Updates from October, 2021 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 1:03 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    THIS IS A TEST THAT’S A SURPRISE 

    I recently ran across a quote which surprised the hell out of me* — not because of what it said, but because of who said it. This made me wonder about other such quotes (serious or humorous), so I decided to do the research and see what I could find. To make it more interesting, I will post the resulting ten quotes and their quotees in separate, unmatched columns. If you can correctly identify more than 100% of who said what, I will call you the wizard of quid pro quoters — not to mention, you’re just….

    1. I don’t feel we did wrong in taking this great country away from them. There were great numbers of people who needed new land, and the Indians were selfishly trying to keep it for themselves.
    2. There are many dying children out there whose last wish is to meet me.” (no, it wasn’t said by Donald Trump)
    3. You can hardly tell where the computer models finish and the real dinosaurs begin.
    4. Politics gives guys so much power that they tend to behave badly around women. I hope i never get into that.”
    5. We’re absolutely stupid to be embarked in a business where our face is connected with our accomplishments. When you get it from morning to night, it’s no longer wonderful. No dear public ever did anything for me.
    6. Man will not be able to fly for at least another fifty years.
    7. Rolls-Royce announced today that it is recalling all Rolls-Royce cars made after 1966 because of faulty nuts behind the steering wheels.”
    8. I’ll never get married again.
    9. I was the first woman to burn my bra–it took the fire department four days to put it out.”
    10. *”The settlement of the North American continent is little the consequence of right in any democratic or international sense; it was the consequence of a consciousness of right rooted solely in the conviction of the superiority and therefore the right of the white race.”

    a. David Hasselhoff
    b. Adolf Hitler, 1932
    c. John Wayne
    d. The Wright Brothers, 1901
    e. Laura Dern (re the film Jurassic Park)
    f. Walter Cronkite
    g. Elizabeth Taylor, 1982 (the year she divorced her sixth husband; and yes, she did get married again)
    h. Dolly Parton
    i. Bill Clinton
    j. Cary Grant

    Just in case you want to know how well you did, here are the answers: 1.c 2.a 3.e 4.i 5.j 6.d 7.f 8.g 9.h 10. b

    What’s that you say? You got all ten (100%) right (which it’s impossible to do better than), so you want to be recognized for your outstanding achievement. OK — so you’re an outliar! Ha ha ha (sorry about that, but this is my blog, so I get the last word).

     
    • Richard A Cahill 1:16 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Only got John Wayne and Dolly Parton, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 2:10 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I got six of them. Hitler, Wayne, Wright Brothers, Dern, Taylor and Parton. Great little quiz. Cheers, Lynette

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:49 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Hitler was the one that “surprised the hell out of me” and led to this post. For getting that one alone, I award you the “quid pro quoters” award!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 3:49 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink

          Thank you very much. 😉 I wasn’t familiar with the quote; I just figured it had to be him talking about the “white race.”

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ark 2:46 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      More than 100 percent?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:54 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        It is a challenge, isn’t it? But I bet Trump could do it without even thinking about it!

        Like

        • Ark 9:05 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink

          You realise, I hope that there is no such thing as more than 100%.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:46 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink

          You realize, I hope, that there is such a thing as satire (no offense meant, but I didn’t think it was necessary to spell it out until now).

          Liked by 1 person

    • rawgod 4:00 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Dolly Parton and Liz Taylor were easy. So were the Wright Bros. The other guys guys were pretty much interchangeable, except Cary Grant. David Hasselhoff thinks kids are dying to meet him? A rather egotistical sense of self-worth there or what! Now, if he had said the French, well, that would have made things easier, and more honest!

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:50 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      The full quote is, “Man will not be able to fly for at least another fifty years…. oh wait, what if we put wings on this thing?”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:55 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I’m afraid I only got the Jurassic Park reference. Not up on my David Hasslehoff quotes I guess.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:23 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        (Laura) Dern it, you only got one (not that I would’ve done any better had I taken the test ‘cold’).

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:09 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      LOL I only got two right (Wright Brothers and Elizabeth Taylor). I’m not very good with quotes apparently.
      You may quote me on that. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 11:17 am on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Well done everyone who scored! I didn’t score any, so that makes me an idiot or a liar! 🤣

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:19 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I wouldn’t go that far, Ashley — let’s just say you’re ‘quote-challenged.’ 😉

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 1:44 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I did not fair well 😦

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 3:54 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Hoff and the Wright Brothers link threw me, then I realised one was all hot air, the other heavier than air. And I was tempted to put Hill Clinton with number 8- then realised it was Bill Clinton. So, no cigar for me there!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:17 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Actually, number 8 is Elizabeth Taylor (Bill Clinton is 4), but 8 should be Hillary because she’s still married to Bill. I’ll leave it there because it’s starting to sound like a soap opera.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:36 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Very well done, mm—and some super puns within! Best thing was TFG didn’t make your quota for the quoters list.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:44 pm on October 20, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I do have a regret about this post/comments, which is that I didn’t temper my second reply to Ark’s comments. I’m afraid I let my exasperation at Ark’s repeated ‘not getting it’ get the better of me.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 12:41 am on October 21, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I understand that. I’ve regretted some responses I’ve made occasionally. To err…to forgive yourself is fine,

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mr. Ohh's Sideways View 1:39 pm on October 21, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I got Wayne, Wright Bros. Taylor, Parton and Clinton I guess that’s half The easy half Nice Bing
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      Take the road to Laughter

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 10:25 am on October 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Some of John Wayne’s values and beliefs were bad news.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:24 pm on October 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      My husband is responsible for the “I will never get married again.” This of course before he became my husband.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:57 pm on October 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I’m sure he hasn’t had any second thoughts, Elizabeth (or, at least, not out loud). 😉

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    RUNNING WILD(E) 

    Tomorrow (October 16) being the 167th birthday of Irish wit, poet, and playwright Oscar Wilde, I’m going to run a delicti-ous corpus of Wilde’s witty and often wise (and, at times, injudicious) words by you. I would have sought some new and original quotes from Mr. Wilde for this post, but given his age and condition, it’s judicious to assume he doesn’t wish to be disturbed. Thus, I will make do with these Oscar winners of old:

    The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast.

    I sometimes think that God, in creating man, somewhat overestimated his ability.

    Women are meant to be loved, not to be understood.

    Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.

    Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

    The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is young” [in memories.*] *my interpretation of the meaning of the quote, which is from Wilde’s novel and play THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY

    INTERMISSION: No doubt you’ve been dying to know from whence cometh the inspiration for the title of this post, so I will keep you in suspenders no longer (just kidding–I have never kept anyone in suspenders….though I have seen fit to gift an upscale belt on occasion):

    The above scene is from the Billy Wilder film Some Like It Hot. We now return from Wilder to Wilde:

    I can resist everything except temptation.”

    Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes.”

    There is always something infinitely mean about other people’s tragedies.

    The more one analyses people, the more all reasons for analysis disappear. Sooner or later one comes to that dreadful universal thing called human nature.

    Who, being loved, is poor?

    There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. That is all.

    This, of course, is not a book, but a blog.

    That is all.

     
    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 1:46 am on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I have always liked Oscar Wilde’s work (I don’t like the comment about women – Oscar, you should know better) and it’s terrible what happened to him. Interesting juxtaposition with the Marilyn Monroe piece; she was always wanting to be understood. Cheers.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 2:01 am on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Wilde was a very complex person who considered himself a genius, and probably was. His observations offended many ‘uptight’ people in his day, but he wasn’t an ungenerous person. As for the comment about women, you can’t say I didn’t warn readers early on about his “at times, injudicious words”!!!

        Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 2:45 am on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      His comments were of his time, though he must have felt so out of time in the society of the times. He was one hell of a wit.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 8:07 am on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      It’s amazing how many of these phrases we know, but don’t realize from whence they came. The old/young is one of my favorites…. perhaps because it’s so true.

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 10:17 am on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Sure he’s quotable… but is he art?

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 1:34 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Though Wilde had a lot to say about art, he seemed to be of mixed minds about it. Here are two quotes which at first glance appear to be at odds with each other:

        “Art is the most intense mode of Individualism that the world has known.”
        “The only excuse for making a useless thing is that one admires it intensely. All art is quite useless.”

        The latter quote is from the Dorian Gray character in his play, and seems out of context with his own belief..

        Liked by 3 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:29 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Loved the Wilde’s quotes. Couldn’t help laughing out loud at God overestimating his abilities 😀

      Liked by 3 people

    • magickmermaid 5:39 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Oscar Wilde was a genius.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 6:15 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      A lot of laughs and a lot of truth in this post, Mr. Muse

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:36 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don — but when you make Oscar Wilde the subject of a post, even I would be hard put to screw it up.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 8:04 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      My favorite, especially useful these days, “The truth is rarely pure and never simple.”

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:32 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        The same, it seems to me, could be said of lies — especially the “never simple” part….hence these famous lines from a Sir Walter Scott poem:

        Oh what a tangled web we weave
        When first we practice to deceive.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Elizabeth 11:02 am on October 19, 2021 Permalink

          I have been stopped many times by remembering that very line. Lying can take too much effort.

          Liked by 1 person

    • icelandpenny 3:22 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Love this, love the quotes, and offer this link for other quote fiends: the Quote Investigator! https://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/09/05/oscar-will/ — this particular link is to its exploration of a reported exchange between Wilde and Whistler. Whistler said something witty at a gathering; Wilde said he wished that he had said that; Whistler replied, “You will, Oscar, you will.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:25 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the very interesting link. That exchange with Whistler was probably one of the few times that Wilde was ‘out-witted.’ No less a personage than George Bernard Shaw wrote of Wilde that “He was incomparably the greatest talker of his time–perhaps of all time.” Though Shaw was a fellow Irishman, I, for one, wouldn’t accuse him of being biased!

        Liked by 1 person

    • icelandpenny 3:26 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      OK, one more quote, because I’m on a roll, and to balance Wilde’s observation about women. I offer you Charlotte Whitton’s observation about men. She was mayor of Ottawa in the early 1950s, a time when women faced big obstacles whenever they got all uppity and stepped out of the kitchen. She said: “To succeed at anything, a woman needs to be twice as good as a man.” She’d then pause & with perfect timing deliver the punchline: “Fortunately, that’s not difficult.”

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:42 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        If I were a woman, there are many men I wouldn’t want anything to do with (much less be twice as “good” as), such as Donald Trump, who somehow has managed to attract many women (it must be his impeccable character, humility and respect for others).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:11 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Such clever and witty observations. I especially like his categorization of books: well written or badly written.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mr. Ohh's Sideways View 9:28 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Great Love the quotes I knew most of them but never knew they were Wilde’s. A question about the last line. As a blog Is Wilde saying It can’t be badly written?? Because Mine can
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      You have to laugh to live but why not Live to Laugh!!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:37 am on October 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I think what Wilde meant is that a book should be judged strictly by how well or badly it’s written, regardless of subject matter. No doubt he’d say the same about a blog if there were such a thing in his day, so have no qualms about posting smut or porn on your blog, as long as you write it well. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 4:48 am on October 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know what happened to him; I had to look it up. Stories like that are always so baffling to me, how churches and/or religious societies could turn someone away who’s looking for help.
      Wilde’s wit brought Dave Chappelle to mind and this recent anger at his latest stand-up. They seem of a similar mind, sort of ahead of their time, forthright, and probably fairly misunderstood.
      Even the quote about women, to me, was touching and poignant; I saw it as women are a mystery, beyond him, at the very least, beyond men in general, at the most, but also worthy of tenderness and care, even adoration, like any human being is.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on October 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        May I say that you are wise beyond your years….and I don’t even know how old you are. I know, flattery will get me nowhere–but I’m already there, so I’ll guess that you’re much younger than me (but then, who isn’t?).

        Anyway, I think ‘the world’ has always been at odds with (if not downright hostile to) those who are more complex than culture’s ‘comfort zone.’ Wilde notoriously exemplified this, and paid the exorbitant price of his LIFE. Others only pay the price of becoming a cynic….a small price, it seems to me, for keeping one’s sanity.

        Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 2:17 pm on October 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Ha. I know what you mean! About “who isn’t” younger, right? Thanks, mistermuse, haha. Although I probably would have said the same thing 20 or 30 years ago, therefore possibly BEING wise beyond my years, I said it now, many years later, making me just average. We’re probably the same generation. My photo’s like ten years old, hehe.
      Oh, man, you said it perfectly: those at odds with those who are more complex than culture’s ‘comfort zone.’ One wouldn’t think one would have to pay with their life for “thinking out of the box”, right? But then again, what am I saying? All the witches who were just midwives, all the astronomers who knew the earth was round, all the persecuted writers and philosophers. How dare they not just sit on their sofas watching The Kardashians and arguing over having pizza or Chinese food for dinner! How dare they?

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:05 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    LO, MORE MR. NICE GUY 

    October 5th being Do Something Nice Day, I thought I’d be nicer than nice and post something extra nice for my nice readers (which I assume includes most of you). As for the nasty nasty faction, Nicely Nicely Johnson nicely nicely asks you Guys and Dolls to SIT DOWN, YOU’RE ROCKING THE BOAT!

    I suppose being a Nice Guy (or Doll) comes with the territory if you live in Nice, France; Niceville, Florida; or Nice, California. I would even go so far as to say that living thereabouts is,,,,

    But even if you’re a resident of the likes of Gross, Nebraska; Monster, Holland; or Toadsuck, Arkansas, on this of all days, you can DO SOMETHING NICE — it’s not all that hard.

    Have a Nice Day.

     
    • willedare 1:25 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      NIce!!!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 2:36 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Would Alice Cooper approve of these slanted lyrics? On the other hand, the people of Stoner, British Columbia or Climax, Saskatchewan might be rather nice because they’re … um, satisfied. 😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 8:13 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I doubt that Alice Cooper, the “Godfather of Shock Rock,” ever saw the Broadway musical “Guys and Dolls” or the movie based on it, even though he and it are approximately the same age. As to the nice people of Stoner, BC, and Climax, Saskatchewan, I applaud their….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:15 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I feel like you wrote this post just for me. Guys and Dolls is my favorite musical ( I know all the words to every song ) and I have visited Nice as well.
      👍

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:28 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        That’s one of the nicest comments ever, Rg! I also love Guys and Dolls, and have watched the movie probably a dozen times over the years.

        Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 8:31 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoyed Bennett’s work with Lady Gaga. Not really a Diana Krall fan, though…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:43 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        As you know, Tony has Alzheimer’s. Here’s the “Sixty Minutes” clip of Anderson Cooper talking about it with Lady Gaga:

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 11:54 am on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful! This post is just for me! 😊🙋‍♂️

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:49 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. I hope many readers feel this post is “just for me!”

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:32 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      What a nice post, Mistermuse! A nice day to you, too 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Elizabeth 4:46 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Do we get to be grumpy the rest of the year? How odd that they felt the need to come up with a nice day.

      Like

    • Carmen 7:03 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t ask me why, but the place Dildo, Newfoundland sprang to mind. (*she grins)

      Liked by 3 people

    • Mr. Ohh's Sideways View 7:22 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      You can never go wrong with Tony Bennet or Rosemary Clooney Real Nice stuff Thanks
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      Try Laughter You might like it

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 1:39 pm on October 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I love the Canadian Capers! Better than nice! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 6:15 pm on October 7, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      this is a very nice post Mr M … so long since I’ve visited I thought I’d share a newer version of an old song 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:51 pm on October 8, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry for the delayed response, but my computer was hacked late yesterday afternoon and I was “out of business” until I got help getting back online (I could never have done it myself because I’m a tech wreck). Anyway, thanks for the comment – “Nice To Meet Ya” again!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Lazos 10:42 am on October 11, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I love the idea of a “do something nice” day. It should be every day!

      Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 2:01 pm on October 14, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I love it ! ! !
      Tony Bennett is like Tom Jones, two of my favs, too, especially because their voices lasted so long even into their upper years.
      Have you ever heard Tom Jones singing the theme song to Duck Dodgers? He puts his all even for a cartoon song !!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:36 pm on October 14, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I hadn’t heard that song before, as (to be honest) I’m not a big Tom Jones fan — not that I dislike him, but I like other male singers more, including Bobby Darin, Mel Tormé, Ray Charles, and (of course) Sinatra. Other than IT’S NOT UNUSUAL and THE GREEN GREEN GRASS OF HOME (both of which I like), I can’t even remember his other hits. Sorry!….but thanks for the clip.

        Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 2:59 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, I guess it’s not unusual to not be loved by absolutely everyone on earth, right?
      (See what I did there? lol) 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:18 pm on October 17, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Fabulous music. I could listen to Tony Bennett all day, and sometimes I do.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on September 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    BY GEORGE (GERSHWIN) 

    “George and [his lyricist brother] Ira Gershwin, musical laureates of the Jazz Age, wrote at the height of Broadway’s glory years–a time when the American theater was at its most varied and abundant. During Broadway’s record-breaking Christmas week, 1927, twenty offerings premiered during a seven night period, eleven on the evening of December 26. In January 1928, the Gershwins had three shows running concurrently on the Great White Way.” –Robert Kimball, musical theater historian

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    You’ll be happy to hear I’m going to be a man of few words in this post, and be even happier to hear music by George on his birthday (Sept. 26, 1898). Inasmuch as my followers are the most discriminating in all blogdom, I see no need to elaborate on the opening quote. You know what Gershwin means to American music….so let’s get right into it and celebrate with this Ella-gent swinger from one of those January 1928 shows:

    Next, another of my favorite Gershwin songs from one of those shows, sung here by the wonderful Lee Wiley with Fats Waller at the piano:

    We bring down the curtain with the title song from OF THEE I SING, which opened at the Music Box Theater, NYC, on Dec. 26, 1931 (and is another of my many favorite Gershwin songs):

    Of thee WE sing, George Gershwin — Happy Birthday!

     
  • mistermuse 12:27 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    ELEPHANT APPRECIATION DAY 

    As you know (of course you do), Sept. 22 is Elephant Appreciation Day…..and, as elephants know (but, try as they may, can’t forget), they are the symbol of the Republican Party in these good old dis-United States of America. But have you ever wondered how this thick-skinned pachyderm came to be linked with the GOP (or the donkey with the Democrats, for that matter)? Here is the link:

    Now, as much as I would like to bandy about what a Grandy Old Party the Republican Party is today, today is, after all, a day to appreciate elephants, not Republicans. So let’s get in the swing of the thing:

    With Thanksgiving Day and pumpkin pie season fast approaching, who wouldn’t appreciate this elephantine service:

    I’d go on, but I can’t remember what I was going to say next, so I’ll just say don’t forget to hug an elephant today, and wish you a happy Elephant Appreciation Day.

     
    • Rivergirl 1:15 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I was unaware of this particular holiday but am in full support and will celebrate accordingly.
      👍

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 2:15 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      My wife thanks you for reminding her and her vast array of elephants, pictures and knick-knacks that are all around our house, that today is dedicated to elephant lovers.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:07 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I know the feeling, Don. My wife has rooster / hen bric-a-brac all around the house. It’s a bad influence, but at least I have something to blame when my puns lay an egg (like this one).

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 3:12 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I thank you, as I’m sure elephants everywhere also do. 😉

      Like

    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 3:25 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know that elephants were so fond of pumpkins!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 3:43 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant reminder! I nearly forgot! Hooooray for heffalumps!

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 4:08 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Elephants everywhere are swing-dancing and and drinking pumpkin lattes! I love the Franz Jackson tune!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:47 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        They need to celebrate while they can, because tomorrow they have to go back to work for the GOP. It’s almost enough to make a groan elephant cry.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 5:39 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      😀 I’m sure they are groaning!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Catherine Haustein 11:42 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Poor elephants. When is donkey appreciation day?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:38 am on September 23, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        The closest such day I can find is WORLD DONKEY DAY (May 8), which donkeys should appreciate because the whole world celebrates it (except for Republican elephants).

        Like

    • annieasksyou 7:41 pm on September 23, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Elephants are the best—thank you for the reminder. It’s time, though, that they organized a union and refused to be associated with the seditious Republican hatemongers.

      “Groan elephant cry” indeed!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 2:45 pm on September 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for reminding us to appreciate the Grand Old Pachyderms, Sr. Muse

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 10:12 am on October 2, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I appreciate that their legs can be made into decorative waste paper baskets…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:33 pm on October 2, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate that their trunks are already trunks so they don’t have to be made into trunks….though it wouldn’t surprise me if humans made them into waste paper baskets.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mr. Ohh's Sideways View 9:27 pm on October 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I can never contribute so I’m glad I can this time But here’s my favorite elephant song The Baby Elephant Walk
      ;;
      ;;
      ;;
      Try Laughter You might like it

      Liked by 4 people

    • literaryeyes 10:07 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know why the elephant and the donkey were such party animals. Interesting. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:49 pm on October 15, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t have a problem with them being party animals, but I think they got their parties mixed up: elephants aren’t mean-spirited and thus should be Democrats, while Republicans are obviously jackasses — er, donkeys.

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:01 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    AHLERT: THERE’S FROST ON THE MOON (and raccoons in the closet) 

    Once upon a yesterday, there was an earthling named Fred Ahlert, who was born tomorrow (Sept. 19) in a year long gone (1892), and lived to compose a time capsule of out-of-this-world music in the 1920s-30s….including:

    If you were puzzled by the assertion “don’t need my raccoon” in the lyrics of the song sung by Shaw’s vocalist*, click https://www.messynessychic.com/2014/11/26/the-1920s-college-kids-and-the-fur-pimp-coat-craze/

    *Peg La Centra, one of the most underrated big band singers of the swing era

    Unlike many composers of that time who wrote songs mainly for stage shows or the movies, native New Yorker Fred Ahlert wrote primarily for Tin Pan Alley. Among his most popular hits were I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter, I’ll Get By (As Long as I Have You), Walkin’ My Baby Back Home, and this yellow moonlight sonata, sung here by ol’ blue eyes:

    One of the few movies for which Ahlert wrote songs was the early talkie FREE AND EASY (1930). Here is the title song from that picture, starring the great silent film comedian Buster Keaton. Who knew he could also sing and dance?

    Fred Ahlert was inducted into The Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970 — seventeen years after his death. Who can say why the Songwriters HOF didn’t get Ahlert sooner? Such is life in the big city, wouldn’t you say?

     
    • Rivergirl 7:46 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      The poor raccoons didn’t stand a chance in the 20’s.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:44 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        ….but, in the Maine, they survived to thrive. 😉

        P.S. For those who don’t follow Rivergirl’s blog, that’s an inside (or rather, outside) joke.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Rivergirl 8:59 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink

          They did indeed.
          😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • rawgod 9:42 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink

          Pretty sure, as long as the joke is read, the reference is quite obvious, lol, even to us uninitiated. But maybe it is time to change that…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 10:09 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink

          For those who still don’t get it, rg, Rg lives in Maine.

          Like

    • ladysighs 8:58 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I love “The Moon Was Yellow.” I may have to give Frank some competition. 😉 In due time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:13 am on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I too love “The Moon Was Yellow.” As for giving Frank some competition, at least you can’t make him jealous, because he’s dead. 😉

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:26 pm on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      As a life-long moon-gazer, I really like the first tune! And learned some new facts. I had no idea Buster Keaton could sing and dance. I remember my parents playing a recording of “I’m going to sit right down and write myself a letter” when I was very small. It always made me laugh. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:54 pm on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I love your childhood reaction to that song. It’s a beautiful example of what adults can lose when no longer able to experience things in a childlike way.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 1:51 pm on September 18, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      The Moon Was Yellow was a favourite of my mother’s. I hadn’t heard it in many, many years – I had a visceral reaction listening to it. Beautiful song and Sinatra sings it so well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 11:58 am on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Well, jeez, those fur coats were pretty snazzy. They looked really good! (even though they could never get away with it today, lol)
      And like you said about Buster Keaton: it’s more like “who knew he could dance in those PANTS?” ha ha!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:50 pm on September 22, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      The raccoons in those days should have pressed charges against the scoundrels who stole their fur coats!
      Who knew Buster Keaton could dance in those pants indeed — not to mention, like a puppet in that clown suit? Great rendition of a good song (especially when you consider how primitive movie making was in those early talkie days).

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:06 am on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    MAURICE de PAREE: A MAN AND HIS MUSICALS 

    “Perhaps the greatest movie musical of all time” — that’s what film critics like Leonard Maltin called Singin’ In The Rain (1952). If you’ve seen it, you know it’s a spoof of the transition from silent to sound films in 1928-29.

    “Only in 1929 did the talkies really begin to talk–and sing–to much of America. By year’s end, nearly half of the country’s twenty thousand movie houses were wired for sound. Nine out of ten Americans were going to the movies at least once a week. Paramount was the most Continental of studios and took pride in the elegance, inventiveness, and visual dazzle of its product. With the shift to talkies, it lured name stage entertainers like Maurice Chevalier, the Marx Brothers, Gertrude Lawrence, Walter Huston, and Claudette Colbert.” –Edward Baron Turk, arts critic, educator and prize-winning author on the culture of France and Hollywood film.

    This post is ‘a remembrance of sings past’ for the first-named of the above entertainers, Maurice Chevalier, who was born in Paris (Sept. 12, 1888) and died in Paris ((Jan. 1, 1972). He signed with Paramount in 1928 and came to America in 1929 to star in musicals, the first of which was INNOCENTS OF PARIS….but the second was the one that won him instant international acclaim. That film, THE LOVE PARADE, was adapted from a French play (Le Prince Consort) and starred Chevalier as Count Alfred Renard, a Sylvanian military attaché in Paris who has been ordered back to Sylvania by the Queen to be reprimanded for his scandalous affairs.

    Co-starring Jeanette MacDonald as Queen of Sylvania, it was the first talkie directed by the man with “the [Ernst] Lubitsch touch.” In this scene from the show, the playboy Count plays the Queen’s frustrated gigolo:

    In real life, Chevalier was far from the jaunty, insouciant character he played on stage and screen. Again quoting Edward Baron Turk: “Lubitsch understood that behind the Frenchman’s bubbly image was a troubled man. From his alcoholic father, Chevalier had inherited a predisposition to panic attacks, suicidal fantasies, and [other] disorders. Above all, Chevalier suffered from a chronic sense of inferiority.” Nevertheless, after a nervous breakdown in 1923, he went on to become the ‘Toast of Paris’ in solo triumphs at such venues as the Casino de Paris and Folies Bergère, leading to his being enticed to Hollywood before the end of the decade.

    Following his great success in THE LOVE PARADE, in 1930-31 he appeared in four more films, including PARAMOUNT ON PARADE, a variety revue devised to show off the studio’s large roster of stars. But it wasn’t until 1932 that Chevalier again found artistic and box office magic in what critic Leonard Maltin called (and I agree) “One of the best musicals ever made”: LOVE ME TONIGHT. Among the many things this film had going for it was the inspired directing of Rouben Mamoulian and the glorious songs of Rodgers and Hart, including “Lover,” “Isn’t It Romantic,” and this ‘signature’ Chevalier chanson:

    By the mid-1930s, his popularity in the U.S. waned, and he returned to France. He came back to the U.S. in 1947, but didn’t recover his former luster until his role in GIGI (1958), for which he received an honorary Oscar. Do you remember this Lerner & Loewe song which introduced the story of Gigi? I remember it well:

    What is left but to say Happy 133rd Birthday, Maurice Chevalier….and Thank heaven for Maurice de Paree, his alter ego.

     
    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 3:33 am on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      He lead quite a life, including being accused of wartime collaboration. I enjoyed the clips.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:00 am on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Lynette. In my research for this post, one encyclopedia’s Chevalier listing included this:
        “Military service, World War I; wounded and in prison camp. During World War II in seclusion; at one time rumored killed.”
        No mention of being accused of wartime collaboration, but the sources I checked are American. There is no doubt more information about it in France, but “I’m not going to go there” (pardon my play on words).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 3:35 pm on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      My French grandmother had a total “thing” for him. I think she told us she knew him. That was unlikely a most of her tales, but it was fun to imagine.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:04 pm on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve read that he was quite the ladies man, so if she ever came within his sight, who knows?

      Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 8:04 pm on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the post and the Chevalier background. That “Thank Heaven for Little Girls” disgusted me as a child and gave me the creeps. It still does.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:46 pm on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        That surprises me, as neither my wife nor my two daughters had that reaction to the song (or film). I’ve always thought of it, as I’m sure the composers (Lerner & Loewe) did, as a paean to little girls. But it doesn’t surprise me that it still gives you the creeps, because childhood trauma can have long-lasting carryover. In any case, I’m glad you appreciated the post as a whole.

        Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 12:06 pm on September 13, 2021 Permalink

          Josie, while talking with my 50 year old daughter this morning, the subject of old songs/music came up, and she mentioned THANK HEAVEN FOR LITTLE GIRLS. ….which led me to bring up this post and mention your comment. She had a different take on your reaction to the song than mine, saying that it is probably cultural and generational, based on modern, politically charged gender attitudes which view such songs as sexist. So, in that contest, I think I should have chosen a better word than “trauma” in my previous comment, and I apologize.

          Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 11:03 pm on September 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      A nice romp with the ever-charming Maurice. Sad to think it may well have been tough for him to turn on the charm—perhaps much of the time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:31 am on September 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Yes — and he does it so naturally, you’d never guess that it didn’t come naturally. All the more credit to him.

        Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 2:30 pm on September 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Of course I had no idea about the inner life of Chevalier; it’s always fascinating to get a peek behind the mask people wear. But it’s a sad peek. Maybe the successes made it slightly less bitter (his past).

      I understand, too, where your other commenter is coming from about “Thank heaven for little girls.”
      It reminds me of how now the popular stance is to boycott the song “Baby, it’s cold outside,” and/or change the lyrics, as I think John Legend did.

      Perception is subjective, and I would never undermine anyone’s point of view re: where they’re coming from. But I definitely think there’s a war of words and feelings going on that has taken a skewed turn that people will come to regret in years to come. I do feel like any tiny thing that can be construed as “objectionable” comes under scrutiny and we’re now living in a culture of fear and self-censureship. It’s often “freedom of speech” only for a certain group now–not for everybody. If people don’t realize that this is the frog boiling slowly in the pot, leading us to Farenheit 451 and 1984… they might feel as scared as I do!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:03 pm on September 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Wisely said. People of different generations (and even the same generation) and cultures are often not on the same wavelength. With maturity should come perspective, but maturity seems to be in short supply these days, even among those old enough to know better (a phrase I remember hearing ages ago).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Geo. Raymond 12:12 am on September 23, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      My favorite Maurice Chevalier film came much later toward the end of his career, In Search of the Castaways. He plays a geography professor who helps two kids search for their missing father. The thing I find most interesting about his character is he continually puts the children in great danger, at one point singing, as they scale a mountain “And if we fall, crash, bang, and die a terrible death, never mind, we’ve had the joy the joy of the climb!” It’s a fascinating film, and deserves to be re-discovered.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:46 am on September 23, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I haven’t seen it, but I checked film critic Leonard Maltin’s review. He says the movie has a good cast, but suffers from “muddled continuity” and gives it only 2 1/2 stars. I guess some people are just hard to please!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Geo. Raymond 12:57 am on September 23, 2021 Permalink

          Haha Well, I loved it, anyway. Bought the record album off ebay, framed it, and it’s on the wall in front of me.

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 8:57 am on September 28, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Ever see Betty Boop’s impersonation of Chevalier?

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:22 am on September 28, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Oui — and merci for the clip.

      For those who don’t want to watch the entire 7 minutes+ clip, here is the pertinent part:

      Like

      • mistermuse 10:26 am on September 28, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Oops — for some reason, the “pertinent part” didn’t show up….but enough is enough, so I’ll leave well enough alone.

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    SOMETHING TO REMEMBER HIM BY 

    More than [various species] becoming extinct in our time, we in the painted jungles of the theatre are also faced with our own disappearing species: charm, [which] lately has been critically outlawed on the grounds of criminal literacy. I can only shrug sadly and chalk it up as another victim of that creeping nastiness called modern civilization.” –Alan Jay Lerner, January 1974

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    The above quote is from the foreword to Dancing in the Dark / Words by Howard Dietz / An Autobiography. Dietz (one of my all-time favorite songwriters) was the decades-long lyricist and librettist of 32 Broadway musicals, whose (Sept. 8, 1896) birthday the day after tomorrow, I remember today.

    I suppose that I’m just an old romantic at heart,
    A lover of love songs, when such songs were an art
    ❤️ Such that music and lyrics with taste and charm
    ❤️ Went Dancing in the Dark, and left arm in arm,
    Alone Together, to live out a dream til death do us part?

    Here, then, are three Howard Dietz songs, starting with something from Three’s A Crowd (1930), starring Libby Holman, Clifton Webb, and Fred Allen:

    In his autobiography, Dietz wrote that “Libby Holman was game for anything. She was a child prodigy and had gone to law school at the age of 16 but decided that she preferred a career on the stage. Though she had studied law, she was a frivolous personality who appeared in the nude in her dressing room, and therefore had a lot of visitors.” Well, I imagine that WAS something to remember her by.

    Next, we have Dancing in the Dark from The Band Wagon (1931) starring Fred and Adele (Fred’s sister) Astaire. This clip is from the movie version (1953) starring Fred and Cyd Charisse, she of the “phenomenal legs” (so pegged by film critic Pauline Kael):

    Our curtain call, Alone Together, is from the 1932 musical Flying Colors starring Clifton Webb and a cast which included Imogene Coca, who seniors may remember as Sid Caesar’s TV co-star in Your Show of Shows in the 1950s:

    NOTE: Pay no attention to the “Video unavailable” below, which I tried, but was unable to delete.

     
    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 1:43 am on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I really enjoyed Cyd and Fred. Amazing dancers. Sigh.

      Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 1:44 am on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      MM, I close my eyes and I’m magically transported to another time and place…always, thank you, kind sir!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:48 am on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        You’re very welcome. As the world keeps getting uglier (or so it seems), it is good to have beautiful memories.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 11:33 am on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I just thought it was me! Getting more cynical as I grow older was not what I expected. I’m beginning to think that I’m walking the streets with a billboard declaring “The End Is Nigh”! Doom, doom, doom!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:30 pm on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Funny you should mention “The End is Nigh” because I swear I can hear John (the one who’s always in the bathroom) say the same thing whenever I’m about to sit on the can.

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:36 pm on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      As the only ‘Dancing in the Dark’ I’m familiar with is by Bruce Springsteen 😉 , it is delightful to see another version. Yes, MM, you are a romantic at heart. The world needs more like you! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 1:46 pm on September 6, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I could watch Fred Astaire dance all day! Thanks for sharing the clip 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • selizabryangmailcom 5:15 pm on September 9, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      It’s really telling that the quote from Lerner: “…charm, [which] lately has been critically outlawed on the grounds of criminal literacy. I can only shrug sadly and chalk it up as another victim of that creeping nastiness called modern civilization” ……….. is from 1974! One would think it was a quote from the ’80s,
      ’90s, or DEFINITELY today. But apparently our downhill slide from civility had already begun…..

      Wow, Dietz was a talent.
      Also fascinating to read about Miss Holman studying law but deciding to be an entertainer. That would be handy for being able to spot grifters of any sort, I would think, in that business.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:52 pm on September 9, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        As much as anything else, I think Lerner was decrying the demise of the kind of Broadway musical which had entertained audiences since the days of Cole Porter and Rodgers & Hart up to Lerner and Lowe. But I also think you’re right that this can’t be separated from (and is a reflection of) our culture’s “downhill slide from civility.”

        Like

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:20 am on September 11, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      The Band Wagon: a great movie. Hi. I enjoyed this essay a lot.

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 10:35 am on September 16, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I never warmed up to Cyd Charisse… I think it had something to do with the way she jilted Nerd-Gene-Kelly in Singin’ in the Rain…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 6:45 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    CHANGE OF PACE: OLD NEW ENGLAND 

    I have long had an interest in American history, so when I rediscovered a book of old New England houses as I was perusing my overloaded book shelves (looking for ‘downsizing candidates’), it brought back memories of several long-ago trips to and through that venerable region….and I decided to do this post as a change of pace from my usual fare.

    OPEN HOUSE IN NEW ENGLAND is, for want of a better term, a biography in words and pictures of 242 houses, taverns and other buildings which were old (built 1600s to 1840s) when the book was published in 1937 — though at least one home (Longfellow’s birthplace in Portland, demolished in 1955) has since been lost to the ravages of time/vagaries of fate and progress. There is too much to cover in one post, so I will confine the following to just one of the six New England states: Maine, home of my blogging friend and yours, Rivergirl (River’s world).

    Among the 22 Maine edifices listed, there are several familiar names, such as the HARRIET BEECHER STOWE HOUSE in Brunswick, Maine, which was recently restored by nearby Bowdoin College:

    Here, minus the Harriet Beecher Stowe House and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s Birthplace, are some of the other listings (alphabetically by city/town):

    AUGUSTA: THE BLAINE MANSION (built 1830s, one-time home of James G. Blaine, former Republican congressman, senator, Secretary of State, and presidential nominee in the late 1800s)

    AUGUSTA: FORT WESTERN (built 1754, consists of two restored block houses and original garrison house)

    FARMINGTON: NORDICA HOMESTEAD (built circa 1840, home of Lillian Nordica, opera singer, the first American woman to achieve international acclaim in her field

    GORHAM: BAXTER MUSEUM (built 1797, birthplace of former Gorham mayor and home of former Maine governor

    KITTERY POINT: LADY PEPPERRELL HOUSE (built 1760) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Pepperrell_House

    MACHIAS: BURNHAM TAVERN (built 1770) https://www.burnhamtavern.com/

    YORK: THE OLD GAOL (built 1653) https://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ME-01-031-0003


    We end up appropriately AWAY DOWN EAST IN MAINE, recorded almost a century ago:

     
    • JosieHolford 7:01 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Love the song! What a great find!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:14 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        The composer of that song, Walter Donaldson, was almost as prolific as his contemporary, Irving Berlin, and yet is all but forgotten today. Among his many hits were MY BLUE HEAVEN, LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME, LITTLE WHITE LIES, and YES SIR, THAT’S MY BABY (most, or all, of which are also all but forgotten today).

        Liked by 3 people

    • rawgod 7:52 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Maine. I actually lived across the border from Calais, Maine in St. Stephen, New Brunswick. Even did a bit of illegal massage work in Calais, no green card. Never saw any of these houses, but saw a lot of really old homes from the outside. It seemed a nice area, but everyone talked funny, lol.

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 8:22 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I’ve driven through Calais/St. Stephen twice (four times, counting the return trips) on the way to vacations in New Brunswick and beyond, but that was decades ago. I don’t recall a thing about either town, but that’s probably good, because I’ve run into a few real a-hole customs agents crossing the U.S.-Canada border elsewhere that left an indelible memory.

        Liked by 1 person

        • rawgod 4:33 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink

          I hope those agents were American? Canadian agents are supposed to be nice to our American brothers and sisters!
          Though it seems they do not have to be nice to travellers from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Funny about that!

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 5:28 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink

          One was American and one was Canadian. Both were at relatively remote crossings with little traffic, so the agents were free to play Lord of the Border. The Canadian agent was at a crossing from North Dakota into either Manitoba or Saskatchewan and, as I discovered later, disconnected a wire beneath my dashboard while ostensibly searching my car for I-don’t-know-what. The moral of the story is to cross at busy crossings where agents don’t have time to indulge their malevolence toward ‘foreigners.’

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:05 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I’m ashamed to say I’ve only been to three of these. Interesting tidbit…. our neighbor 2 doors down just had Joshua Lawrence Chamberlin’s carriage house moved to his property. The land where it originally stood had been sold and it was going to be demolished.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:02 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I note that the above carriage house was located in Brewer, Maine, so to have a former Brewer site moved to within spittoon distance of your house probably carries historic associations. 😉

        P.S. I haven’t been to many more than three historic sites (not counting dozens oi covered bridges) here in Ohio, so I should be equally ashamed.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rivergirl 7:40 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink

          It’s funny, when we travel we seek out historic sites but rarely explore them here at home. As for Brewer, yes. An ironic coincidence.
          😉

          Liked by 2 people

    • Catherine Haustein 8:38 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I have never even been to Maine. I will put it on my list of places to visit. Such history and I think I’m a Yankee at heart.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:19 pm on August 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        If you’re a nature (as well as a history) lover, I recommend a stop at Acadia National Park on your visit to Maine. It alone is worth the trip.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 1:11 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I haven’t been to Maine in many years (I used to live somewhat close by in Canada), but I recall it as being quite “well-preserved”. I very much enjoyed the video about the Stowe house. Cheers.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:36 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I enjoyed that video as well. History can be both informative and fascinating if we’re open to learning from it.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Ashley 5:59 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      An interesting post. I enjoyed the history tour! Perhaps one day I’ll get across the”pond”. Umm! At my age, time is running out for such capers but I’m ever hopeful 😂🙋‍♂️

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:02 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Time is running out for me too, Ashley. That’s why I (and after getting married, WE) am/are glad to have done a lot of traveling while young.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 8:20 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Looks interesting. My ex and I used to tour the plantations in my state… just wander from place to place, on vacation, until we saw something on a roadside or map that looked interesting…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:06 am on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I can relate. I was always more than just a ‘destination’ traveler, stopping at interesting places along the way (and sometimes,out of the way).

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 12:38 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I love historic houses and architecture! I’ve visited several in various countries and never cease to be amazed at the details and care in construction.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:11 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I love historic homes — but historic mansions, not as much as I used to. Many of them are too ostentatious for my taste: the rich showing off how rich they are. However, I do appreciate the architecture and fine craftsmanship that went into many old homes.

        Liked by 2 people

        • magickmermaid 4:35 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink

          That sounds like the mansions in Newport, RI. Way over the top! They are gorgeous though. I guess they had to do something with all that money. 😀

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 5:03 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink

          You hit the nail on the head, mm: “they had to do something with all that money” — not unlike those who like the likes of Donald Trump because they have to do something with all that ignorance and nativism.

          Like

    • Richard Cahill 12:40 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Do I think Maine is a beautiful state and well worth visiting? Yes. Would I rather be there than in Baja, where I woke up this morning? No.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:17 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I hear Baja Maine is beautiful this time of year (if you don’t mind rain and humidity). 😉

        Like

    • Priscilla Bettis 7:15 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never been up that way. My goodness, what a rich archeological history!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:57 pm on September 1, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry I’m tardy with this reply — so tardy that August is now history..So I’ll make the best of it by wishing you a happy September!

        Like

    • Mr. Ohh's Sideways View 11:40 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      A few years back I took a trip to Massachusetts I spent three says in and around Lexington looking at the old buildings and reading the histories It was fascinating. I’ve only spent a very short time in Maine
      ;;
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      Laugh everyday, It’s as necessary as food

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:53 pm on September 1, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I’ve been in (more like “I’ve been through”) Massachusetts several times, but was almost always on my way to somewhere else and didn’t stick around (except for a few days on Cape Cod on one trip). The only New England state I’ve spent less time in is Rhode Island.

        Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 9:59 pm on September 3, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      There are so many beautiful, grand old homes. I’m glad so many are being restored. There’s a HGTV show that explores magnificent old homes that are listed for under $150,000. I have no idea how much it would cost to restore an old home to it’s former glory, but I bet it’s a lot more than $150,000. Mona

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:34 pm on September 3, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I’m sure you’d win that bet, depending on the size, condition, and location of the home. In San Francisco, for example, you’d probably have a hard time restoring an old dog house for under $150,000.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    I HAVE KNOW IDEA 

    It takes a wonderful brain and exquisite senses to produce a few stupid ideas.” –George Santayana

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    People are ever (as in never) asking me where I get the ideas for my posts. The answer is, ideas just poop into my head….which may be explain why some people call them crap. But why should I care what “some people” say, when a philosopher like George Santayana thinks I have “a wonderful brain”? Now there’s an ideas man who knows what he thinks about…..whereas I’m a man who has know idea what all the stink’s about.

    What about other men who get ideas, such as….

    And then there’s this poor guy whose idea may have been a bit short of realistic, but he probably got his comeuppance before long:

    If I were a Richman, I’d go with other Ideas (recorded in New Orleans in 1928):

    And so I close, as I began, with a George Santayana quote — this one, on a questioning note:

    Only the dead have seen the end of war.

    Has there never been a man alive with any idea how to keep men from making war?

     
    • SoundEagle 🦅ೋღஜஇ 2:07 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Dear mistermuse,

      Thank you for including the few songs. Nostalgia! Nostalgia! Nostalgia! All the music from the bygone eras. . . .

      Whilst you “HAVE KNOW IDEA”, I “HAVE SNOW IDEA” in my latest post just published half a day ago. This new post combines poetry, visual art and science in an innovative way. Please come and let me know what you make of my latest foray at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/2021/08/25/snowflakes-tell-me-why-you-are/

      Thank you in anticipation. Wishing you a productive week doing or enjoying whatever that satisfies you the most!

      Yours sincerely,
      SoundEagle

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lynette d'Arty-Cross 3:50 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe some women. 😉 Great selections.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:35 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I was considering a clip of a woman (Annette Hanshaw) singing “My Idea Of Heaven Is To Be With You”, but decided against it because it’s not one of her better performances….and I couldn’t come up with a substitute because there aren’t many old songs with the word IDEA in the title. Sorry about that!

        Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 7:40 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      If it takes a wonderful brain to produce stupid ideas… you and I are well matched.
      😉

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:47 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        If we should ever meet, be sure to wear an I’M WITH STUPID t-shirt.

        On second thought, I’ll wear it. I wouldn’t want people to think you have stupid friends. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 10:35 am on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Love the tunes; especially the third one! In answer to your last question: No there hasn’t. Solution: Let women run the world. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 1:38 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Be careful what you wish for, mm. Extremist female politicians like congresswomen Marjorie Taylor Greene and Lauren Boebert aren’t fit to run out of breath, much less run the world!

        Liked by 1 person

        • magickmermaid 4:49 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink

          I’ve not heard of either of them. I will google to see what they are all about.
          No extremist views are good in my opinion. I hate to be boring, but middle-of-the-road generally works.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:36 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Some might pun that the middle-of-the-road is a dangerous place to be, but punning aside, I agree that a head-on-straight, non-ideological, empathetic outlook (among other traits) is the way to go.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 1:34 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, mm—there you are fiddlin’ with Santayana on the edge of profundity (a la richman, if my reference was too broad). And the post was not devoid of FUN, though war is invariably hell.

      Somehow, I seem to have posted this on Facebook first(?). How that occurred is a puzzle for sure!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:52 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not on Facebook, so my face took no notice….but if anyone did, I hope they don’t get any wrong ideas about me: I’m not always this serious. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 2:18 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I have no eye deer either. Don’t no wear you can bye them these daze.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for that, Josie, but all that punning makes me fear I’m becoming a bad influence on you. I highly recommend that you take a break from my blog until my next post (unless you’re desperate these daze, which is what summer re-runs and old posts are for).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:49 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      I do believe that George Santayana has answered your final question: “Only the dead have seen the end of war.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • JosieHolford 7:33 pm on August 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Homonyms rule mistermews. Ewe can’t beet them.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mr. Ohh's Sideways View 6:56 pm on August 29, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Great ideas require silly thinking. You can’t have one if you think like everyone else Great post
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      Laugh Well and Often!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kally 11:23 am on September 4, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for bringing music in my days.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:15 pm on September 4, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        You should have music in your nights too….and here you are, by way of some jubilant Japanese jazz:

        Like

    • masercot 8:56 am on September 9, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      My ideas come from real life… like my novel about the chimera who finds a dead unicorn in his garage and tries to find the murderer…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:29 pm on September 9, 2021 Permalink | Reply

        Some of my ideas come from reel life. Right now I’m thinking of doing a post on the late, great movie star Maurice Chevalier, whose birthday is Sept. 12. I remember him well.

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 12:41 pm on September 9, 2021 Permalink

          Ever see that Marx Brothers routine where they each impersonate Chevalier?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:12 pm on September 9, 2021 Permalink

          Yes, but I couldn’t remember which movie it was in, so I did a quick check….and it bounced (sorry, I couldn’t resist). In any case, it was MONKEY BUSINESS (1931) — the same film in which Groucho asks Margaret Dumont, “Is it true you’re getting a divorce as soon as your husband recovers his eyesight?”

          Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 7:11 pm on September 9, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      always a treat. thanks. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

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