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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , William Shakespeare, , Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Albert Einstein, , , , , , , , TV quiz shows, William Shakespeare   

    TRUTH BE TOLD 

    When in doubt, tell the truth. –Mark Twain

    Truth be told, I just found out that July 7 was TELL THE TRUTH DAY.  Better late than never?  That may or may not be true, but today I’m in the mood to post, and at this “late” juncture, truth is doubtless as good a thesis as any (if you believe Mark Twain).

    Friends, I don’t claim to be in the same league as such legendary and current truth-tellers as Pinocchio and Donald Trump, but I am (almost) always in favor of telling the truth. In fact, one of my favorite TV quiz shows back in the day was TO TELL THE TRUTH. But before we go there, I need to set it up with a clip from a quiz show I featured in a previous post (I’VE GOT A SECRET)….the reason being that one of the panelists on the latter program (a humorist who is little-remembered today) plays a big part in the surprise ending of the TO TELL THE TRUTH clip, and it helps if you know he was once famous.

    Assuming you can abide a bit more truth-telling, I will close with some quotes on the subject:

    The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and simple. –Oscar Wilde

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. –Aldous Huxley

    If you are out to describe the truth, leave elegance to the tailor. –Albert Einstein

    Beware of a half-truth: you may have gotten hold of the wrong half. –Evan Esar

    A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes. –Charles Spurgeon

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Luc de Clapiers

    Doubt thou the stars are fire,
    Doubt that the sun doth move.
    Doubt truth to be a liar,
    But never doubt I love.
    –William Shakespeare

     

     
    • GP Cox 6:45 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My mom and her best friend had tickets for 3 to go to the taping of “To Tell the Truth”. It was interesting and fun, something I obviously still remember despite being so young.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:20 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate your comment, GP. You have the honor of being the first person I know who’s ever been to the taping of a TV program. Good show, old chap! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • GP Cox 7:43 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink

          How about that!! I also saw “What’s My LIne” and got a private tour of NBC in NYC [only because the secretary for Tom Synder was a childhood friend of my parents and I was in NYC to see the Pope and we ended up on the news that night.]

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 11:11 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Truth is mighty and will prevail. There is nothing the matter with this, except that it ain’t so.” Would that Mark Twain could be resurrected for this age of Trump.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:53 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It’s too bad Trump’s nose doesn’t grow like Pinocchio’s every time he tells a lie. He’d have to get a nose job every day to cut it back to size, but at least he has so much money he wouldn’t have to worry if his health insurance didn’t cover it.

      Like

    • Mark Scheel 4:28 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      muse,

      Wow! That brings back some memories. But makes me feel really old. Well, I AM old! I note one famous quote you didn’t use–“Then you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” (I’ll leave the attribution to you.) ; – )

      Mark

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:56 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, if you think those clips make you feel old, I was already in my twenties at that time. 😦

      As for the quote you noted, attribution is easy: I attribute it to Mark Scheel. 🙂

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:46 pm on July 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Friends, I don’t claim to be in the same league as such legendary and current truth-tellers as Pinocchio and Donald Trump”

      Odd that his followers saw him as authentic. I guess authentic for them is a willingness to be hurtful to others. Or babbling on.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:12 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        “Authentic,” as in telling it like it is — but any fool can tell it like (he thinks) it is. By that standard, , we should admire Hitler or any “authentic” leader who tells it like (he thinks) it is.

        Like

    • moorezart 11:25 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , James Jones, John Steinbeck, , , , , , , Willa Cather, William Shakespeare,   

    TELLTALE TITLES 

    How much time and thought do you devote to coming up with just-the-right title for your story, poem or article? If you take writing seriously, the answer is probably: as long as it takes to nail it — which could be almost no time at all, if it comes to you in a flash — or, more time than a less intense writer is willing to allot.

    Ernest Hemingway, for one, evidently wasn’t the latter type. Case in point: in writing his definitive Spanish Civil War novel, he didn’t settle for less than a killer title that would encapsulate ‘the moral of the story,’ eventually finding it in this passage from a 1624 work by the poet John Donne: “Any man’s death diminishes me because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

    As a writer of (mostly) humorous poems and posts, I’m inclined to go for witty and/or wordplay titles. Many times, the title to a particular piece all but suggests itself, but more often, no such luck, and I’m stuck — until eventually (as with the title of this post) a eureka moment rewards my resolve….or a poem resists my labeling efforts, and I just settle for:

    UNTITLED

    This poem’s title is Untitled —
    Not because it is untitled,
    But because I am entitled
    To entitle it Untitled.

    If I’d not titled it Untitled,
    It would truly be untitled….
    Which would make it unentitled
    To the title of Untitled.

    So it is vital, if untitled,
    Not to title it Untitled,
    And to leave that title idled,
    As a title is entitled.

    Moving on, suppose we try a title quiz based on the Papa Hemingway model (sorry, those of you who’d prefer the mistermuse model). Here are five passages from classic original works from which later authors lifted titles for their novels. Can you name the five later works and pin each tale on its author (ten answers total)? If you name all ten correctly, you win the title (with apologies to Cervantes) of Donkeyote Of All You Survey.

    PASSAGES FROM ORIGINAL WORKS:

    Gentlemen-rankers out on the spree/Damned from here to Eternity/God ha’ mercy on such as we/Ba! Yah! Bah! –Rudyard Kipling

    The best laid schemes o’ mice an’ men/Gang aft a-gley/An’ lea’e us naught but grief an’ pain/For promised joy! –Robert Burns

    By the pricking of my thumbs,/Something wicked this way comes. –Wm. Shakespeare

    Come my tan-faced children/Follow well in order, get your weapons ready/Have you your pistols? Have you your sharp-edged axes?/Pioneers! O pioneers! –Walt Whitman

    No Place so Sacred from such Fops is barr’d,/Nor is Paul’s Church more safe than Paul’s Churchyard./Nay, fly to altars; there they’ll talk you dead/For Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread. –Alexander Pope

    TITLES (WITH AUTHORS) FROM  ABOVE PREVIOUS WORKS:

    FROM HERE TO ETERNITY –James Jones
    OF MICE AND MEN –John Steinbeck
    SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES –Ray Bradbury
    O PIONEERS! –Willa Cather
    WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD –E.M. Forster

    How many of the ten titles/authors did you get? That last title, parenthetically, became part of Johnny Mercer’s lyrics to this 1940 hit song composed by Rube Bloom:

    And now I fear I must tread on out….before something wicked this way comes.

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 10:29 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If there were an award entitled “The Best Poem about Title-ing An Untitled Poem” you certainly would be entitled to it. I recall a creative writing teacher who was a stickler about titles; she said leaving a poem untitled was lazy and a refusal to finish your poem properly. In the history of Literature it seems even the use of Numbers—Sonnet 24—has been acceptable, and often the first line or phrase of a poem is used as its title—-“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night….”.

      I liked the quiz. Pour moi it was a piece of cake. Just this past month I used a line from a Shakespeare sonnet for one of my titles: “Love’s Not Time’s Fool.” Thanks for an enjoyable post!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:21 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cynthia. I believe the exception to the ‘poems must be titled rule’ is the limerick, which should never be titled (if one were to follow the rules, which apparently exist to curtail my fun, so I have occasionally titled a few of mine).

        Congrats on getting 100% on the quiz. I hereby award you the title (in deference to your gender) of DONNA-KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:14 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got all the titles but sad to say did not know the last three authors off the top of my head. I guess I get a 70. But of course I knew the song.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:05 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, you know how much I dig great old songs, so I’m giving you 30 bonus points for knowing FOOLS RUSH IN (WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD). That brings your score up to 100, which wins you the DON(FRANKEL)KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY AWARD….and well deserved, I might add!

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:32 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      AUTO REPLY: I’m on vacation. Any quizzes will be taken when I get back to my office.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:07 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I auto wish you a great vacation, but no doubt you’re having one anyway. Safe trip home.

      Like

    • inesephoto 5:55 pm on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Love your poem 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:20 pm on June 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got the titles but didn’t know all the authors. This was really interesting. Your poem made me laugh. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Christopher Marlowe, , , , , Patrick Henry, , , , , , , William Shakespeare,   

    MISTER MUSE AND MISS QUOTES 

    I have made it a rule that whenever I say something stupid, I immediately attribute it to Dr. Johnson, Marcus Aurelius or Dorothy Parker. –George Mikes, British author

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Fellow and female Americans: In case you’re not old enough — as I am — to remember the Father of our Country, George Birthington’s washday was February 22nd. OK, I admit that after all these years, I may have a hard time recalling names and certain words correctly, but what does it matter? As Christopher Shakespeare (or was it William Marlowe) famously wrote, a ruse by any other name would smell anyway.

    Anyway, my point is that quotes may frequently get mis-attributed, but Miss Attributed couldn’t care less, so why should we? Well, I’ll tell you why — because we’re righters, that’s why, and we righters deserve credit where credit is dubious. Therefore, with the aid of my busty — I mean, trusty — aide, Miss Quotes, the objective here was to do an extensive investigation into the subjective and dig up our quota of misquotes (our quota being whenever we decided to quit) . You are now about to be the beneficiary of our research, which we bent over backwards to have ready for this post (just to make it a bit more fun, I’ll throw in a few correctly-attributed quotes; can you pick them out of the pack?):

    1. “I cannot tell a lie.” –George Washington
    2. “Give me liberty, or give me death.”  –Patrick Henry  
    3. “The British are brave people. They can face anything except reality.” –George Mikes
    4. “Anybody who hates dogs and children can’t be all bad.” –W.C. Fields
    5. “Our comedies are not to be laughed at.” –Samuel Goldwyn
    6. “I never said most of the things I said.” –Yogi Berra
    7. “Let them eat cake.” –Marie-Antoinette
    8. “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics.” –Mark Twain
    9. “Elementary, my dear Watson.” –Sherlock Holmes (in the stories of A. Conan Doyle)
    10. “I am the greatest!” –The Donald

    Here are the misattributions:

    1. The quote itself is a lie. An Anglican minister, Mason Locke, ascribed it to our first President in his pietistic biography of Washington as part of the made-up ‘Who chopped down the cherry tree’ story: “I can’t tell a lie, Pa; I did cut it with my hatchet.”
    2. Possibly another biographical fiction, though not as clear-cut as the cherry tree story. Biographer Wm. Wirt based his attribution on the memory of two Henry contemporaries. The phrase resembles a passage from CATO, a 1713 play written by Joseph Addison.
    4. Actually said by humor writer Leo Rosten in introducing Fields at a dinner.
    5. An old Hollywood gag, not said (at least originally) by Goldwyn.
    7. By all accounts, Marie-Antoinette never uttered those words. Several years before she supposedly said them, they appeared in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s THE CONFESSIONS.
    8. Although Twain used this quote in his autobiography, he credited it to Benjamin Disraeli.
    9. Doyle never put those words in the great detective’s mouth in any of his four novels and 56 short stories about Holmes between 1887-1927.  It was actor Basil Rathbone, playing Holmes in the late 1930s-1940s, who spoke those words and made them famous.
    10. Donald Trump may think it, but it was Muhammad Ali who said it.

    As a bonus, I leave you with this quote:

     

     

     

     
    • mistermuse 12:04 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      NOTE: By virtue of February having less than 30 days (even in this year of the leap), my post-every-fifth-day schedule is doomed to run into “the best laid plans of mice and men” by the end of the month. Thus, my last Feb. post will be on the 29th, and I’ve opted to move this post up to Feb. 24.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Joseph Nebus 1:37 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Coincidentally, the old Roman calendar treated the 24th as the leap day. That is, in a leap year, they had two days that were both what we’d call the 24th of February. This sounds confusing, but it’s honestly better than what they had before, which was to in some years stick a whole extra month in between the 24th and 25th of February.

        Anyway, point being, having a post on the 24th so that you have a post timed for Leap Day works nicely. Somehow.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 8:56 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I knew that was Ali at the end there as I’m not only old enough to remember but I know Trump said. “It’s huge.” Which is now being pronounced as Yyyyuge. But it might get miss quoted or I might be miss quoting as Bernie Sanders also says Yyyuge as does Larry David and well most of us here in New York City.

      My favorite miss quote is General Sherman’s. “War is all hell.” He didn’t say it but when he found out he said it, he kept saying it, till he said it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:44 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “When in trouble, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout.” That’s my favorite quote. Google can’t really tell us its origin, although some people attribute it to the neo-Nazi science fiction author Robert Heinlein.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:25 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, when Trump said “It’s huge,” I thought he was referring to his ego (or the unbelievable gullibility of his followers).
      Good comment about Sherman. He certainly turned Atlanta into hell when he burned it.

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 11:33 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like the quote, Ricardo….though I must admit I haven’t heard it before and don’t know who said it. It couldn’t have been The Donald, because he’s never in doubt about anything (& wouldn’t admit it if he was).

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mél@nie 11:08 am on February 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      over here, in “old Europe”, we just can’t imagine the fair-wigged ignorant racist as the POTUS!!! same for ted cruz(doesn’t deserve capitals!!!)

      • * *

      oh, it seems that Marie-Antoinette never stated that sentence… it’s been invented, as the French people didn’t like “the snobbish Austrian waster”… 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • tomorrowdefinitely 1:51 pm on March 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Nice one! I especially like the quote at the top 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 12:40 am on June 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,
      Now that was educational. I knew only a few for certain. Makes you wonder if anybody ever really says anything! Ha.

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 7:20 am on June 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, all my posts are educational — even those expose that, unlike quote #10, I’m not the greatest (just the 3rd greatest, behind The Donald and Muhammad Ali). 😦 😦 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • dbmoviesblog 12:16 pm on August 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thought-provoking post. The number nine made me smile because most people will swear they read it in the novel haha. I kinda always hoped that people know that the quote “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics” belongs to Disraeli, and I also know that there are so many things that Marie-Antoinette allegedly said which are not just not true. The whole French Revolution seems to have a bunch of slogans and quotes which were simply made up afterwards to heighten the effect.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 5:39 am on May 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: a mind is a terrible thing to waste, , , Ivan the Terrible, , , William Shakespeare   

    A WASTE OF BREADTH 

    People waste many things — time, money, talent, food (one way or another) — but I think the saddest waste of all is the mind. You probably do too — especially when you stop to think how mindless all those fools are who disagree with what you think. I believe it was Ivan Vasilyevich who first said A mind is a terrible thing to waste, the wisdom of which so impressed his comrads that he became forever famous as Ivan the Terrible (apparently he did not suffer fools gladly).

    So, it should be clear from the above that almost all waste can be controlled if we but set our minds to it. If you’re sitting around on your ass just wasting away, there is simply no excuse for it. Remember, mind over matter –it’s the only way to go if you want to get ahead, if you will. If you won’t, you have no one to blame but yourself.

    I hope I have inspired you to get a grip and stop squandering away your life, of which you have but one to live, unless you have faith in reincarnation. Even so, there’s no telling what you might come back as — a curably dying Christian Scientist, for example – so why take a chance? If you don’t believe me, perhaps you’ll listen to the testimony of these waste not, want not-ers:

    I spent 90% of my money on wine, women and song and just wasted the other 10%. –Ronnie Hawkins

    A day without laughter is a day wasted. –Charlie Chaplin

    The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. –Bertrand Russell

    The man who views the world at 50 the same as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life. –Muhammed Ali

    If I don’t learn something every single day, it’s a wasted day. –Leonard Lauder

    A Congressman’s idea of government waste is the money spent in another Congressman’s district. -Evan Esar

     I wasted time, and now doth time waste me. –William Shakespeare

    I wish I could stand on a busy street corner, hat in hand, and beg people to throw me all their wasted hours. –Bernard Berenson

     

     
    • arekhill1 9:00 am on May 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Or my personal observation on time wasted, “If life is so short, why do we spend it doing the same things over and over?”

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:55 am on May 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Good question. I’ve watched “Groundhog Day” over and over and still keep coming back for more.

      Like

    • paulwhitberg 12:15 pm on May 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always loved the quote from Shakespeare, but the wonderful one from Ali is new to me.Thanks for sharing!

      Like

    • mistermuse 1:59 pm on May 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      If I had seen that quote unattributed, I wouldn’t have guessed it came from Ali. It’s good to see that he grew into that wisdom as he’s aged.

      Like

    • Thom Hickey 2:10 am on May 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks enjoyed the telling quotes. Will investigate archives. Regards Thom at the immortal jukebox.

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:07 am on May 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thom, If you’re looking for a theme song for your blog, give a listen:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GK72A_eV8Lg

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:27 pm on May 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Muse if I didn’t waste my time what would I do with it?

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:55 pm on May 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t have an answer for that, Don — maybe Dr. Don could tell you.

      Like

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