Z END (AT LAST)

With Z 26th letter of Z alphabet/26th post of this series, we come equally to Z end of both. This calls for Z celebration….so “Come wiz me to ze Casbah” and we make sweet music together. Z girl songs, zey may be few, but zat does not mean we need end on Z sour note.

Ah, ze Casbah in old ALGIERS — where French-turned-American actor Charles Boyer famously put the above Come to ze Casbah come-on on the beautiful Hedy Lamarr….or did he? To answer zat question, you must comme see for yourself:

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/121579%7C0/Algiers.html

Comme saw?

But I digress from the music, for which we turn first to beautiful American-turned-French (due to racism in America) entertainer, Josephine Baker:

We turn next to one of England’s finest (and one of my favorite) composers, Noel Coward, whose urbane, wistful lyrics graced such great songs as A ROOM WITH A VIEW and….

And now we come to the song I referred to (in reply to a comment to my previous post) as, strictly speaking, not qualified for this post….the reason being that it starts with T. However, the T is silent; for all intents and purposes, and in a pronounced way, it’s a Z song….and a rousing, joyous one it is, for “Dawn will find us laughing in the sunlight, dancing, dancing with my Tzena”:

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This is my last post until after the holidays, as this series has been music to my ears at the expense of other demands and endeavors (once I got on a roll, I got caught up in posting every third day despite not intending such frequency). Now, before catching up becomes the impossible dream, it behooves me to hustle while I work at getting around to tackling those other endeavors….such as catching some more Zs.

If I’m too sound asleep to be alarmed by all this by the end of the year, wake me when it’s over.

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Y ME, LORD

Friends, if you Xpected an X post after my W post, U haven’t been paying attention, because as I’ve previously Xplained, X is out. Even X post facto, there is no X factor here. Y? There are no old songs with girls named X in the title, that’s Y. That’s Y U C Y here.

Now that we got that straightened out, a word to the Ys: even if I were a Ys man (or a Ys guy, for that matter), I am not Ys enough to know more than one or two Y girl songs. So let’s start with that, and then, if necessary, I’ll pray for God’s help to find another Y song.

Sorry I asked, Lord. I could have done without that last one.

THIS IS THE S’s

If perchance you wonder where my wandering minstrel brain finds the titles of my posts, some are based on old song titles, as with post OLGA, YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL. I will now return to the scheme of the crime with this S post, whose title is based on THIS IS THE MISSUS, fittingly played by S‘s Ben Selvin & His Orchestra/Paul Small, vocal refrain:

With the setup out of the way, pardon me as I digress to rant on a matter impacting all of my posts for some of my readers: Is it asking too much for Google Translate do a more professional job of translating? As I read my foreign followers’ blogs, it’s obvious that the translation from their language (usually Spanish) to English leaves algo* to be desired, despite being generally forthright articles without the wordplay which rules my writing and thus requires intelligent (or at least non-mindless) translation. I hardly recognize my translated work, leaving me amazed that I have any non-English speaking followers at all.

*Spanish for “something”

Now that I’ve got that off my scalp, I am going to Sioux you before you sue me:

If you think that was sweet, you ain’t heard nothin’ yet:

Well, that’s a fine way to treat Sweet Sue. Surely such sophomoric she-nanigans shouldn’t stand, so we shall see that Sue shall see some sensible semblance of suitable staging here:

I have more S-girl song selections, for which I will do a Part II, as I need to get a post ahead of the game to make up for the anticipated skipping of Miss(ing) X.

Olga, YOU BEAUTIFUL DOLL

Who better than a double O-gal to kick off my O-girl post (which features two versions of the same song, as OLGA is the only old song I know with a girl’s name starting with O):

Version #1 is the original recording of the song by its composer, jazz legend Joe “King” Oliver (mentor of Louis Armstrong):

#2, different version, same beautiful Olga song:

Extra added attraction: the song on which I based the title of this post….

 

 

‘LLZAPOPPIN (PART ONE)

The above title (a contraction of HELLZAPOPPIN, a 1941 movie based on a long-running Broadway show of the same name) sets the stage for letter L in our fem song series. Ere we proceed, just for the L of it, let’s pop in on the film’s frenetic LINDY HOP dance number:

Speaking of numbers, I’m breaking L up into two parts — due, not just to an abundance of Lady L songs to choose from, but to previously needing to combine two letters (H-I) into one post. Part II will get the focus back on locus, becoming opus #12 of this hocus-pocus, once again matching the post with the corresponding letter of the alphabet.

Our first Lady L is the title song of the 1944 film noir classic LAURA, with lyrics by Johnny Mercer, who Must Have Been A Beautiful (November) Baby*. Believe it or not, Mercer wrote what has to be a record 20+ songs with a girl’s name* in the title — none more haunting than….

We conclude Part One with the indelible SWEET LORRAINE (instrumental version):

If you want to ‘sing along’ with the song (assuming your family and/or neighbors won’t object/protest), here are the lyrics:

http://www.carsieblanton.com/lyrics/sweet-lorraine/

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* Johnny Mercer was born November 18, 1909. YOU MUST HAVE BEEN A BEAUTIFUL BABY was one of his many hit songs.

* Mercer “girl’s name” list (#2 after Cinderella signifies two songs with that name in the title):

Amber
Antonia
Ariane
Bernadine
Blossom
Celia
Cherie
Cinderella (2)
Cindy
Deirdre
Emily

Georgia
Jezebel
Joanna
Jo-Jo
Kate
Laura
Mandy
Mary
Pollyanna
Sally
Tangerine

 

 

 

 

 

 

GEO ON MY MIND

How times flies — basketball season is back. The National Basketball Association began play yesterday, with college basketball to follow shortly. But, for the season opener (Oct. 19) which leads to this post, we have the Harlem Globetrotters, whose famous theme song is the Sweet G song which gets our ‘girl’s-names-starting-with-G-songs’ ball bouncing:

Next, let’s go with this contemporary take-off on a 1937 Count Basie/Jimmy Rushing hit:

Sensing a Geo-centric pattern here? This (from ALFIE, 1966) is the new girl of the bunch:

Last, but no less ‘Geo,’ we have this all-time standard sung by the composer as it should be sung (not that others haven’t done it equal justice in their own way):

NOTE: Sorry about eclipsing my usual limit of three clips per post, but all four songs rose to the level I was seeking in this ‘Geo-desy,’ and I couldn’t bring myself to drop one.

EEEasier Said Than Sung

In a comment to my last post, I thanked reader Don Frankel for informing me, in anticipation of this ‘E’ post, that Eleanora was the birth name of Billie Holiday, and I replied that I might include a song of her’s in my endeavor. Easy for me to say, because although there are a number of good songs with girl’s E names in the title (modeling the basis of this series to begin with)….adding non-E named title songs (if sung by E-named singers) seems a natural extension of my original premise. After all, I had taken the liberty of working into my D post a non-D named title song by Dinah Washington, and received no Death threats (or even Demands to Desist) as a result.

D that as it may, for brevity’s sake I have D-cided to limit such liberties to one (if any), as I realize I can’t realistically expect time-pressed readers to view more than three clips per post, no matter how much I personally Dig the songs. So I am going to refrain from supplementing this post with a (Billie) Holiday refrain, though friend Frankel is free to free-lance one in a comment if he chooses.

Now to those E songs, starting with a 1942 hit by Russ Morgan, with lyrics by Mack David:

Some of you may remember a series of ELOISE children’s books (the first written in 1955) by the multi-talented Kay Thompson, about a precocious six-year old girl living on the penthouse floor of the Plaza Hotel in NYC. Here is a clip of a NOT SO SWEET Eloise song from the 1956 PLAYHOUSE 90 television production (based on the book) with a distinguished cast only a prestigious show like PLAYHOUSE 90 could have reeled in in those days. How many faces do you recognize?

Saving for last the E that has Klass with a capital K, here’s a song Ethel Merman is known for, but I’ve opted to go with this rendition by the legendary Lillian Roth from the pre-code 1933 film TAKE A CHANCE:

The End.