Tagged: Oscar Wilde Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Machiavelli, Oscar Wilde, , , , , ,   

    PHILOSPHER STONED 

    If there’s one thing I think we can all agree on about Donald Trump, it’s that he isn’t a philosopher. If, however, he can be said to have one guiding precept remotely resembling a philosophy, it has to be IT’S ALL ABOUT ME….or, secondarily, DON’T BLAME ME (which happens to be the title of a song I was going to link here until — faster than you can say Niccollo Machiavelli — Google removed share, embed & copy from their music clips, leaving technologically-challenged mistermuse at a loss as to how to post them).

    Be that as it may, I got to thinking that if THE DONALD were a lit-wit (rather than a nitwit) who wished to appear philosophical, there must be any number of wise philosophical quotes he might plagiarize to his greater glory (or, if he were stoned, learn from). Here are some I drug up which could fill the (Duck’s) bill:

    There is nothing so absurd that it cannot be believed if repeated often enough. — William James, American philosopher

    Philosophy teaches us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of others. –Oscar Wilde, Irish wit, poet and playwright

    Any man can be a philosopher if he only thinks enough about his own foolishness. –Edgar Watson Howe, American novelist and editor

    Philosophers have only interpreted the world. The point, however, is to change it. –Karl Marx, German philosopher, political theorist and socialist revolutionary

    If I killed everyone who was stupid, I wouldn’t have time to sleep. –Tamora Pierce, American fantasy fiction writer

    Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something. –Plato, Greek philosopher

    Always recognize that human individuals are ends, and do not use them as means to your end. — Immanuel Kant, German philosopher

    Philosophers before Kant had a tremendous advantage over philosophers after Kant, in that they didn’t have to spend years studying Kant.  –Bertrand Russell, British philosopher, writer and social critic

    Only one philosopher in history had a perfect alibi for doing nothing, and his name was I. Kant. –Evan Esar, American humorist

     
  • mistermuse 9:40 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Hickory dickory dock, , , Oscar Wilde, , ,   

    THE ART OF BAD POETRY 

    Oscar Wilde quote: “All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling.” Maybe so, but you can’t blame a guy for trying.

    A few days ago, in pondering the possibility of posting a post of putrid poetry for BAD POETRY DAY (August 18th), I took the precaution of reviewing a decade (my blog began in 2009) of August posts to make sure I hadn’t previously perpetrated poetic perfidy on unsuspecting readers on this day. Unluckily for you , I found that I’ve never posted a post on Aug. 18, so we’re good to go….make that, I’m good to go. Or bad to go. You have to stay, because if you don’t, you’ll break my poor art — and that wouldn’t be polite.

    Perhaps you think that my calling bad poetry an art
    doesn’t pass the smell test, like calling passing gas a fart.

    Not to put you on the spot, but was that a bad-ass poem, or what?
    Granted, it has a perfect rhyme, but is that such a crime?
    As bad poetry, I still say it’s sublime….speaking of which, I’ll have you know there are actually high-class contests to determine how low a bad poem can get, such as:

    With that behind us, it’s time we get back to sum-more of my cool august poetry:

    CLOCKING OUT

    Hickory, dickory, dock,
    The doc ran up the rock.
    The rock was more slippery
    Than doc’s hickory dickory,
    So down he fell, which cleaned his clock.

    HAIR APPARENT

    A Whig party wig
    Is my saving grace —
    It diverts your gaze
    Away from my face.

    I WILL ONLY STOOP SO LOW

    I don’t do windows,
    I don’t do lawns —
    But when I doo-doo,
    I do do johns.

    And with that, I bid you a fond adieu-doo.

     

     
    • Carmen 10:20 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      • she chuckles *

      Of course you know I’ll have to offer my favourite poem (by Sheree Fitch, of Nova Scotia)

      TOES IN MY NOSE

      I stuck my toes in my nose and couldn’t get them out
      It looked a little strange and people began to shout
      “Why would you ever?”
      “My goodness I never!”
      They got in a terrible snit.

      “It’s simple” I said, as they put me to bed –
      “I just wanted to see if they FIT!”

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 10:45 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for that beautiful bad poem, Carmen. It calls to mind this golden oldie:

        You’re a poet
        though you don’t know it
        but your feet show it —
        they’re Longfellows.

        HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

        Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 11:29 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Your last poem is so bad it’s actually good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:46 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      To quote the late author and critic D.B. Wyndham Lewis, “There is bad Bad Verse and good Bad Verse.” Hopefully he would have agreed with you that my last poem fits the latter category.

      Like

    • Rivergirl 1:22 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      When it comes to bad… you’re very good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:48 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Chelsea Owens here on WP runs a weekly terrible poetry contest that is a total hoot. Much in line with the rhymes you posted. Lol. If you ever need a laugh in these dark days of Trump, there are plenty of bad poets willing to share their terribleness. 😀 Thanks for the clip about intolerable moo too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:20 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Only you could pull off bad poetry with such aplomb!

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 7:21 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Always a pleasure to read bad poetry- or so my proof reader tells me. Seriously, it is a pleasure to read. No doubt you’re aware of William McGonagle, the high/low mark of all bad poets He tried so hard to write well, in his so earnest po-faced way. That makes it all the more hilarious.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:12 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. McGonagall had this in common with all bad poets: he was clueless that his poetry was bad. Still, I don’t mean that uncharitably — bad poets ‘gotta live too,’ and for all I know, maybe it keeps many of them out of trouble (although we all know a certain very bad tweeter who makes a lot of trouble for others).

        Like

    • America On Coffee 2:36 am on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I kind of like bad poetry. Composition charisma is what it has. 💕

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 12:04 pm on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hooray for bad poetry! Groaning 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 4:17 am on August 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      oy!
      oh boy!
      hoy hoy floy floy
      i may just be the hoi polloi
      but i really truly did enjoy.

      continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Give Me That Old Time Religion, , , , It Ain't Necessarily So, longevity, , , oldest living man, Oscar Wilde, , , ,   

    SENIOR MUSE SOUNDS OFF FOR OLD TIMERS SAKE 

    In 1984, members of the Oxford Library Club for Retired Professional People were especially looking forward to hearing a guest speaker on “Old Age, Absent-Mindedness, and Keeping Fit.” Unfortunately, the speaker forgot to show up. –excerpted from the book 1,000 UNFORGETTABLE SENIOR MOMENTS

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    MAY being OLDER AMERICANS MONTH, and ME being an older American, I’ve decided to post a post predicated on passing on — make that on passing along — hoary words of wisdom concerning a subject I’m surpassingly qualified to write about, namely …. ….hmmm….uh….ah…. longevity (ha ha — you thought I forgot what I was going to write about, didn’t you?).

    Actually, I must admit to being a bit of a senior citizen-slouch when it comes to longevity — at least, compared to this guy:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/worlds-oldest-man-146-birthday-long-life-location-country-name-celebrates-old-age-a7505401.html

    And of course, that there this guy is himself a slouch compared to this here this guy:

    Methuselah, as all my bible-believing brethr’n and sistern know, was said to have lived 969 years (Genesis 5:27), so you might think this song is my inspiration to keep marching on:

    But (and I quote) “Who calls that livin’ when no gal’s gonna give in to no man what’s 900 years?”

    So there you have it from Bobby Darin singing the lyrics of Ira Gershwin. Or you can take it from Senior Muse quoting the words of Oscar Wilde: “The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is not young.”

     

     

     

     
    • mlrover 8:03 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It Ain’t Necessarily So is one of my favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 9:18 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      love it .. our resident ‘expert’ on longevity ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 2:08 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You must have read my mind. I think that at least a dozen times a day (or is I think it for the first time, a dozen times a day?)

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Well, there’s being “only as old as you feel” — and then there’s this:

        Like

    • Eliza 4:15 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Imagine being young for eternity??

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Being old, I find it hard to imagine. But innocence is for the young, and who am I to throw a sour note into their song?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:29 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d like to live to 969 years old… if only to piss off the Social Security office.
      😈

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:34 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If the extreme right wing ever gains control of all branches of government, it may not matter how long you live — there probably won’t be a Social Security office (but not to worry; charity will take care of you).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 12:22 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always thought the world’s oldest man (or woman) to be the ultimate temp job, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:00 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I have laughed about a song that promises “I will love you until you’re 70.” Then what? Thanks for the opening laugh.

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:19 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Incredible!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:20 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video not available.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:55 pm on May 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know which video you mean. The first is METHUSELAH, the second is GIVE ME THAT OLD TIME RELIGION, and the third is IT AIN’T NECESSARILY SO. If you can’t get the latter two, there are many other versions. If you can’t get METHUSELAH, the name is really all you need to know, so it ain’t necessarily worth the trouble of trying to find a substitute.

        Like

        • America On Coffee 1:38 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink

          Bobby Darin and Methuselah. I found Methuselah and its a great video as well as the old time religion which the world and I really need. Thank you mistermuse for all of your inspirings. Have a great week!

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:58 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The OLD TIME RELIGION clip is a scene from the 1960 movie INHERIT THE WIND based on the notorious 1925 “Scopes Monkey Trial” of a Tennessee schoolteacher for teaching evolution. It’s a great film (starring Spencer Tracy) and I highly recommend it.

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 4:49 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      146 years! Good grief!

      Also, I love a post that includes “Inherit the Wind” and Bobby Darin. Nicely done.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:53 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        INHERIT THE WIND was on TCM again last night. Since I hadn’t seen it in several years, I watched it again and enjoyed it as much as ever (though I think Gene Kelly is a bit miscast as the reporter).

        Like

        • Silver Screenings 1:00 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Agreed. I want to like Gene Kelly in that role, but I never quite buy it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:24 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Fortunately, Spencer Tracy, Fredric March and the rest of the cast are so spot-on that Kelly’s off-key performance can be given a pass (though not by much).

          Like

      • mistermuse 3:33 pm on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Bobby Darin is all but forgotten today but was one of the great singers of his tragically short time in the spotlight.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:36 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Getting old ain’t for wimps, but a sense of humor goes a long way.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:32 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, Diana. If I didn’t have a sense of humor, I probably wouldn’t have any sense at all!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 1:32 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Growing old is better than the alternative – not growing old any longer.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:05 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I said that to an old relative in a nursing home years ago, and she said “How do you know — we don’t know what the alternative is.” Now that I’m old myself, I must admit there’s a sense in which she was right. Nonetheless, I plan on living to reach 100 if it kills me.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:05 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , misfortune, , Oscar Wilde, , ,   

    WHEEL OF MISFORTUNE 

    When misfortune comes, take it like a man–blame it on your wife. –Evan Esar

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Many of us suffer an unanticipated misfortune at some point in our lives. It could be the missed fortune of being left out of the will of a rich cousin you loved like a brother (until the ungrateful s.o.b. left every cent he had to his actual brother)….or it could be distress under duress, like your mistress taking egress, leaving you in a mess, no less, with your wife. Or, if you are a wife, perhaps you got wind of, not only the mistress on the side, but the ‘steady at the ready’ and the ‘wench on the bench’ (otherwise known as having too many loins in the fire). Yes, friends, misfortune is an ill wind which blows no good…

    Now, far be it from mistermuse to blame his misfortunes on his wife. As a matter of tact, if it weren’t for my wife, I don’t know what I would do (or is it, wouldn’t do?). Yes, friends, mistermuse has been a sappily married man for 49 years, 10 months, and 13 days now, and I can honestly say it doesn’t seem like a day over 49 years, 10 months, and 12 days.

    That said, game on. Let’s see what other men have had to say on the subject:

    Wives are people who feel that they don’t dance enough. –Groucho Marx

    How can a woman be expected to be happy with a man who treats her as if she were a perfectly natural being? –Oscar Wilde

    If Presidents can’t do it to their wives, they do it to their countries. –Mel Brooks

    No matter how happily married a woman may be, it always pleases her to discover that there is a nice man who wishes she were not. –H. L. Mencken

    My advice to you is get married: if you find a good wife you’ll be happy; if not, you’ll become a philosopher. –Socrates

    Some wives are like fishermen: they think the best ones got away. –Evan Esar

    I’ve had bad luck with both my wives. The first one left me and the second one didn’t. –Patrick Murray

    A man placed an ad in the classifieds: “Wife wanted.” Next day he received over a hundred replies: “You can have mine.” –Anonymous

    NOTE: The last quote is absolutely NOT mine!

     
    • Paul Sunstone 3:16 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      So far a I know there are at least three or four major religions that each claim their own god created the institution of marriage — and everyone of them say they did it to protect the women, which I find hilarious.

      Liked by 3 people

    • calmkate 4:31 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      lol hilarious .. big 50 celebration coming up, well done both of you!

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:33 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Women are the major cause of mental illness in men…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lisa R. Palmer 8:36 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats on making it work!! That is quite an accomplishment for both of you…

      I laughed at almost all of these, being an ex-wife, except one, which I simply didn’t understand. Goes to show that humor targets certain audiences (probably based on common experiences…?).

      What the heck was Oscar Wilde trying to say here, and where is the “funny”? Lol!

      “How can a woman be expected to be happy with a man who treats her as if she were a perfectly natural being?” –Oscar Wilde

      P.S. No need to actually explain; it only makes things worse. If a joke needs lengthy rationale, then it already failed. But since I’m not the intended audience, no harm done. Just thought I’d share my ignorance, as it might make it funnier to others. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        No problem, Lisa–I’ve found from long experience that explanations only get me into longer no-win situations. That’s why “Yes, dear” is almost always the better part of valor….and, as you can tell, I’ve become very well trained in almost 50 years. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 8:48 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Here’s the one I like, and which was stuck on our fridge for years –
      “The best thing a father can do for his children is love their mother”.

      Almost 50 years! Wow! We’re 9 years behind you, mister muse, which reminds me of another statement I read when I first got married – and it has stuck in my head because of its truth (well, in our case anyway!) –
      “Marriage is a contest of wills.” 🙂

      Congratulations and in my opinion, you brought the very best trait to the union – a kick-ass sense of humour!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:32 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Carmen. Unfortunately, the ass I’d most like to kick is out of reach (not my wife–Donald Trump)! 🙂

        P.S. I like your “statements.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 10:17 am on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      A friend of ours once told a young fellow who was getting married that there were only two responses he needed to know – “Yes, dear” and “That outfit looks lovely on you!” 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 1:26 pm on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats to you and Senora Muse on your upcoming 50th.

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 1:52 pm on July 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Eternal source of jokes 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 2:13 pm on July 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Here’s some advice on the subject that I didn’t take. But I was happy anyway.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:17 pm on July 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Good song, Don. I like toe-tappers which don’t lead to my wife putting her foot down.

        Like

    • floatinggold 10:40 pm on July 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Almost 50 years? That’s impressive. How do people manage to put up with ANYONE for so long?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:50 pm on July 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        First, you have to live long enough. Second, so does your wife. Third, it helps to have a sense of humor. Fourth, if your wife has a strong arm throwing pots, pans and dishes, it helps to have good reflexes. Fifth, when all else fails, either pray for a miracle that she’ll see things your way, or say “Yes, dear.” Or both.

        Liked by 1 person

    • MikeTX 10:49 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats on the half a century of marital bliss Muse.

      I guess you have no wench on the bench; a fact which also keeps a foot from being put down…on your throat. Good luck on your next half-century!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:07 pm on August 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mike. Sorry about the delayed reply — I just noticed that your comment was awaiting approval.

        Like

    • America On Coffee 1:43 pm on August 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Love this!!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 8:25 pm on September 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Oscar Wilde,   

    LIKE WISE 

    Noble goal like chasing rainbow — beautiful while it lasts.

    If the above quote sounds familiar, you have the memory of an elephant. It — the quote, not you or the elephant — appeared in my previous post as a Charlie Chanism which I made up after a trip to the latest local library book sale where my returns are becoming re-nowned and their books are becoming re-owned….and one of my new buys was titled CHARLIE CHAN — The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang.

    If you’re an old movie buff like me, you’ve probably seen a number of 1930s-40s Charlie Chan films (based on the 1920-3os novels by Earl Derr Biggers) in which Charlie chanted such gems of wisdom as these:

    Hasty deduction, like ancient egg, look good from outside.
    Mind, like parachute, only function when open.
    Trouble, like first love, teach many lessons.
    Facts like photographic film — must be exposed before developing.
    Advice after mistake like medicine after funeral.

    You will find these, and many more, Chanisms in Appendix I of the book. But that’s just a bonus — the real story of this book is “The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective”…. a story I can’t tell you because either I would have to kill you (leaving no clues), or it would spoil the story and leave you without a motive to buy the book. But I will tell you that the fictional Honolulu detective Charlie Chan was based on real-life Honolulu detective Chang Apana, who was a character in his own right and whose career included jobs ranging from gardener to gumshoe. So get the book, plant yourself in your favorite chair, and enjoy the read.

    Speaking of flowery characters, Earl Derr Biggers was no shrinking violet. Before turning novelist, Biggers (a Harvard grad)) was an outspoken newspaper columnist and drama critic. In one of his columns, he wrote of “a citizen of Mingo, Okla., [who] whipped out his trusty six-shooter the other day and shot the mustache off another citizen. We sincerely hope that the gentleman who lost the mustache appreciated the fact that he had a mighty close shave.” Shades of such baldfaced punsters as Dorothy Parker, Oscar Wilde and mistermuse! (The latter includes himself in such company on the grounds that the dead can’t object.)

    But enough about me. Here’s Charlie!

     

     
    • linnetmoss 8:26 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hahaha! Is that Tim Conway?
      What cracks me up about the Biggers story is the name “Mingo, Okla.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:17 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, that is Tim Conway, and that clip is like a scrambled egg — it breaks me up. 😦

      “Mingo” reminds me on “Mongo” in BLAZING SADDLES — which also breaks me up. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 10:32 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      One of the Facebooks groups I belong to has the parachute quote on its home page, Sr. Muse, only they attribute it to Frank Zappa. Since Chan preceded Zappa in the popular canon, it’s probably a misattribution. However, let’s face it–the fictional Chan never thought of it, either. It sprang from the brain of a now-forgotten writer. Such is the eventual fate of all we scribblers.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:21 pm on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Maybe I should have that “Noble goal like chasing rainbow” quote etched on my gravestone, Ricardo, so at least one of my scribblings survives long after I’m gone.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:36 am on September 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I went looking for a Charlie Chan saying for this case. “Blond hair can be obtained from a bottle – or wig maker.”

      I also semi-remembered something about Number 1 son. Looked that up too. He was played ,many times by Keye Luke who went onto to be in a ton of movies. He might best be remembered by TV fans as the old master in Kung Fu the TV show..

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:37 am on September 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, here’s a bit of trivia for you. As you know, the best Marx Brothers movie is generally considered to be A NIGHT AT THE OPERA (1935). The best Charlie Chan movie (according to film critic Leonard Maltin) appeared a year later: CHARLIE CHAN AT THE OPERA (1936).
      Coincidence?

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 4:37 am on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love the wisdoms in Chan, so concisely put. 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 8:49 pm on September 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never seen a Charlie Chan movie, I hate to admit! I’ll have to check it out sometime.

      Funny Carol Burnett sketch!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:08 am on September 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Charlie Chan movies were fun when I was young, but I must admit that most of them don’t age well. Of the few that do, I’d recommend CHARLIE CHAN AT THE OPERA.

        Liked by 1 person

    • eliza rudolf 1:15 am on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice post❤💖❤💖

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Albert Einstein, , , , Oscar Wilde, , , , TV quiz shows,   

    TRUTH BE TOLD 

    When in doubt, tell the truth. –Mark Twain

    Truth be told, I just found out that July 7 was TELL THE TRUTH DAY.  Better late than never?  That may or may not be true, but today I’m in the mood to post, and at this “late” juncture, truth is doubtless as good a thesis as any (if you believe Mark Twain).

    Friends, I don’t claim to be in the same league as such legendary and current truth-tellers as Pinocchio and Donald Trump, but I am (almost) always in favor of telling the truth. In fact, one of my favorite TV quiz shows back in the day was TO TELL THE TRUTH. But before we go there, I need to set it up with a clip from a quiz show I featured in a previous post (I’VE GOT A SECRET)….the reason being that one of the panelists on the latter program (a humorist who is little-remembered today) plays a big part in the surprise ending of the TO TELL THE TRUTH clip, and it helps if you know he was once famous.

    Assuming you can abide a bit more truth-telling, I will close with some quotes on the subject:

    The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and simple. –Oscar Wilde

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. –Aldous Huxley

    If you are out to describe the truth, leave elegance to the tailor. –Albert Einstein

    Beware of a half-truth: you may have gotten hold of the wrong half. –Evan Esar

    A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes. –Charles Spurgeon

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Luc de Clapiers

    Doubt thou the stars are fire,
    Doubt that the sun doth move.
    Doubt truth to be a liar,
    But never doubt I love.
    –William Shakespeare

     

     
    • GP Cox 6:45 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My mom and her best friend had tickets for 3 to go to the taping of “To Tell the Truth”. It was interesting and fun, something I obviously still remember despite being so young.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:20 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate your comment, GP. You have the honor of being the first person I know who’s ever been to the taping of a TV program. Good show, old chap! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • GP Cox 7:43 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink

          How about that!! I also saw “What’s My LIne” and got a private tour of NBC in NYC [only because the secretary for Tom Synder was a childhood friend of my parents and I was in NYC to see the Pope and we ended up on the news that night.]

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 11:11 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Truth is mighty and will prevail. There is nothing the matter with this, except that it ain’t so.” Would that Mark Twain could be resurrected for this age of Trump.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:53 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It’s too bad Trump’s nose doesn’t grow like Pinocchio’s every time he tells a lie. He’d have to get a nose job every day to cut it back to size, but at least he has so much money he wouldn’t have to worry if his health insurance didn’t cover it.

      Like

    • Mark Scheel 4:28 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      muse,

      Wow! That brings back some memories. But makes me feel really old. Well, I AM old! I note one famous quote you didn’t use–“Then you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” (I’ll leave the attribution to you.) ; – )

      Mark

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:56 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, if you think those clips make you feel old, I was already in my twenties at that time. 😦

      As for the quote you noted, attribution is easy: I attribute it to Mark Scheel. 🙂

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:46 pm on July 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Friends, I don’t claim to be in the same league as such legendary and current truth-tellers as Pinocchio and Donald Trump”

      Odd that his followers saw him as authentic. I guess authentic for them is a willingness to be hurtful to others. Or babbling on.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:12 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        “Authentic,” as in telling it like it is — but any fool can tell it like (he thinks) it is. By that standard, , we should admire Hitler or any “authentic” leader who tells it like (he thinks) it is.

        Like

    • moorezart 11:25 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Brigham Young, , , , , men, Oscar Wilde, , , , , Solomon, , ,   

    HUSBAND APPRECIATION DAY 

    The third Saturday in April, which happens to be today, is HUSBAND APPRECIATION DAY. Unfortunately (or fortunately, as the case may be), I have but one wife to appreciate me. Not that I’m greedy, you understand, but I can’t help wondering what it would be like having many wives appreciate me — like in such open-minded countries as Afghanistan, where polygamy is a common practice. Speaking of practice, practice may make perfect, but prudence dictates that such things should be checked out before one plunges into it.

    Luckily, one has only to turn to Googlepedia to find pertinent reports. For example, a well-educated Imam of Islam, Mohammed Bello Abubakar, was quoted in The Christian Science Monitor and the BBC as saying, “I married 86 women and there is peace in the house — if there is peace, how can this be wrong? A man with ten wives would collapse and die, but my own power is given by Allah. That is why I have been able to control 86 of them.” By the time of his death on January 28 at 92 (years, not wives), he actually had not 86, not 92, but 120 wives, and had fathered 203 children. And I thought I was busy.

    But Bello Abubakar was a piker at polygamy compared to that wisest of Old Testament wife hoarders, King Solomon, who is said to have had up to 1,000 wives….not to mention 300 concubines on the side. Apparently, it helps to get religion if one hopes to honey-up and handle hives of wives. Bee that as it may, the problem is that one can’t grab unto just any religion in order to have one’s fill of mates. For example, I was raised Catholic, which is not the most reasonable religion in the world when it comes to conjugal largesse. On top of that — though I am now free of such doctrinaire prohibition — the secular powers-that-be in America maintain equally unenlightened views in marital matters. So you can see what we poor, monogamous men are up against in so-called liberal democracies.

    Of course, we could resort to bigamy, but at what cost? It’s a sad state of affairs when you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t. But never let it be said that I’m not a broad-minded guy — thus, I call on the following sexpert testimony, which unfortunately (or fortunately, as the case may be) includes no female witnesses:

    Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same. –Oscar Wilde

    The best argument against bigamy is that it leaves a man no place to hang his clothes. –Evan Esar

    Bigamy is the only crime where two rites make a wrong. –Bob Hope

    Why a man would want a wife is a mystery to bachelors; why a man would want two wives is a bigamystery. –Evan Esar

    Polygamy, n. A house of atonement, fitted with several stools of repentance, as distinguished from monogamy, which has but one.–Ambrose Bierce (The Devil’s Dictionary)

    Brigham Young originated mass production [in America], but Henry Ford was the one who improved on it. –Will Rogers

    Polygamy: an endeavor to get more out of life than there is in it. –Elbert Hubbard

    Every man should have four wives: a Persian, with whom he can converse; a woman from Khorasan, for the housework; a Hindu woman to raise the children; and one from Transoxiana, whom he can beat as a warning to the others. –Mirza Aziz Koka

    That last quote seems a bit over the top, I must admit. How could the average person be expected to know where the hell Khorasan and Transoxiana are?

     

     
    • linnetmoss 7:13 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Groucho: “Well whadaya say girls? Are we all gonna get married?” Woman: “All of us? But that’s bigamy!” Groucho: “Yes, and it’s big-a-me too.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:47 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I remember that joke, but I’m not sure if Groucho was the first to say it. No matter — no one ever said it better!

        P.S. For the benefit of those not up on their Marx (Brothers), Groucho said it in ANIMAL CRACKERS (1930).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 10:20 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never heard any women saying they’d like to have multiple husbands. . Hmmm. . . Wonder why? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:47 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Carmen, I can only speak for myself: when a wife has me for a husband, she thinks….

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 11:14 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink

          I’m laughing.

          But since it’s Hubby Appreciation day, I will save my deprecatory comments. 🙂
          (and don’t tell me, you think that song is about you)

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 11:36 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink

          Carmen, I trust that you are giving your hubby the appreciation he is due today! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 11:44 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink

          Always! (in fact, he really is quite spoiled – just ask our daughters!)

          Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:42 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Transoxiana was easy for Google to find, Sr. Muse, and it turns out to be modern Uzbekistan, approximately. Apparently its natives have always preferred to live in a nearly unpronounceable land.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:33 am on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I clicked “Like” but I meant “Don’t like.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:24 pm on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      This brings up images of monogamy and or memories of Mr & Mrs Bundy but then there is nothing to suggest that Cahn and Van Heusen were talking about only one marriage. Just that you need love.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:39 pm on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, as it happens, one of the books I bought at that library book sale several months ago was Sammy Cahn’s autobiography titled I SHOULD CARE….and one of the chapters is titled LOVE AND MARRIAGE. I haven’t gotten around to reading the book yet, but I can tell you that he was married more than once (but not at the same time, because that would’ve been bigamy — or rather, biga-him).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 7:09 pm on April 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I thought you made this up. Just took a ‘stroll’ through Noseybook and indeed, it’s true! (I mean, it HAS to be if it’s on FB!)

      I should know better than to doubt you, mister muse. . .

      Liked by 2 people

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:14 am on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      SO sorry I missed Husband Appreciation Day, but since I am no longer so encumbered, I hope I may be forgiven. I hope you enjoyed your day.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:23 am on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Madelyn. I got a big kick out of Husband Appreciation Day because my wife waited on me hand and foot (a hand grabbing unto my ear and a foot launched at my rear end). It’s good to know she still loves me after all these years.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 5:14 pm on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ha ha ha. Great post. I love the Wilde and Esar quotes. I hope Koka was a bachelor.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lavinia Ross 7:42 pm on April 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Have you seen the 2009 Woody Allen movie “Whatever Works”? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • heidi ruckriegel 12:26 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That whole thing of one guy having 100 wives always seemed a bit selfish to me. Wouldn’t there be 99 guys who have to stay single?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:40 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Possibly….but 50 of them might WANT to stay single (just kidding — I’d make a quip of almost every single reply if I could!). 🙂

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: blarney, , , , , , Irish wit, , , Oscar Wilde, , , St. Parick's Day   

    ST. PATRICK’S DAY? BAH! HUMBUG! 

    Here it is two days before March 17, and I’m resigning myself to be the Grinch who stole St. Patrick’s Day. Being a writer of (part) Irish heritage — and thus feeling obliged to beget my readers a post to celebrate the occasion — I’ve been roiling me brain to come up with something about Ireland’s fifth-century snake-chaser that isn’t the same old blarney, but I’ve hit a stone wall stouter than those that subdivide the Irish countryside:

    The Stone Walls of Ireland

    Enough already. If St. Patrick thinks I’m going to waste another second of my busy day refraining from raining on his parade, he’s got another think coming. There are plenty of other dead fish in the Irish Sea who merit time in the sun, and though it may raise a stink, I am going to turn this post over to them and say “Bah! Humbug!” to St. Patrick.

    I showed my appreciation of my native land in the usual Irish way by getting out of it as soon as I possibly could. –George Bernard Shaw

    I am allergic to all Irish wit, charm and humor not provided by myself. –Denis Brogan

    Good Lord, what a sight/After all their good Cheer/For people to fight/In the midst of their Beer. –Jonathan Swift (from THE DESCRIPTION OF AN IRISH-FEAST)

    The lanky hank of a she in the inn over there
    Nearly killed me for asking the loan of a glass of beer:
    May the devil grip the whey-faced slut by the hair,
    And beat bad manners out of her skin for a year.
    If I asked her master he’d give me a cask a day;
    But she, with the beer at hand, not a gill would arrange!
    May she marry a ghost and bear him a kitten, and may
    The High King of Glory permit her to get the mange.
    –James Stephens (from RIGHTEOUS ANGER)

    For the Great Gaels of Ireland/Are the men that God made mad,/For all their wars are merry/And all their songs are sad. –G. K. Chesterton

    Other people have a nationality. The Irish and the Jews have a psychosis. –Oscar Wilde

    The actual Irish weather report is really a recording made in 1922, which no one has had occasion to change. –Wilfred Sheed

    I saw a fleet of fishing boats…I flew down, almost touching the craft, and yelled at them, asking if I was on the right [course] to Ireland. They just stared. Maybe they didn’t hear me. Maybe I didn’t hear them. Or maybe they thought I was just a crazy fool. An hour later I saw land. –Charles Lindbergh (2nd day of first solo transatlantic flight, 5/21/1927)

     

     
    • BroadBlogs 12:47 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Love St. Patty’s Day! (My grandpa’s birthday). Happy day to you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:58 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As an Irishman whose beloved is a Jew, I feel alarmed by Wilde’s observation, made here in your post.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:03 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Well, Ricardo, at least you have the right to drown your troubles in a brew or two (or more). I leave it to you how to relieve your beloved’s psychosis.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 6:50 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      They most probably thought Lindbergh was a Brit that’s why they didn’t answer him. But I remember not so long ago marching in the St. Patrick’s Day parade in New York. The sun was out and the temperature reached into the 60’s. It was a great day for the Irish and anyone else who happened to be about.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:21 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, back in 1927, those simple Irish fishermen may have never seen an airplane before. It’s a wonder that didn’t jump overboard at the sight and sound of Lindbergh and his big metal bird coming down at them from out of the blue.

      Happy snowy St. Patrick’s Day there in NYC (though I hear you didn’t get the foot of the white stuff yesterday that was expected).

      Like

    • Garfield Hug 8:44 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy St Patty’s Day. Smile Mistermuse ha ha😊

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:58 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise, me bonnie lassie….and watch out that your orange pet Garfield doesn’t celebrate by drinking too much green beer and maybe spilling it all over his fur — the colors might clash.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 9:51 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse we got about 4 inches and they didn’t even try to tell us it was 12 inches. Lately snow fall accumulations reported by weathermen seem to be like guys talking abut there you know what’s. Not quite as advertised.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 10:18 am on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Kudos to the Irish descendant
      Whose muses are comment dependent.
      His genius, you see, is apparent to me –
      And all other “Observation Post” attendants.

      Happy St. Patty’s Day MisterMuse!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:20 pm on March 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      What can I say —
      You made me day.
      No way did I know it —
      That you’re such a poet.
      With envy I’m green —
      Such talent I’ve not seen
      Since Dickenson and Browning
      And I’m not just clowning….
      Well, maybe a bit —
      But I must show I’m a (nit)wit.

      Have a Happy yourself, dear lady! 🙂

      Like

    • linnetmoss 7:52 am on March 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You made me chuckle with your dead fish. And reminded me that it’s time to buy some Guinness. No green beer for me!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:07 am on March 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I think Guinness owes me a commission, but I won’t press the issue because they might pay me in dead fish. No matter — your chuckle is reward enough. 🙂

      Like

    • In My Cluttered Attic 3:17 pm on March 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      And a happy St. Paddy’s Day to you mistermuse. :O)

      Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 7:31 pm on March 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I signed up for a photography tour of Ireland for this summer but it was canceled due to lack of interest. Whaaaaaat???? I am so bummed…..

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:40 pm on March 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I would be bummed too. The tour company must not have promoted the tour very well. I can’t imagine a lack of interest in such a tour if enough people knew about it!

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , comedy of manners, , , , loneliness, Oscar Wilde, , THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, trust, ,   

    THE IMPORTANCE OF QUOTING ERNEST 

    Did you fathom that the title of my last post (THE OLD MAN AND THE SEASON) was a play on Ernest Hemingway’s last completed novel, THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA? Because that post was about aging and autumn, perhaps I was remiss in not including a Hemingway quote (such as the first one below) among those I gathered for the occasion.

    This post will attempt to make up for that shortfall with a selection of Hemingway quotes, starting with this autumn-appropriate eulogy he wrote for a friend:

    Best of all he loved the fall/the leaves yellow on cottonwoods/leaves floating on trout streams/and above the hills/the high blue windless skies./Now he will be part of them forever.

    For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.

    The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.

    There is nothing to writing. All you have to do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed. 

    When you go to war as a boy, you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed, not you… Then, when you are badly wounded, you lose that illusion, and you know it can happen to you.

    In modern war, there is nothing sweet nor fitting in your dying. You will die like a dog for no good reason.

    True nobility is being superior to your former self.

    No weapon has ever settled a moral problem. 

    Writing, at its best, is a lonely life. For he does his work alone and if he is a good enough writer he must face eternity, or the lack of it, each day.

    There is no lonelier man, except the suicide, than that man who has lived with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other, there can be no happy end to it.

    But hold on — happy or not, this isn’t the end. The title of this post is another play on words, this being Oscar Wilde’s peerless comedy of manners titled THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST….a parody of Victorian age social standing previewed in this trailer for the 1952 film (not to be confused with the inferior 2002 remake) of the Wilde play:

    Now (as the movie says when it’s over) this is THE END

     
    • linnetmoss 7:15 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, Michael Redgrave! What a great cast this version has. Thanks for the trailer 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:34 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great cast, great movie. Just seeing the trailer makes me want to watch the whole film again!

      Like

    • arekhill1 9:59 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      While I am not sufficiently versed in Hemingway, not having read any since my extreme youth, the competitors in the Bad Hemingway Contest have always had my respect: http://articles.latimes.com/1987-04-09/news/vw-142_1_bright-boy

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 11:18 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great stuff Muse. And, I got the reference to the the Old Man and The Season. But a slight correction on that. The Old Man and The Sea was the last novel Hemingway wrote while he was alive. He wrote a whole bunch of novels after he was dead. None of them were any good. But let’s cut Papa a little slack as it must be tough writing when you’re dead. I mean it’s hard enough when you’re alive.

      In case people reading this don’t understand, his last wife Mary, kept finding manuscripts in the attic that Papa had never published. Either he didn’t publish them because they weren’t very good or the people who wrote them using his name weren’t very good. Take your pick.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:52 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree that it must be tough writing when you’re dead, Don — for one thing, you get terribly stiff, and it has to be hard to type with stiff fingers. The light can’t be too good six feet under, either. But at least he didn’t need no ghost writer, because he was one himself.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Don Frankel 4:23 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink

          Great one Muse. He was his own Ghost Writer.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:52 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Singielka, thank you for your “Like” — this is just to let you know that I tried to submit a comment on one of your blog posts, but it didn’t go through (something about an insecure connection). Sorry.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:40 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        How lovely of you to attempt to follow up, and to comment that you did so. I get a more than a few folks whose online presence is impossible to access or locate – but I lack the time to leave them each a comment once I’ve tried and failed. I’m impressed.

        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 10:06 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never cared for Ernest Hemingway’s works and it was a suffering to have to put up with them when they were assigned in English classes. Oscar Wilde, on the other hand, is a real favorite of mine. I loved reading The Importance of Being Earnest, and was part of a group that performed the original stage play in college….what great lines! Very interesting, the trailer you show here; I never happened to see “Earnest” as a movie. It seems it is a perennial.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 7:59 am on October 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I also love the Wilde wit (wild wit too, for that matter) — unfortunately, each succeeding younger generation seems less connected to an appreciation of such wordly delights….and “more’s the pity” (to repeat a phrase I used in my last post). BTW, I now find that the 1952 & 2002 films aren’t the only versions of the play; there was a 1986 remake as well. I think all three can be viewed online in their entirety.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sarita 7:56 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 10:09 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not sure what you mean. If you mean why don’t I click Like, I don’t see where I can click Like on your posts. Apparently your internet connection is incompatible with mine. In any case, I do not have sufficient computer expertise to know what to do about it. Sorry.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mél@nie 7:38 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      EXCELLENT post, Monsieur Muse… I always love your puns & intellectual “blendings”… 🙂

      I love Oscar Wilde’s works – he is one of the titans of world’s literature, and you certainly know he passed-away in Paris – his “chosen” city…(I saw his tomb in Père Lachaise cemetery) btw, he’s still present in Paris these days: 🙂
      http://www.rtl.fr/culture/arts-spectacles/oscar-wilde-l-impertinent-absolu-est-a-decouvrir-au-petit-palais-7785456107

      • * *

      speakin’ of “papa Hemingway”, he’s been one of my favourite-US writers since high-school… I visited his villa in Key West a few years ago… you may have read my blog-post:
      https://myvirtualplayground.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/ernesto-mi-amor/

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mél@nie 7:40 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        P.S. désolée, but I forgot WP does NOT accept 2 links in the same comment… 🙂 that’s why, my comment is awaiting moderation… 🙂

        Like

      • mistermuse 11:34 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I knew Wilde died in Paris, but your link filled in details I did not know. Merci!

        P.S. I do recall reading your Key West post & recommend your 2nd link to those who haven’t.

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 6:52 pm on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hemingway has some great quotes. Bleeding on the typewriter is a favorite as well as the one about trust. Oh, and the eulogy is beautiful. And the one about no happy end to love. And….

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:21 am on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree. I would add the one about being superior to your former self. Sorry to interject politics into this, but could there be a clearer example of not being superior to your former self (i.e. not growing as a human being) than the Republican candidate for President of the U.S.?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 5:09 pm on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,

      The typewriter and bleeding–or some version of it–is more likely from Red Smith, the great sports writer. Although many have been credited with some variation. Yeah, I got the first Hemingway word play. He was one of my favorite authors early on and I studied his work endlessly–even into grad school. The comments on being dead and writing–were you aware that there’s a fellow who channels Hemingway and did a book on the conversations? It’s utterly fascinating–if it isn’t Hemingway’s ghost talking, it’s a remarkable imitation! Well, I won’t comment on the Trump allusions, just let the renewed e-mail discoveries and coming Wiki-Leaks dumps lead where they may! LOL

      Good post, muse!

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 5:50 pm on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No, I wasn’t aware of the fellow who channels Hemingway — he must be English (if you think that pun was bad, wait till you see my next post). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:48 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Clever title. Wilde was a childhood favorite, but I never really warmed up to Hemingway. For me, a small book of quotes is about all I can get through where he is concerned – so thanks for yours.

      The comments on this post were fun to read too – and I love your theme (blog look) – which one is it?
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
      – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:36 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks. I try to respond to comments with ‘in kind’ (as opposed to generic) replies, as I feel that anyone who takes the trouble to read what I have to say and to comment specifically (as opposed to generically) deserves a thoughtful reply.

      As for Hemingway, I think he captures the meaning of inspiration perfectly with the quote that ends “Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.”

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dylan Thomas, , , Marianne Moore, one-liners, Oscar Wilde, , poets on poetry, , , , substance, T. S. Eliot   

    NONE LINERS TO ONE LINERS 

    Because my last post (TITLES FOR BARE NAKED POEMS) featured ‘no-line’ poems, which some readers might consider devoid of substance, I will try to wrecktify that air with a whole caboodle of one-line poems for you nit-pickers who insist that poems should have words — followed (in a spirit of munificence) by a bonus kit of one-line quotes, just for the tell of it. Now, far be it from me to make threats, but be forewarned: if this post isn’t enough to placate your unreasonable expectations, I may have to up the ante next time with a post of two-line poems….and you wouldn’t want that two happen, would you?

    POET AT WORK

    Have an angst day.

    A VERY SHORT, PASSIONATE POEM

    Would I lie to you?

    WE LIVE IN IGNORANCE

    Who knows why?

    GOD ONLY KNOWS

    So….I suppose.

    DEER HUNTER TRIES SHOTGUN

    Anything for a buck.

    BLUE NOSE STUMBLES UPON RED-LIGHT DISTRICT

    Whores!

    DEAF SQUAD SEARCHES HENHOUSE

    Nobody hear but us chickens.

    TEMPUS FUGIT

    Please excuse it.

    MOLEHILLS AS MOUNTAINS

    What’s up with that?

    GREAT POEMS NEED GREAT READERS

    Sign here ______________________

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    There are two ways of disliking poetry: one way is to dislike it, the other is to read Pope. –Oscar Wilde

    I like to think of poetry as statements made on the way to the grave. –Dylan Thomas

    All that is worth remembering of life is the poetry of it. –William Hazlitt

    Poetry is what Milton saw when he went blind. –Don Marquis

    Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat. –Robert Frost

    You will not find poetry anywhere unless you bring some of it with you. –Joseph Joubert

    Poetry is a gift; maybe that’s why you can’t sell it. –Evan Esar

    In a poem, the words should be as pleasing to the ear as the meaning is to the mind. –Marianne Moore

    Once in a while I meet someone who has read me; it did him good — I mean it served him right. –Robert Frost

    What stimulates me to write a poem is that I have got something inside me that I want to get rid of — it is almost a kind of defecation. –T. S. Eliot

    Gotta go.

     
    • scifihammy 2:32 am on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      haha Excellent one-liners 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 9:05 am on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Clever. Ha ha.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:58 am on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. While I’m at it, I’d like to recommend your blog to readers who value the values expressed in your interview post of Oct. 7 — check it out (by clicking “D. Wallace Peach” above) to see what I’m talking about. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 10:08 am on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I have a favorite among your poems and a favorite among the quotes.

      Favorite poem: TEMPUS FUGIT It has great potential to continue on as a two-liner, a three liner, etc. and is very inspiring as long as you don’t abuse it, confuse it, obtuse it or generally over-mistermuse it….

      Favorite quote:The one by T.S. Eliot….it explains a lot.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:27 am on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Tempus fugit was originally the first line (“Please excuse it” was the second line) of a poem I wrote titled IMPOLI-TICK, back in the day when clocks actually ticked. Because tempus fugit, many people today are too young to remember such clocks and probably wouldn’t get the title, so I salvaged the poem as a one-liner.

      As for the T.S. Eliot quote, perhaps it explains a lot about political speechifying as well as writing poetry, except that poetry is seldom a lot of BS.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:20 pm on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Tempus fugit indeed, Sr. Muse. I fugited the weekend away in Mexico, which left me behind on mucho today. Glad I could finally catch up to you.

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:45 pm on October 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Now that The Donald’s chances of being elected Pres are fast fugiting away, you can go to Mexico as often as you please without worrying about a wall being built while you’re there, keeping you from returning home unless you dig a tunnel underneath. Yes! There is a God after all!!!

        Like

    • Mark Scheel 6:16 pm on October 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      I like the one-liners, but Esar’s comment really enlightened me. So that’s the reason there’s no money in it! Now I understand. LOL

      Mark

      Like

      • mistermuse 10:23 pm on October 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mark. If I may change the subject, I notice that, in order to submit comments on your posts, I have to duplicate and submit a ‘CAPTCHA Code’ which, if I don’t do it exactly right, results in the disappearance of the comment which I may have spent 20 minutes (or more) composing. Not only is that frustrating, but I don’t see any point to it (even if I got it right every time)!

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:35 pm on October 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Clever!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:10 pm on October 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. It makes me happy when my work appeals to a “Broad” audience. 🙂

        Like

    • Don Frankel 3:11 pm on October 12, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Frost was lucky he lived in the day before the internet. Can you imagine what some people might have said to him on SWI? Could he handle it?

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:00 pm on October 12, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      That last Frost quote surprised me with its wit. As for “Could he handle it?”, wit can handle almost anything but the witless, so no doubt he wouldn’t waste time trying.

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 9:36 am on October 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant and profound!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:38 am on October 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      As the circus elephant said to its admirer, I should hire you as my publicist, but I could only pay you peanuts!

      Like

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