Tagged: Frank Sinatra Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:09 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Blowin' In The Wind, , Frank Sinatra, Gone With The Wind, Gordon MacRae, High On A Windy Hill, , , , When I Get Low I Get High   

    JUST BECAUSE 

    Four days after RIDE THE WIND DAY comes JUST BECAUSE DAY. Because Aug. 27 is JUST BECAUSE DAY — and because some solid* would-be-gone-with-the wind songs didn’t make my RIDE THE WIND DAY post — today conveniently provides an excuse to rewind and take up where I left off. As it happens, I have just the appropriate song:

    Of all the wind songs I failed to include in my last post, perhaps I blew it the most with….

    If you’re feeling a bit low from on high,
    don’t end up on the downside like this guy….

    Be like Ella. Tell a fella….

    *Swing era slang for great, wonderful, sensational, far-out

     

     
    • emergingfromthedarknight 3:18 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You can never have too much wind or fresh air. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:31 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Hurricane and tornado prone areas might take exception to “You can never have too much wind,” but I take your comment in the ‘breath of fresh air’ spirit in which it was intended. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 3:59 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Stunning track from Sinatra. Glad I stopped by! Have a great week 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 5:36 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ahh, you can’t beat old blue eyes!

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:19 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I saw the Peter, Paul and Mary at Wolf Trap… with the Smothers Brothers…

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:07 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ella wins hands down, Peter Bald and Hairy 2nd … a bit breezy around here ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:01 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know about Peter, but I’m Bald and Hairy. Problem is, I’m bald where I should be hairy, and hairy where I should be bald.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 9:03 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink

          ah gross that has totally destroyed the fantasy I had of you 😩

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:38 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink

          Sorry about the destroyed fantasy, but that’s how it goes: Hair today, gone tomorrow.

          Like

    • Rivergirl 8:30 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      There’s one type of wind I don’t see represented…. but that’s probably a good thing.
      đŸ€Ł

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:06 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Aug. 27 also happens to be Global Forgiveness Day, so I forgive you for that ‘muse-like’ quip. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 9:02 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Was lucky to meet Gordon Mcrae when in my teens, when I knew his mother-in-law, a delightful British lady. He would visit her with roses and candies and that big beautiful smile. What a wonderful personality. Apparently the story about how he was discovered for movies is true, overheard singing in the showers, mostly likely at Warner Bros. Before that he’d worked on stage and in radio. At least the shower story is what Sheila told and that she’d met him when he “carried a spear” in a movie. A family story, so who knows if it was a joke. Never met Sheila but the grandkids were good about visiting their grandmother.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:11 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        How interesting! I’ve always liked Gordon MacRae as a singer, and it’s good to know that he was a good guy as well.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:41 pm on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Just because my composure sort of slips..” Plus it is an invaluable phrase for a parent. I probably should have had it imprinted on a t-shirt.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:22 pm on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I think “Because I say so” is the old standby phrase for a parent, though I’m not sure how invaluable it is. I am surprised that it’s not one of Trump’s favorite phrases, because it’s obviously his modus operandi.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 11:32 am on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the songs. Cheered me up!👍😃

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 5:33 pm on August 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:57 pm on August 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you! I can’t think of a more appropriate post for you to reblog, Just Because. Hahahaha.

        Like

    • America On Coffee 12:12 pm on September 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video is not available.😰

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:42 pm on September 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry, but I don’t know which video you’re referring to: GONE WITH THE WIND, BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND, HIGH ON A WINDY HILL, or WHEN I GET LOW I GET HIGH.

        Like

        • America On Coffee 5:48 pm on September 10, 2019 Permalink

          Sorry the unavailable is Gone With The Wind.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:28 pm on September 10, 2019 Permalink

          Here is a different video of GONE WITH THE WIND (this one by Ella Fitzgerald) which I hope is available to you. The song was written two years before the film of the same name came out in 1939, and should not be confused with the movie’s theme song (aka Tara’s Theme):

          Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: all or nothing, , , , Frank Sinatra, , liar, mad, , , , , , William Barr,   

    THINK NOTHING OF IT 

    Seeing as how July 26 is ALL OR NOTHING DAY, I realized ALL OR NOTHING is as good a subject as any to post about today. A good thing too, as the only thing that had come to mind was nothing, otherwise this post might be about something, which at this point is something I want nothing to do with, as a post about something would be worth nothing unless nothing is the something I want to post something about nothing about.

    Speaking of ALL OR NOTHING AT ALL, I subsequently came upon a dissertation by one Farouk Radwan, MSc, about all-or-nothing thinking, which may explain one way why The King of Self-Trumpeting Liars, Donald Trump, is the way he is. Unless you’re a glutton for punishment, this may be more than you want to know (and certainly more than Trump knows, or would admit if he DID know), but I can stand it if you can:

    “Narcissism is one of the causes of the all or nothing way of thinking. Being a narcissist either devalues people and considers them worthless, or thinks highly of them” [like how The Donald devalues Robert Mueller but thinks highly of his no-bargain Attorney General, William Barr?].

    Anyway — after much ado about nothing — I close with the Trump badministration’s theme song*:

    *composed in the year 1934 B.T. (Before Trump) by Cole Porter, including these oh-so-apt-today lyrics:

    The world has gone mad today
    And good’s bad today
    And black’s white today
    And day’s night today

    So ANYTHING GOES, but TRUMP STAYS? That can’t be good, or my name is Cole Porter.

     

     

     
    • calmkate 5:01 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      nailed it … reminds me of the Abbot and Costello argument about Who’s on third base …

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. For the benefit of those Who Do not know What You are referring to:

        Liked by 3 people

        • Ashley 7:44 am on August 21, 2019 Permalink

          Brilliant! The Who , What and Why of Life! My day is complete!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:48 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      And now England has their own Donald. What the hell is happening ?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:09 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        “THE WORLD HAS GONE MAD TODAY” indeed (MAD because a lot of people are mad, but not for the right reason).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ashley 7:48 am on August 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I hope you’re not refering to B.J. He’s nothing like D.T.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:50 pm on August 21, 2019 Permalink

          I assume you’re responding to Rivergirl’s comment. I don’t know enough about Boris Johnson to compare him to Donald Trump.

          Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 9:14 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      hahaha You are very amusing! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:14 am on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That reminds me of this lyric (from the Noel Coward song IF LOVE WERE ALL):

        But I believe that since my life began
        The most I’ve had is just
        A talent to amuse.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:46 pm on July 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 4 people

    • America On Coffee 6:09 am on July 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Songs were so humble in lyrics and expressions. Sinatra looks good. He will always be a classic. I wonder why I would often confuse the Sinatras as Fondas and the Fondas as Sinatras? Hmmm..

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:59 am on July 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I assume you’re referring to Frank Sinatra and Henry Fonda and their daughters Nancy and Jane. Regarding the first two. I’m ‘admirer’ of Sinatra as a singer, but fonder of Fonda as an actor. As to their daughters, I fancy Frank’s Nancy, but Jane was a pain to Henry (though they reconciled late in Henry’s life).
        Speaking of Nancy….

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:42 pm on July 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The post where the man parodies Trump ala H.M.S, Pinafore was the best comeback to Trump madness I have ever seen.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:40 pm on July 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely agree, Elizabeth. As I replied to arekhill1 (Ricardo), who posted the comment containing that clip, it made my day. One of my readers (mirover) commented in a previous post that she is a big fan of “the man who parodies Trump” (Randy Rainbow), so I hope she ‘tunes in’ and sees the clip.

        Liked by 2 people

      • literaryeyes 12:28 am on July 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I hadn’t heard of him either. His videos are spot on!

        Liked by 2 people

    • moorezart 8:44 pm on July 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:14 pm on July 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        mistermuse: “Thank you.”
        moorezart: “THINK NOTHING OF IT”
        mistermuse: “Hey, that’s my line!”

        Like

    • mlrover 10:56 am on July 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This is one of Randy’s that I hadn’t seen yet. I first heard of him from a NPR interview. Randy does his own tech work, (yikes) and is nominated for an Emmy! He also tours but not close to where I live or I’d stand in line, as I did for the late Leon Redbone.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 11:19 am on July 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Gilbert had such a way with lyrics and Randy makes one of the most difficult to sing into a clever version of his own. He has a wonderfully snarky way with words, like Cole Porter. One of my favor versions of What a Swell Party:

      https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=kevin+kline+well+did+you+evah&view=detail&mid=275211AB5D878698FB5F275211AB5D878698FB5F&FORM=VIRE

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:50 pm on July 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Great clip! As a lover of language and witty words, it doesn’t get any better than Wm. S. Gilbert and Cole Porter (and let’s not forget Lorenz Hart).

        As for ANYTHING GOES (the play), my book of THE COMPLETE LYRICS OF COLE PORTER includes no less than six songs that became standards or semi-standards: I GET A KICK OUT OF YOU, ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT, THERE’LL ALWAYS BE A LADY FAIR, YOU’RE THE TOP, BLOW GABRIEL BLOW, and, of course, ANYTHING GOES (the song).

        In the book’s introduction, it says “Porter wrote over eight hundred songs. More than half of his songs, however, have never been published.” It makes one wonder how many hidden gems repose among them.

        Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 5:37 pm on August 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      i think a “song” must have the word “bitch” in it today. it’s a rule. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:16 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Frank Sinatra, , Memories of You. The Ink Spots. humor, ,   

    A com-POSE-r BY ANY OTHER NAME (Part 2 of 2) 

    I am pleased to announce (as is often said when making an announcement) the proper pairings of birth names with noms de plume listed in Part 1:

    a. 2
    b. 3
    c. 4
    d. 5
    e. 6
    f. 1
    g. 10
    h. 9
    i. 8
    j. 7

    Next (as is often said when making another announcement), I am pleased to announce that I have selected the following song from the requests made by readers of Part 1 to be played in Part 2, which I am pleased to announce totaled one request, which was a considerable help in deciding the final choice. So, after much soul searching — not to mention weeping and gnashing of my remaining teeth — here is the request winner:

    But wait — there’s more! I have my own favorite song from the list. Composed by Eubie Blake with lyrics by Andy Razaf, here is MEMORIES OF YOU, with vocal refrain:

    I close with the 1930 instrumental version played by Eubie Blake & His Orchestra:

     

     
    • scifihammy 4:30 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Yay! It was Me! I asked for April in Paris 😀 Thank you for this great Frank clip 🙂
      Also really like the Ink Spots Memories of you. No-one seems to be able to sing like this any more!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Growing up, the Ink Spots were my favorite singing group — so much so that I formed my own group to emulate them, called THE STINK SPOTS, but for some reason, we bombed. 😩

        Liked by 2 people

    • carmen 11:30 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mr. Muse,
      I am in the middle of Gr. 9 Art class. For a distraction, I checked my emails and – lo and behold! – a hilarious post from your brilliant mind. I’d love to share your ‘artwork’ with these folks, but unfortunately I think it’d be lost on them. . . 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 3:29 pm on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m glad to hear that, when it comes to the art of distraction, my posts are in a class by themselves — which is good, because if they were to be let out among the population at large, I could be locked up. Still, if you wish to share my “artwork” with the Art class, it’s probably just as well that I be the instrument of their disillusion now rather than the ‘real world,’ which will discolor their ideals soon enough.

      And on that less than ideal note, I thank you for being your usual gracious self. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:37 am on February 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know we could make requests or I would have requested this one by Vladimir Dukelesky.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:42 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, this brings up an interesting tale, not of two cities, but of two songs by Vladimir Dukelsky aka Vernon Duke: APRIL IN PARIS (listed in Part 1), and AUTUMN IN NEW YORK. Rather than try to condense the tale, let me relate it as told by author Warren Vaché in THE UNSUNG SONGWRITERS:

        APRIL IN PARIS, of course, was a tremendous hit in 1932, but AUTUMN IN NEW YORK, which was introduced in the stage show “Thumbs Up” in 1935, made no such impression.
        In 1947, or thereabouts, my [Warren VachĂ©’s] good friend Ross Doyle, a pianist and composer, was performing double duty as band manager and manager of Tommy Dorsey’s music publishing house. In the latter capacity he was entitled to a tiny office in Manhattan’s Brill Building with a piano and a few chairs. The chairs were usually occupied by song pluggers hopeful of persuading Ross into persuading Tommy to play the latest gem on their push lists. One day I decided to drop in and see Ross, and before long I was in conversation with a man I had never met before about the great songs of the past. During this spirited exchange the man put his heart into a comment that went something like this: “What a great tune APRIL IN PARIS was! I’d give my right arm to have another tune like that one.”
        “Yes, it is a great tune,” I agreed, “but Duke wrote another one that I like just as well, and it has been completely forgotten. In fact, it was hardly recorded at all. The only reason I know about it is because I happen to have an old Victor record of it by Richard Himber’s band.”
        The man’s head came up like a rabbit sniffing a carrot. “That so?” he asked eagerly. “What’s the name of it?”
        “AUTUMN IN NEW YORK.”
        He reached into an inside pocket of his jacket and brought out a little black notebook and after running a finger down one of the pages, nodded his head.
        “We’ve got it!” he announced delightedly. He stood up, acknowledged my contribution with a quick “thanks” and left.
        I never ran into the man again, but shortly afterwards it seemed that AUTUMN IN NEW YORK was being played by every band, recordings were being made by both bands and singers, and all at once the tune attained the hit status it had never achieved in 1935. Which only goes to prove, I guess, that of such chance conversations great hits are made.. I can only hope that Vernon Duke appreciated the revival of his lovely composition, even if he never knew what brought it about.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 4:04 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink

          That’s a great story, Mr. Muse! I was going to comment earlier this morning so here goes.
          I couldn’t listen to the music on the blog b/c I was at school all week and unable to play the videos. I finally got a chance to listen to all the songs (including yours, Don) this morning as I was cleaning up my kitchen. (I’m one of those cooks who manages to dirty every dish, utensil, and litter all counter-spaces, so the old tunes made my drudgery that much more bearable . . .) I thought to myself, “Is there a theme here?” When I listened to “April in Paris” and “Autumn in New York”, followed by the thought, “That guy got around!” After reading through your story, I thought the same thought – you really did get around, Mr. Muse!! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • Don Frankel 7:29 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink

          Great story. hey you never know in this life.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:07 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Carmen, speaking of “chance conversations,” which is at the heart of that story, here is a quote on the subject which I know you’ll love:

      “A chance remark is anything a man gets a chance to say when two women are talking.” –Evan Esar

      See, I told you you’d love it! 😩

      Liked by 1 person

    • MĂ©l@nie 6:58 am on February 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      great post, Sir… and I also love “April in Paris”, as I lived there for several years! ❀

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:01 pm on February 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, MĂ©l@nie. I “lived” in Paris for one day (on a European tour) — it wasn’t in April, but I still loved it!

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:12 am on January 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ALL OR NOTHING AT ALL, Cocktails for Two, firewater, Frank Sinatra, horticulture, , , , , , Tchaikovsky,   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 01) 

    This post is JAZZ FOR LAUGHS — or, more to the part, the first in a series of JAZZ FOR LAUGHS posts. Just for laughs is my musical theme — when it comes to funny, I’ll stop at nothing. So, when you hear Nothing, it means something. Or Nothing At All.

    So, what’s so funny about that song, you ask. Nothing. Nothing at all. But I needed a lead-in, and that’s the best I could do. Seriously. Speaking of seriously….

    Well, that clip started out well, but I must admit it Peter-ed out after a while. (Did you get it — Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky “Peter-ed” out….hahahahaha.) So enough of the serious stuff. Let’s see what else drives Spike to drink….

    As the horse said to the horse traitor who led him to firewater, “I’ll drunk to that” (with apologies to Dorothy Parker, who once said, “You can lead a whore to culture, but you can’t make her think.” Horticulture has had a soiled reputation ever since.).

     
    • Don Frankel 8:54 am on January 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, I’m glad you’ve decided to stop at nothing because…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:45 pm on January 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, if I recall correctly, that’s from the gospel according to Luke. Luckily, they took a gamble and made a movie of it, with Paul Newman playing Luke.

        Like

    • arekhill1 3:47 pm on January 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Any post that mentions Dorothy Parker gets five stars from me, Sr. Muse. “There, but for a typo, is the story of my life.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 1:11 pm on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I had heard the name, Spike Jones, but really had no idea who he was (before my time in the US). So this was an education… of sorts! A different era, for sure.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:35 pm on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Spike Jones’ music was an education, all right — though not exactly what you’d call a ‘high class’ education (except maybe in the opinion of those in the upper classes, like The Three Stooges). 😩

        Like

    • tref 6:07 pm on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Each time I saw Sinatra I wanted to be the guy who, during a moment when Sinatra was between songs, yells out, “You’re the king!” Of course, Sinatra always had a ready answer. Yet, for the handful of times I saw Sinatra sing I could never muster the nerve. And then, inevitably, somebody would yell a variation of that line. Sinatra would effortlessly return the volley. And I’d sit in my chair and think, “Damn. I missed it again.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:01 pm on February 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        And to think that back in the early 1940s, Sinatra was a heartthrob of teenage girls who didn’t wait until he was between songs to voice their adulation (not that I fault them….or us adults, for that matter)

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: culture, Frank Sinatra, , I'll Take Tallulah, , , , , , , Tangerine, TINA, Tommy Dorsey,   

    IT’S T TIME 

    It’s T time — time once again to take to the links and “T” off. Our first link, as I post this in the wee small hours of the morning, is a tune that goes through a roll call of maids-in-waiting. As you will hear, Frank’LL TAKE TALLULAH. (It dawns on me that come the Don, Frankel take her too, or I miss my bet*):

    *referring to our friend Don Frankel, fellow unofficial member of the Frank Sinatra fan club

    Four years after the above 1944 recording, another T came into Sinatra’s life:

    As you may know, Tina is the name of Sinatra’s ‘other’ daughter (Nancy being the older and more celebrated of the two). So how did Tina really feel about her famous father?

    We started with a WW II era song from a movie, and we’ll close with another: Johnny Mercer’s TANGERINE, from THE FLEET’S IN (1942). The orchestra this time is Jimmy Dorsey’s (brother of Tommy, who took Tallulah aboard Ship Ahoy in the first clip):

    If the last clip, in particular, shows its age and looks/sounds quaint to us today, remember this is what your parents or grandparents listened and danced to in their day ….and you would have done the same in their place. Truth be told, aren’t most of us captives of the culture we’re in? I may be spitting into the wind, but it strikes me that we’re stuck in shallow water if we think there is only ‘now.’ Why so many have so little interest in where we came from is beyond me. It might tell us how we got here. It might even help tell us where to go (not that I would ever do such a thing).

     

     
    • scifihammy 5:41 am on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love that last clip. It reminds me exactly of the kind of music my Mum loved to listen to. And they could really sing in those days – not like now! (Seems the Video is more important than the music these days!)
      I think it’s fascinating to find out things from the past.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:29 am on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I’m glad you like finding out things from the past, because there aren’t a lot of things more past than me. I’m so ancient, my dreams about girls are re-runs (as the old joke goes). 😩

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 9:33 am on December 1, 2017 Permalink

          hahaha And oh dear! 😀
          But you may be surprised to learn I’m pretty sure I’m around your age and I always believe you’re as young as you feel . . Either that or I’m having my second childhood!
          Anyway, thank you for the great post as always 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:40 am on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, I never heard Tallulah and a nice piece of music too.

      The story I heard behind the song Tina is that after Nancy with the Laughing Face was such a big hit, Sinatra had to have a song for his other daughter. And you’re right if you like a subject you really need to know its history.

      But people need to know history, period. I was speaking to someone last week and Thanksgiving comes up and I’m stunned as I start talking about it that the guy I’m talking to has no idea what the holiday is all about. When it comes to history in this country it sort of amazes me how little we know.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:17 am on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. BTW, in case you didn’t notice it in the second sentence of my post, 8 of the words come from the title of one of Sinatra’s most popular albums: IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS OF THE MORNING. The reason I know it is I own it.

        Like

    • arekhill1 2:27 pm on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Can’t think of a T song to add to yours, Sr. Muse, but I’ve solved your X problem.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:16 pm on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Xena would have to age about 30 more years to qualify as an oldie in my book, Ricardo….and I doubt that she would appreciate being accorded oldie status just for the privilege of solving my X problem. So, though I appreciate the thought, unfortunately this doesn’t change the concession I’ve made about having to X-clude X from post-consideration.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:35 pm on December 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, I caught that and that’s why I came up with “how little we know”.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Madame Vintage 2:11 pm on December 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It’s always Tea time for moi. The song in honour of Sinatras daighter -Tina is very admirable and in return to hear her speak of her father in such a ‘normal’ way. Tangerine being my favourite one here. It’s a beautiful orchestra which I favour the sound of quite fondly. It’s funny how were told not to grow up so quickly yet I always had a fondness for things that went beyond my years. Now nearing 30, I appreciate exploring such eras moreso with a passion, sadly not many people in my social friendship feel the same way.

      Sincerely Sonea

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billy Eckstine, Black Eyed Susan Brown, Frank Sinatra, , , , I Love You Samantha, , , , , Susie,   

    THIS IS THE S’s (PART II) 

    Believe it or not, I have standards — which I have made the standard for S (Part II). One of the all-time great standards of America’s Golden Age of popular music is STELLA BY STARLIGHT, composed by Victor Young for the 1944 film THE UNINVITED.  I invite you to be my guest for this good-as-it-gets rendition by the man known as “Mr. B”….

    By most standards, the obscure tune which follows isn’t considered a standard….but when it’s by Cole Porter, almost any song (in my considered opinion) qualifies:

    Our next S song has had more lives than a cat named Susie. It was first recorded by Eddie Cantor on 4/6/1925 and became a bestseller. It was subsequently sung by an actor who played Cantor in THE GREAT ZIEGFELD (1936), by two guys named Gene & Frank in ANCHORS AWEIGH (1945), and again by Cantor in the films IF YOU KNEW SUSIE (1948) and THE EDDIE CANTOR STORY (1953)….not to mention other vintage recordings and performances. The clip below is from (guess which) one of the above:

    We close with a song which may be too highbrow for some of you, but a little taste of class is surely worth the risk of a black eye to your reputation (such as it is — ha ha):

     

     
    • arekhill1 2:44 am on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:47 am on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Ah, yes, Ricardo — life was a beach with Sandy. Where have all the good times gone?

        Like

    • Don Frankel 8:22 am on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Am I old enough to remember Billy Eckstine singing on TV? Yes, and quite vividly too. And you’re right even some drunks singing in a bar, can’t ruin Cole Porter. You know there is an intricacy and a depth to his music and Gershwin too, that I don’t think exist in too many places.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:52 am on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, in preparing this post, I listened to those first two songs multiple times. To repeat words from my first paragraph, they’re as good as it gets.

        Like

    • Madame Vintage 3:07 pm on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Some wonderful song choices here. I type this as my heart agrees to the sound of Stella by Starlight. It does something magical when I hear them in movies so it’s a wonderful feeling to be had.

      Sincerely Sonea

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:09 pm on November 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        When Stella By Starlight first appeared in the 1944 film THE UNINVITED, it was only an instrumental. In 1946 lyricist Ned Washington added words to the melody composed by Victor Young, and (as the old saying goes) the rest is history.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 9:09 am on November 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Frank Sinatra, Grand Central Station, , Nancy, Nellie, Nina, ,   

    THE N DAME 

    In doing research for the posts of this fem song series, I occasionally come across an old tune which not only is unfamiliar to me, but has a ‘trivia’ connection that catches my attention as much as the song itself. Such is the case with my first N song — NINA, recorded in 1931 by Wooding’s Grand Central Red Caps:

    Orchestras of that era often adopted the names of venues where they played extended gigs, such as Richard Himber and His Ritz-Carlton Orchestra / Billy Wynne and His Greenwich Village Inn Orchestra. These venues lent a certain prestige to the orchestra and, one assumes, vice versa — though it’s hard to see how Grand Central Station could gain prestige from being coupled with a relatively obscure band like Wooding’s. But beyond that, it seems unlikely that any orchestra would be the ‘house band’ at a train terminal ….even one so grand as Grand Central — unless a night club was ‘on board’ there (which I can find no record of). If anyone can throw some light on the latter, please comment.

    Moving on, we have a gal named NELLIE who is also waiting for some light:

    The end dame of our N game is NANCY….you know — the one with the laughing face.

     

     
    • mistermuse 6:53 pm on November 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      NOTE to Alexandra Hampton: I appreciate your “Like” on this and several previous posts, but I can’t find your blog to check it out. If you have one, please give me the link (if you wish).

      Like

    • lexborgia 7:33 am on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I must admit an unfamiliarity with such music,
      After the intro I went straight to the red caps, and liked it a lot, it relayed a special type of nostalgia. 90secs later, reading on, I thought it would never end, but after 30secs of Nellie (and not a second more) I realised just how good the caps were. Frank/Nancy was a nice finish

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 am on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Unfamiliarity with such music, being a cultural/generational thing, it doesn’t surprise me that you and most of my readers haven’t heard of most of the songs in this series. I’m just pleased that you’re open to giving them a shot.

        For those who are unfamiliar with Red Caps, they’re Pullman Porters whose history goes back 100+ years. Here’s a short clip that I hope you find interesting:

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 4:24 pm on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      I knew you had to have Nancy With The Laughing Face. You couldn’t do this without it But this was another difficult one. The only song I could think of was No No Nanette but not because I even knew the song but the story associated with it. And that story was that Harry Freeze then owner of the Boston Red Sox sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $100,000 so he could finance the show. But then some people say it didn’t exactly happen that way. Like a lot things.

      Don

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:20 pm on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I did have a few other N choices, but none of them appealed to me as much as the 3 songs I chose. The next letter is going to be the most difficult so far, as I know of only one old song title with a girl’s name beginning with O. If I can’t come up with one or two more, I may end up combining O and P in my next post.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 6:41 pm on November 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Instead of waiting till you post and knowing this is a tough one I know I mentioned Miss Otis Regrets. There’s also the song Ophelia but it’s not much of a song, And it’s obvious that you not just going for anything but good music as well. But after those Muse I’m tapped out. If I think of anything I’ll post it here.

      Don

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:11 pm on November 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I’m trying to stick to girl’s first names, but I’d use Miss Otis Regrets as a last resort if I hadn’t come up with another idea. I’m putting the finishing touches on it now and will post it late tonight. Thanks again.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Frank Sinatra, , , Sophisticated Lady   

    THE DUKE AND THE COUNT 

    Contrary to what the above title may suggest, this post is not a narrative of two nabobs of European nobility in medieval times. Rather, it’s about two giants of jazz royalty in Big Band-era America: one whose birthday, and the other whose expiration day, occurred last week. I refer to Duke Ellington (born 4/29/1899) and Count Basie (died 4/26/1984).

    If you’re of a certain age, no doubt you’ve heard of them, but unless you’re a pre-rock jazz buff, that’s probably the extent of it. Permit me, then, to introduce you to these musical titans of yesteryear, and to a sampling of their legacy.  After all, it’s not every day that you get to meet a Duke and a Count.

    I could get carried away with all there is to say about the former, but in the interest of not getting carried away, I will confine my remarks mainly to this quote:

    Ellington has often credited his sidemen with the success of his band. But those who knew Duke and his music best — and this includes those very sidemen — will invariably tell you that what set Ellington’s apart is just one thing: the brilliant conductor-composer-arranger-pianist-bon vivant and leader of men, Duke Ellington himself. –George Simon (from his book, THE BIG BANDS)

    Here are two of the Duke’s many compositions, the first from the 1930 film CHECK AND DOUBLE CHECK, and the second from a European tour decades later:

    Let us now turn to that other distinguished composer-pianist-band leader, Count Basie, whose talents weren’t as multifaceted as the Duke, but whose orchestra likewise outlasted the end of the Big Band era. Quoting George Simon one more time:

    For several years [after] the days of the big bands, Basie didn’t do well, and he was forced to cut down his group to a sextet. But then he made a comeback and, aided greatly by support from Frank Sinatra, who helped him get lucrative bookings in Las Vegas and appeared with him in a series of successful concerts, the Basie band [again] rode high. 

     Let’s jump to a conclusion with this swinging rendition (especially the last seventy seconds) of Basie’s own composition and theme song:

     
    • calmkate 12:15 am on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      wow wow wow … two royal heroes of mine, thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

    • GP Cox 6:42 am on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      They help represent an era of outstanding music!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 9:39 am on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Had quite the jazz collection myself in my misspent youth, Sr. Muse, because it was my favorite music to listen to when I was completely baked on hashish. Nowadays not so much, but with cannabis legal here in CA, who knows? I may rebuild it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:28 pm on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I have so many records in my collection that I’m beginning to think I overdid it, Ricardo, so my advice (if you “rebuild”) is Don’t get carried away, or when they carry you away, you’ll leave your heirs to decide the collection’s fate (which will probably be the trash bin).

        Like

    • Carmen 3:42 pm on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Just lovely tunes!! You have exquisite taste in music! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:36 pm on April 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Carmen, if you think I have excellent taste in music, you should see my pet rock collection. It rocks! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:51 am on May 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m pretty sure everyone whether they realize it or not everyone is very familiar with the music these men created, even if they don’t realize where it comes from. That’s how ingrained in our culture it is.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:12 am on May 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you’re right, Don. We all need to know where we came from, if for no other reason than to realize that everything is built on a foundation of what was there before us.

      Like

    • milliethom 2:20 pm on May 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m certainly of ‘a certain age’ (meaning getting a bit long in the tooth) Mr M, and had certainly heard of these two musicians and some of their pieces. But I hadn’t realised just how talented they both were, so it was interesting to find out a little more about them here. Great choice of videos.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:49 pm on May 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Millie. I think you can tell how much Duke Ellington loved his craft by the title of his autobiography: MUSIC IS MY MISTRESS. Count Basie’s autobio, on the other hand, bore the title of one of his hit records:

        Like

    • ComputerBook 5:50 am on May 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      ! I think you can tell how much Duke Ellington loved his craft by the title of his autobiography: MUSIC IS MY MISTRESS.

      Liked by 1 person

    • geo. raymond 1:46 am on May 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      In ’83 Count Basie did a show at my school & I didn’t go. That is something I will just have to live with.

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 12:35 am on May 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      2 giants! continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • MG WELLS 6:13 pm on July 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Love the DUKE and your blog. Something for everyone. Enjoy and best wishes to you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:50 pm on July 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, and all good wishes to you as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Balzac, Frank Sinatra, , , , , , , , , , wedding anniversary,   

    MARRIAGE TO A-MUSE 

    Marriage is a wonderful institution, but who wants to live in an institution? –Groucho Marx

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    My wife and I celebrated our 48th wedding anniversary yesterday. You may think that, unlike the 50th, a 48th wedding anniversary is no big deal — and I wouldn’t disagree. But, being in need of an idea for this post, I wasn’t about to look a gift source in the mouth; thus, yesterday’s anniversary became my inspiration to write about….divorce.

    Ha ha — just kidding (my wife might kill me if I were serious). This post will, of course, be about MARRIAGE….a fate which, as fates go, beats being killed (almost) any day. Ha ha ha. Just kidding again! Lest there be any doubt concerning my true feelings about marriage:

    Yes, just as in the song, ask the local gentry, and they will say it’s elementary. But why stop with the local gentry? I believe my readers are nothing if not broad minded:

    Marriage is the most licentious of human institutions — that is the secret of its popularity. –George Bernard Shaw

    Getting married, like getting hanged, is a great deal less dreadful than it has been made out. –H. L. Mencken

    It’s no disgrace for a woman to make a mistake in marrying — every woman does it. –Ed Howe

    A good marriage would be between a blind wife and a deaf husband. –Michel de Montaigne

    Marriage is like paying an endless visit in your worst clothes. –J. B. Priestley

    When a man opens a car door for his wife, it’s either a new car or a new wife. –Prince Philip

    Marriage is a feminine plot to add to a man’s responsibilities and subtract from his rights. –Evan Esar

    Before marriage, a man declares he would lay down his life to serve you; after marriage, he won’t even lay down his paper to talk to you. –Helen Rowland

    The majority of husbands remind me of an orangutan trying to play the violin. –Honore de Balzac

    I haven’t spoken to my wife in years. I didn’t want to interrupt her. –Rodney Dangerfield

    Ha ha ha ha….I mean, Yes, dear — I’m listening. Seriously.

     

     
    • painkills2 12:13 am on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      48 years is quite an accomplishment… for your wife. 😀

      Liked by 3 people

    • Carmen 7:53 am on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats to both of you! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 8:23 am on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations to you both! I have noticed that the Irish love mordant jokes about marriage:
      An Irishman surprised his wife and her lover in the act.
      He grabbed a pistol and pointed it at his head, which made his wife burst out laughing.
      “What do you think you’re laughing at,” he cried, “you’re next.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:19 am on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Lucky you, Sr. Muse. If you added my years of marriage to yours, you’d be at 50 exactly.

      Like

      • mistermuse 1:03 pm on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Lucky indeed, Ricardo….apropos of which, here is an appropriate song (from the same film featured in my previous post):

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mary Cathleen Clark 11:48 am on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations…48 years is quite an accomplishment.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 4:03 pm on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations to you and Mrs. Muse and as you just pointed out, you remembered it.

      Like

      • mistermuse 4:47 pm on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. At my age, it’s no small thing to remember small things (or, sometimes, even large ones).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 5:28 pm on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’m never sure if a marriage is an accomplishment, but yours certainly has been long. Warmest wishes as you celebrate!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:17 pm on September 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Cynthia. Some say you have to work to make marriage work, so in that sense, I guess it is an accomplishment (though I don’t think of it as work!). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jane 4:56 am on September 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations on surviving 48 years! 😉 There are some ripper quotes there and I’m looking forward to using them myself on occasion. Thanks for the laughs! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:25 am on September 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, Jane. One of my favorite tasks in writing posts such as this is doing the research and choosing about ten ‘killer’ quotes (those which, paradoxically, are the “surviving” finalists from the hundreds available). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 9:13 am on September 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations mistermuse to you and yours!! Diamond anniversary is around the corner…so plan a big party and a great gift for Mrs😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:08 am on September 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, first I’ve got to make it to our Golden (50th) Anniversary! 🙂 As for a great gift for the Mrs., I’m thinking what could be better than a furball Garfield? My bank account tells me a diamond wouldn’t be appropriate until our Diamond (60th) Anniversary….ha ha.

      Like

    • MĂ©l@nie 12:23 pm on September 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      admiration and respect, Sir… send you my very best: health, joy, love and long life together… sincerely, MĂ©lanie NB

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:30 pm on September 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, MĂ©l@nie — my best to you as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Belle Papillon 24/7 8:55 am on September 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Wow! Some people are blessed to meet that one person who will complement them and are willing to work on the marriage no matter what. Congratulations to you both and I wish you the best.

      How I wish I was fortunate enough… but I have given up on that institution.
      I have accepted the fact that I’m a frog picker so I will shy away from that and say never again.

      Namaste!

      ❀ BP

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:14 pm on September 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The old saying “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” may be an iffy proposition when it comes to marriage, but as one who got it right the first time, who am I to judge? So I will shy away from “never again” as an absolute….but if that’s what it’s come to in your case, more power to you! 🙂

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Frank Sinatra, , , James Jones, John Steinbeck, , , , , , , Willa Cather, ,   

    TELLTALE TITLES 

    How much time and thought do you devote to coming up with just-the-right title for your story, poem or article? If you take writing seriously, the answer is probably: as long as it takes to nail it — which could be almost no time at all, if it comes to you in a flash — or, more time than a less intense writer is willing to allot.

    Ernest Hemingway, for one, evidently wasn’t the latter type. Case in point: in writing his definitive Spanish Civil War novel, he didn’t settle for less than a killer title that would encapsulate ‘the moral of the story,’ eventually finding it in this passage from a 1624 work by the poet John Donne: “Any man’s death diminishes me because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

    As a writer of (mostly) humorous poems and posts, I’m inclined to go for witty and/or wordplay titles. Many times, the title to a particular piece all but suggests itself, but more often, no such luck, and I’m stuck — until eventually (as with the title of this post) a eureka moment rewards my resolve….or a poem resists my labeling efforts, and I just settle for:

    UNTITLED

    This poem’s title is Untitled —
    Not because it is untitled,
    But because I am entitled
    To entitle it Untitled.

    If I’d not titled it Untitled,
    It would truly be untitled….
    Which would make it unentitled
    To the title of Untitled.

    So it is vital, if untitled,
    Not to title it Untitled,
    And to leave that title idled,
    As a title is entitled.

    Moving on, suppose we try a title quiz based on the Papa Hemingway model (sorry, those of you who’d prefer the mistermuse model). Here are five passages from classic original works from which later authors lifted titles for their novels. Can you name the five later works and pin each tale on its author (ten answers total)? If you name all ten correctly, you win the title (with apologies to Cervantes) of Donkeyote Of All You Survey.

    PASSAGES FROM ORIGINAL WORKS:

    Gentlemen-rankers out on the spree/Damned from here to Eternity/God ha’ mercy on such as we/Ba! Yah! Bah! –Rudyard Kipling

    The best laid schemes o’ mice an’ men/Gang aft a-gley/An’ lea’e us naught but grief an’ pain/For promised joy! –Robert Burns

    By the pricking of my thumbs,/Something wicked this way comes. –Wm. Shakespeare

    Come my tan-faced children/Follow well in order, get your weapons ready/Have you your pistols? Have you your sharp-edged axes?/Pioneers! O pioneers! –Walt Whitman

    No Place so Sacred from such Fops is barr’d,/Nor is Paul’s Church more safe than Paul’s Churchyard./Nay, fly to altars; there they’ll talk you dead/For Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread. –Alexander Pope

    TITLES (WITH AUTHORS) FROM  ABOVE PREVIOUS WORKS:

    FROM HERE TO ETERNITY –James Jones
    OF MICE AND MEN –John Steinbeck
    SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES –Ray Bradbury
    O PIONEERS! –Willa Cather
    WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD –E.M. Forster

    How many of the ten titles/authors did you get? That last title, parenthetically, became part of Johnny Mercer’s lyrics to this 1940 hit song composed by Rube Bloom:

    And now I fear I must tread on out….before something wicked this way comes.

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 10:29 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If there were an award entitled “The Best Poem about Title-ing An Untitled Poem” you certainly would be entitled to it. I recall a creative writing teacher who was a stickler about titles; she said leaving a poem untitled was lazy and a refusal to finish your poem properly. In the history of Literature it seems even the use of Numbers—Sonnet 24—has been acceptable, and often the first line or phrase of a poem is used as its title—-“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night….”.

      I liked the quiz. Pour moi it was a piece of cake. Just this past month I used a line from a Shakespeare sonnet for one of my titles: “Love’s Not Time’s Fool.” Thanks for an enjoyable post!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:21 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cynthia. I believe the exception to the ‘poems must be titled rule’ is the limerick, which should never be titled (if one were to follow the rules, which apparently exist to curtail my fun, so I have occasionally titled a few of mine).

        Congrats on getting 100% on the quiz. I hereby award you the title (in deference to your gender) of DONNA-KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:14 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got all the titles but sad to say did not know the last three authors off the top of my head. I guess I get a 70. But of course I knew the song.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:05 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, you know how much I dig great old songs, so I’m giving you 30 bonus points for knowing FOOLS RUSH IN (WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD). That brings your score up to 100, which wins you the DON(FRANKEL)KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY AWARD….and well deserved, I might add!

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:32 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      AUTO REPLY: I’m on vacation. Any quizzes will be taken when I get back to my office.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:07 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I auto wish you a great vacation, but no doubt you’re having one anyway. Safe trip home.

      Like

    • inesephoto 5:55 pm on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Love your poem 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:20 pm on June 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got the titles but didn’t know all the authors. This was really interesting. Your poem made me laugh. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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