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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: blogosphere, food for thought, history, , irrationality, , power, rationality, reason, , SNAFU, The Enlightenment,   

    A HELLUVA WAY TO RUN A WORLD 

    “This is a helluva way to run a railroad.” –from a 1906 speech by Leonor F. Loree, railroad executive, to a committee of creditors who asked him to take charge of the Kansas City Southern Railroad, which was described as two streaks of rust; its engines lost steam; the men were disheartened; and the stations were shacks.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Since first said in 1906, the above quote has famously become a catchphrase for the high-and-mighty mentality of any commercial, governmental, military, or other top-down entity operating in a fashion oblivious to SNAFU (Situation Normal, All Fucked Up). I (and maybe you too) have had occasion to view SNAFU close-up and personal, having served as a draftee in the military and as a 30-year “soldier” in the corporate milieu before retiring to savor domestic life anew (and rue honey-do). But at least I’m the boss of my own blog (though still at the mercy of invisible forces somewhere out there in the blogosphere).

    Anyway, being of a philosophical bent, this got me to thinking about helluva railroads and SNAFU, writ LARGE –as in, dude: how did this whole woebegone world come to be so SNAFUed? Do we have a clue? Perhaps a few of us do.

    It’s a story we can’t stop telling ourselves. Once, humans were benighted by superstition and irrationality, but then the Greeks invented reason. Later, the Enlightenment enshrined rationality as the supreme value. Discovering that reason is the defining feature of out species, we named ourselves the “rational animal.” But is this flattering story rational? From sex and music to religion and war, irrationality makes up the greater part of human life and history. –from a reference to IRRATIONALITY (subtitled A HISTORY OF THE DARK SIDE OF REASON), a book by Justin E. H. Smith, a professor of history and the philosophy of science.

    Well, if that isn’t food for thought, I don’t know what is. The problem, of course, is what it has always been: those most in need of reflecting on and applying such appraisal to oneself wouldn’t be caught dead doing so. It’s Greek to them. The Trumps of the world live in their own little world where big money talks….and it speaks power.

    Oh well. So much for funny money.

     

     
    • obbverse 12:28 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The world is mad. I tell ya- mad, its mad mad mad. Powerful mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 12:47 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      we spell SNAFU differently here down under, it’s spelt STUFFED …

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:18 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s post-modernism in its grossest form…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:40 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        My post makes no apologies (except for subjecting readers to the inclusion of His Grossness near the end).

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 9:13 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          Remember when the right-wing accused their opponents of trying to make reality flexible? Little did we know that they’d actually be the ones doing that…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 9:28 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          “Flexible” is a very charitable word for the right-wing’s appropriation of reality.

          Liked by 3 people

    • Rivergirl 8:14 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      SNAFU times 2!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:52 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        ….as in Doublemint gum on one’s shoes (sorry about that — I searched my sole, but was stuck for a better reply).

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rivergirl 8:54 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          I‚Äôd insult your reply, but that would make me a heel. A sticky situation at best…

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:30 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      ūüėČ

      Like

    • magickmermaid 11:03 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hell in a hand basket to be sure! ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 5:50 pm on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

    • mistermuse 6:16 pm on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I see that I commented on that January post, Ricardo, but unfortunately no space alien has subsequently come to take Trump back to his home planet for experiments, as I hoped (probably scared off by the coronavirus outbreak, which Trump was ignoring at the time).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:49 pm on April 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I suppose those are the stimulus checks floating down to appease us and distract from the insanity.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:39 pm on April 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Everything Trump says or “floats” is either about him, or is something he does to turn things to his advantage. I have no doubt he will tout the stimulus checks accordingly.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 4:49 pm on April 9, 2020 Permalink

          He will probably sign them himself.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:33 pm on April 9, 2020 Permalink

          ….and the checks will probably have his face imprinted on them (giving BAD checks a whole new meaning!).

          Like

    • GP Cox 6:58 am on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People keep saying they admire the Greatest Generation, in this world-wide predicament, they can try to emulate them, rather than sit back and find things to complain about.
      They can’t make movies like ‘It’s a Mad, mad, Mad World’ – the actors would want too much money, plus a percentage of the profits.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:51 am on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It seems to be mostly young people (teens & 20s) and evangelicals who are disregarding the “rules” and doing their own thing. Young people have always thought they’re invincible, but evangelicals should know better….actually, deep down they probably do, but under the spell of the Falwells and Rick Warrens of the world, they suspend belief in everything but what they’re misled to believe.

        As for “Mad World,” no doubt you’re right. It probably had more stars than any other film in movie history (most of them in cameo appearances), including Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney, Ethel Merman, Sid Caesar, etc. — many of them all but forgotten today.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 12:10 pm on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 5:04 pm on April 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I always forget how many big stars were in this film. It was a truly ambitious undertaking in so many ways.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:23 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It’s a pretty good film, but I think it should’ve been better. It was director Stanley Kramer’s first attempt at comedy, and despite some good scenes, the unevenness shows. I’d rate it about a 7 out of 10.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 3:28 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And the world gets madder and madder each day!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:35 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I couldn’t agree more, Lorraine….especially when you think how much better it could be if more countries had better leaders. Trump has been an absolute disaster for the US, and no doubt your country is hurting for lack of competent, humane leadership, as well….while the rest of us pay the price for their arrogance and bungling.

        Sorry this reply is such a downer. Hopefully we’ll survive this epidemic and live to elect leaders worthy of their calling.

        Liked by 1 person

        • blindzanygirl 3:05 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink

          Don’t worry about it being a downer Mistermuse. We have to say it as it is. I’m all for that. I don’t know how any of us are going to get out of this mess but I bet once we have, there will be another one waiting around the corner. How are all our Leaders going to deal with the Recession that we are going to get? Hmmm.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:20 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Good attitude, Lorraine. As for handling the recession-to-come, I don’t know about your country, but I have no confidence whatsoever in Trump. It would be hard enough for a competent, caring President, much less an incompetent, self-serving narcissist like Trump.

      Like

    • Carol A. Hand 6:21 pm on April 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a mad world, indeed, Mister Muse. Thought you might appreciate a bit of musical humor about these times, created by Don Caron from the Parody Project:

      Battle Hymn of the Republic ‚Äď Revised for Relevance (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eR0ckpJ3bk);

      The Ballad of New Orleans (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB11scadABg)

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 8:15 pm on December 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: history, , phonograph, recorded sound, , Wizard of Menlo Park   

    WE’RE OFF TO HEAR THE WIZARD 

    To those of you who may think the fourth word of the above title is a misprint, I hasten to tell you that we’re not off to SEE the Wizard of Oz , but to¬†HEAR the Wizard of Menlo Park (as Thomas Alva Edison was known) speaking the first words he recorded:

    Many of us have seen photos of the famous inventor when he was old. Here he is at age 31:

    https://www.onthisday.com/photos/thomas-edisons-phonograph

    Note that in the “Photo Info” several paragraphs below the photo, the location is given as Menlo Park, California. I believe it should be Menlo Park, New Jersey. There is a Menlo Park, CA, which, surprisingly, was founded before the New Jersey town, which was named after the California town, which happens to be the headquarters of Facebook, which is located at 1 HACKER WAY, Menlo Park, CA. Just for the record….would I kid you?

    Seriously, why am I publishing this post on this day?

    http://www.findingdulcinea.com/news/on-this-day/December/Edison-Successfully-Tests-Phonograph.html

    Would you care for a demonstration?

    I leave you with this famous Edison quote: “Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.” So stock up on deodorant and don’t give up, or you’ll be foiled again.

     
    • obbverse 12:21 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      He must’ve sweated himself into a lather. Dripping with inspiration?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:27 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Here’s another Edison quote which suggests that he sweated himself into what one might gather was rather a lather: “I have not failed, I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

        Liked by 3 people

    • Garfield Hug 12:31 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for a good share Mistermuse! Happy weekend to you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 1:29 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I rather like the lather wordplay,A Mused…

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:37 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      farcebook in hacker way …. now I’ve heard it all!
      Thanks for expanding my education ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:34 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I had the same reaction to 1 HACKER WAY, but upon reflection, I think that the head of Facebook had a sense of humor and chose that address deliberately.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:25 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      What a great picture of the young man. Love the suit!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:37 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Ashley. How different Edison looked as a young man. On the other hand, I look the same as I did 50 years ago (I wish).

        Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 1:33 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse, what an interesting bit of information. Tubularsock immediately went to the kitchen drawer and pulled the tin foil out of it’s box and screamed at it. Nothing.

      So then Tubularsock walked backwards to the drawer and repeated the experiment. Nothing.

      But from this experience Tubularsock had not failed because on the third attempt Tubularsock fabricated a great Tin Foil Hat!

      Now when Tubularsock stands on the street corner and yells it all seems to fit.

      Great post.

      Cheers.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:51 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Well done….and, this time of year, you probably even didn’t need any deodorant.

        BTW, if I thought he’d wear it, I’d suggest that you send that tin foil hat to Trump so we wouldn’t have to see his stupid hair.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 2:52 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Isn‚Äôt there a new movie about the war between Edison and Tesla? Fascinating part of technology‚Äôs history…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:56 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’ve read about the “war” between Edison and Tesla, but not about the new movie. Sounds like it would be very interesting….maybe even electric (sorry, I couldn’t resist).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 3:41 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I haven’t seen you around in ages!

      Love, light and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:02 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Actually, I published more than my usual number of posts last month, but this month, I’ll probably be back to once a week or so. In any case, always glad to have you stop by. Take care.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Eliza 5:05 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink

          I wasn’t around much the past month… only checked periodically… I’ll have to go back and check them out

          Love, light and glitter

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 6:43 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting post. What we take for granted today is built upon Edison’s pioneering ingenuity.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:48 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Made me remember a great visit we made a couple of years ago to Alexander Graham Bell’s home in Nova Scotia. The museum there shows he was nearly as prolific and varied in his endeavors as Edison.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:57 pm on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I also was fortunate enough to have been to the Alexander Graham Bell Museum years ago. I’ve never been to a better museum.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 7:32 pm on December 8, 2019 Permalink

          It was an amazing place. We just happened to drop in and then stayed for so long we even ate lunch there.

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 1:49 pm on December 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Edison, Tesla and Bell were smart enough to take advantage of the new technology of electronics…

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 2:11 pm on December 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      ‚ÄúI have not failed, I‚Äôve just found 10,000 ways that won‚Äôt work.‚ÄĚ I repeat this quote often! ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ultra 5:39 pm on December 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great minds will always fascinate and bewilder the average person. These 10,000 ways will always arouse admiration that so much work needs to be done to make this one invention succeed.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:54 pm on December 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        True. On the other hand, Edison didn’t like jazz, which only goes to show that genius in one field doesn’t necessarily convey an appreciation of genius (or of A genius) in another field (his Edison Records produced hundreds of recordings during the “Jazz Age” after WW I, none of which were jazz).

        Liked by 1 person

    • mesabele 4:45 am on December 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Maravilla.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 6:57 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I always forget what a remarkable achievement that was, recorded sound, because I take it too much for granted.

      Also, that Thomas Edison was quite a dish when he was young, no?

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:13 am on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: glow worm, history, , National Postal Museum, North Pole, , Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, , , , toys   

    POST PROPOSES PARCEL-POSTING PRES TO POLE 

    This post¬†is honored to¬†note the 105th anniversary tomorrow¬†of¬†a notable day in U.S. Postal history. Let’s begin with a ‘little’ background, which you can take as gospel because it was written by a Pope:

    https://postalmuseumblog.si.edu/2013/02/very-special-deliveries.html

    Yes, friends, for just 53 cents worth of stamps attached to a little girl’s coat, the precious cargo wearing that coat was shipped by rail in a train’s mail compartment, thereby saving the cargo’s parents a pretty penny in¬†passenger fare. This got me to thinking about¬†the possibility of saving money by restoring the¬†mailing of¬†humans¬†via the U.S. Postal Service. Think, for example, of all the “border wall” money alone¬†that could be saved by shipping President Trump¬†to the North Pole to¬†chill¬†in Santa’s workshop, helping Santa make toys that insure¬†children are happy¬†instead of¬†policies that¬†traumatize them….or¬†Santa could toy with the bright¬†idea of replacing Rudolph’s red nose with¬†Donald and his orange glow.

    Now, I’m not saying The Donald is a worm, but if it acts like a worm, leaves a trail of slime like a worm, and glows like a worm, that¬†may account for why so many¬†have taken the bait.

     

     
    • calmkate 2:55 am on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      great idea, do hope you act on it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:29 am on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It would probably take an Act of Congress, which (unlike Parcel Post) has a history of delivering responsibly about as often as Trump tells the truth.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:08 am on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      ūüĎćūüĎć

      Liked by 1 person

    • rivergirl1211 9:53 am on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Marvelous ideas all..

      Liked by 2 people

    • mlrover 10:21 am on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Fascinating post and article. Love bits of history like this and am over the moon with the Spike Jones album cover. I actually have it. Last night re-watched “Laura” for the umpteenth time with a mystery writer friend who’d never seen it. (How is that possible!?) All through it I could hear Spike’s parody of the theme song. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:59 pm on February 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        The trip was my pleasure, mirover. How well I remember LAURA, as well as such other Spike Jones classics as CHLOE, COCKTAILS FOR TWO, and HAWAIAN WAR CHANT. In my opinion, GLOW WORM isn’t one of his best, but it’s still fun. ūüôā

        Liked by 1 person

    • Susi Bocks 1:41 pm on February 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, he’s a worm and so much more than that!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:58 pm on February 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In some respects, he’s a monster. What else do you call an egomaniac whose every lie, exaggeration, and maneuver are done in furtherance of seeing himself deemed King Trump.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard Cahill 9:15 pm on February 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Completely unfair to worms, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:36 pm on February 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed, Ricardo. No self-respecting worm would want to be seen in the company of The Donald.

        Like

    • America On Coffee 9:45 am on February 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video not available

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 8:29 pm on February 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      That was a fascinating link re: mailing children. I had no idea ‚Äď and what a good price, too! ūüėČ

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:27 am on February 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I had the same reaction when I happened upon that link, SS. History is endlessly interesting to those of us who find human nature fascinating (as opposed to those of us for whom the world revolves entirely around him or her self).

        Liked by 1 person

    • The Coastal Crone 7:22 pm on February 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great idea!

      Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 8:35 am on February 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I like the question: “If you could post trump somewhere where would that somewhere be?” And I like your North Pole occupation location. Very benign. But works as well as any more violent or punitive revenge fantasy would. I think a nice sheltered workshop – a long way away from the means of communication – doing something of value for other people’s children would be a worthy and just punishment. He could even have hamberders and covfefe shipped in if it helped him concentrate on doing things to make other people’s lives better.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:36 pm on February 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Yours is certainly a compassionate take on my proposal to send Trump to the North Pole, and more compassionate than he deserves. considering the places he sends children he has separated from their asylum-seeking parents. What he deserves is prison, but that’s probably about as likely as sending him to the North Pole (pending Mueller’s findings and further developments).

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: black history, Charlottesville, Confederate statues, editorial, history, , , Southern heritage, violence, white supremacists   

    SEE NO EVIL (REVISITING CHARLOTTESVILLE AS METAPHOR) 

    The statues you’re defending are of men who erased my history. –Kevin S. Aldridge, opinion editor, Cincinnati Enquirer

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Rick Borden¬†said of his son, Daniel Borden, who¬†(along with others)¬†beat up¬†an unarmed black man, “I absolutely don’t think my son did anything wrong.”¬†Daniel’s mother called reports of her son’s¬†actions “fake news” (sound familiar?). The beating victim¬†was left with a concussion, eight staples in his head,¬†a broken wrist, and other injuries. And we wonder why¬†the¬†son¬†of¬†such¬†a father and mother¬†grows up with¬†moral blinders.

    That beating¬†wasn’t the only¬†violent act¬†committed in Charlottesville, Virginia, during¬†that white¬†supremacist rally in¬†August 2017.¬†An avowed neo-Nazi deliberately drove his car into rally-protesters, injuring¬†dozens and¬†killing 32-year old protester Heather Heyer. Her¬†offense: actively opposing the alt-right’s¬†racism. In her last Facebook post before her death, she had said of her activism:¬†If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention.

    Last month, Heyer’s killer was sentenced to life in prison. As for Daniel Borden, he was sentenced last week. The particulars?¬†In¬†the words of the old idiom, “Read ’em and weep”:

    Parental influence: Borden gets nearly four years for garage attack

    Around the time of the Charlottesville madness, the opinion editor (a black man) who was quoted at the beginning of this post, wrote an editorial titled YOUR HERITAGE BEING ERASED? WELCOME TO THE CLUB. It included these words:

    “There’s been a lot of consternation among some folks about this growing movement to take down Confederate statues and monuments across the United States. Even President Trump has joined the chorus of laments that removing these monuments is an attempt to erase or rewrite history and rob certain people of their Southern culture and heritage.”
    “But here’s the thing that some people don’t seem to get or want to acknowledge: These monuments pay tribute to individuals who took away and erased the history of Africans through slavery, through the killing and slaughtering of innocents, through the destruction of black families by way of rape and separation¬† – all in the name of cruelty, white supremacy, exploitation and greed.”
    “How would I like my history taken away?”
    “Been there and done that, sir.”
    “Most African-Americans in this country will never know the true history of our ancestors. Much of our heritage was lost when our forefathers were densely packed into slave ships and transported across the Atlantic to be sold like common goods. Many of them died and their individual histories along with them. And those who survived….had their native, ancestral names stripped from them and replaced with the ones slave masters wanted them to have.”
    “Much of our African heritage has been irretrievably lost to the ravages and ruthlessness of callous individuals and traitors to this nation, such as General Lee, who fought to maintain the deplorable and murderous system of slavery. Now there are some who want to romanticize, revere and commemorate them as heroes.”
    “Well, excuse me if I’m not willing to buy that brand. Forgive me if I don’t shed a tear for your loss. Sorry if it ruins some quaint childhood memory.”
    “All I can say is, welcome to the club.”

    Are YOU paying attention?

     

     
    • calmkate 6:50 am on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      powerful words and so true … we must honour those who were killed and raped, not the perps!

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 7:18 am on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Same thing happened to my family as they were marched from their tribal lands across the country. We lost eighty percent of our family on that march. AND, if that wasn’t bad enough, they settled us in Oklahoma…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:35 am on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for reminding us that many European migrants to America centuries ago weren’t satisfied with what they did to African slaves — they grossly mistreated native Americans as well.

        Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 4:19 pm on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for this post. The racism espoused and encouraged by our “president” has exposed an ugly underside of American culture, and we all should be concerned. My husband is African American and records of his family only go back to 1865 (I wonder why? Hmm). We recently had our DNA ancestry done, and he discovered that he is 56% European! But he knows of no mixed marriages since the Civil War. To me, his discovery speaks to the despicable prevalence of rape and rape and rape, generations of rape. I can’t even contemplate the accompanying rape of children. Take down those statues, and while we’re at it, take down the statues of anyone who participated in the genocide of Native Americans, another travesty that white Americans have refused to acknowledge. You hit a hot button for me. Thank you.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:07 pm on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana. I wrote this yesterday (& posted it overnight) because no one else (that I knew of) said it, and I strongly felt it needed to be said. Imagine my surprise this morning when I read today’s Cincinnati Enquirer and saw a similar article about the Bordens titled HIS KID IS GUILTY, YET ‘HE DID NOTHING WRONG’ by Enquirer columnist Byron McCauley, a black man and fellow member (with Kevin Aldridge) of the editorial board.

        As a white man, I am proud to associate myself with Mr. McCauley, yourself and other commenters in calling attention to this “ugly underside of American culture.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 4:47 pm on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I would recommend for reading, BARRACOON: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” by Zora Neale Hurston, published in 2018.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:28 pm on January 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the recommendation, Rosaliene. This led me to check out two ‘excellent reviews’ of the book online, one of which praised everything about the book except the title. Perhaps that reviewer didn’t know the meaning of BARRACOON, which I learned from the other reviewer is “a word for the barracks built near the coast [of Africa], where the enslaved were kept until they boarded the ships.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard Cahill 1:36 pm on January 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Trump–worst President since Jefferson Davis.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Resa 4:37 pm on January 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A sad commentary about rights and freedoms.
      Your supreme leader is wracking havoc everywhere, even up here in Canada.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:22 am on January 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and a sad commentary about Americans voters who elected him and right-wing sycophants who empower him.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Resa 6:03 pm on January 16, 2019 Permalink

          It seems to spreading around the world. I suppose trumpo didn’t start it, but he has sure empowered the right.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 12:37 pm on January 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This post just made me sad. And reinforced why I don’t read the news. I know it’s important to know what goes on, but mostly it’s just so full of sad stuff. Stuff like this. The innocent being hurt. The good being bullied. And there is so much good out there too! But is it written about??? It’s actually why I love WATWB – posting something good from the news once a month (I wonder if it’s still happening or not)
      Lotsa love and light…
      Keep paying attention!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:18 pm on January 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t say that I blame you for not reading the news. It’s not easy for a person who has their heart and head on straight to make sense of those who don’t. I suppose the only way to deal with it is to accept that the world is full of altruists, scumbags, and a wide range of in-between….and do our best to fight off the scumbags and encourage the better angels of the in-between. The battle is never-ending and often discouraging, but must be fought. Giving up/in is unthinkable, or all is lost.

      Like

    • America On Coffee 8:38 pm on May 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Awful!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 10:09 am on July 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: dirty laundry, history, , leaks, , relief,   

    UNACCUSTOMED AS I AM TO PUBLIC LEAKING…. 

    Perhaps, by the title, you’re anticipating that¬†this post¬†will be a¬†dissertation on the subject of urinating in unisex restrooms–a¬†practice little practiced in these provincial parts, and which, therefore, I feel little qualified to address.¬†Obviously,¬†such a¬†paucity of experience could only¬†end up in¬†a¬†cock-and-bull story¬†which peters out soon after it starts, leaving my post hanging. That would be a big disappointment to my followers, I’m sure, but luckily,¬†I have in mind¬†other kinds of leaks to stretch this sordid exposition¬†out to a respectable length.

    Friends, I¬†mean the kind of leaks which¬†emanate from¬†sources I can use to¬†pad this post, thereby relieving me of the chore of overworking my brain cells. To my mind, that’s….

    Yes, friends, I refer not to the kind of leaks that are a plumber’s best friend, but to….

    https://www.history.com/news/9-leaks-that-changed-the-world

    Of course, the above leaks barely scratch the surface when one considers the sheer volume of leaks released on a daily basis throughout history. Perhaps you yourself would like to¬†reveal something¬†that’s in the¬†public interest, which you’ve kept bottled up for fear of exposure. Friends, if that’s the case with you, you can leak your¬†dirty laundry¬†right here with reasonable assurance that your name will¬†stay right here. After all, who takes the time to read comments, much less¬†notice who writes them….and you know mistermuse would never betray a source. So, leak with confidence,¬†my friends,¬†while I will go about my business, and you too will conclude….

     

     
    • arekhill1 10:38 am on July 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I fear the sheer volume of skeletons in my closet will far exceed the number of characters I am allowed to post here to describe them, so I have to decline. But thanks for the invite, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:48 am on July 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      No problem, Ricardo. I’m just happy that you have a closet big enough to hold them all. ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 8:15 pm on July 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      You mention some real heroes here … should be far more public leaking of the linked type not that so graphically described in your forward ūüė¶

      As for my own, if I tell you I’d have to kill you … and as I campaign for anti-violence i must refrain ūüôā

      Like

    • Don Frankel 8:17 am on July 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The authors of the article seem to have missed the Zimmerman Telegraph and the X, Y, Z affair but maybe those things were just too long ago.

      Speaking of leaks a friend of mine who is in his 70’s went to his Doctor and said. “Doctor, Doctor I have to pee ever hour or so.” The Doctor said. “So, piss! Piss!” Good advice, no?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:06 am on July 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I guess saying “Piss! Piss!” is better than saying “Tsk! Tsk!”, but still, maybe your friend should’ve gone to another doctor for a second opinion.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:24 pm on July 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      What would the second opinion be, he shouldn’t piss?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:15 pm on July 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Not pissless, but piss less (often). How? I don’t know–I’m not a doctor (though I wouldn’t refuse payment for the second opinion). ūüė¶

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:28 am on July 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The Doctor prescribed Flomax. I’m just funnin’. But do as Dr. Don does and only take cash.

      Like

    • Marietta Rodgers 10:18 am on July 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I have seen all the Jurassic Park movies. I’m not proud of this, but there it is.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:57 pm on July 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of which, I’m not particularly proud of this post, Marietta, but I ‘fell in love with the title’ and was determined to base a post on it–which is exactly what I ended up with (a ‘base’ post). Oh, well, as long as Santa doesn’t wind of this naughty post, I should still make out OK for Xmas.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , David McCullough, , flight, , history, , , , , , Orville Wright, , , rhymes, , Wilbur Wright, William Howard Taft   

    LET US TURN BACK TO THE WRIGHT, BROTHERS AND SISTERS 

    PROLOGUE:
    We had to go ahead and discover everything for ourselves.
    –Orville Wright, 1901

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *¬†* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Friends, Readers,¬†Countrymen¬†—

    If you have spent many a sleepless night
    tossing and turning¬†’til dawn’s early light,
    wondering¬†if I’d e’er¬†host another¬†post,
    take such¬†worries¬†off¬†thy plate — they’re toast.

    Yes, Brothers and Sisters,¬†thy long wait is o’er.
    I’m back,¬†and who of you could ask for more
    although I must confess
    that¬†most may ask for less. ūüė¶

    Never-the-less, Brothers and Sisters,
    it is written in the stars that I must return to the scene of my rhymes and other crimes. It’s Kismet.

    Notwithstanding the never-the-less, Brothers and Sisters, I digress.
    I come here not to berhyme the Wrights, but to praise them.

    Thus this¬†follow-up to¬†my May 17 post, THE DAY THE WRIGHTS DONE ME¬†WRONG, because, by ancient¬†axiom, it’s¬†the Wright thing to do¬†(If at first you don’t succeed, fly, fly again). And if¬†this discourse¬†has the unintended¬†consequence of being the¬†sleep-aid you need¬†to¬†catch up on¬†those¬†zzzzz, the added benefit comes¬†at no extra charge.

    But I doubt that will be the case with¬†THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, which, it so¬†happens, is the title of¬†a¬†book I¬†just finished reading (by my favorite historian, David McCullough). It’s¬†no less than¬†you’d expect from a¬†Pulitzer Prize winning author: a masterful¬†biography which (quoting from the dust cover)¬†“draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including personal diaries, notebooks, and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence, to tell the human side of a profoundly American story.”

    The Wrights¬†spent¬†years of¬†trial and air working¬†to¬†construct the world’s first ‘aeroplane,’ but as reader Don Frankel noted on May 17, America paid scant attention even after their successful first flight Dec. 17, 1903¬†at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina (and¬†Don wasn’t just whistling Dixie in his comment).¬†Finally, in¬†1906, after¬†numerous improvements (including¬†a more powerful engine) and¬†many test flights, “much of the scientific world and the press [began] to change their perspective on the brothers”, and they¬†started to attract commercial and government–especially French,¬†not American– interest.

    To the latter point, President (and fellow Ohioan) Wm. Howard Taft spoke as follows in presenting the two brothers with Gold Medals on June 10, 1909, in Washington D.C.:

    I esteem it a great honor and an opportunity to present these medals to you as an evidence of what you have done. I am so glad–perhaps at a delayed hour–to show that in America it is not true that “a prophet is not without honor save in his own country.” It is especially gratifying thus to note a great step in human discovery by paying honor to men who bear it so modestly. You made this discovery by a course that we of America like to feel is distinctly American–by keeping your noses right at the job until you had accomplished what you had determined to do.

    There are many stories within the story of THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, many twists and turns and mishaps along the way. The Wrights¬†weren’t ‘stick’ figures with¬†no interests and little¬†to commend¬†beyond their mechanical genius. Wilbur, for example, wrote home from France¬†in 1906¬†of long walks and¬†“the great buildings and art treasures of Paris, revealing as he never had–or had call to–the extent of his interest in architecture and painting.”

    Read this bio and you will surely be taken along for the ride, as was I,¬†by “the human side of a profoundly American¬†story” of two men¬†most of us¬†know only from dry history books.

    So fasten your life jackets and come fly with me.

    EPILOGUE:
    We dared to hope we had invented something that would bring lasting peace to the Earth. But we were wrong. We underestimated man’s capacity to hate and to corrupt good means for an evil end. –Orville Wright, 1943 (during WWII)

     

     
    • Carmen 12:50 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      A timely subject, Mr. Muse. . I’m flying from Melbourne, Australia to Halifax, Nova Scotia on Friday. :). Those Wright Brothers started somethin’, eh?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:15 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        It certainly sounds Wright that from Down Under, there’s hardly anywhere to go but up…so have a safe flight home, Carmen. I’ll look forward to reading all about your trip if you post it on your blog.

        Like

    • calmkate 4:31 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      lol love your opening poem and your review sounds interesting but … ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:53 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        No buts about it, Kate — my reviews are always interesting (except when they’re not). ūüė¶

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:26 pm on June 13, 2018 Permalink

          except the topic holds no interest for me .. but as you wrote it I still read it ūüôā

          Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 10:12 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Re: Orville Wright’s 1943 quote ‚Äď ain’t it the truth! As I read your last post on the Wright Bros., I thought, “In a few short years, folks would be arming this marvellous invention in an effort to kill more people.”

      The biography sounds fascinating. Thanks for the recommendation!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:28 pm on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You’re more than welcome, SS. As for the quote, “ain’t it the truth” indeed.What an ugly and beautiful mixed bag of a world this is!

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:02 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Isn’t that last quote the truth? And the brothers Wright never even heard of Facebook.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Don Frankel 8:49 am on June 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That’s a great book Muse. I was amazed at all the things they had to develop in order to figure how to take flight. It is an amazing story. But I still can’t get over how they are flying just about everyday in Dayton and the only person who wrote about it was a traveling bee salesman in his little magazine which would be a the equivalent of a blog today.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:29 am on June 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I’m glad you mentioned the bee magazine, Don — it’s the perfect example of how under-appreciated and almost ignored the Wrights were when you consider the game-changing nature of their accomplishment. The failure to recognize what seems so obvious reminds me of the old saying, IF IT WAS A SNAKE, IT WOULD HAVE BIT YOU.

        Liked by 1 person

    • chattykerry 9:21 am on June 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I am going to work at the airport today and I will consider the amazing achievements of the Wright brothers as I attempt to deal airlines and passengers who think they are riding a Greyhound bus…ūüėĀūüėĀ

      Liked by 3 people

    • barkinginthedark 6:51 pm on August 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Orville’s regret is too sad…to see your marvelous invention being employed to kill…too sad. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:08 pm on August 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “We underestimated man’s capacity to hate and to corrupt good means for an evil end.” Today, Orville’s 1943 quote has an even wider application than airplanes, as (courtesy of Donald Trump) democracy itself is being corrupted for an evil end.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on May 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , book recommendation, , , history, , , , ,   

    JAZZ DAYS IN THE JAZZ AGE 

    The 1920s were an era of great contradictions. After winning WWI, the United States seemed to be (on the surface) a more liberated country than previously, finally shaking off the restrictions of the Victorian era. Dresses became shorter, many more women entered the workforce, dancing became more exciting and sensuous, some movies actually hinted strongly at sex, the economy was prosperous, and jazz seemed to be everywhere as the country experienced something like a decade-long party [known as The Jazz Age and The Roaring 20s].
    But a closer look reveals Republicans ruled the White House, liquor was illegal (even if gangsters and bootleggers made it widely available), the Ku Klux Klan was at the height of its popularity (with lynchings of blacks commonplace), racism was institutionalized, big business had few restrictions, poverty was widespread, and there was no safety net. It was a great era to be rich and white, but the poor and blacks were barely tolerated by average middle-class citizens. –Scott Yanow, author of CLASSIC JAZZ*

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *¬† * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    The above puts¬†Charles Lindbergh’s¬†1927 nonstop transatlantic¬†flight (see my¬†last post) in broader¬†historical context. ‘Fellow’ aviator Elinor Smith Sullivan later said, “It’s hard to describe the impact Lindbergh¬†had on people. The twenties was such an innocent time.” This helps explain why¬†songs¬†like LINDBERGH, EAGLE OF THE USA and LUCKY LINDY¬†were written by wantwits¬†with words which would make¬†wittier writers wince.

    Thus, the wittiest composer/lyricist this side of the Atlantic, Cole Porter, put the Jazz Age in earthier terms:

    In other words….

    Our¬†flight of fancy, like Lindbergh’s, ends in gay Paree with a song (recorded in 1930)¬†from Porter’s 1929¬†musical FIFTY MILLION FRENCHMEN:

    *Kindle edition available online for as low as $17.99 (highly recommended for classic jazz lovers)

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 4:48 pm on May 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      What a great collection … that performer in the first one did it exceptionally well ūüôā

      Why don’t you write poetry anymore?

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 5:41 pm on May 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. Actually, I do still write poetry — just not as often as I used to. Recent posts which include one or more of my poems are those of May 14, April 14 & 11, and March 17 & 12. I’ll probably publish another one by the end of the month, as I haven’t yet decided what to write for my next post.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 5:57 pm on May 24, 2018 Permalink

          thanks I’ll read those as time permits … so do we have a date by the kitchen door?

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:01 pm on May 24, 2018 Permalink

          Silly me, of course I totally enjoyed some of these already …just looking forward to more ūüôā

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:10 pm on May 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Glad you enjoyed them, Kate.
      As for the kitchen door, I don’t have a cow shed for the moon to shine over, so I guess we’re out of luck — as is anyone else who’s trying to figure out what we’re talking about. ūüôā

      Like

    • restlessjo 4:32 am on May 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Love this version of Let’s Misbehave. What a magnetic personality ūüôā ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 11:12 am on May 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Since the booze was flowing the dresses were coming it must have been…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:45 am on May 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Billie is absolutely Easy To Love on this one, Don….especially when backed by the great Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra. Incidentally, this recording was made three days after I was born — I wonder if they had me in mind when they recorded it?

        Like

    • America On Coffee 11:16 pm on May 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyable unique entertainment.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 8:47 am on May 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      My pleasure. In my opinion, the music and songs of that era have never been surpassed for pure listening pleasure.

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 7:19 pm on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love the first performer with her rendition of Let’s Misbehave. She does a terrific job.

      Cole Porter is a gem. The songs are catchy and amusing and smart.

      Thanks for the book recommendation. The Roaring Twenties have certainly been glamourized, but there is the other side of the coin.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 8:24 pm on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Right you are!

      Cole Porter didn’t have much of a singing voice, but the clip is fascinating nonetheless because it’s interesting to hear how famous songwriters of yesteryear sounded. Several of them (Harold Arlen, for example) actually had very good voices.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Eagle of the USA, first transatlantic flight, history, , , , May 20 in aviation history, , , songs, Spirit of St. Louis, ,   

    IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE….IT’S CHARLES LINDBERGH! 

    Taking off from my last post¬†(where¬†I left the Wright Brothers¬†up in the air and me breezin’ along¬†with the¬†breeze), we¬†come to¬†May 20, a day second to none in aviation annals.*

    On this May day in 1927, Charles Lindbergh took off¬†from¬†New York for Paris in the Spirit of St. Louis (his monoplane), to begin the second¬†(and most famous)¬†nonstop transatlantic flight in history. Yes, I said second — the first¬†was made by¬†paired English aviators in 1919, from Newfoundland to Ireland¬†(about half the distance of Lindbergh’s solo¬†flight).

    On this date in 1932, Amelia Earhart took off¬†from Newfoundland for Paris, but due to weather conditions,¬†she had to¬†‘pull up’¬†short in Northern Ireland, nonetheless¬†becoming the first woman to make¬†a solo¬†nonstop transatlantic flight.

    We¬†now turn¬†to the musical portion of the program. Faster than you can say “It’s a bird,” Lindbergh’s fame brought songwriters¬†down from the¬†clouds to cash in,¬†hatching¬†a¬†flock of¬†insipid pop¬†songs. Not so with¬†Earhart’s¬†feat, not¬†even a peep of a song….although her lost flight over the Pacific Ocean¬†in 1937¬†did inspire¬†a few¬†songs that didn’t long survive.

    OK. If I had to eat crow in my last post, can I now soar like an eagle with these jazzed-up Lindberg hit tunes soaring over treacly lyrics:

    Ladies and gendermen,¬†the Spirit of St. Louis¬†is¬†coming in for¬†a landing¬†— and if we’re¬†Lucky, Lindy will be in the spirit for¬†a rousing finish.

    *In addition to the Lindbergh and Earhart flights, May 20 was also the day Congress passed the Air Commerce Act licensing pilots and planes in 1926, and the date of the first regular transatlantic airmail flight (Pan Am, NYC to Marseille, France) in 1939.

     

     

     

     
    • scifihammy 9:59 am on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Very interesting – lots I didn’t know. ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:10 am on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        This was an interesting piece to research, as I too learned a few things — in particular, that Lindberg’s wasn’t the first transatlantic flight, and that Earhart’s intended destination was Paris. I guess that puts me one up on Earhart, because I DID make it to Paris (with the minor caveat that I was on a bus and not alone). ūüė¶

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 12:39 pm on May 20, 2018 Permalink

          Yes, I did not know those things either. ūüôā
          And I also made it to Paris. ūüėÄ

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:13 pm on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Our local airport here in San Diego is named Lindbergh Field, Sr. Muse, which never fails to irritate my Jewish girl, since Lindbergh, besides being an air hero, was an anti-Semite with pro-Hitler leanings. Amelia Earhart made the wise choice to preserve her legacy intact by disappearing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:46 pm on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Funny you should mention that, Ricardo, because I was going to use this funny clip, but couldn’t work it in. Your comment gives me the perfect excuse to do so now:

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:29 am on May 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Good stuff Muse. The first transatlantic flight was completed by U.S. Navy planes, the NC 1, NC 3 and NC 4 with NC 4 landing first. This was back in 1919. They were sea planes and stopped 5 times. I think what Lindbergh represented was you could fly across the Atlantic from New York to Paris in one jump. Meaning you could make money doing it.

      But since this is ‘It’s a bird. It’s a plane’ let us not forget…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:18 am on May 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I remember the Superman intro well. As a boy, it really stirred the imagination!

        In my research, I didn’t come across mention of the 1919 U.S. Navy transatlantic flight, probably because it wasn’t nonstop like the English flight the same year. But neither flight made near the impact that Lindbergh’s did in terms of fame and fortune.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 12:29 pm on May 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Same as Alan Shepard Gus Grissom space flights didn’t capture the nation’s attention the way John Glenn’s did.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lisa R. Palmer 10:06 am on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Fascinating facts and music, mistermuse!

      Like

    • mistermuse 12:44 pm on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Glad you enjoyed the post, Lisa. Appreciation is music to my ears! ūüôā

      Like

    • RMW 9:12 pm on May 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Having just flown from LA to London and back again within ten days I think May 6 and May 16 should be commemorated in the annals of flight from now on! It wasn’t easy drinking all that wine and watching all those movies!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:08 am on May 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      But look at the bright side, RMW — you got a ten day reprieve from Trump’s BS!

      Like

    • moorezart 12:20 pm on June 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: airplane, as the crow flies, bicycles, Breezin' Along With The Breeze, , first flight, history, , , ,   

    THE DAY THE WRIGHTS DONE ME WRONG 

    Where were you on the morning of December 17, 1903? If you had been on the beach at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, at 10:30 a.m., this is what you would have seen:

    As for yours truly,¬†that’s too long ago¬†to remember exactly¬†where I was on that date, but wherever I was, I was¬†most likely trying to think what¬†I would¬†write about when I learnt¬†to write right….which brings¬†me to my good friends,¬†the Wright Brothers, who owned a bicycle shop¬†right up the¬†pike from me in Dayton, Ohio (about 50 miles as the crow flies).

    In those¬†days,¬†a¬†fifty mile trip¬†was no breeze (not even¬†with¬†a breeze, as¬†a crow knows). The Wright Brothers¬†offered to¬†sell me¬†a bicycle¬†cheap, but,¬†though the price was right, I¬†couldn’t find a crow to take me to Dayton, and they¬†wouldn’t deliver it (the bicycle, that is). So I told them¬†to go fly a kite,¬†plain and simple. Next thing I knew, they were off to Kitty Hawk to fly a light plane¬†— almost,¬†if not exactly, what¬†my directive to them¬†directed. So you see, by rights, I’m at least partly¬†responsible for¬†the first¬†heavier-than-air flight in history, though never given¬†credit. After that slight, needless to say, I no longer considered them friends.

    There you have it. The Wrights done me wrong, but am I bitter? No way — not this bird. I’m above that kind of pettinest. As you can plainly sees, I’m just….

    As they used to say back in the day, “That’s all she wrote.”

     
    • Don Frankel 9:29 am on May 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I read an excellent book on the Wright Brothers. I think it was by McCollough. One of the most amazing things in it was the Wright Brothers go back to Dayton, work on the plane and they’re flying it every day and no one takes much notice of it. It’s not till they pack the plane up take it to Paris and fly it around there that the world takes notice. But I digress. This is about people who have done others wrong and the ramifications there of.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:27 am on May 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, sometimes great minds do indeed think alike — and on the same day, too. Earlier this very morning I placed an order for two books, including David McCullough’s THE WRIGHT BROTHERS which I would have done some time ago, but for procrastination. Also, I was hoping to use the FRANKIE AND JOHNNY song (for the “done him wrong” lyric), but couldn’t fit it in. Great clip!

        Like

    • lexborgia 2:31 am on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The ‘cycle’ of life is like that.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:10 am on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said….or should I say, well spoke-n. ūüė¶

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 7:27 pm on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      An incredible achievement, of course, but in watching this again, it struck me that something else is remarkable: the way they filmed it. The filmmaker(s) really planned out the shots and gave us good angles. Aside from putting a camera on the plane, they’ve presented us with the best possible view of this historic event.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:00 pm on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Glad you appreciated this post….which leads me to believe you will also want to check out my next post, which is a follow-up to this one about the Wright Brothers. I’ll be posting it in about 3 hours. Enjoy!

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alan Ladd, all-girl orchestras, history, , , ,   

    WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH AND ALL THAT JAZZ (PART II) 

    In this follow-up to my previous post, rather than go into a more detailed history which might bore those with only a passing interest in¬†classic jazz and pop music of the period, I’ve decided¬†to¬†stick to¬†clips of the era’s¬†all-girl bands, with minimum commentary.

    Some of you may recall that I once published a post with a clip of Jimmy Stewart, of all people, singing. Here’s a clip of an all-girl band featuring a vocal by another actor you’ve probably never heard sing:

    Speaking of “never heard,” here’s an all-girl¬†band even I had never heard before:

    Last but luscious, jazz writer George T. Simon¬†called this gal¬†“Without a doubt, the sexiest of all the big bandleaders….waving her baton in a languorous, seductive sort of way [and]¬†weaving her torso in¬†her magnificent, undulating manner,” INA RAY HUTTON (if you were hoping for¬†more, stay tuned for the announcement at¬†the¬†close of the clip):

     
    • scifihammy 8:04 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Gosh! No I never have heard Alan Ladd sing before; and very well too! My Mum used to like him.
      Lovely to hear some more girl bands. Thank you ūüôā

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:31 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You’re welcome, scifi. Alan Ladd may not be the legend Jimmy Stewart is, but he was in some very good movies, the best remembered of which is probably SHANE.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 8:43 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Good stuff, Mistermuse!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Carmen. Like the Maltese Falcon, it’s the “stuff” dreams are made of.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 9:53 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink

          Oh, and I just thought of something. In the first clip, the first player — she looks much like Julie Andrews, don’t you think??

          Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 9:55 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The trumpet player at 1:00, that is. ūüôā

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:13 am on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Carmen. Sharp eye! If it was Julie Andrews, she sure was mature for her age (7 years old at the time of that clip)! ūüôā

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:47 pm on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Come back Shane! Come back!” Who knew he could sing? And, I’m kind of liking Ina Ray Hutton. I’m not sure she’s doing anything to call attention to herself. She’s just hot.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:38 pm on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      One of these days when I have nothing better to do (?), I should do some research to try to find clips of other “Golden Age” actors/actresses singing who nobody knew could sing. Or I could just do a post of me singing, and lose all my readers. ūüė¶

      Like

    • Don Frankel 8:32 pm on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I think that’s a great idea Muse and no you wouldn’t lose any of your readers. Certainly not me.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:59 pm on March 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Not a band exactly but… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qOiNnK7AFg

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:25 am on March 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I dig the Supremes, Ricardo, though I don’t exactly dig that particular song. Maybe I’m just too particular.

      Like

    • Ms. Mae 1:02 pm on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Love Jazz!
      Love the all girls band.
      Makes this ChUnKy Gal smile for sure.

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 7:19 pm on January 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      such great clips – and such great music. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

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