929) of my favorite Kay Swift/Paul James songs:

    Let’s close with the title song from the aforementioned 1930 musical FINE AND DANDY:

     
    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:03 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for bringing her to my and other people’s attention. Don’t think I heard of her before.

      Neil Scheinin

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:27 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        My pleasure, Neil. There were relatively few female songwriters in the 1920s & 30s. The most well-known one was Dorothy Fields, and even she has been largely forgotten. I should do a series on them because they wrote some great songs which deserve to be heard again.

        Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 9:17 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      wow great tunes, great musos and favourite Jazz singers … all hoppin good 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:40 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. I love sophisticated songs with popular appeal such as those of Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart, Noel Coward and other “Golden Era of Popular Music” song writers. I think the three Kay Swift songs above are in and of that class

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 11:47 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink

          indeed that are classy and talented … a banker writing songs, who’d have guessed 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 10:10 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video unavailable… but was that Ella? I just saw a documentary on the Apollo Theater in Harlem that told the story of a young Ella Fitzgerald who forgot the words to a song during her first performance. The result? Scat.
      😊

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:18 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry about the unavailable Ella video, Rg (actually, it’s Ella AND Louis Armstrong singing Can’t We Be Friends?). Here’s a different clip of the same singers and song — if this one is also unavailable, let me know, as there are other similar clips.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 10:15 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      That dreaded line “can’t we be friends?” Great post. Never heard of her or her “long involvement with Gershwin” as that biography puts it. Maybe they should have just been friends!

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:50 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        According to Wikipedia’s article on Kay Swift, “Gershwin and Swift’s affair lasted over ten years until his death in 1937. Despite their long relationship, Kay and George never married” — even after Kay’s divorce from Paul Warburg in 1934. So I suppose you could say that they were “just friends!”

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:32 am on December 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Every time I learn something I did not know before, I become a little stronger and the end of the world draws nearer. Thank you for bringing Armageddon just a little closer.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:05 am on December 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I doubt that we’re going to see Armageddon in our lifetime (unless Trump is reelected next year). Nonetheless, I’m happy to take credit for helping make you a little stronger.

        Like

    • Ashley 11:44 am on December 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! I will be listening to these over and over which is fine and dandy! Thanks for posting!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 7:09 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You always treat us readers to terrific music. Thank you!

      Like

      • mistermuse 12:58 am on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’re most welcome, SS. I think it’s terrific too, so the old saying must be true that “Great minds think alike”!

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:17 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love these tunes!

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:17 am on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dick Smith, doo wop, , It's Wondereful, , , Louis Armstrong, Maxine Sullivan, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington, , Peter Minturn, , , Smith Brothers, songwriters, Stuff Smith, The Sheik of Araby   

    SONG SMITHS 

    By all accounts, SMITH has long been the most common surname in America. On the other hand, SMITH has been one of the least common surnames among popular songwriters. Take the example of when, in 1939, Mr. Jimmy Stewart Smith goes to Washington and becomes a sen-sation, rather than going to Tin Pan Alley to become a song-sation. We can surmise why mistermuse goes to Word Press in 2009 but doesn’t become a pun-sation; misterstewartsmith could’ve had A Wonderful Life acting like a songwriter in Hollywood musicals.

    During the period with which I am most musically in tune (1920s-1950s), I can count on one hand the number of songsmiths named Smith whose compositions achieved contemporary hit status (much less, lasting status as standards). Compared to the percentage of Smiths in the overall (or, for that matter, the underwear) population, there were fewer Smiths of note in music than in the Hollywood Senate — which, for better or verse, leads us to the first of our handful of Smiths, Chris Smith, composer of….

    Next, time to rise and shine with Billy Dawn Smith, composer of….

    Next next, we turn to lyricist Harry Bache Smith for the words to this somber classic:

    Speaking of serious stuff, Stuff Smith composed this wonderful ballad. It may not be your cup of tea, but I can say without fear of contradiction that It’s Wonderful:

    We close with a song written by Dick Smith. Yes, THAT Dick Smith. If you don’t believe me, look him up and ask him.

     

     

     
    • calmkate 1:26 am on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      well I think you are pun-tastic! Some great classics here, thanks for sharing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:52 am on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Kate (speaking of Smiths), here’s a song that’s a real classic:

        Footnote: GOD BLESS AMERICA was written by Irving Berlin in 1918 (near end of WWI) for a show, but it was never published or recorded and was filed away by Berlin “to use someday on the right occasion” (quoting him). That occasion occurred after Neville Chamberlain appeased Adolph Hitler in 1938, leading to WWII. Kate Smith introduced the song on her CBS radio show on Nov. 10, 1938.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:17 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink

          lol we look nothing alike and I can’t sing a note … a bit too much for me at breakfast time thanks MrM 😉

          Liked by 1 person

    • smbabbitt 10:15 am on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Out of a generic name, a delightful assortment of songs.

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 12:13 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Leon Redbone did a great version of Sheik of Araby…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 12:50 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      There are certainly plenty of singers named Smith. Clever of you to realize that there are not too many songwriters with the name.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:11 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Having little or no interest in today’s music, Elizabeth, I don’t know how many Smith singers OR songwriters there are now….but I do find it interesting that historically, there have been relatively few songwriters among the millions of Smiths in America over the past 100 years.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 2:26 pm on October 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Mistermuse is definitely a pun-sation! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 2:06 pm on October 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d bring to your attention The Smiths, a popular band in the ’80’s whose songs featured ramblings about death, depression and dissatisfaction in love, except that I couldn’t stand them and I’m glad I never hear their music anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:57 pm on October 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        The Smiths sound like a good(?) example of why I haven’t listened to popular music since the 1970s, Ricardo. If I missed anything, Ignorance is bliss (so they say).

        Like

    • America On Coffee 10:57 pm on October 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A very interesting selection, some I am not familiar with. I really appreciate all of them. Thanks for sharing.❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Jelly Roll Morton, , Louis Armstrong, , , , Satchmo, , , trumpet,   

    MEMORIES OF SATCHMO (Aug. 4, 1901-July 6, 1971) 

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis (“Satchmo”) Armstrong

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Awake at night, at sunrise, every sunset too, seems to be bringing me….

    But that was long ago, and now my consolation is in the….

    My only sin is in my skin — what did I do to be so….

    In contrast to our current culture of celebrity-for-celebrity’s-sake, today we celebrate the memory of a man who was the genuine article: a true game-changer, unsurpassed in the history of America’s contribution to the music world, namely jazz. To quote Scott Yanow, author of CLASSIC JAZZ:

    Although jazz existed before Louis Armstrong (including important giants Jelly Roll Morton, James P. Johnson, Freddie Keppard, Sidney Bechet, and King Oliver), Armstrong had the biggest impact of any jazz musician. Whether it was transforming jazz from an ensemble-oriented music into one showcasing solos by virtuosos, popularizing both scat singing and hornlike vocalizing, infusing pop songs with the blues, making dramatic statements with the inventive use of silence and dynamics, and (via his sunny personality) making jazz accessible to millions who had never heard it before, Armstrong’s contributions are so vast [that] jazz would have been a lot different if he had not existed.

    To help the reader (who isn’t a jazz buff or remembers only the past-his-prime Armstrong) understand something of the impact of the early Armstrong, I’ll close with this 1928 recording — his favorite (and mine) of his own playing:

    There, brethren, you have the earthly counterpart of The Rapture enrapturing you from the West End of jazz heaven. May you abandon yourself to the American Gabriel’s clarion call as his golden trumpet leads you to Blues paradise. Or just enjoy.

     

     

     

     
    • leggypeggy 12:30 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I was lucky enough to hear Satchmo perform live.

      Liked by 4 people

    • calmkate 3:01 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      one of my heroes, thanks for this delightful tribute!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 4:58 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These are beautiful oldies but goldies😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:54 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Incomparable” is the only word you need to describe Armstrong…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:25 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hello there. I saw him once in concert, in a stadium in the borough of Queens, which is part of New York City. He lived in Queens with his wife. Their home has been turned into a museum.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Neil. I didn’t know their home had been turned into a museum. It could have just as fittingly been turned into a shrine.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:29 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Love that last piece….the best!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:48 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s what’s known as saving the best for last (though, in this case, it’s the best of the best)..

        Like

    • scifihammy 8:37 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent post and music. 🙂
      My Mum really like Satchmo. 🙂
      Once when I was talking about him to my kids, I called him Sasquatch!! But my kids knew who I meant. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:53 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad to hear you talked to your kids about Sasquatch — I mean Satchmo. All most kids today know about music is today’s music.

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 10:16 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink

          That’s true. But I think it’s important to share with your kids things that you appreciate 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 10:40 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Classic!
      Great clips… I’d never heard Black and Blue from 1929.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:08 pm on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In 1929, only a black man with the stature of Louis Armstrong could ‘get away with’ performing such a song sympathetic to the black man’s perspective. Then, in 1939, a black woman first sang this much more outspoken song that continued to outrage white racists for years, including during the McCarthy hearings of the early 1950s. Here she sings it in a 1959 TV appearance:

        Like

    • In My Cluttered Attic 3:34 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Satchmo, truly was one of the very best. Thanks for this post, Jazz. :O)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:53 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Neil for getting me out of the funk caused by this horrible weekend. I found that playing my wide selection of Satchmo’s recordings helped me see in spite of what’s happening, deep down I agree with him when he sings ‘What a Wonderful World.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:09 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My oldest daughter is a Red Cross volunteer in Dayton, helping with the human aftermath of the horrible weekend there. Words cannot adequately convey what the victims’ families are going through. We can only hope that, with time, it will become a Wonderful World for them again, although it will never be the same.

      Like

    • thelonelyauthorblog 8:27 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A great one from our past.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 4:05 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, these songs are a marvellous soundtrack to this gorgeous, sunny Wednesday. Thanks so much. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:27 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the comment, SS. You inspire me to write this:

      I screening, Silver Screening, we all screening for ice creaming.

      Actually, I wouldn’t blame you for screaming at me to stop being so inspired.

      Like

    • America On Coffee 12:15 am on August 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Such an amazing personality with a loving style and loving smile. Great song!

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 3:04 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      MM, i had the great honor of Louis Armstrong recording one of my songs; Not a great jazz piece just a little feel good thing. I am eternally humbled by it. Here it is:

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:28 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Love this kind of “little feel good thing,” Tony! Although no one could do it like Louis, it’s the kind of song I think a good Dixieland band could also ‘have a party’ with.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , French kissing, getting hitched, , , kissing, Louis Armstrong, , ,   

    THE KISSING POST 

    I am in favor of preserving the French habit of kissing ladies’ hands–after all, one must start somewhere. –Sacha Guitry, French actor, playwright and film maker

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    The title of today’s post is THE KISSING POST– not to be confused with THE HITCHING POST, which would be a post about the ceremony of getting hitched (after kissing went to the hand-kisser’s head). Alternatively, THE HITCHING POST could be a post about a post to which you tether your horse….as opposed to your spouse (pardon my horse play).

    Be that as it may, it may interest you to know that anthropologists believe kissing is a learned behavior. But they believe above all in science, so what competence could anthropologists possibly have in the field of kissing….with the likely exception of Parisian anthropologists, who are said to have French kissing down to an art….in the interest of science? C’est une bonne planque!*

    Knowing that many of my readers are serious about science, you would no doubt like to know where I came up with what “it may interest you to know” — so, just so you know:

    https://people.howstuffworks.com/kissing2.htm

    As for the romantic barbarians among you, far be it from me to kiss you off. Kiss on!

    *Nice work if you can get it!

     
  • mistermuse 1:33 am on January 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Louis Armstrong, old time camp meeting,   

    I’LL MEET YOU AT THE OLD CAMP MEETING 

    It has been some time since I devoted a post to one of my passions, namely CLASSIC JAZZ, so what say we ramble on down to the old camp meeting and get some jazz religion? If you’re not a classic jazz lover, perhaps it’s because you’ve never been exposed or open to the sound of America’s own indigenous music, with its roots in late 19th century ragtime, gospel and blues, among other influences. So I’m making it my mission (and New Year’s resolution) to deliver you from that sin of omission in your musical faith upbringing.

    One of the greatest pioneering jazzmen was New Orleans-born Joseph “King” Oliver, mentor of Louis Armstrong, who made a number of historic jazz records beginning in 1923, including CAMP MEETING BLUES. Here is the beginning of that primitive recording, which transitions beautifully (after 37 seconds) into the PERUNA JAZZMEN’s 1988 faithful-to-the-original rendering:

    Next, we turn to an even more recent rendering of an even older Camp Meeting song:

    :

    Our last Camp Meeting is a Swing era classic from another king, the King of Swing, Benny Goodman:

    Now that you have seen the light, go and sin no more.

    Amen.

    Oh….and Happy New Year!

     

     
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