Tagged: Fred Astaire Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Star Is Born, , Fred Astaire, , , , , , musicals, ,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: END OF THE TRAIL 

    Just as all good things must come to an end, so too must all bad things (even Trump’s evil rule will run out of recourse¬†eventually — e.g., the fat lady’s last aria at the opera seems to go on forever; will it end short of becoming a hoarse opera?). What it all a-mounts to is….

    Meanwhile, back at the ranch , we bid happy trails to “bad” actors not named Trump, and end our HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE series with a roundup of some of the era’s great song & dance stars, starting with this incomparable pair whose magic outlasted their time:

    When it comes to high-energy dancing, no one outshined Gene Kelly. Here he is in THE PIRATE (1948), clowning around with the fabulous Nicholas Brothers:

    I do have one regret about this retrospective: so many musical stars, so little time and wherewithal for them all. Perhaps, as time goes by, I will use a favorite star’s birthday as an occasion to do an occasional post.

    In closing (speaking of when A STAR IS BORN), if ever someone was born to be one, it’s this star-crossed girl/woman with whom we bring down the curtain on this series:

     
    • calmkate 4:07 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      what a joyful collection of viewing, thanks Mr M!

      But Ginger and Fred are just sheer magic … no couple have ever created the ease and charm that they exuded on screen! My forever heros ūüôā

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:54 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It didn’t hurt (quoting from A SMITHSONIAN SALUTE TO THE AMERICAN MUSICAL) that “Astaire and Rogers worked with the finest composers of their day. Of their ten films together, one featured music by Cole Porter, two by Jerome Kern, one by George and Ira Gershwin, and three by Irvine Berlin.” Throw in great directors and supporting casts, and it’s no wonder there was movie magic!

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 6:15 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink

          that would certainly help and their stage settings add to the majesty but they had class and talent by the ton!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:27 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Have you seen the new movie Judy? I liked it very much. It focuses on the final months of her life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:01 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Haven’t seen it, but saw snippets and an interview with the star on TV. Thanks for your comment.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 1:51 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This has been a great series and you should be congratulated for putting it all together.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:28 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks, Ashley….and I even managed to cast a few aspersions at Trump in the bargain.

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:39 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I could watch Fred & Ginger and Gene Kelly dance all day long! They brought joy to my tumultous young life.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:34 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        To bring joy to a “tumultuous young life” — as Ira Gershwin wrote and Gene Kelly sang (in AN AMERICAN IN PARIS), “Who could ask for anything more?”

        Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 8:52 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The Nicholas Brothers! That goes back…
      ūüėä

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:31 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        They go way back, but they lived long — especially the older brother, who died in 2006 at age 91.

        Liked by 2 people

    • mlrover 8:53 am on November 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ginger spoke in an interview about that particular dance. Fred insisted on perfection, and as usual, doing it in one take. She said that by the time this scene was done as he liked it there was blood in her shoes. She also said, as she had before and would again, that she got paid less and did everything he did in heels and backward.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:28 pm on November 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Fred was indeed a perfectionist. Quoting from the book I mentioned in my earlier reply to calmkate, “the roller skating sequence in SHALL WE DANCE, for example, was shot 30 times, and the Never Gonna Dance number from SWING TIME was done in forty-eight takes.” As for Ginger, “I had plenty of input in our routines and got to be known as the ‘button finder’….the one who puts the last word or finishing touch on a scene.” So I don’t blame her for complaining “that she got paid less.”

        Although Ginger “did everything he did in heels and backward,” the one thing she didn’t do as well was sing. Irving Berlin said, “I’d rather have Fred Astaire introduce one of my songs than any other singer I know — not because he has a great voice, but because his delivery and diction are so good that he can put over a song like nobody else.”

        Liked by 2 people

        • David Thompson 9:00 pm on December 6, 2019 Permalink

          I grew up, will h my mother’s influence ..with this era. I am richer for the experience.

          Like

    • Elizabeth 1:40 pm on November 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I loved this series. Thanks for all the time and thoughtfulness you put into it.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 12:22 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing tributes, all, but the one for Judy Garland is amazing. To see all those films in one clip is a little mind-blowing. She was certainly prolific!

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:50 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m glad you singled out the Garland clip for special mention — it was an unexpected find, and probably my favorite in this series.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:12 pm on December 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for the Like, David Thompson. I tried to check out your blog, but when I click the link, I get a blank screen. Before I approve your comment, kindly advise if your blog is not operational for some reason.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:57 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: awards, draining the swamp, Dumbo, Fred Astaire, , , , keister, Mike Pence, , , , , Sarah Huckabee Sanders, , , WASP   

    I BE NOMINATED FOR THE KIESTER AWARD! 

    Friends, I am proud,¬†humbled¬†and honored to tell you that I (will) be nominated for the Kiester Award¬†for blogging (over, above and beyond the call of duty, no less). Yes, friends, I foresee that you will see fit, after reading this, not¬†only¬†to get off (or on)¬†your kiester, as the case-ster may be,¬†to nominate me….but¬†also to¬†kick yourself in the kiester for not doing¬†so before.¬†So, though your awakening may be in arrears, it¬†is appreciated.

    But I’m conflicted, friends.¬†It’s not that I’m¬†ungrateful for the¬†Kiester that you¬†are aching¬†to bestow upon me; however, there are others much more deserving. I would therefore caution you to control yourselves, because¬†worthy as I may be,¬†it’s only right (wing) that¬†you should nominate¬†someone with¬†far superior qualities, such as:

    THE¬†DONALD¬†— aka The Orange (T)error. America’s bully boy¬†and wall nut¬†who¬†is able to¬†leap (t)all Republicans in a single bound and make them kiss his ass in a single tweet. Drains swamps by filling them in with b.s. Loves everyone (who loves him), but¬†retains Godfather complex¬†(for those who don’t).

    THE MIKESTER — aka¬†Straightarrow Mike. Joined to The Donald at the hip while being the least hip VP in American hipstery.¬†Even a¬†dog couldn’t be more loyal.¬†Leading contender for the Cardboard Poodle award.

    THE MITCH-ELAINE MAN — aka Monotone Mitch.¬†The Blue Grass State’s gift horse¬†to the U.S. Senate. Was once caught smiling, and vowed never to smile again.¬†Doesn’t parrot The Donald as much¬†as¬†The Mikester, but¬†is nonetheless for the birds. Married to Elaine Chao, Secretary of Transportation in the horse’s ass administration.

    THE HUCKABEE WASP — aka Sarah the married¬†Spinstirrer. White House Press Secretary and daughter of¬†White Anglo-Saxon Protestant Christian Minister and¬†former Arkansas governor, Mike Huckabee. Read her lips. She may not be a dummy, but¬†The Donald’s got her back (or¬†is it the other way around?).

    DUMBO THE UGLY¬†ELEPHANT — aka The GOP. It’s¬†the body¬†the Republican Party has become since The Donald took¬†power,¬†as¬†Ronald Reagan turned over in his grave. Who knew Ronnie’s reign as President¬†would¬†one day¬†turn out to be, not only¬†The Good Old Days of fond memory, but the elephant in the room, the ghost of civility past?

    In closing, friends, a few of you may think I misspelled Keister, but in my dictionary, Kiester is also acceptable. Spelling can be like pronunciation:

     
    • Carmen 1:25 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      All this time I thought it was Christer ‚ÄĒ as in, Holy Christer. . . I‚Äôve got a few of them around here today. . And it‚Äôs raining. . . ūüė¶

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:25 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        According to the Urban Dictionary, Christer is a popular name among religious fanatics, TV ministers and do-gooders, so I’m guessing you’ve had a drought and you invited them to pray for rain. Saints be praised, you had a conversion, and this is your reward! Now all you have to worry about is the coming flood! ūüė¶

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 6:25 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink

          I was referring to my grandchildren. . . big grin. ..

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 2:39 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Assholes all, Sr Muse. A spot-on analysis.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:40 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ricardo. There’s lots more where they came from, but I can only fit so many a-holes on one po(s)t.

        Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 3:34 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 3:38 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “The Orange (T)error. America‚Äôs bully boy and wall nut who is able to leap (t)all Republicans in a single bound” is a hoot. The Stump is so disgusting that some ask who we’d have to laugh at when he’s gone. He’s become so revolting he’s just sad (and dangerous) while making our country a laughingstock in the eyes of the rest of the world. The majority of the Republican Party isn’t much better. Clever posting and loved the Astair/Rogers clip, one that was done in more than one take. Rare for them. Astair usually insisted on single, seamless takes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:52 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. I think the reason Astaire/Rogers seldom needed multiple takes was that he was such a stickler for rehearsing over and over again until they achieved perfection (or as close to it as humanly possible) that by the time it came to shoot a scene, one take was all that was necessary.

        Liked by 2 people

        • mlrover 4:43 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink

          I thought I heard Rogers talking about the one take thing, but it was long ago so I could have it mixed up.

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 6:36 pm on August 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Fortunately I don’t know most of these nominees but I sincerely appreciate your wordsmith skills in aptly describing them … so I feel compelled to give my vote to the queen

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:29 am on August 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Just for the record, the other nominees (besides Trump) are Mike Pence, President in charge of Vice; Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader in charge of blocking Supreme Court nominees of Democrat Presidents and confirming Supreme Court nominees of Republican Presidents; Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House Press Secretary in charge of explaining what Trump means by what he says and tweets; and the GOP, the political party in charge of sitting on their assumptions while their President runs the country like a raving egomaniac.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 2:37 am on August 10, 2018 Permalink

          oh he is a ridiculous dictator .. does what he wishes and still has support … from over here it looks like your whole country has gone insane ūüė¶

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Fred Astaire, , , , mental block, , On A Clear Day,   

    BLANK 

    Normally, when I write a post, I think about what I want to say — the body of the post — and¬†at some point¬†during¬†this labor of love¬†(after¬†considerable cogitation), a title is born. With my last post, the title¬†came first and I¬†then had to work¬†to¬†shape¬†the body¬†(after considerable consternation) in¬†language of the what-have-I-gotten-myself-into¬†kind. Believe me, friends — it’s a pain in the brain¬†to be boxed in by a title, so¬†with this post,¬†I decided to leave the title BLANK. I feel better already.

    But,¬†now that I have¬†a blank canvas,¬†one would think I should be able to¬†paint a word picture;¬†yet¬†it’s like I can’t see the¬†blog for the fog.¬†Have I become¬†color¬†blind?

    So it’s just the time of day,¬†a mere¬†matter of mind over time. Tomorrow the fog will¬†clear and¬†this¬†will seem like a black and white¬†dream….

    And you know what they¬†say about a clear day….

     
    • calmkate 2:51 am on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Being a huge fan of Fred and Gingers … loved their set and her dress was dreamy!
      Anthony has won me … thanks heaps for this colourful Blank post ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:35 am on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I’m a big fan of Fred and Ginger too, but for me, the outstanding ‘find’ among the 3 clips was “The No-Color Time of the Day.” I’ve also been a big fan of Peggy Lee for a long time, but somehow I’d never heard her (or anyone) sing that great song before. I probably missed it because, the year she recorded it (1960) was the year I was drafted into the army. Also, Rock ‘n’ Roll had taken over pop culture by then, and a wistful song like “No-Color Time” had little chance of becoming a hit.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 4:31 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink

          hadn’t realised that you were a Vietnam Vet … guessed you missed lots of things for those two years!

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 6:16 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink

          Kate, I was in the Army 1960–62, so I’m actually a pre-Vietnam vet. Not that I’m complaining–as far as wars are concerned, service between, rather than during, was fine with me.

          Like

    • scifihammy 7:53 am on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      haha Interesting how you construct your posts. ūüôā
      I often have an idea for a post and think of the title before I start writing. Sometimes I struggle for the right title. Now I know I can should put BLANK! ūüėÄ
      Really like the Fred and Ginger clip. They were so elegant together. ūüôā

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:52 am on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Although I sometimes think of a title before I start writing, when that happens I almost always have some idea of what I’m going to write. The previous post was a case of thinking of (and ‘falling in love’ with) the title before I had a clue what to write. So, being “boxed in by the title” led to the post being a bit more bawdy than it might otherwise have been.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:56 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Drawing a blank when staring at an empty computer screen is common. But I wouldn’t recommend titling many posts “Blank.” The more alarming the titles of my posts, the more hits they get, although the percentage of people who just read the title and promptly take offense probably approaches 50%.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 3:38 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Such is life in the blog city, Ricardo. I don’t understand how anyone could object to the gentle tweaks you employ in your posts and titles. As for my titles, maybe you’re right. As a step in the direction you suggest, for my next post, I’m thinking of titling it BLANKETY-BLANK. If someone takes offence at my upping the ante, I will gently suggest that they go BLANK themselves.

        Like

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 4:20 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Like you, I’d never heard of The No Color Time Of The Day before.
      How’d you come upon it?
      It’s nice song. I’m a sucker for songs in waltz time.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:25 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Neil, I hadn’t heard it before I stumbled upon it while searching for another ‘color’ song on Google (see my 8:35 am reply to calmkate’s first comment for more info).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 4:58 pm on July 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      In the movies the actors fire blanks. You can always fill in the blanks. The subject on an email can be blank and you can still send it. And, you can be a tabular rosa or a blank page. Maybe like nothing, sometimes blank, can be a real cool hand.

      Liked by 3 people

    • renxkyoko 5:45 am on July 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love watching Fred Astaire dance. I wonder if he had children who inherited his dancing talent.

      Liked by 3 people

    • renxkyoko 5:46 am on July 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, and I always end my post with the title, because I just write what comes to mind.

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 1:26 pm on July 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m not so much on Fred Astaire, but I love Ginger Rogers… even wrote an essay about her. I think she was a pretty swell dancer; but, her comedy was even better.

      BTW, if I draw a blank on what to write about, sometimes I use a random word generator to get my brain moving around. Doesn’t always work, but it has from time to time…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:27 pm on July 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        If you love Ginger Rogers, you should watch (if you haven’t already) one of her lesser-known films titled THE MAJOR AND THE MINOR. In addition to be a great film, it has the distinction of being the first movie directed by Billy Wilder, and the only movie (to my knowledge) in which Ginger’s mother appeared (near the end of the film, in a short but important role).

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 9:09 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink

          I’ve seen it a few times. She is wonderful at playing a youngster, a sexy young woman and a mature mother. Jerry Lewis remade that movie in the fifties with Dean Martin. Not as good but there is a fantastic dance routine that has to be seen to be believed…

          Have you seen Monkey Business with Rogers and Cary Grant?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:46 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink

          I’ve seen Monkey Business, but so long ago that I don’t remember it well. I think it shows up on TCM occasionally, so I’ll keep an eye open for it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 12:00 pm on July 18, 2018 Permalink

          She dances in it, almost as an afterthought, but she is so GOOD at it.

          Liked by 1 person

    • da-AL 7:18 pm on July 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      you’ve fashioned a kaleidascope for us ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Fred Astaire, , , old films, , , The Fat Lady Sings   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 05) 

    If you haven’t been following this series, you don’t know what you’ve been missing (athough¬†some might¬†claim¬†ignorance is bliss). If you¬†are a follower, you¬†may think¬†the humor has been¬†pretty juvenile. This first selection of Part 05 should assuage¬†all concerns:

    3 to 1¬†you now¬†think this series is¬†for the birds….but¬†you ain’t heard nothing yet.¬†Here’s a real turkey:

    OK, I don’t need a straw vote to tell me¬†the next selection has nowhere to go but up….

    Now that’s what I call ending on a high note (as opposed to starting on a high chair). And¬†so we come to¬†the moment you’ve all¬†been waiting for….

    You’re welcome.

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:28 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Not at all juvenile as I enjoy these very much! Thanks for the laughs!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:09 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I intended “juvenile” in a tongue-in-cheek way, but no matter how you took it, I’m glad you appreciated the clips. Two of the four were very obscure, and I was fortunate to find them.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 9:32 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Great clips here. I’m not sure which is the best but I’ll give the nod to Laurel and Hardy.

      Now in the interests of political correctness let us say the opera ain’t over till the plus sized lady sings. Or maybe we could use the medical code E66.3 which is used to indicate overweight. It would be like spelling a word in front of a two year old because you don’t want them to hear it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:36 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I agree with your nod to the Laurel & Hardy clip, which is from one of their best movies, WAY OUT WEST (1937). I thought TURKEY IN THE STRAW (one of the two obscure clips I mentioned in a previous comment) was relatively well done, given that many ‘hayseed’ films of this type are just plain cornball.

        As for “the plus sized lady sings,” that description may be more politically correct, but it ain’t nearly as FUNNY as “it ain’t over until THE FAT LADY sings” — though I admit I probably wouldn’t think it was funny if I were a fat lady. On second thought, make that “if I were a plus sized lady.” ūüė¶

        Liked by 1 person

    • 2017blogpresse 2:24 pm on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      nice blog, I like very much.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 3:42 pm on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful. Thanks for the giggles!

      Liked by 2 people

    • moorezart 1:18 pm on February 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:30 pm on February 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, moorezart. May the Fat Lady never sing on your blog!

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:30 pm on February 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Make that “May the Fat Lady never sing AGAIN on your blog!” ūüôā

        Like

    • tref 11:40 pm on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Turkey in the Straw” is one of those songs I like to suddenly start whistling when I’m in line for a movie or something.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:29 am on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Probably no one in line who hears you whistling knows the title of the song, because if they did, they’d might say there’s a turkey in the theater (just kidding — I’m sure you whistle beautifully, tref).

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: By the Sea, Fred Astaire, , , La Mer, , , , ,   

    MER-SEA 

    In comments to a¬†Jan.2¬†Peach of a post titled Fallen Angel, I included links to BEYOND THE SEA and¬†LA MER (English and¬†French versions of¬†the same¬†song).¬†Diana Peach’s preternatural post & both song¬†links can be found¬†here: https://mythsofthemirror.com/

    I bring this up because that song is just one of¬†several ‘beautiful’ sea songs I recall, and I thought I’d take a stroll down memory lane — or should I say, memory¬†beach.¬†I¬†invite you¬†to join me….that is, if you don’t mind getting¬†sand —¬†as I don’t mind¬†getting….

    And now let us start our stroll:

    Of course, there is more than one way to see the sea — you can¬†join the Navy:

    You say the Navy’s not your cup of sea?¬†Then let us end our stroll¬†like Mr. Bean,¬†oblivious to all else, bidding glorious¬†adieu to….

    Mer-sea beaucoup.

     
    • Don Frankel 11:00 am on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse there are other great sea songs like ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’, ‘C C Ryder’ and ‘Good Night Irene’ that has the line “I’ll see you in my dreams”. But that’s enough out of me. I’ll see you later.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:08 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, “I’ll see you in my dreams” is actually a song in itself, written in 1924, pre-dating “Good Night Irene.” It was one of lyricist Gus Kahn’s biggest hits — so much so that it served as the title of the hokey 1951 biopic directed by Michael Curtiz, starring Danny Thomas as Gus Kahn. Here is the Mills Brothers’ version:

        Like

    • Carmen 1:27 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mornin’ mistermuse,
      Of course you must realize that I live on the sea bound coast. . .
      The first video mentioned the sand on Havana beaches – gorgeous! We’ve been to several around Cuba and they are, indeed, as good as the lady sings about. ūüôā
      Lovely song selections!
      (and you were worried I’d unleash a sea of slights)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:05 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Good afternoon, Carmen. Not only do I remember that you live on the sea bound coast, but I think I mentioned in a comment a few years ago that I’ve been in your lovely neck of the woods (and coast) on vacation….when it was slightly warmer, of course.

        Glad you enjoyed the song selections. I think the last one (from the film MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY) is a visual delight, as well as an auditory one.

        As for your last sentence, I wasn’t worried in the slightest. ūüė¶

        Like

        • Carmen 5:48 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink

          Well, I am sorry to have mist you. . . ūüėČ (and excuse my foggy memory)

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Blues for Yolande, Fred Astaire, , , , , Yolanda   

    Y ME, LORD 

    Friends, if you Xpected an X post after my W post, U haven’t been paying attention, because as¬†I’ve previously¬†Xplained, X is out.¬†Even X post facto, there is no¬†X factor here. Y? There are no¬†old songs with girls¬†named¬†X in the title, that’s Y. That’s¬†Y U C¬†Y here.

    Now that we got that straightened out, a word to the Ys: even if I were a Ys man (or a Ys guy, for that matter), I am not Ys enough to know more than one or two Y girl songs. So let’s start with that, and then, if necessary,¬†I’ll¬†pray¬†for God’s¬†help to find¬†another¬†Y song.

    Sorry I asked, Lord. I could have done without that last one.

     
    • scifihammy 2:49 am on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nicely written ūüôā I was thinking there’s Xanadu – but not a girl’s name!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:24 am on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks. I thought of Xanadu too, but the movie and song of that name came out in 1980, so it doesn’t qualify as an oldie (by my criteria) even if it were a girl’s name. Nice song, though.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 12:20 pm on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I think Yolanda’s Blues is the cream of the crop but Fred Astaire does a pretty good job. I think or read somewhere that Song writers really liked and wanted Fred Astaire to sing their songs. At first that sounded strange to me as he doesn’t have a strong voice but then I could hear how he pays such careful attention to the lyrics that it made sense.

      I got something for Z that does not fit the criteria so I’ll save it for the comments.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:10 pm on December 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, you’re right about Fred Astaire — he didn’t have a strong voice, but he knew how to sing, and songwriters knew he would sing their songs the way they wanted them sung.

        Re Z, I also have a song in mind that, literally speaking, doesn’t meet the criteria (not because it’s not an oldie). It’ll be interesting to see if we’re talking about the same song.

        Like

    • tref 4:21 pm on December 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice song. I don’t think I’ve ever heard it before.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:10 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Couldn’t think of anything besides the theme from Xena, the Warrior Princess myself, Sr. Muse, and I’ve already posted that for your review. Can’t say as I really blame you for not including it.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Borscht Belt, , Carl Reiner, , , Dancing In The Dark, Fred Astaire, Howard Dietz, , Imogene Coca, Isaac Newton, , , , Sid Caesar, television, , , Your Show of Shows   

    A LAUGH AND A SONG AND DANCE 

    If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants. –Sir Isaac Newton

    Comedian Sid Caesar, in his autobiography, CAESAR’S HOURS, quotes¬†the above and adds, “I too stand on the shoulders of giants. Nobody does anything alone.”

    To me,¬†to call Sid Caesar (born 9/8/22) a¬†comedian is akin to calling Newton¬†a physicist¬†— accurate, yes, but hardly adequate.¬†In¬†a down-to-earth way,¬†I might even say that¬†what Newton was to gravity in the 1680s, Caesar was to levity in the 1950s.¬†The¬†bottom line¬†is,¬†I was in my teens¬†then (the 1950s, not the 1680s), and still reasonably sentient at the time; thus I can¬†bear witness¬†to¬†the comic genius that¬†I, as¬†a geezer, still see¬†in Caesar.

    And just who were those giants on whose shoulders Caesar stood? He tells us in his book: “I always wanted to be Charlie Chaplin. He was one of my earliest comedic heroes, along with Buster Keaton, Laurel and Hardy, and W.C. Fields. Most of their comedy came from their character. They each believed in what they did, and I believed them.”

    Caesar¬†was an up-and-coming comic performing mainly in the so-called Borscht Belt in New York’s Catskill Mountains when this opportunity arose in the infancy of network TV:

    It was¬†called YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS, and what an innovative¬†show it was. It premiered live on 2/25/50 with writers like Mel Brooks, Max Liebman (who also produced) and (later) Woody Allen.¬†Said Caesar: “For nine years, I presided over what was arguably the best collection of comedy writers ever assembled in the history of television, and possibly in the history of the written word — unless you think the U.S. Constitution is funny.”

    Add co-stars Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris, and the show was both a commercial and artistic success from Hour One. Here, they show you why:

    Again quoting Caesar: “Until that time, the only big things on television were bowling, wrestling and Charlie Chan. [Max Liebman] wasn’t interested in the American public’s lowest common denominator. He wasn’t going to dumb down.¬†His goal was that the quality of the show would drive its popularity and ultimately elevate taste.”

    As¬†Charlie Chan¬†might say: Noble goal like chasing rainbow —¬†beautiful while it lasts.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Originally, I¬†came to this¬†post with the idea of¬†making it a¬†birthday (9/8/1896) tribute to Howard Dietz,¬†one¬†of my favorite lyricists, whose autobiography (titled DANCING IN THE DARK)¬†I also commend.¬†Then I¬†learned that¬†Sept. 8¬†is the birthday of Sid Caesar as well as Howard Dietz, and I thought I GUESS I’LL HAVE TO CHANGE MY PLAN.

    Hold on —¬†it wouldn’t be right¬†not to¬†dance with¬†the¬†dude what brung me, so rather than ditch Dietz,¬†I’ll sing¬†his¬†praises here¬†too….starting with his first big¬†hit¬†(above),¬†then an excerpt from¬†early in the book,¬†closing with a¬†realization of¬†the song which titles his story.

    The following is quoted from the book’s forward by¬†Alan Jay Lerner: As for that quality of life known as charm, I can only shrug sadly and chalk it up as another victim of that creeping nastiness called modern civilization. I think about the man whose reminiscences are contained in this book. They come to mind because of that special gift of charm that is so characteristic of his lyrics. Howard [Dietz]¬† is the Fred Astaire, the Chevalier, the Molnar, the Lubitsch of lyric writers.

    Dancing in the dark
    Till the tune ends
    We’re dancing in the dark
    And it soon ends
    We’re waltzing in the wonder
    Of why we’re here
    Time hurries by we’re here
    And gone

     
    • scifihammy 2:41 am on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know Sid Caesar too well but I have seen that hilarious clock clip. ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ricardo 9:44 am on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Your talent for bringing back things I barely remember from childhood continues unabated, Sr. Muse. My dad was a big fan of “Show of Shows.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:31 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I can still remember seeing that Bavarian Clock piece when they first did it in the early 1950s. It made such an impression on me that I still think it ranks as one of the most original and funniest skits ever done on TV….especially when you consider how ‘primitive’ television was back then.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jay 12:17 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hardly adequate: you’ve got that right.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 4:39 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That makes it absolutely certain, because two rights can’t make a wrong. ūüė¶

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 8:40 am on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I was a little too young for that show and then it didn’t get syndicated, or at least we didn’t see it where I lived. I only heard about Sid Caesar later, but of course I knew of Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner. Speaking of Mel Brooks, I just watched “Young Frankenstein” last night and could not stop laughing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:19 am on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        In his autobiography, Sid Caesar has some very interesting and funny things to say about Mel Brooks when Brooks was a 20-something year old CHARACTER (that’s character with a capital CHARACTER) working for YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS. I have a feeling you would enjoy the autobio (CAESAR’S HOURS) tremendously if you have time to read it (Amazon has it in both hardcover and paperback).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 10:05 pm on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Wow! That takes me back all right. You’ve got a great talent for bringing back the blast from the past! Thanks for the memories.

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 5:17 pm on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse most people are familiar with Sinatra’s upbeat version of Dancing in the Dark but he also sang it like this from time to time a little slower and more poignant.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:40 pm on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don — I hadn’t heard this version before, and must say I prefer it to the upbeat version. I usually prefer Frank’s older & more mature voice, but in this case, I think he’s more in tune with the way the song should be sung and no doubt the way the songwriters (Dietz and Arthur Schwartz) envisioned it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jadi Campbell 3:02 am on September 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for a grreat post! I had the incredible good luck to see Sid Cesar and Imogene Coca together on stage. They did a piece without any words and it was amazing. I knew I was watching legends at the height of their gifts. Still shake my head at the memory, all these years later.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:31 am on September 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        That was indeed incredible good luck, Jadi — and it was an incredible pleasure to do this post, bringing back such recollections as the “Bavarian Clock” sketch which I hadn’t seen in decades.

        Thank you for sharing your memories.

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 4:38 am on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      LOVE a song and dance man ūüôā ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Song and dance men don’t come any better than Fred Astaire!
        I especially love the DANCING IN THE DARK dance with Cyd Charisse — so sensual, so effortless, so perfect.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 11:43 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Eleanor Powell, Fred Astaire, Golda Meir, , , , , ,   

    AGE WISE 

    For the benefit of¬†my fellow geezers out there who may not be aware of it, May is OLDER AMERICANS MONTH (not to be confused with NATIONAL SENIOR CENTER MONTH (September) or NATIONAL ACCORDION MONTH (June).¬†Accordionly,¬†May you and I¬†bask in¬†the recognition which is¬†due us¬†for living long enough to¬†pass¬†along¬†our well-earned wisdom¬†to those who don’t¬†want to hear¬†it.

    To be sure, there is also a slight ¬†drawback about old age: there’s not much future in it….but otherwise, it’s not a bad¬†time to be alive. At any rate, it beats the alternative — or so they say (as if¬†“they” have experienced¬†said alternative).¬†¬†On the flip side,¬†there are many¬†timely quotes on the age-old¬†subject of age, so let’s put on our reading glasses and see if we can make heads or tails of some of them:

    If¬† I’d known I was going to live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself. –Anonymous

    An archaeologist is the best husband any woman can have: the older she gets, the more interested he is in her. –Agatha Christie

    Age does not diminish the extreme disappointment of having a scoop of ice cream fall from the cone. –Jim Fiebig

    Millions long for immortality¬†who don’t know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. –Susan Ertz

    Old age is like a plane flying through a storm. Once you’re aboard, there’s nothing you can do. –Golda Meir

    Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional. –Chili Davis

    You’re only as old as the girl that you feel.¬†–Groucho Marx

    Time may be a great healer, but it’s a lousy¬†beautician. –Anonymous

    If you worry, you die. If you don’t worry, you also die. So why worry? –Mike Horn

    I was going to use that last quote to¬†close with the song¬†DON’T WORRY, BE HAPPY, but on the occasion of the birthday (May 10, 1899)¬†of the never-grows-old¬†Fred Astaire,¬†this song and dance make me¬†happy to change my tune:

     

     

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:38 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hysterical first paragraph (even the pun), and I always love the quotes you feature. I heard the first quote, btw, with “my teeth” replacing “myself” – both are apt and only slightly funny once you get old enough to be considered a senior. ūüôā

      Love-love-LOVE the tap number – rarely seen in today’s dance shows (unless you want to count the choreography of STOMP or a few contestants on So You Think You Can Dance, where it is rarely featured predominantly). Thank you for making me grin by posting.

      Crazy about Astaire, but must chime in again that it’s a shame that his partners never seem to have gotten the credit they deserve – rarely credited at all, actually, when Fred Astaire numbers are posted (even here). ::sigh::

      ANYWAY, Happy Older Americans Month! Let’s get up out of our rockers and rock the month!
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:57 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        And a Happy to you as well, Madelyn! ūüôā

        I have to disagree (in part) about Fred’s partners not getting the credit they deserve. I think Ginger got a lot of credit — the whole world knows immediately that when you say Fred and Ginger, you’re referring to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. In my opinion, it was some of his other partners who didn’t receive enough credit, even though they were considered better dancers than Ginger (Eleanor Powell, Rita Hayworth, Cyd Charisse). Of course, Ginger made many more films with Fred than they, and built the sustained magic with Fred that wasn’t possible in one or two films with other partners. But there is magic nonetheless in such clips as his tap dance with Eleanor Powell!

        P.S. I didn’t think it necessary to mention Eleanor’s name in introducing the clip because her name appears in the clip photo itself….and, after all, it’s HIS birthday, not her’s!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:33 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink

          Great points. btw – this would be a great post to share on today’s Senior Salon – the little couch at the bottom of May’s Mental Health Calendar has a direct link.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:09 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink

          Thanks for the share suggestion, Madelyn, but I don’t think you appreciate what a dufus I am with regard to the internet. I don’t see “the little couch at the bottom of May’s Mental Health Calendar,” and even if I did, I probably wouldn’t know what to do with it to share this post. I ain’t an old geezer for nothing! ūüôā

          Like

    • scifihammy 2:24 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the laugh! ūüėÄ An hilarious post – plus the bonus of Fred Astaire! ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

    • Michaeline 5:29 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse, I liked your posts, and especially your quotes while I enjoy the warm, sunny coast of Florida. I think of most poets that you are the most congenial, better than an epidural by far, and I wish on a star that you stay as young as you are.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:25 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Not only am I better than an epidural, I’m better than an epidemic (though an epicurean might give me problems — it would be an epic contest). ūüė¶

        Like

    • linnetmoss 6:38 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Haha! These were great. I have been watching my scoops of ice cream fall in slow motion for some time now, and I’ve decided that laughter is the only medicine. And a little Eleanor Powell (such a worthy partner for Fred) never hurts…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:15 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Unfortunately, those scoops of ice cream never fall in slow enough motion to catch them before they hit the ground (or your shoes) — leaving you standing there holding an empty cone and looking like an idiot (make that ME looking like an idiot — I’m sure you would look like you were just giving your dog a treat….or your dogs a treat, if the scoop hit your feet). ūüôā

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:00 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      How delightful lol … Fred and Ginger are my favourites, you got the wrong gal.
      I intend growing old disgracefully … any one care to join me?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:14 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks to all for your comments. Calmkate, I’m not sure there’s any such thing as “the wrong gal” when it came to dancing with Fred — even a non-dancer like Joan Fontaine looked pretty good dancing with Fred in DAMSEL IN DISTRESS. But I agree that Ginger was special.

        As for growing old disgracefully — you go, girl! ūüôā

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:18 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink

          “wrong girl” in that it wasn’t me … ūüė¶
          Joan was a hero of mine but last I saw she should have retired .. her partner had to carry her around the stage … it was so sad

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:46 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      A wise man once said. “Don’t look back something may be gaining on you.” He also said. “Age is mind over matter. If you don’t mind it don’t matter.”

      If you believe that baseball is life as I do then another wise man put it best. “70% of baseball is mental. The rest of it is in your mind.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:31 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, for the benefit of the baseball uninitiated, the wise men you quoted were Satchel Paige and Yogi Berra. But there can’t be just two wise men — there must be three. So here’s a quote from Tommy Lasorda: “I love doubleheaders. That way I get to keep my uniform on longer.”

      Whatever happened to doubleheaders, anyway?

      Like

    • MC Clark 12:48 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m still wondering how the heck I got here…I was 25 just the other day. ūüôĀ
      Thanks for the laughs!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 2:57 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      We grow old too early and wise too late, Sr. Muse. On the other hand, you can dispense with any effort to acquire wisdom at all, and take comfort in the assertion that there’s no fool like an old fool, and congratulate yourself for being on top of the fool chain.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:19 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Well, at least I’m not on top of the drool chain yet, Ricardo. Hopefully it will never come down to that.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:34 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      One good turn deserves another and we can’t leave this guy out on this subject. “The Yankees fired me because I turned 70. I’ll never let that happen again.” Casey Stengel.

      Then there was Warren Spahn who played for Casey before he managed the Yankees and later when Casey managed the Mets. “I worked for Casey before and after he was a genius.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Margarita 10:14 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As I said to a friend recently, I love being an old person! ūüėČ xoM

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:37 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As Thoreau once said, “None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.” You obviously haven’t outlived yours, Margarita. ūüôā

      Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 12:19 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love the humor in your intro and these quotes are great. Susan Ertz was my favorite, but the anonymous one about the lousy beautician made me laugh. Great post. Happy Belated Birthday!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:46 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, Diana….and I’m sure Fred Astaire, from that great ballroom in the sky, thanks you as well (for the Happy Birthday wishes). ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • Pat 3:04 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Synchronicity . . . love it. I just signed up for Silver Sneakers today and didn’t even know it was Older Americans Month. First time over here and enjoyed the quotes — not done yet in these golden years – just figuring that out. Forever young (Eleanor Powell and Fred Astaire) — fun to watch them again. Thank you for sharing. ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • M. Talmage Moorehead 4:35 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t believe how much I enjoyed that dance. They must have practiced endlessly to remember all those details. Eleanor Powell blew me away. The guy was good, too. Hahaha

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:47 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I had the same reaction as I watched it when selecting it for this post — and I had already seen it probably 5 or 6 times over the years.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 11:13 pm on May 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Pithy: “Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.” ‚ÄďChili Davis

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bette A. Stevens 12:57 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Fun and funny! ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 2:47 am on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Magic! What a way to start my day ūüôā ūüôā How does he manage such energy and elegance combined? Many thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:25 am on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        In a word, Astaire was a perfectionist. Such ease and elegance came from untold hours of practice and hard work (not to mention, natural talent)!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Zinni 1:40 pm on June 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It’s never too late to cherish the disappointment of a scoop of ice cream falling from the cone

      Liked by 1 person

    • Zinni 1:40 pm on June 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      ūüėć

      Liked by 1 person

    • kertsen 3:30 am on June 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Keep up the good work. Old age is very relaxing I have great difficulty getting out of my chair.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Burns and Allen, , Fred Astaire, , Gracie Allen, , , , , ,   

    THIS POST IS FOR THE BURNS 

    My last post was published on the birthday (Jan. 20, 1896) of GEORGE BURNS. This post is being published on the birthday (Jan. 25, 1759) of ROBERT BURNS. The former lived to the ripe old age of 100, the latter to age 37; a punster might say (0f the disparity) that they Burns the candle at both ends (of course, I would never say such a thing).

    Some of you no doubt remember George Burns as God in the 1977 hit film OH, GOD!, and as the Academy Award winning Best Supporting Actor in THE SUNSHINE BOYS (1975), but we geezers best recall him as straight man to wife Gracie Allen in the comedy team of BURNS AND ALLEN. After she died in 1964, he immersed himself in work, remaining active for another three decades in TV, movies, and as author of ten books.

    Here are Burns & Allen with Fred Astaire in two fun scenes from DAMSEL IN DISTRESS (1937):

    http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/374102/Damsel-In-Distress-A-Movie-Clip-Stiff-Upper-Lip.html

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Many of you¬†probably do not remember ROBERT BURNS¬†(aka RABBIE BURNS). Even I, ancient as I am, do not recall him. But¬†history tells us¬†he was known as the Ploughman Poet, the¬†Bard of Ayrshire (Scotland), and as a¬†pioneer of the Romantic movement. Regarded as the National Poet of Scotland, in 2009 the Scottish public voted him the¬†Greatest Scot, evidently as¬†a belated¬†promotion from Great Scot! Among his best known poems are “Auld Lang Syne,” “A Red, Red Rose” and “To A Mouse” (said to have been written when¬†he accidently¬†destroyed a mouse nest while plowing a field). I suspect the mouse would have preferred¬†if Burns had restored the nest, but nonetheless,¬†the poem¬†was a¬†mice gesture.

    In closing, it might be nice¬†to see what the Burns¬†boys had to say in their own words (George’s quotes are¬†in italics, followed by Robert’s in what¬†I take to be¬†post-Old English):

    Acting is all about honesty. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made.

    Nice to be here? At my age, it’s nice to be anywhere. (Tell me about it!)

    First you forget names, then you forget faces. Next you forget to pull your zipper up, and finally, you forget to pull it down. (Don’t tell me about it.)

    When I was a boy, the Dead Sea was only sick.

    It takes only one drink to get me drunk. Trouble is, I can’t remember if it’s the 13th or 14th.

    Oh wad some power the giftie gie us / To see ourselves as others see us!

    Gie me ae spark o’ Nature’s fire, /¬†That’s a’ the learning I desire.

    An’ there began a lang digression /¬†About the lords o’ the creation.

    Wee, sleekit, cow’rin, tim’rous beastie, /¬†O, what a panic’s in thy breastie!

    The best laid plans o’ mice and men Gang aft a-gley.

     
    • New England Nomad 12:41 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Interest that you should mention Robert Burns. Funnfact: there is a statue of him in my home city. It seems kind of random to see it since he never resided in Massachusetts and I’m not sure he ever lived in the states. To make a long story short, a Scottish heritage group, called the Scottish clans of America in honor of all of the Scottish people who had settled in the area.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:26 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for that interesting info. I wonder if there is a similar statue in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, which was a Scottish colony for a brief period in the 17th century.

        I don’t know if you watch JEOPARDY!, but if so, perhaps you’ve noticed that Rabbie (Robert) Burns turns up relatively often as a question (answer).

        Thanks again for commenting.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 6:06 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I am bat-sh*t crazy about “back in the day” tap routines — but would you believe that I either didn’t know (or had totally forgotten) that Burns was a tapper? And an excellent one too! I mean, anyone who can keep up with Astaire is NO slouch!!!

      I had to watch this 3 times, putting my attentional spotlight on each of them. BRILLIANT routine! Such lightness in their execution – and CLEAN as a whistle taps.

      I also think that G. Burns was one of the few (besides me, of course) who really appreciated Gracie’s comic genius – in addition to his being able to set her up perfectly – one of the best straight men in the biz.

      Bobby, on the other hand, is my personal guru of oh-well. I am a repeat winner of the Bobbie Burns award, having ganged oft aglee more times than *anybody* can count!

      Thanks for another great post.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
      – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:12 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I agree about George Burns. He, like most entertainers back in the day, started out in vaudeville and could do more than one thing. Astaire, for example, was not only a great dancer, but an actor, singer (I personally love his way with a song), choreographer, percussionist, and even wrote a few popular songs. In those days, you had to have talent — you didn’t get to be famous for being famous.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 9:05 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, I remember the TV show from when I was a kid. While Gracie and Harry Von Zell would be plotting, George would be upstairs in his den watching it on TV. I thought that was the coolest thing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Although George wasn’t my favorite comedian, George and Gracie as a pair were “the coolest thing” indeed. If I recall correctly, at the end of the show, he would tell Gracie, “Say goodnight [meaning ‘to the audience’], Gracie.”….and she would repeat, “Goodnight, Gracie.”

        Like

    • arekhill1 10:21 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      To return to your favorite subject, Sr. Muse, if God is going to get started with giving out the gift of perceiving how others see us, He could start with Trump.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:40 am on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, Ricardo. Even when he does perceive how others see him, it’s through the lens of his megalomania. Talk about a legend in his own mind!

        Like

    • milliethom 4:18 pm on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      A great post, told in an appealingly humorous way. I remember Gracie Allen well. I was a teenager when they were on TV quite a lot and my mum loved them. George must have done something right to live to a hundred … perhaps he always ate his greens or something. Lol The tap scene is amazing. All three are wonderful dancers.
      In a comment above, you wondered whether there was a Robert Burns’ statue in Nova Scotia. I looked up about statues of Burns around the world, intending to add some to my post, and I know there are a few in Australia, New Zealand and Canada. I think there’s one in British Columbia and one in Halifax in Nova Scotia. I didn’t get as far as looking to see whether there were any in the USA. I intend to do another post about Rabbie, this time about his life and poetry. I thought I’d talk about the many statues then.
      Thank you for connecting to my post. I enjoyed reading yours.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:12 pm on January 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the kind words. Anyone who’s interested in more info (along with some very nice pix) about Robert Burns should check out your Jan. 25 post by clicking on your name above.

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    • eths 10:57 pm on January 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      When I was a kid, my family and I listed to Burns and Allen weekly. Loved them!

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 1:20 pm on August 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:57 pm on August 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      George Burns thanks you, Robert Burns thanks you, and I thank you (if you don’t believe me, ask them!). ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Fred Astaire, , , , , , Pick Yourself Up, Swing Time   

    A MAN AND HIS ‘DOGS’ 

    dogs,¬†Slang. The feet: My dogs are killing me!¬† fantasy, n.¬†¬†A play of the mind; imagination; fancy; a picture existing only in the mind. –World Book Dictionary

    A footnote to¬†the World Book definition of¬†fantasy: it is personified, in my view,¬†by¬†one man — fittingly so, because¬†beyond his¬†pictures he still¬†dances in¬†the mind,¬†as¬†timeless as imagination….no less real than the Hollywood¬†from which such flights of fancy emanated and stars were born. That ethe-real¬†man is Fred Astaire, the pictures were his movies,¬†and this day is his birthday (May 10, 1899).

    Astaire’s¬†“dogs” may have been what carried him across the dance floor with Ginger Rogers in his arms, but it was his persona that took us with him. I like to think that what Santa Claus embodied¬†for children, Fred Astaire embodied¬†for my parent’s generation as teenagers/young adults, epitomizing¬†easy grace and the¬†allure of dreams¬†more enticing than any toy that¬†Santa could promise.¬† No other hoofer in film history even comes¬†close to capturing his magic….which is why he survives his and¬†my parent’s generation, just as any great artist lives on in what he or she creates.

    In my favorite scene from my favorite Astaire-Rogers film (SWING TIME, 1936), professional dancer Astaire comes to New York and, after a chance street¬†encounter with Rogers doesn’t go well, he¬†follows her to the dance studio where she is an instructor. Pretending to be a novice, he botches the dance lesson. She insults him and is fired. As she is leaving the studio….

    Of course, many elements must come together to produce movie magic, and SWING TIME had the good fortune to combine the¬†talents of the stars with those of¬†a great director (George Stevens), a fine supporting cast (including Eric Blore, seen in the above clip), and one of the best¬†composer/lyricist teams of the Golden Age (Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields). In addition to the ‘dance¬†lesson’ song PICK YOURSELF UP, their¬†outstanding score includes A FINE ROMANCE, NEVER GONNA DANCE, and¬†this love song:

    On this May 10 celebration,¬†let’s end appropriately¬†with this:

     

     

     

     

     
    • scifihammy 4:58 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Movie magic indeed. ūüôā Always a pleasure to watch these two together and the ease with which Fred Astaire sings and dances ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:18 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You know I’ve heard and more than once that song writers wanted Fred Astaire to sing their songs. Not Sinatra as he might change the lyrics on them or any of the other big time singers of the era but Astaire. If you listen to the respect and the tenderness with which he handles the words it makes sense.

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      • mistermuse 7:42 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Exactly right, Don. To quote from one of my Astaire record album covers: “In creating these songs, it almost seemed as if five of the undisputed masters in the field–Irving Berlin, Ira and George Gershwin, Dorothy Fields and Jerome Kern–were stimulated by their assignments to out-do themselves in the quality of their work. And the reason was undoubtedly Fred Astaire himself. What songwriters loved about him was that, despite his admitted vocal limitations, he brought to each song a personal involvement that never distorted either the meaning or the melody.”

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    • Midwestern Plant Girl 6:35 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I always loved the quote, “Ginger Rogers did everything the great Fred Astaire did backwards and in high heels.” ūüėČ

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 9:14 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I ask you, Sr. Muse, in your capacity as a semi-official curator of proclaimed national and world-wide days, should Astaire’s birthday be celebrated as White Guys Who Can Dance Day?

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    • mistermuse 9:37 am on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sounds good to me. I’d also proclaim Oct. 2o and March 17 as Black Guys Who Could Dance Like No White Guys Did And Become Legendary Day (the birthdays of the fabulous Nicholas Brothers, Fayard and Harold).

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    • Cynthia Jobin 12:17 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The kind of art that Astaire personified is one (of only a few, mind you) reason I wouldn’t mind returning to that era…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:40 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      My sentiments exactly, Cynthia. But at least we still have Turner Classic Movies to go to whenever it’s worthwhile returning to that era, such as today when TCM is running a number of old Astaire films, such as CAREFREE at three P.M. Eastern Daylight Savings Time (SWING TIME was on this morning).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 1:51 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      That’s our cable channel 42 here in Maine….ROYAL WEDDING is on now…thanks for the tip!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:24 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You’re more than welcome. ROYAL WEDDING (for me) doesn’t have the magic of the Astaire-Rogers films (or even DAMSEL IN DISTRESS with Astaire-Joan Fontaine, which was on earlier), but it’s still worth a view or two. ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 5:01 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      That man is sure light on his feet!

      If someone made a list comparing slang for dogs and cats, wonder what we would find?

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 6:21 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Awesome scenes. When my daughter was about 4 years old she LOVED these old movies. We would snuggle on the couch and watch Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Gene Kelly, and the rest. Great dancing and so much romance. ūüėÄ

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:55 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        It’s good to expose children to what was good about the good old days, so that they realize there’s a lot more to life than just the current culture. The more expansive their upbringing, the more well-rounded they will be when they’re on their own. ūüôā

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:37 pm on May 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If you’re a lucky dog , BroadBlogs, what you find would be the cat’s meow, otherwise you’re barking up the wrong tree. That’s a short list, but if I made it longer, it would be so bad, we might fight like cats and dogs. ūüė¶

      Like

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