Updates from February, 2019 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Auguste Rodin, Bessie Smith, , , NO BRAINER DAY, poet, President, , Rene Descarte, , , , , thought, ,   

    NO BRAINER DAY 

    I think, therefore I am. –René Descartes 
    I overthink, therefore I post.
    –mistermuse

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Lately, I’ve been burning too much mental energy cooking up posts to roast Trump (e.g., I almost said toast rump); the heat is turning my face red and giving me the thinking blues:

    Frankly, friends, I think I need to cool it before the strain becomes a drain on my brain and gives me a pain. Fortunately, Feb. 27 is NO BRAINER DAY — a perfect day to post a post which requires little or no thinking. But before you Trump reprobates snidely ask how that would make this post any different from my previous posts, answer me this: how much thought do you think The Donald gives his tweets? Even a smart-ask Trumpite should allow that mistermuse be entitled to one day of devoting the same paucity of gray matter to his post that your Orange Oligarch devotes to his tweets every day.

    With that in mind, I’m giving the rest of this tome over to posting what others thought when they thought about thinking/not thinking. Do I think their thinking will make you think you’re thinking what I’m thinking about thinking/not thinking? Just a thought.

    So, let’s get quoting before I change my mind and start thinking again:

    I think that I think; therefore, I think I am. –Ambrose Bierce

    [I think that I think, therefore] I yam what I yam. –Popeye the Sailor Man

    There is no expedient to which a man will not go to avoid the labor of thinking. –Thomas Edison

    Ours is an age which is proud of machines that think, and suspicious of men who try to. –Howard Mumford Jones

    The best way [for a woman] to win a man is to make him think you think as much of him as he does. –Evan Esar

    In America, we say what we think, and even if we can’t think, we say it anyhow. –Charles F. Kettering

    In closing, did you know Rodin’s THE THINKER was originally called THE POET:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thinker

    I happen to know that THE POET didn’t appreciate the name change, thus this reaction:

    Mused The Poet to a passing skunk,
    “What good is being called The Thinker?
    To some day convey the aura of a President,
    It should Don the wrap, like you, of The Stinker.”

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:20 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Kettering says it best … take deep breaths, calm down … your blood pressure is thru the roof young man ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:39 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I think what Kettering said applies more to Trump and his supporters, Kate. How does one calm down so long as such a dangerously immoral man remains in power? Call me overly concerned, but Like Popeye (and Trump), “I yam what I yam.”

      Like

      • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:06 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’m with you on Trump. He stinks up the joint.

        Neil Scheinin

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:51 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink

          You got that right, Neil. The most worrying thing is that the joint he stinks up is The White House.

          Correction: he stinks up the country, if not the whole world.

          Liked by 2 people

    • scifihammy 8:13 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I like Your quote. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • rivergirl1211 9:18 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You’ve given me a lot to think about there…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You go, rivergirl!

        On second thought, stay — I need all my brilliant, witty, adorable followers (and you too)! 🙂 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 9:32 am on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I think, therefore I am. –René Descartes or I overthink, therefore I post. –mistermuse
      I like yours better.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:40 pm on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Manoloprofe, thank you for the like. I read your latest post about William Tell, but there appears to be no way to leave responses on your blog, so I’ll leave my response here:

      Like

    • Eliza 2:54 pm on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the smiles
      Happy Wednesday
      Love, light and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:39 pm on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment. I’ll take the love and the light, but leave the glitter to pop artists and Hollywood celebs who (apparently) can never have enough!

        Take care, and remember what Abe Lincoln said: “Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 10:46 pm on February 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I think you failed to write a trump-free post, Sr. Muse. As far as wishing not to abuse Trump in prose, been there, tried to do that, failed miserably myself. I feel your pain.

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 7:41 pm on February 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A very well-thought out post! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:50 pm on February 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I think so too, therefore I thank you! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 7:38 am on March 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I do love me some Bessie Smith…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:48 pm on March 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Hopefully, there’s something here to please every reader (except Trump supporters, some of whom may know how to read, and happen upon this post).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Resa 8:34 pm on March 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Nice post! I like the Popeye “Yam am”
      Don’t hear much about Popeye, anymore. He’s too, anchored in the past. 😀
      My cat is named Jeep, after Eugene the Magical Jeep! True!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:57 pm on March 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry to say, I’ve never heard of Eugene the Magical Jeep. However, I have heard of Puff the Magic Dragon, so I hope that counts for something! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Paul Sunstone 2:03 am on March 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve come to believe that for most of us, “thinking” is not much different than exploring the insides of our boxes. The boxes our parents, teachers, peers, culture, etc. give us to play around inside of. Now and then, we make an important discovery. “The walls are brown!”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Susi Bocks 12:27 am on March 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I think I need to think about all this carefully. 😉 BTW, “I overthink, therefore I post.” Spot on, Mister Writer! I thoroughly enjoyed your mini-rant. May you be able to de-stress a bit.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 11:08 am on March 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hey, I didn’t know The Thinker was originally called The Poet. I always learn something when I come here.

      Also: I love the quote about our society being proud of machines that think, but distrustful of people who try to. Very well said.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 am on March 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, SS — I thought I had replied before, but apparently I forgot. Apparently I need a machine that thinks for me, or at least remembers for me! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • kutukamus 2:20 am on March 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Now this ‘no-brainy’ is something to think over, really 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , readers, ,   

    A READER WANTS TO KNOW…. 

    THE ART OF THE REAL

    “Would you explain your writing to me?”
    “Certainly — I write what I see.”

    “So, what you see is what you say?”
    “In my mind, I see it that way.”

    “But things aren’t always what they seem.”
    “In that case, I write what I dream.”

    “Pray, how to tell the two apart?”
    “Some might say, therein’s the art.”

    “Then, that’s the art — to part the two?”
    “No, that’s the part that’s up to you.”

    “Up to me? But you’re the writer!”
    “Truth be told, aren’t you the decider?”

     

     
    • Lisa R. Palmer 7:08 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant!! Absolutely brilliant! Love this… 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:30 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for that “dream” comment, Lisa. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Lisa R. Palmer 11:04 pm on March 12, 2018 Permalink

          It’s absolutely true, and real, offered in daylight by a conscious, enthusiastic fan… (who also happens to believe that dreams are often real as well – lol!)

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:03 am on March 13, 2018 Permalink

          Much appreciated, Lisa….and to show that “dream” comment was meant as a compliment, here’s a little ditty for the dreamer in us:

          Like

    • scifihammy 7:41 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Clever – and entertaining 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:18 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Nice set of rhymed couplets you have there, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:33 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        That’s “The Art of the Real,” Ricardo. Eat your heart out, Donald (“The Art of the Deal”) Trump.

        Like

    • thelonelyauthorblog 11:11 am on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      This is brilliant. Bravo.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:16 pm on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse earlier this year I had a thought in a similar vein and that happened when I realized I didn’t know anything. It was quite a moment because I’d been walking around for six decades and I didn’t know anything. I only thought i did.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:21 pm on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Don, count yourself fortunate to have been walking around for only six decades and not knowing anything — I’ve been walking around for over seven with the same disability. But at least we know what we don’t know….which is more than can be said of a certain President of the United States.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:11 am on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse full disclosure here as someone from my old neighborhood told me that a young Donald Trump used to come into Karl’s Lunchoenette where I worked as a teenager and that I used to make him milkshakes, vanilla by the way. I would have disclosed this before but I just didn’t remember.

      Also pointed out to me is that we played baseball against him. I thought he grew up about a mile from our neighborhood but it seems it was a lot closer than that more like a half a mile or even less. But that all makes Donald Trump my friend. That’s the way things worked in Queens back in the 1960’s, Sorry to disappoint.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:38 am on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        No problem, Don. I simply can’t abide the way Trump treats people and believes “it’s all about him” — but I guess friendship trumps everything (pardon the pun)….although the way you define (for want of a better word) friendship seems to me a bit of a stretch, considering that it’s strictly a one-way street. I always thought of friendship as a reciprocal relationship.

        Don, I like to think of you as a friend, so I hope you don’t mind my telling you how I see it. I certainly appreciate your telling me how you see it.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 11:51 am on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, when you make someone a Milkshake, they leave you a tip, especially the rich kids from Jamaica Estates so it was reciprocal. But I don’t only have friends who agree with me. That’s boring. My late wife and I agreed on practically nothing but we didn’t have angry arguments we just disagreed and had fun doing it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:55 pm on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, since I wasn’t a rich kid, I probably wouldn’t have left a tip if I bought a milkshake from you, so I hate to think that could’ve cost us a friendship. But I mostly agree with the rest of your comment, especially when it comes to politics. Too bad Trump doesn’t see it that way — at least, I assume he doesn’t, or he wouldn’t mock those who disagree with him.

        Like

    • moorezart 3:09 pm on March 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bennett Cerf, game shows, , , , , , , TV history, What's My Line?,   

    CERF’S UP 

    In his comment to 20/20 BEHINDSIGHT (my May 20 post which contained a look back at TWENTY QUESTIONS), long-time blog buddy Don Frankel mentioned WHAT’S MY LINE? (another old TV game show). It so happens that one of the regulars on that show, humor writer and publisher (co-founder of RANDOM HOUSE) Bennett Cerf had chosen the 25th of May (1898) to be born; thus, today I honor his birthday by posting a selection of favorite Cerf puns and quotes (and high time I returned the favor, considering that lo, some twenty-plus years ago, RANDOM HOUSE published several of my poems in THE RANDOM HOUSE TREASURY OF LIGHT VERSE).

    But first, let’s take a look back at one of the WHAT’S MY LINE? programs from the same year as the TWENTY QUESTIONS clip shown in my previous post:

    There is little question, I think you’ll agree, that WHAT’S MY LINE? was a step up in class compared to TWENTY QUESTIONS…..so it’s time to hit the Cerf (as beach bums refer to the swells) and ride the wave….to wit:

    Gross ignorance is 144 times worse than ordinary ignorance.

    The confused young man couldn’t decide whether to marry Kathryn or Edith. Try as he might, he just could not make up his mind. Unwilling to give up either, he strung them along far too long. This indecision continued until both women tired of the situation and left him for good. Moral of the story: You can’t have your Kate and Edith too.

    Then there was the young female comic who was promised good roles in a hit TV show. All she had to do was divide her favors between the star and the producer. But it was just a sham; she never got any air time at all. You might even say she was….shared skit less.

    There once was a student named Bessor
    Whose knowledge grew lesser and lesser.
    It at last grew so small
    He knew nothing at all
    And today he’s a college professor.

    The Detroit String Quartet played Brahms last night. Brahms lost.

    I shouldn’t be surprised  — it was four against one.

    And on that note, I bid thee a fond fare well.

     

     

     

     
    • Ricardo 12:30 am on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Substantial puniness, Sr. Muse. Substantial.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:35 am on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Gracias, Ricardo. At first I thought you might be accusing me of substantial puniness in the sense of weakness, but being both puny and substantial would be an oxymoron, which also sounds rather unflattering. So, knowing you’re too much of a gentlemen to be doubly insulting, I graciously re-gracias you.

        Like

    • calmkate 1:25 am on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      put a smile on my dial … a published poet and I didn’t know it! Had anymore published since?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I had hundreds of poems published in my former life, Edith — I mean, Kate — but THE RANDOM HOUSE TREASURY OF LIGHT VERSE publication was probably the most rewarding. Maybe I’ll re-publish those light verse poems in my next post. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:50 am on May 25, 2017 Permalink

          lovely that would be greatly appreciated 🙂 well which of us do you prefer … lol

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 2:50 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink

          I prefer Kate over Edith, of course — otherwise, you might become agitatedkate, and I wouldn’t want that to happen! 🙂

          Like

    • Don Frankel 12:14 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Glad to be of some assist Muse. I’m struck by the level of discourse here. This is a far cry from the Kardhasians.

      I think the Mick blew it as soon as he said. “Yep.” To the first question. Not just the Oklahoma accent but he had a very distinct voice.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:42 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, from what I hear, just about anything is a far cry from the Kardashians. But I agree that Mick could’ve done a much better job of disguising his voice and saying something other than “Yep.” BTW, I was glad to see Steve Allen on the panel — he was one of the shining lights in the ‘dark ages’ of early TV.

        Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 12:47 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Very entertaining. Thanks for the laughs. Kate and Edith was hysterical, but the one I’m going to remember is gross ignorance. Ha ha. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:07 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. In the interest of maintaining a peaceful relationship with another commenter (above), I agree with only Edith being hysterical. Kate is as calm as a clam (at least, I think clams are calm, though I suppose they have bad days just like anyone else).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mark Scheel 2:57 pm on May 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      muse,

      Well, that takes me back. I remember old Bennett and his wit. And, hey, congrats on getting into that anthology! A most pleasing accomplishment.

      Have a pleasant Memorial Day weekend.

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 3:01 pm on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Remember watching What’s My Line as a kid in England… loved it…. coming to the US I was surprised to learn it was an American invention!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:59 pm on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don’t forget Donald Trump is an American invention too, which just goes to show that you never know when you’re going to hit a clunker! 🙂

        Like

        • RMW 12:15 pm on June 7, 2017 Permalink

          If we did a DNA test on the Donald I believe we would discover he is actually an alien… from another planet! Some other politicians I could think of too….

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:39 pm on June 7, 2017 Permalink

          Trump’s an alien, all right — alien to practically every decent human instinct.

          Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 9:33 pm on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I like the Brahms one. There’s been many variations on it, but it’s good to know the original – and Cerf was an original.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:21 pm on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Absolutely!

      Like

    • barkhabale 2:28 am on June 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Beautifully written

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:43 am on June 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you!

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: First day of Spring, , , , , , , Robet Louis Stevenson, , , spring cleaning,   

    SPRING CLINGING 

    There’s something bad in everything good: when spring comes, can spring cleaning be far behind? — Evan Esar

    Spring has come, but in my sequestered domain, this doesn’t mean spring cleaning must follow. Though my closets be crammed and my drawers be loaded — make that cluttered — I’ll have no problem leaving spring cleaning far behind (even if others stink otherwise).

    Now, I’m not saying that spring cleaning doesn’t have its place. For example, it might be worth the bother if you’re young and in love:

    Speaking of “young love,” how old do you think the above song is? If you guessed it dates back to the ‘Golden Age’ of popular music (1920s, 30s, 40s), welcome to one of my happy places. If you’re thinking I’m clinging to the best of those romantic old songs out of naught but nostalgia, nothing could be further from the youth — my guileless youth that Father Time gradually re-placed. But suppose the mature me were unable to relate to the ever-young work of, say, Twain, Stevenson and Swift — it wouldn’t be that their writing has become outdated.  I would simply have lost the capacity to appreciate its timelessness.

    In like manner, whether it be seen as ‘gilding the lily’ of youth or burnishing the harmony of maturity, I still think of the oldies as younger than springtime….and on that note, I’ll tune out:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 3:35 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My happy place too . What every happened to harmony — and words you could understand – and “girl singers” who sang without belting out most of the song – dressed, even? But don’t think its because I’m growing old. I’ve said the same thing since I was in my 30s.

      But I’m with you – and Quentin Quisp – on spring cleaning, “There is no need to do any housework at all. After four years the dirt doesn’t get any worse.”

      Another one from him (Naked Civil Servant):
      “Keeping up with the Joneses was a full-time job with my mother and father. It was not until many years later when I lived alone that I realized how much cheaper it was to drag the Joneses down to my level.”
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:53 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I like the quotes. As for “girl singers belting out most of the song” — that wasn’t unheard of (get it? — ha ha) in the ‘old days.’ Remember Ethel Merman, for example? She wasn’t one of my favs, but she was definitely loud (and dressed)! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 4:47 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink

          Good point. I guess I was thinking more of the singers who fronted the Big Bands. I never was sure if Merman was actually “singing” lol – but that voice was perfect for Broadway, and she could certainly sell a number like nobody else. And I do like some of the female performers today – just not as much as I loved the ones from the 30s-40s-50s (even as a teen in the 60s).
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:21 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink

          Merman may have been the loudest, but she wasn’t the earliest girl singer who belted out songs. One of the first (and probably most well known) pre-Merman belters was Sophie Tucker, heard here in in a 1926 recording of her most famous song:

          Like

    • Don Frankel 6:32 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Can I say The Girls From Mars, they send me? But Spring cleaning is in the same league as New Year’s Resolutions as it much talked about but seldom accomplished.

      Richard Rogers what a treasure.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:08 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I thought girls were supposed to be from Venus, men from Mars. But “supposed to be” is no longer in the stars — girls can be from wherever they want to be, and more power to them! And you’re right about Spring cleaning and New Year’s Resolutions.

        Richard Rodgers is indeed a treasure, and Oscar Hammerstein ain’t bad either (though I’m more partial to Rodgers’ original lyricist partner, Lorenz Hart).

        Like

    • Carmen 6:34 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great tunes, Mr. Muse! As soon as I started listening to the second one, I thought, “I’ve heard that guy before!” Sure enough, he does “Bring Him Home” (Les Mis)

      First day of spring here and – what do you know! – school is cancelled. (I think for the 13th day since December) Icy roads, apparently! Means I’m on my 3rd cup of coffee. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the heads up about Isaac Benelli. I couldn’t place him despite the fact he has such a beautiful voice that he must have been on Broadway. I need to start paying more attention to today’s (and not just yesterday’s) Broadway scene!

        Like

    • scifihammy 7:21 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You can’t beat these old well written and well sung songs. 🙂
      Enjoy your Springtime – the cleaning can wait! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:27 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. This must be the start of fall where you are in South Africa, so to return the favor, I’ll say Enjoy your autumn — the leaf raking can wait! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 11:04 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink

          Oh for sure the leaf raking can wait. And if I wait long enough, a good wind will blow it all away! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:22 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Living in the Golden State, as well as during my time in Hawaii, cleaning can be accomplished any time of year. When the filth and dreck of one’s home becomes too much to tolerate even when drunk, it is subject to scouring no matter the season.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carmen 11:33 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Geez, I’d love to see my husband THAT drunk. . . 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:55 pm on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Some might say your attitude lowers the standard in ‘standard of living,’ Ricardo, but as long as you can get to the beer in the fridge without undue difficulty, it seems like a workable concept to me.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:10 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m with you about leaving Spring cleaning in the dust! 🙂 Thanks for the tunes!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:27 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Diana. I like your “cleaning in the dust” pun so much that I can’t wipe the smile off my face! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 5:54 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Something beautiful to brighten my day is always available on your blog 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:15 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Any and all appreciation is always appreciated (and your blog will likewise have a brightening effect on any reader who wishes to check it out). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 9:33 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Spring renewal! Yay!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Little Monster Girl 10:08 pm on March 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi mistermuse! Would you like to answer questions with me on my weekly Friendly Chat on my blog? I’m going to post it in a short while.I get the questions from Cee’s Share Your World and I share my answers every week with another blogger, and I’d like you to do it this week if you like! 😀 Here’s the questions for this week: https://ceenphotography.com/2017/03/20/share-your-world-march-20-2017/

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:28 am on March 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Many thanks for thinking of me, but due to very limited time (not to mention computer skills), I don’t feel I can commit to such an undertaking for the foreseeable future. Please accept my regrets and apologies.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , comedy of manners, , , , loneliness, , , THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, trust, ,   

    THE IMPORTANCE OF QUOTING ERNEST 

    Did you fathom that the title of my last post (THE OLD MAN AND THE SEASON) was a play on Ernest Hemingway’s last completed novel, THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA? Because that post was about aging and autumn, perhaps I was remiss in not including a Hemingway quote (such as the first one below) among those I gathered for the occasion.

    This post will attempt to make up for that shortfall with a selection of Hemingway quotes, starting with this autumn-appropriate eulogy he wrote for a friend:

    Best of all he loved the fall/the leaves yellow on cottonwoods/leaves floating on trout streams/and above the hills/the high blue windless skies./Now he will be part of them forever.

    For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.

    The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.

    There is nothing to writing. All you have to do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed. 

    When you go to war as a boy, you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed, not you… Then, when you are badly wounded, you lose that illusion, and you know it can happen to you.

    In modern war, there is nothing sweet nor fitting in your dying. You will die like a dog for no good reason.

    True nobility is being superior to your former self.

    No weapon has ever settled a moral problem. 

    Writing, at its best, is a lonely life. For he does his work alone and if he is a good enough writer he must face eternity, or the lack of it, each day.

    There is no lonelier man, except the suicide, than that man who has lived with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other, there can be no happy end to it.

    But hold on — happy or not, this isn’t the end. The title of this post is another play on words, this being Oscar Wilde’s peerless comedy of manners titled THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST….a parody of Victorian age social standing previewed in this trailer for the 1952 film (not to be confused with the inferior 2002 remake) of the Wilde play:

    Now (as the movie says when it’s over) this is THE END

     
    • linnetmoss 7:15 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, Michael Redgrave! What a great cast this version has. Thanks for the trailer 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:34 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great cast, great movie. Just seeing the trailer makes me want to watch the whole film again!

      Like

    • arekhill1 9:59 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      While I am not sufficiently versed in Hemingway, not having read any since my extreme youth, the competitors in the Bad Hemingway Contest have always had my respect: http://articles.latimes.com/1987-04-09/news/vw-142_1_bright-boy

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 11:18 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great stuff Muse. And, I got the reference to the the Old Man and The Season. But a slight correction on that. The Old Man and The Sea was the last novel Hemingway wrote while he was alive. He wrote a whole bunch of novels after he was dead. None of them were any good. But let’s cut Papa a little slack as it must be tough writing when you’re dead. I mean it’s hard enough when you’re alive.

      In case people reading this don’t understand, his last wife Mary, kept finding manuscripts in the attic that Papa had never published. Either he didn’t publish them because they weren’t very good or the people who wrote them using his name weren’t very good. Take your pick.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:52 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree that it must be tough writing when you’re dead, Don — for one thing, you get terribly stiff, and it has to be hard to type with stiff fingers. The light can’t be too good six feet under, either. But at least he didn’t need no ghost writer, because he was one himself.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Don Frankel 4:23 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink

          Great one Muse. He was his own Ghost Writer.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:52 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Singielka, thank you for your “Like” — this is just to let you know that I tried to submit a comment on one of your blog posts, but it didn’t go through (something about an insecure connection). Sorry.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:40 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        How lovely of you to attempt to follow up, and to comment that you did so. I get a more than a few folks whose online presence is impossible to access or locate – but I lack the time to leave them each a comment once I’ve tried and failed. I’m impressed.

        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 10:06 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never cared for Ernest Hemingway’s works and it was a suffering to have to put up with them when they were assigned in English classes. Oscar Wilde, on the other hand, is a real favorite of mine. I loved reading The Importance of Being Earnest, and was part of a group that performed the original stage play in college….what great lines! Very interesting, the trailer you show here; I never happened to see “Earnest” as a movie. It seems it is a perennial.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 7:59 am on October 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I also love the Wilde wit (wild wit too, for that matter) — unfortunately, each succeeding younger generation seems less connected to an appreciation of such wordly delights….and “more’s the pity” (to repeat a phrase I used in my last post). BTW, I now find that the 1952 & 2002 films aren’t the only versions of the play; there was a 1986 remake as well. I think all three can be viewed online in their entirety.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sarita 7:56 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 10:09 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not sure what you mean. If you mean why don’t I click Like, I don’t see where I can click Like on your posts. Apparently your internet connection is incompatible with mine. In any case, I do not have sufficient computer expertise to know what to do about it. Sorry.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mél@nie 7:38 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      EXCELLENT post, Monsieur Muse… I always love your puns & intellectual “blendings”… 🙂

      I love Oscar Wilde’s works – he is one of the titans of world’s literature, and you certainly know he passed-away in Paris – his “chosen” city…(I saw his tomb in Père Lachaise cemetery) btw, he’s still present in Paris these days: 🙂
      http://www.rtl.fr/culture/arts-spectacles/oscar-wilde-l-impertinent-absolu-est-a-decouvrir-au-petit-palais-7785456107

      • * *

      speakin’ of “papa Hemingway”, he’s been one of my favourite-US writers since high-school… I visited his villa in Key West a few years ago… you may have read my blog-post:
      https://myvirtualplayground.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/ernesto-mi-amor/

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mél@nie 7:40 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        P.S. désolée, but I forgot WP does NOT accept 2 links in the same comment… 🙂 that’s why, my comment is awaiting moderation… 🙂

        Like

      • mistermuse 11:34 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I knew Wilde died in Paris, but your link filled in details I did not know. Merci!

        P.S. I do recall reading your Key West post & recommend your 2nd link to those who haven’t.

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 6:52 pm on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hemingway has some great quotes. Bleeding on the typewriter is a favorite as well as the one about trust. Oh, and the eulogy is beautiful. And the one about no happy end to love. And….

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:21 am on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree. I would add the one about being superior to your former self. Sorry to interject politics into this, but could there be a clearer example of not being superior to your former self (i.e. not growing as a human being) than the Republican candidate for President of the U.S.?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 5:09 pm on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,

      The typewriter and bleeding–or some version of it–is more likely from Red Smith, the great sports writer. Although many have been credited with some variation. Yeah, I got the first Hemingway word play. He was one of my favorite authors early on and I studied his work endlessly–even into grad school. The comments on being dead and writing–were you aware that there’s a fellow who channels Hemingway and did a book on the conversations? It’s utterly fascinating–if it isn’t Hemingway’s ghost talking, it’s a remarkable imitation! Well, I won’t comment on the Trump allusions, just let the renewed e-mail discoveries and coming Wiki-Leaks dumps lead where they may! LOL

      Good post, muse!

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 5:50 pm on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No, I wasn’t aware of the fellow who channels Hemingway — he must be English (if you think that pun was bad, wait till you see my next post). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:48 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Clever title. Wilde was a childhood favorite, but I never really warmed up to Hemingway. For me, a small book of quotes is about all I can get through where he is concerned – so thanks for yours.

      The comments on this post were fun to read too – and I love your theme (blog look) – which one is it?
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
      – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:36 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks. I try to respond to comments with ‘in kind’ (as opposed to generic) replies, as I feel that anyone who takes the trouble to read what I have to say and to comment specifically (as opposed to generically) deserves a thoughtful reply.

      As for Hemingway, I think he captures the meaning of inspiration perfectly with the quote that ends “Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.”

      Like

  • rielyn 12:56 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Ten Things You Didn’t Know About Mistermuse: A Birthday Tribute 

    On this day, *ahem* years ago, mistermuse (aka my dad) was born. And so to mark this auspicious occasion, I have compiled a list of little known facts about his life. There are many things we already know about mistermuse – he’s a reader, writer, thinker, jazz aficionado and classic movie buff, and today, in honor of his birthday, here are ten things you didn’t know about the man who aMUSEs us all!

    1. His grandfather came from County Clare, Ireland and could “talk the blarney”. Perhaps this is where mistermuse got his way with words.
    2. As a boy he traded his set of original Superman comics for a BB gun. At least he didn’t shoot his eye out!
    3. He worked for the same company his entire career, starting out in the mailroom and working his way up. How many can say that today?
    4. He met my mom through a “computer dating service” – a newfangled thing in the 60’s. His first matches weren’t so hot and he was going to give up the experiment after his sixth and last match. Thank goodness my mom was the sixth and not the seventh!
    5. When I was five years old he brought home a pet for the family in a cardboard box – no, it wasn’t a puppy, it was a duckling! For the next ten years we had a duck waddling around in our suburban backyard.
    6. In his travels, mistermuse has visited eight countries (Canada, Mexico, Ireland, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Germany and Switzerland), all fifty US states, and has taken pictures of covered bridges in every state that had one.
    7. He retired at age 50 with a nice early retirement package and then worked for a couple of years as a building security guard. His favorite part of that job was getting to watch TV while working.
    8. Mistermuse has a sneeze with a decibel level high enough to set off our doorbell sensor. Thankfully, he has not yet blown down the house.
    9. He was always a devoted son and cared for his mother for the last 11 years of her life while she lived with our family.
    10. He is the best dad I could ever ask for. 🙂

    So now you know ten more things about mistermuse than you did before and I hope you all enjoyed reading it too.

    And finally,

    Happy Birthday, Dad!

    As poet I can’t compare – your wit’s sharpened on a strop,
    but if Daddy I’m the bottom, you’re the top!

     
    • scifihammy 1:25 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Birthday Mistermuse! What a lovely tribute 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Bun Karyudo 2:05 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      This was a good post for me to read. This was my first visit to the Mistermuse site, so this post gave me a lot of factual data to be going on with. Incidentally, as a very young person, I do have a question about point number three: What’s mail? 😀

      Liked by 3 people

    • linnetmoss 6:09 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Charming! I knew there was an Irish connection in there somewhere 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 6:18 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, well! About the Irish descendants – I figured as much! 🙂 I am wondering if he’s got a picture of the famous covered bridge in Hartland, New Brunswick (Canada). It’s supposed to be the longest in the world.

      What a track record! Since he’s always telling us things about everyone else, it was time we learned some things about him – thanks for that, eh? 😉

      Found this Irish blessing-
      “May the winds of fortune sail you
      May you sail a gentle sea.
      May it always be the other guy
      who says, “This drink’s on me!”

      HAPPY BIRTHDAY Mister (A)muse!!!

      xx

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:01 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, well, I was simply overWELLmed to find this post on my blog when I turned on my computer this morning. Need I add that this was a complete surprise, and appreciated more than I can say. And now Ill tell you a thing or two you don’t know about daughter ‘rielyn’: she and her big sister are the best daughters a dad could wish for, and her ‘real’ name is LITTLE ONE (and oddly enough, we call her older sister ‘Big One’). Love you, Little One!

        Also thanks to scifihammy, Bun Karyudo, linnetmoss, and Carmen for their comments (and yes, Carmen, I have photographed the Hartland Covered Bridge from both sides of the river, although it took me two days to cross over the bridge from one end to the other). 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        • rielyn 5:39 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink

          You’re very welcome, Dad! I’m glad your readers like it too. 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

    • Carmen 7:15 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The birthday boy makes an appearance, as cheeky as can be,
      Another year older and better at hyperbole. . . 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • GP Cox 7:47 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      What an outstanding tribute. Funny, one thing that caught my eye was the covered bridges. My own father was drawn to them as well, maybe that’s why I like them so much? My present one year at Easter was 2 duck chicks and yes, he loved his mother dearly.
      (Hey – are we related? haha)

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:41 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks (on behalf of my daughter), GP. Yes, I believe we are related, in the best possible way — our common humanity. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

    • arekhill1 9:16 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy, Happy, Sr. Muse. And I trust your birthdays will continue to be happy, as long as you stay away from those Dayton girls.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:57 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, I anticipated your advice by deleting the “Dayton girls” reference before I saw your comment, Ricardo, because I’d already forgotten all about them (besides, who outside of Ohio ever heard of Dayton?). “Let sleeping dogs lie” is my motto.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 6:34 pm on November 23, 2016 Permalink

          Come ON, MM! Everybody in the Air Force knows Dayton – the “big city” close to Wright Patterson AFB in Fairborn, of course.

          I don’t know if my Mom was one of those Dayton girls of whom you speak, but – from a story related to me when I was about five years old – she did attend Bath HS (where the football team chant was — “Saturday nite is Bath nite”).

          xx,
          mgh
          (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
          – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
          “It takes a village to educate a world!”

          Like

        • mistermuse 9:55 pm on November 23, 2016 Permalink

          Well, I don’t know if I have any readers in the Air Force, but if so, I humbly apologize (which is more than I would probably do if those “Dayton girls” had been from Dayton, Tennessee (of Scopes Monkey Trial fame)!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 10:52 pm on November 23, 2016 Permalink

          lol – I doubt they would expect ap0logies – they’d most likely chuckle.

          I’m with you on Dayton, Tn. btw- apologies would, no doubt, be lost on them. Most folks with any sense are long-since gone, I imagine, and the rest – well, genetics will out?

          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 9:26 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “stay away from those Dayton girls.” says the ‘sex magnet’. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:04 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I see that I didn’t delete the “Dayton girls” reference quick enough, Carmen. I hope this doesn’t change things between us. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 3:21 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink

          Ha, ha. No chance, Mister!

          It might change things between myself and everyone else, though, because they might not have seen what I saw – arkehill’s hovercard. . . 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

    • Cynthia Jobin 11:30 am on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Two literary giants in one family….who knew? Happy Birthday to you!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 2:46 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        One of those “literary giants” is a Little One, and the other is shrinking from old age — none the ‘less,’ all accolades are gratefully accepted. 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

    • BroadBlogs 8:20 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy birthday to your dad!

      I had no idea that there was computer dating in the 60s. Your parents were ahead of their time.

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:17 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      And now we old-geezer parents are behind the times….and I have an idea the computer is behind that too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cynthia Jobin 9:44 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I was in college in 1965 and I remember Operation Match. This sent me to Google which tells me:

        Operation Match was the first computer dating service in the United States, begun in 1965. Users filled out a paper questionnaire which they mailed in with a $3 fee. The questionnaire was geared to young college students seeking a date, not a marriage partner. Questions included “Do you believe in a God who answers prayer?” and “Is extensive sexual activity in preparation for marriage part of ‘growing up?’”[1] The questionnaires were transferred to punched cards[2] and processed on an IBM 7090 computer at the Avco service bureau in Wilmington, Massachusetts.[3] A week or two later, the user received an IBM 1401 print out in the mail listing the names and telephone numbers of their matches.[4]

        Operation Match was started by Harvard University undergraduate students Jeffrey C. Tarr, David L. Crump and Vaughan Morrill, with help from Douglas H. Ginsburg, then a student at Cornell[3] who later became Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. [5] Tarr, Crump and Ginsburg formed a company called Compatibility Research, Inc. and rolled out the service in several cities.

        Liked by 3 people

        • mistermuse 12:16 am on October 19, 2016 Permalink

          I appreciate your taking the time to find and pass along that very interesting info, Cynthia. I don’t remember the name of the computer dating service which brought my wife and I together, nor do I remember the specific questions….which I suppose is typical of a man, but I make up for it by being the sexiest husband my wife ever had (not to mention the only one she ever had, but who’s counting?).

          Liked by 2 people

    • Michaelinw Montezinos 11:33 pm on October 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy birthday to a wonderful gentleman. Rielyn wrote a greeting that lets us know more about mistermuse. I hope you keep on writing and may the good luck of Ireland be with you always.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Enigma 8:12 am on October 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Like

    • Don Frankel 10:02 am on October 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      And now we know the rest of the story. Well done Rielyn and you picked the perfect song.

      HAPPY BIRTHDAY MISTERMUSE!

      Liked by 2 people

    • eths 7:52 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      What a lovely tribute!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:04 am on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: black and white, , , , , , ,   

    TITLES FOR BARE NAKED POEMS 

    Words should be only the clothes, carefully custom-made to fit the thought. –Jules Renard

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    With the above in mind, I have tailored the following titles to fit a dozen poems fashioned to stir your imagination. WARNING: These poems may drive you stir crazy; do not take too literally.

    WHITE OUT

    I THOUGHT ABOUT EWE*

    SILENCE OF THE LAMBS

    EASY WRITER

    THIS IS A PIECE OF CAKE

    THE ICING ON THE CAKE

    POETIC SUBSTANCE ABUSE

    BLACK AND….

    SNOW JOB IN SIBERIA

    DRAWING A BLANK

    SHAKESPEARE’S WORK BY BACON

    LOVE’S LABOR#

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    #The way to love anything is to realize that it might be lost.
    –G. K. Chesterton

    *In coming up with this title, I thought about this Johnny Mercer song:

     

     

     
    • Superduque777 3:37 am on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe you´d like our blog
      Even you could vote us
      https://superduque777.wordpress.com/
      Posiblemente le guste ntro blog..

      Liked by 1 person

    • José Luis Bárcenas 5:51 am on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 6:16 am on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry, but I still don’t see LIKES. Unfortunately, between the language barrier and my lack of computer skills, I can’t devote further time to pursuing this.

        Like

    • arekhill1 12:35 pm on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you keep your poetic license on you at all times, Sr. Muse. The Pun Patrol is out there gunning for you. They know you’re a repeat offender.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:23 pm on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        If I’m caught, I’ll simply welcome the gendarmes while throwing myself at their merci. Vive la France! 😦

        Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 1:12 pm on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I disagree with Renard. Words are not just the clothes of thought; if they were, you could take the clothes off and the thought would still be there. Anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed taking in the golden syrup of Ella’s audio. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:10 pm on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        You can never go wrong with Ella, which is one reason I included it in this post, which I don’t include among my better ones.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Michaeline Montezinos 2:50 pm on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      clever and witty poem, mistermuse

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:07 pm on October 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, M. This post was more hastily put together than my norm, so if it came out half-way ‘decent,’ I can’t complain.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 2:41 pm on October 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Titles, titles everywhere, but where are the poems? (Well, the titles do make a poem! Yeah!) LOL

      Finally, here’s what I posted on The Grant Journal in reply to your comment. Hope it helps clarify????

      Hi mistermuse,

      Woops! Now hold on, partner. I deeply appreciate any and all comments and, indeed, I do reciprocate, both answering comments and also commenting myself on fellow bloggers’ posts. But, muse, you ain’t posted nuthin’ here in a long time. Come on, man. I had no idea you were still posting anywhere, or where to find you. I asked Richard Cahill here awhile back and he said you weren’t posting here anymore. So I let it go. Now, experimenting around today I did discover a link to what I believe is your own blog site? I’ll check it out and see what’s what there. But, I’d strongly urge you, if posting somewhere else, paste in your stuff here also and I assure you I’ll comment freely! Ha. Yeah, I’m busy, but that’s not it–it’s just a case of not knowing.

      Okay, let’s see if I can find you. 🙂

      Have a good one,

      Mark
      *****

      As you see, I found you, but had to do a lot of surfing around, signing in, etc. Now post some of this back on Grant’s Journal–really, you’re needed there. And I’ll follow you like a faithful doggie! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:53 pm on October 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the clarification, Mark.

      Having already posted my answer to the above on your blog, I will only add that I have all I can do to stay on schedule (every 5 days) with my own blog, much less worrying about posting on Grant’s Journal.

      Take care.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 4:46 pm on October 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The Muse finger writes and then muses on. Just a thought for a poem in the future.

      I’ve been working on something for the last few days and I just realized I haven’t been here or the other place.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:00 pm on October 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’ve been very busy myself lately, Don — so much so that I haven’t been able to devote as much time as I’d like to my writing and commenting. But I guess it’s better to wear out than to rust out, as the old saying (I think) goes.

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 8:17 pm on October 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Clever with words! You should write a book.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:49 pm on October 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Actually, I did, years ago — it’s titled SEX SCELLS. If interested, let me know and I’ll send you a free copy (paperback). If you like it, you can reimburse my postage (let’s say $1) if you choose, but in any case, it’s yours to keep (or dispose of).

      Like

    • inesephoto 9:37 am on October 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Very, very inspiring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • eths 1:02 am on October 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      G. K. Chasterton quote – How true!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:24 am on October 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I agree. Here’s another quote you might like: “We are only as good as the way we treat each other.” Who am I quoting? Myself! 🙂

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Edgar Guest, , , , ONE TOUCH OF VENUS, , , ,   

    BE MY GUEST 

    I’d rather be a great bad poet than a bad good poet. –Ogden Nash

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Today is the birthday, not of Ogden Nash, but of Edgar Guest (Aug. 20, 1881). And who, you might ask, was Mr. Guest, and why is he my special Guest for this post? (Sorry about that, but to paraphrase Will Rogers, I never met a pun I didn’t like.) Though he is all but forgotten today, in his day Guest was a poet so popular that he was known as the People’s Poet. Unfortunately for him, this lofty regard was not shared by more discriminating appraisers such as Dorothy Parker, who is reported to have declared:

    I’d rather flunk my Wassermann test*
    than read a poem by Edgar Guest.”

    *a test for syphilis

    Were his poems really that bad? Here are a few examples; you be the judge:

    Home ain’t a place that gold can buy or get up in a minute;
    Afore it’s home there’s got t’ be a heap o’ living in it.
    –from his most famous poem, titled “Home”

    When you’re up against a trouble,
    Meet it squarely, face to face,
    Lift your chin, and set your shoulders,
    Plant your feet and take a brace.
    –from “See It Through”

    Now, I’m not saying I’d rather flunk a syphilis test than read a poem by Edgar Guest, but August 18 was/is BAD POETRY DAY, and one wonders why that date was chosen rather than August 20, which would have coincided perfectly with the birth date of the critics’ poetaster child for BAD POETRY DAY. Of course, it’s possible there are worse poets than Guest, so perhaps neglected candidates for the honor would have raised a stink (as opposed to raising a stinker, like the parents of a certain GOP candidate for President).

    But I digress (the devil made me do it). Back on message, your humble host is more than capable of vying for the honor; as proof, he submits the following for your disapproval:

    RAINED ALL NIGHT THE DAY I LEFT

    It was a dark and stormy night
    On the day I left to stay.
    The sun was shining brightly
    On yon shadows afar away.

    I be starting on a journey
    Just as soon as I know where.
    I’ve packed a lot of nothing
    To unpack when I get there.

    They say the spirit’s willing,
    But the flesh is weak as sin;
    The former is my future —
    The latter is where I’ve been.

    So come, sweet spirit, raise me
    From the heap o’ living dead.
    I surrender — set me free from
    My behind to look ahead.

    And should I meet up with trouble,
    I’ll meet it squarely and not duck;
    I’ll shoulder my chin, a face lift face,
    And just show all-around pluck.

    And if that doesn’t take me
    Beyond that unbending bend,
    I’ll just declare this is where
    Both journey and poem end.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Back to Mr. Nash. I opened this opus with his “great bad poet/bad good poet” quote. There was a method to my badness: he was America’s preeminent writer of humorous light verse from 1931 until his death in 1971, a favorite of mine, and, apropos to this post’s focus on an August 18-20 time frame, he was born Aug. 19 (1902). So Happy Birthday, Ogden Nash — a wit as a light versifier and, I might add, no twit as a lyricist; witness his words to this tune composed by Kurt Weill, as sung by Eileen Wilson (lip synced by Ava Gardner) and Dick Haymes in the 1948 Hollywooden film version of the play ONE TOUCH OF VENUS:

     

     

     
    • renxkyoko 12:11 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like it.

      I like poems that are direct and to the point, thus , easy to understand and appreciate.

      Liked by 1 person

    • painkills2 12:20 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Poetry is in the eye of the beholder. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Michaeline Montezinos 12:31 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I also like your poem. It reminds me of the one I wrote as Artemus Bumpkin on SWI.

      Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 2:41 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think people can be snobs about poetry like they can about art. If you like something, does it matter if the critics think it is good or not?
      I like your poem, and you’re amusing as always. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:07 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks (to all four of you) for your comments. My take on the excellent points about the kinds of poetry you (or anyone, for that matter) like and poetry being “in the eye of the beholder,” is that this is TRUE OF MANY THINGS, but is internalized by too few people. Being unable to accept and appreciate that we all see things from our own vantage point (based on our upbringing, culture, religion, maturity, etc.) is, in my opinion, the primary reason why this is such a violent, “my way or the highway” world. Antagonism is no substitute for empathy and gets us nowhere but where we are. We need to get to a better place.

        Liked by 2 people

    • linnetmoss 7:45 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “Set me free from my behind”? I am going to be laughing all day over this one. I also like “Hollywooden.” But Dick Haymes actually had a good voice.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:21 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It may be hard to believe now, but in the 1940s, Dick Haymes was Frank Sinatra’s biggest rival as the bobbysoxers’ favorite crooner. In my opinion, Haymes had a better voice than Sinatra at that time, although of course Frank went on to reach the heights, while Haymes slid into near-oblivion. His story is a sad one in many ways, and makes for interesting reading for anyone interested.

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 9:12 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sounds like that particular dark and stormy night—of all dark and stormy nights—was a most auspicious one, and whether you have a bandage or a banjo on your knee in future, things are looking good for your liberation from your behind. And since your poem is a delight, neitherr I nor Susannah will cry for you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:54 am on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always liked Stephen Foster’s songs such as OH! SUSANNA (from which I borrowed the title of my poem), CAMPTOWN RACES, BEAUTIFUL DREAMER and JEANIE WITH THE LIGHT BROWN HAIR. For those who aren’t familiar with OH! SUSANNA, it goes like this:

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 12:05 pm on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think your poem is too clever to qualify as bad. 🙂 Loved it!

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 12:13 pm on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you (I only hope Stephen Foster isn’t turning over in his grave)!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 6:43 pm on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like the way Guest sets his chin up. It would make it real easy to land a left hook or a right cross or both. He may not be the worst poet but he’s got to be pretty close.

      Is Dick Haymes trying to sound like Sinatra or is that his natural voice? I know from comments Sinatra made that he couldn’t stand the guy.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:00 pm on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, that Haymes’ natural voice, but I think he shows it to better effect in the DON’T THROW COLD WATER ON THE FLAME OF LOVE clip in my previous post (SAY WHAT AGAIN?).
      Also, both his voice and his acting ability are better displayed in the 1945 version of the film STATE FAIR, with great Rodgers and Hammerstein songs like IT MIGHT AS WELL BE SPRING and IT’S A GRAND NIGHT FOR SINGING.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 9:15 pm on August 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy birthday to Ogden Nash! I say great bad poets have a lot of soul.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:47 pm on August 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      His body of work isn’t bad either! 🙂

      Like

    • arekhill1 12:26 am on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Both my parents would quote Guest when Mom made one of her cherry pies. “As I wend my way to Heaven, I’ll be full of cherry pie,” they would laugh between forkfuls. Didn’t make me like them any better, but I didn’t let it destroy my taste for cherry pie.

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:34 am on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Neither of my parents had any interest in poetry, so I wasn’t subjected to similar experiences at an early age. If there’s a creative writing gene in my family background, it must come from my mother’s Irish ancestors.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , James Jones, John Steinbeck, , , , , , , Willa Cather, ,   

    TELLTALE TITLES 

    How much time and thought do you devote to coming up with just-the-right title for your story, poem or article? If you take writing seriously, the answer is probably: as long as it takes to nail it — which could be almost no time at all, if it comes to you in a flash — or, more time than a less intense writer is willing to allot.

    Ernest Hemingway, for one, evidently wasn’t the latter type. Case in point: in writing his definitive Spanish Civil War novel, he didn’t settle for less than a killer title that would encapsulate ‘the moral of the story,’ eventually finding it in this passage from a 1624 work by the poet John Donne: “Any man’s death diminishes me because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

    As a writer of (mostly) humorous poems and posts, I’m inclined to go for witty and/or wordplay titles. Many times, the title to a particular piece all but suggests itself, but more often, no such luck, and I’m stuck — until eventually (as with the title of this post) a eureka moment rewards my resolve….or a poem resists my labeling efforts, and I just settle for:

    UNTITLED

    This poem’s title is Untitled —
    Not because it is untitled,
    But because I am entitled
    To entitle it Untitled.

    If I’d not titled it Untitled,
    It would truly be untitled….
    Which would make it unentitled
    To the title of Untitled.

    So it is vital, if untitled,
    Not to title it Untitled,
    And to leave that title idled,
    As a title is entitled.

    Moving on, suppose we try a title quiz based on the Papa Hemingway model (sorry, those of you who’d prefer the mistermuse model). Here are five passages from classic original works from which later authors lifted titles for their novels. Can you name the five later works and pin each tale on its author (ten answers total)? If you name all ten correctly, you win the title (with apologies to Cervantes) of Donkeyote Of All You Survey.

    PASSAGES FROM ORIGINAL WORKS:

    Gentlemen-rankers out on the spree/Damned from here to Eternity/God ha’ mercy on such as we/Ba! Yah! Bah! –Rudyard Kipling

    The best laid schemes o’ mice an’ men/Gang aft a-gley/An’ lea’e us naught but grief an’ pain/For promised joy! –Robert Burns

    By the pricking of my thumbs,/Something wicked this way comes. –Wm. Shakespeare

    Come my tan-faced children/Follow well in order, get your weapons ready/Have you your pistols? Have you your sharp-edged axes?/Pioneers! O pioneers! –Walt Whitman

    No Place so Sacred from such Fops is barr’d,/Nor is Paul’s Church more safe than Paul’s Churchyard./Nay, fly to altars; there they’ll talk you dead/For Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread. –Alexander Pope

    TITLES (WITH AUTHORS) FROM  ABOVE PREVIOUS WORKS:

    FROM HERE TO ETERNITY –James Jones
    OF MICE AND MEN –John Steinbeck
    SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES –Ray Bradbury
    O PIONEERS! –Willa Cather
    WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD –E.M. Forster

    How many of the ten titles/authors did you get? That last title, parenthetically, became part of Johnny Mercer’s lyrics to this 1940 hit song composed by Rube Bloom:

    And now I fear I must tread on out….before something wicked this way comes.

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 10:29 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If there were an award entitled “The Best Poem about Title-ing An Untitled Poem” you certainly would be entitled to it. I recall a creative writing teacher who was a stickler about titles; she said leaving a poem untitled was lazy and a refusal to finish your poem properly. In the history of Literature it seems even the use of Numbers—Sonnet 24—has been acceptable, and often the first line or phrase of a poem is used as its title—-“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night….”.

      I liked the quiz. Pour moi it was a piece of cake. Just this past month I used a line from a Shakespeare sonnet for one of my titles: “Love’s Not Time’s Fool.” Thanks for an enjoyable post!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:21 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cynthia. I believe the exception to the ‘poems must be titled rule’ is the limerick, which should never be titled (if one were to follow the rules, which apparently exist to curtail my fun, so I have occasionally titled a few of mine).

        Congrats on getting 100% on the quiz. I hereby award you the title (in deference to your gender) of DONNA-KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:14 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got all the titles but sad to say did not know the last three authors off the top of my head. I guess I get a 70. But of course I knew the song.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:05 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, you know how much I dig great old songs, so I’m giving you 30 bonus points for knowing FOOLS RUSH IN (WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD). That brings your score up to 100, which wins you the DON(FRANKEL)KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY AWARD….and well deserved, I might add!

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:32 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      AUTO REPLY: I’m on vacation. Any quizzes will be taken when I get back to my office.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:07 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I auto wish you a great vacation, but no doubt you’re having one anyway. Safe trip home.

      Like

    • inesephoto 5:55 pm on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Love your poem 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:20 pm on June 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got the titles but didn’t know all the authors. This was really interesting. Your poem made me laugh. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Academy of American Poets, , , , , , , , , ,   

    A TOWERING FIGURE IN POETRY 

    April is NATIONAL POETRY MONTH (as decreed by the Academy of American Poets in 1996). Can there be any doubt that a poet of my stature* would be expected to contribute a poem to the celebration?

    *about 5′ 7″

    As it happens, I had a poem in my April 20 post, but that doesn’t count….unless I say it does, which I don’t, because I’ve composed a new poem for the occasion (or any occasion, for that matter). The point is that this occasion happens to be at hand and is sufficiently worthy of a work of such distingué distinktion:

    ONCE A POET

    Once I wrote poems;
    Writing poems was fun.
    Once I wrote poems;
    Now I write none.

    Once I wrote poems;
    Poems were my life.
    Once I wrote poems;
    Then I met my wife.

    I’m just joking, of course;
    I still write, as you see —
    For my wife loves my poems,
    And I still loves she*.

    *That end word was going to be me, but that might be the end of me, so I reconsidered.

    Thank you very much, ladies and sentimentalmen. I’m glad you appreciate the heartfelt passion and savoir fairy that went into said poem. Your defecating applause on this historic day warms my cockles to the core. This calls for a curtain call. But I don’t have another new poem handy, so how about two oldies that survived previous publication:

    RHYME GONE TO HELL

    I don’t comprehend
    why poems that rhyme
    must, most of the time,
    just rhyme at line’s end.
    Who so decreed it to, as though it needed
    to? And would it spell

    nonsense if most rhymes
    commence where lines start?
    Dare we call it art?
    Where I’m at, at times,
    is: does it matter where rhyme is, if indeed
    it’s where mine is? Hell!!!

    TRYING TIMES

    Forgive me, please, my verse you’ve read —
    Much better works are in my head….
    –  But they’ll remain there
    –  Until the brain there
    Learns how to extract gold from lead.

    But enough about me. Let us close on a serious quote from ex-Chancellor of the aforementioned Academy of American Poets, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet/novelist, Robert Penn Warren, who was fittingly born (April, 1905) in what would become National Poetry Month:
    Historical sense and poetic sense should not, in the end, be contradictory, for if poetry is the little myth we make, history is the big myth we live, and in our living, constantly remake.

     

     

     
    • scifihammy 1:48 am on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Love your poems! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 2:25 am on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Me too! And I also admire my humility! 🙂

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 8:07 am on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I had not thought of begin-rhyme as an alternative to end-rhyme…an ingenious idea! And I see your poetry as taking a place in the great canon of verse somewhere beside/between Edward Lear and Ogden Nash…but I could be mythtaken…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:13 pm on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Cynthia, if Robert Penn Warren was right, we’re both mythtaken (a designation I’m honored to have in common with you). I would suggest reflecting our status by changing our names to myth-termuse and Mythnia Jobin, but our readers might think we both lisp.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 9:23 am on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I wish you would remind me earlier of these national month celebrations, Sr. Muse. It’s the 25th and I haven’t rhymed a damn thing.

      Like

      • mistermuse 3:35 pm on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        As Yogi Berra once said,
        It ain’t over till it’s….dead.
        Others say, not until the fat lady doth sing —
        So you still have 5 days to rhyme a damn thing.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 9:49 am on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think you’ve got the gold from lead down pat Muse.

      I also think rhyme comes from the need to memorize. It’s a memory trick. Don’t forget people were writing poetry long before anyone figured out how to write it all down.

      Like

    • mistermuse 3:39 pm on April 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Good point, Don. At my age, I need all the memory tricks I can get.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 3:48 pm on April 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Fun poems!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:50 pm on April 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’m just a fungi — I mean, fun guy! In any case, I’m glad you enjoyed the poems.

      Like

    • RMW 10:47 am on April 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Did not realize this was National Poetry Month… So when is National Prose Month?

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:24 pm on April 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for that thorny question.
      There doesn’t seem to be a National Prose Month, but there is a National Rose Month (June). Those who prefer prose to rose could “p” on a rose and make it prose, and perhaps it will catch on and become National Prose Month. After all, a rose by any other name would….whatever.

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 9:11 pm on April 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you can hear the “deafening” applause from over here! Loved them. LOL

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:02 pm on May 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks. Sorry for the late response to your comment, but your applause was so deafening, I didn’t hear it until now. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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