Updates from July, 2020 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 8:43 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: beacon of hope, , , David Niven, , , , ,   

    WAR GAMES 

    “War is nothing more than a catalogue of mistakes and misfortunes.” –Winston Churchill

    ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * **

    It’s funny– well, not literally funny — how one thing can lead unexpectedly to another. I’m half-way through another biography….but, unlike the others I’ve been reading recently, this one has led to the sort of post I didn’t anticipate writing when I began reading it.

    Its title is THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOON (A BIOGRAPHY OF DAVID NIVEN) by Sheridan Morley. NIVEN (1910-83), as you may know, was an American actor who was born/raised in England and came to the U.S. in 1932. When WW II broke out in Europe, he returned to England to serve in the military. In 1941 he wrote a letter to a fellow British-born actor friend back in Hollywood, part of which I quote here from the book:

    Thank God we have now got a real government and in Churchill a real leader at last, but there is going to be a little scalp-hunting when the smoke has cleared off the battlefields. I am unimportant, but besides cousins and relations, I have now lost practically all my old friends, and all in the past few weeks….they need never have been sacrificed if the people then at the top had been doing their jobs as well as they said they were doing them [emphasis mine].

    Sound familiar? Today, with the corona virus, we have a different kind of world war, but the same (and even more lame) kind of sophistry, gas-baggery, and incompetence resulting in unnecessary casualties:

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=trump+coronavirus+down+to+zero&docid=607986001098770809&mid=730D607688499A94FB45730D607688499A94FB45&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

    And so I ask you: How on earth does the most morally corrupt President in U.S. history not belong behind bars or in a mental institution rather than in the White House? How is it, after 3 1/2 years of reigning the swamp, that roughly 40% of the American people either cannot, or will not, see through this pathetic con man of a President — a President who thinks he is not only above the law, but thinks he IS the law, who tries to subvert the law to his own ends? Are his supporters deaf, dumb and blind….or simply incapable/too much in denial to look behind the curtain and see that the mighty Oz is the very hoax he labels all that exposes him?

    Come November 3, we must turn from the dark side to the other side of the moon, or America will have surrendered all claim to being the “beacon of hope” for the world.

     

     
    • Rivergirl 8:51 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I have no answers. His appeal to the right, and their unwavering support of him is mystifying.

      Liked by 4 people

    • equipsblog 9:00 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Amen. I agree with what Rivergril said.

      Liked by 4 people

    • BACK ROADS AND OTHER STORIES 10:12 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s mind boggling how this can go on for so long. I hope November will bring change!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 11:51 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi. Many times on your blog I’ve slammed Trump. I once said this, and it remains true: Trump is an enemy of democracy. Ditto for anybody who supports him.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 5:18 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It is to the Senate Republicans’ shame that it took this pandemic — and thousands of lives — to bring Trump down (assuming he is defeated Nov. 3). If they had voted to impeach him when they had the chance, Pence would probably have become President and, as a former governor, would likely have been more inclined to listen to the states pleas for federal help. Or not.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Yeah, Another Blogger 6:06 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          Here’s the thing: Trump is evil. This was obvious to me way before he took office. If he wins in November, he will do far more damage in his second term than he already has.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:53 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          I agree. It was obvious when he was just one of many Republicans running for the nomination that he was evil. More recently, it has become obvious that he is a mental case: a bad man and a mad man rolled into one. God (or fate) help us.

          Liked by 1 person

    • pendantry 12:15 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      One thing I find mighty peculiar is that every post about Trump that I read on WordPress has much the same to say about this obnoxious, egotistical, narcissistic windbag, yet he clearly has many supporters. I guess that there are very few, if any, of his followers on this platform… but that would seem odd.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:53 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Maybe Trump’s followers have too limited a vocabulary for WordPress. They’re more accustomed to the grade school bombast of Trump on Twitter.

        Liked by 1 person

        • pendantry 5:59 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          … I nearly said something like that (but more acerbic)… but restrained myself.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Paulie 1:25 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Trump certainly BELONGS behind bars but the system failed. I guess that the framers never saw it coming; a Senate that would, in a brazen act of partisan politics, essentially abdicate it’s responsibility when it came to an impeachment trial. As for the 25th amendment, the reverend Mike Pence would no more move to declare Trump incapable than he would covet his neighbor’s wife.

      As it stands now, the system is too cumbersome and too dependent on politics and will never, ever be changed. I would be shocked to see a new amendment during my lifetime but there has to be some mechanism introduced that can address the crisis of an incompetent president.

      As for the 40%, I’ve stopped trying to figure it out. In 2017 I read three books to try and gain some understanding as to why people voted for Trump and I suppose that I did gain some small insight. Why Trump still has any support beyond 10% (because we’ll never rid ourselves of the tinfoil hat faction) is completely beyond me. I guess I’ll never know because I’ve cut ties with anyone who supports Trump. That’s with the exception of some cousins and I simply don’t discuss it with them.

      In any other occupation, Trump would be fired for failing to do his job and/or creating a hostile work environment.

      Right now we are limping towards January and god knows what Trump will do between November and January as a lame brain (er duck) president.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:03 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I see that Trump’s approval rating is now down to 37% in one poll (Gallup, if I recall correctly). Some of that 40% is apparently starting to erode, but I’m not counting my trends before they’re matched (by other polls)..

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:59 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      As I see it, our minds are very malleable, making us easy prey for those who seek to manipulate and control our beliefs and behavior. We are all susceptible. We are all under mind control of some form or the other, for example, think of our consumption habits. Our 45th president has successfully managed to capture and hold a particular mindset among us.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:43 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think that is true in one sense, Rosaliene, but only to the point (for many of us) where minds become made up and set in concrete for the rest of our lives (like Trump). Meaningful malleability requires an openness to (and weighing of) challenges to what we have been indoctrinated or conditioned to believe….which, I suppose, is just a fancy way of describing GROWTH or MATURITY. All I know is I’m not the same person I was in my 20s and 30s — but that’s another story for another day.

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 4:33 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      His followers are deaf dumb and blind. Even worse, wilfully pig-headedly so.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:31 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your your word “pig-headedly” — between that and “gas-baggery” in my post, we may be starting a whole new lexicon-ery.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 5:11 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Gov. Cuomo today appropriately called him out for enabling the pandemic. That sadly is too true.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Gov. Cuomo is almost as good at ‘telling it like it is’ as Trump is at telling it like it isn’t.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 5:36 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          He just flat out said “Trump lies.” Very refreshing compared to the toadies around Trump.

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 6:53 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If British incompetency lost a few of Nivens family … we wont try to count the number of Aussies they slaughtered! Landing them in the wrong place eg Gallipoli, etc … we were sent in first sheep to the slaughter …

      He says what they want to hear and fear renders them deaf dumb and blind …

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:29 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        When I was growing up, American (and I assume British) history books were written as if our political and military leaders were almost uniformly great and noble figures and our countries acted in good faith in almost all cases. Hopefully we’ve learned our lesson and Trump will go down in history as the worst of the worst.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 3:41 am on July 7, 2020 Permalink

          lol all our history books need rewriting, massive correction … let’s see how your election goes …

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 12:43 pm on July 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Niven wrote a book called “The Moon’s a Balloon”. What is it with him and the Moon and Balloons?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:03 pm on July 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Niven’s 1971 memoir THE MOON’S A BALLOON was originally to be titled THREE SIDES OF A SQUARE, but was changed due to a title conflict….and the biography THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOON was written after Niven’s death. The only other “moon” connection with Niven I’m aware of is his role in the 1953 film THE MOON IS BLUE, which was considered so risqué at the time that it was refused the seal of approval by the Motion Picture Production Code. I haven’t finished reading the biography, so perhaps there is more ‘moonshine still’ to be uncovered.

        Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 6:30 am on July 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Haven’t heard about the “Moon” book but read Niven’s Bring on the Empty Horses years ago. I respected him for going home to fight for his country, unlike John Wayne, who wriggled out of the war and later showed his disloyalty to his colleagues by promoting McCarthy. It’s one of those ironic instances when a coward and a gasbag was made into an American hero. A friend of mine made a movie with him and had his heart broken when he discovered the “true” Wayne.
      On another note, I LOVE gasbaggery!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:51 am on July 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      One of the reasons I like biographies and autobiographies is that that they often reveal another side of famous contemporaries the writer knew. Of course, it’s prudent to be aware that opinions of others are only as good as the character and judgment of the writer (who, for example, would believe anything Trump says, good or bad, about anyone?).

      I appreciate that you love “gasbaggery.” That helps me feel better about the dreadful “moonshine still” that I pun-ished masercot with in my reply to his comment. 😉

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: actors, , , book rview, , , , , , ,   

    THE FIX IS OFF (for now) 

    Something has come up to postpone my out-of-town daughter’s Father’s Day visit until the following weekend ….so my browser problem will remain on hold, and without resolution, until the (offspring’s) fix is in. Meanwhile, back at the rant, I’ve finished reading the outspoken CARROLL O’CONNOR’s autobiography wherein he vents about many things. So, to fill in, let’s take up where my last post left off. After all, it’s All In The Family.

    O’Connor had a very varied pre-Archie Bunker life. Like many in their early adult years, he couldn’t find his niche. “I could not shake off a feeling of foolishnessa man of 26 plodding through the days and months with no plan, no answer for anyone who might ask “What are you going to do with yourself?” The eventual answer, after many dead-end turns, turned out to be acting….and, finally, stardom (which came with an Archie Bunker mentality).

    I — no doubt like most who read autobiographies — do so primarily to learn more about the author, his/her life and times. But I’ll also admit to the guilty pleasure of learning what the author thought of well-known contemporaries — in fact, such opinions may offer insights into other personalities and professions, which broaden (for better or worse) what I thought I knew about them. So, what were O’Connor’s impressions of….

    JOHN WAYNE: “He perceived America as the preeminent hero-nation, virtually a land of heroes in which he himself felt heroic (and actually was, as I knew him) and infused that perception into all his roles as naturally as if it were one of the primary  emotions.”

    JEAN STAPLETON: “Jean’s idea of Edith Bunker was not only original and perfectly suited to the American audience, but very comical and emotionally moving. If ever anything on television changed the country, not radically, not even obviously, it was the performance of Jean and the example of Edith. Did our series effectively attack bigotry and racism? We thought so at the time –”

    HARRY TRUMAN: “Nobody expected Truman to take part in a Korean civil war, if one should begin. His military chiefs had no battle plan; on the contrary, they had a plan for getting out of the way — withdrawing to Japan. I thought Truman was totally wrong — his political vision faulty, his practical leadership unintelligent, his moral justification false. For me, the issue of morality in war– whether or not it is a “just war” — turns on the question of choice. When you wage war because you have no choice you are acting justly. But when you have a reasonable choice and choose to wage war, you can’t call your war just.”

    MOVIE WRITERS, “though marvelously reliable in inventing space creatures — shriveled humanoids and hugely swollen insects — are unreliable in depicting intelligent life on earth.”

    AGENTS “are generally shrewd, knowing, clever people; good company, good friends. They have made my career; they make all careers; they are the most important people in the business.”

    ACTORS: “I shall never forget my first professional play rehearsal at The Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, in the spring of 1951 — the immediate cordiality of my new friends the actors: they greeted me like an intimate. Now after all these years I am still unfailingly comforted, encouraged and elated in the company of actors. There is something about the work these dear neurotics do, investigating every kind of human character, that  develops in them an extraordinary tolerance, forgiveness and good humor. I commend their company even to normal folk.”

    ….and I commend this book of Carroll’s to you.

     
    • waywardsparkles 1:50 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Those were the days watching All in the Family, The Jeffersons, and Maude! Ya know, I can’t remember a single episode of any of them; but I loved how Archie continued to open up as the show went on. Wait a minute, do you remember the episode when Archie had to get a transfusion? I do remember that episode. That was genius! Thanks for sharing about Carroll O’Connor’s autobiography, MM. Mona

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I vaguely remember that episode, Mona, but like you, I mainly remember the series in general, as a whole, not for individual programs. The same, I think, applies to MASH, although re-runs appear regularly on local TV and refresh memories of specific episodes much more readily.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 2:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Aww. Sad your fix is off. But this is a very interesting post

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sorry your daughter is delayed, but she will get there!

      So JW was just being himself, explains why he was monotonously the same in everything he appeared in … Carroll’s shares some good insights, particularly about war! Thanks for the review 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. I have several dozen biographies/autobiographies on my bookshelves, and O’Connor’s is one of the best.

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 4:03 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t panic! Help sounds like its on the way. Autobiographies seem to become more interesting the older we get. Something to do with the human condition, or trying to understand it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:08 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, o.v. The ‘search’ for understanding is never-ending (until the end), but to paraphrase an old saying, “’tis better to have searched and come up short than never to have searched at all.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 6:44 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      That book sound very interesting — what a character! Hope you get your fix soon, mister muse! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:57 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope so too, Carmen. The problems are getting worse (for example, my computer is increasingly ‘freezing’ on me — usually in the middle of writing a post or comment — requiring that I shut down and re-start). I wonder if it would help if I put my computer outside in the hot weather? 😉

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:15 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People always think of Archie when they think of O’Connor, but he really was so much more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg. If he were still alive today, it’s not hard to imagine Archie supporting King Trump and O’Connor railing against him as the emperor who has no clothes.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 10:44 pm on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I spent a week at Leonard Nimoy’s house which was across the street from O’Connor’s. That entire week, Carroll O’Connor cut his grass. He would finish with the lawn and start over again. I wanted to go and meet him, I heard he was a kind and intelligent person, but I never had the time. The Nimoys said he was a great neighbor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:42 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Very interesting. The Nimoys must have had the fast growing grass in town. I mow my lawn once a year whether it needs it or not. 😉

        Like

        • Don Ostertag 1:17 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Not the Nimoy’s lawn.., It was Carroll O’Connor cutting the O’Connor lawn.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:47 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the clarification — I took “cut his grass” to mean that, because he was “a great neighbor,” O’Connor cut Nimoy’s lawn while Nimoy was away for a week. Out of even lesser misunderstandings, yards have been known to turn into battlefields!

          Like

    • annieasksyou 12:01 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting, mistermuse—especially O’Connor’s takes on Truman and John Wayne. Did he say why he felt Wayne was heroic?

      I don’t think computers like hot weather one whit, but I’m perhaps a tad more tech-adept than you, based on your description, so don’t byte a single bit of info I provide.
      Enjoy Father’s Day. Is this an actual —as opposed to virtual—visit?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:16 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        When he knew Wayne, O’Connor wasn’t as liberal as he later became, so I assume that was how he felt then, before he ‘matured.’

        My daughter’s visit will be “actual” in order to install a new browser, as I am virtually blogging “up a creek without a paddle” on my outdated browser (at least, I assume that’s the cause of the problems I’m having — if not, I’m thinking of drowning my sorrow, and I don’t mean in the creek).

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:21 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope your daughter rescues you forthwith. If not, I assume you mean drowning your sorrow in a “spirited” manner, to which I say “bottoms up.”
      I switched from Safari to Firefox at WP’s suggestion, only to learn that Firefox, for reasons I can’t comprehend, will not let me grab images the way Safari does. So I do my image search with Safari and my writing with Firefox. I am way beyond creek depth now with no daughter available to paddle me to safe land. Best of luck!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It so happens that my daughter plans to switch me to Firefox. Before she does, I’ll bring your experience to her attention. She’s the head computer technician at the university where she works, but she doesn’t blog, so she may not be familiar with the idiosyncrasies of the various browsers when it comes to blogging. Thanks for the ‘heads-up.’

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 2:35 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You’re welcome. It happened to me with Google Advanced Image Search, which I use a lot, and with YouTube. But maybe your daughter the pro will be able to show you how to overcome my problem. And then maybe you can tell me!

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 5:20 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you are having a nice Father’s Day!
      There was a Microsoft update this past week in which the new version of the Edge browser was installed. Much to my surprise it’s super-fast!
      I forgot to mention something regarding the “like” problem. If you have your Enhanced Tracker Setting for your browser set for “custom” or “strict”, that prevents “liking” on certain blogs. Just click on the shield icon in the address bar and you can uncheck the tracking. You will then be able to “like”. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:08 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. I AM having a nice Father’s Day — made all the nicer by my neighbor mowing my lawn this weekend (he is the father of the (no longer) little girl my wife and I took care of years ago while he and his wife worked). Now that’s what I call a good neighbor!

        P.S. I will pass your tip on to my daughter next weekend when she installs a new browser, as I will not be publishing any more posts until then.

        Liked by 1 person

    • josephurban 3:57 pm on June 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice article. If you like autobiographies I suggest the Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant. I am currently reading it after watching a History Channel 3 part series on Grant. Fascinating.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:23 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This looks like a truly interesting, well-written book with lots of insight. I think I need to find a copy.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:42 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t think you’ll be disappointed, SS. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked the book.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Machiavelli, , , , , , ,   

    PHILOSPHER STONED 

    If there’s one thing I think we can all agree on about Donald Trump, it’s that he isn’t a philosopher. If, however, he can be said to have one guiding precept remotely resembling a philosophy, it has to be IT’S ALL ABOUT ME….or, secondarily, DON’T BLAME ME (which happens to be the title of a song I was going to link here until — faster than you can say Niccollo Machiavelli — Google removed share, embed & copy from their music clips, leaving technologically-challenged mistermuse at a loss as to how to post them).

    Be that as it may, I got to thinking that if THE DONALD were a lit-wit (rather than a nitwit) who wished to appear philosophical, there must be any number of wise philosophical quotes he might plagiarize to his greater glory (or, if he were stoned, learn from). Here are some I drug up which could fill the (Duck’s) bill:

    There is nothing so absurd that it cannot be believed if repeated often enough. — William James, American philosopher

    Philosophy teaches us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of others. –Oscar Wilde, Irish wit, poet and playwright

    Any man can be a philosopher if he only thinks enough about his own foolishness. –Edgar Watson Howe, American novelist and editor

    Philosophers have only interpreted the world. The point, however, is to change it. –Karl Marx, German philosopher, political theorist and socialist revolutionary

    If I killed everyone who was stupid, I wouldn’t have time to sleep. –Tamora Pierce, American fantasy fiction writer

    Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something. –Plato, Greek philosopher

    Always recognize that human individuals are ends, and do not use them as means to your end. — Immanuel Kant, German philosopher

    Philosophers before Kant had a tremendous advantage over philosophers after Kant, in that they didn’t have to spend years studying Kant.  –Bertrand Russell, British philosopher, writer and social critic

    Only one philosopher in history had a perfect alibi for doing nothing, and his name was I. Kant. –Evan Esar, American humorist

     
  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: blogosphere, food for thought, , , irrationality, , power, rationality, reason, , SNAFU, The Enlightenment,   

    A HELLUVA WAY TO RUN A WORLD 

    “This is a helluva way to run a railroad.” –from a 1906 speech by Leonor F. Loree, railroad executive, to a committee of creditors who asked him to take charge of the Kansas City Southern Railroad, which was described as two streaks of rust; its engines lost steam; the men were disheartened; and the stations were shacks.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Since first said in 1906, the above quote has famously become a catchphrase for the high-and-mighty mentality of any commercial, governmental, military, or other top-down entity operating in a fashion oblivious to SNAFU (Situation Normal, All Fucked Up). I (and maybe you too) have had occasion to view SNAFU close-up and personal, having served as a draftee in the military and as a 30-year “soldier” in the corporate milieu before retiring to savor domestic life anew (and rue honey-do). But at least I’m the boss of my own blog (though still at the mercy of invisible forces somewhere out there in the blogosphere).

    Anyway, being of a philosophical bent, this got me to thinking about helluva railroads and SNAFU, writ LARGE –as in, dude: how did this whole woebegone world come to be so SNAFUed? Do we have a clue? Perhaps a few of us do.

    It’s a story we can’t stop telling ourselves. Once, humans were benighted by superstition and irrationality, but then the Greeks invented reason. Later, the Enlightenment enshrined rationality as the supreme value. Discovering that reason is the defining feature of out species, we named ourselves the “rational animal.” But is this flattering story rational? From sex and music to religion and war, irrationality makes up the greater part of human life and history. –from a reference to IRRATIONALITY (subtitled A HISTORY OF THE DARK SIDE OF REASON), a book by Justin E. H. Smith, a professor of history and the philosophy of science.

    Well, if that isn’t food for thought, I don’t know what is. The problem, of course, is what it has always been: those most in need of reflecting on and applying such appraisal to oneself wouldn’t be caught dead doing so. It’s Greek to them. The Trumps of the world live in their own little world where big money talks….and it speaks power.

    Oh well. So much for funny money.

     

     
    • obbverse 12:28 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The world is mad. I tell ya- mad, its mad mad mad. Powerful mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 12:47 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      we spell SNAFU differently here down under, it’s spelt STUFFED …

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:18 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s post-modernism in its grossest form…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:40 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        My post makes no apologies (except for subjecting readers to the inclusion of His Grossness near the end).

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 9:13 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          Remember when the right-wing accused their opponents of trying to make reality flexible? Little did we know that they’d actually be the ones doing that…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 9:28 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          “Flexible” is a very charitable word for the right-wing’s appropriation of reality.

          Liked by 3 people

    • Rivergirl 8:14 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      SNAFU times 2!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:52 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        ….as in Doublemint gum on one’s shoes (sorry about that — I searched my sole, but was stuck for a better reply).

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rivergirl 8:54 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          I’d insult your reply, but that would make me a heel. A sticky situation at best…

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:30 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      😉

      Like

    • magickmermaid 11:03 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hell in a hand basket to be sure! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 5:50 pm on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

    • mistermuse 6:16 pm on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I see that I commented on that January post, Ricardo, but unfortunately no space alien has subsequently come to take Trump back to his home planet for experiments, as I hoped (probably scared off by the coronavirus outbreak, which Trump was ignoring at the time).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:49 pm on April 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I suppose those are the stimulus checks floating down to appease us and distract from the insanity.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:39 pm on April 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Everything Trump says or “floats” is either about him, or is something he does to turn things to his advantage. I have no doubt he will tout the stimulus checks accordingly.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 4:49 pm on April 9, 2020 Permalink

          He will probably sign them himself.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:33 pm on April 9, 2020 Permalink

          ….and the checks will probably have his face imprinted on them (giving BAD checks a whole new meaning!).

          Like

    • GP Cox 6:58 am on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People keep saying they admire the Greatest Generation, in this world-wide predicament, they can try to emulate them, rather than sit back and find things to complain about.
      They can’t make movies like ‘It’s a Mad, mad, Mad World’ – the actors would want too much money, plus a percentage of the profits.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:51 am on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It seems to be mostly young people (teens & 20s) and evangelicals who are disregarding the “rules” and doing their own thing. Young people have always thought they’re invincible, but evangelicals should know better….actually, deep down they probably do, but under the spell of the Falwells and Rick Warrens of the world, they suspend belief in everything but what they’re misled to believe.

        As for “Mad World,” no doubt you’re right. It probably had more stars than any other film in movie history (most of them in cameo appearances), including Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney, Ethel Merman, Sid Caesar, etc. — many of them all but forgotten today.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 12:10 pm on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 5:04 pm on April 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I always forget how many big stars were in this film. It was a truly ambitious undertaking in so many ways.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:23 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It’s a pretty good film, but I think it should’ve been better. It was director Stanley Kramer’s first attempt at comedy, and despite some good scenes, the unevenness shows. I’d rate it about a 7 out of 10.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 3:28 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And the world gets madder and madder each day!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:35 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I couldn’t agree more, Lorraine….especially when you think how much better it could be if more countries had better leaders. Trump has been an absolute disaster for the US, and no doubt your country is hurting for lack of competent, humane leadership, as well….while the rest of us pay the price for their arrogance and bungling.

        Sorry this reply is such a downer. Hopefully we’ll survive this epidemic and live to elect leaders worthy of their calling.

        Liked by 1 person

        • blindzanygirl 3:05 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink

          Don’t worry about it being a downer Mistermuse. We have to say it as it is. I’m all for that. I don’t know how any of us are going to get out of this mess but I bet once we have, there will be another one waiting around the corner. How are all our Leaders going to deal with the Recession that we are going to get? Hmmm.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:20 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Good attitude, Lorraine. As for handling the recession-to-come, I don’t know about your country, but I have no confidence whatsoever in Trump. It would be hard enough for a competent, caring President, much less an incompetent, self-serving narcissist like Trump.

      Like

    • Carol A. Hand 6:21 pm on April 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a mad world, indeed, Mister Muse. Thought you might appreciate a bit of musical humor about these times, created by Don Caron from the Parody Project:

      Battle Hymn of the Republic – Revised for Relevance (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eR0ckpJ3bk);

      The Ballad of New Orleans (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB11scadABg)

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Blaise Pascal, Erica Jong, , Lenin, , , opera, , , ,   

    TRUTH BE TOLD….so it is said 

    When I come across a quote I love, and which is so true that it hits home (home being where the heart is), I often tell Cupid to get lost while I grab a pen, because in my heart….

    Yes, I want to be alone so I can write down said truth on whatever scrap of paper is handy before I get distracted and forget it….even then, I often don’t recall where I left that lovely quote, and Cupid will call me stupid (but then, aren’t we all when Cupid is involved?).

    Anyway, I haven’t written a post since I got home from the (soap) opera six days of our lives ago, so today I thought I’d seek out and gather up some of the bold and beautiful quotations I misplaced, for you alone (you ARE alone, aren’t you?):

    I don’t want to be alone, I want to be left alone.” –Audrey Hepburn, actress

    “In Genesis, it says that it is not good for a man to be alone, but sometimes it is a great relief. –John Barrymore, actor

    “Solitude is un-American.” –Erica Jong, novelist and poet

    All men’s miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone.” –Blaise Pascal, writer, inventor, and theologian

    “The trouble with opera in the United States is that it is trying to sell caviar to a hamburger-eating country.” –Helen Traubel, opera singer

    “Opera: a play about life in another world whose inhabitants have no speech but song, no motions but gestures, and no postures but attitudes.” –Ambrose Bierce

    Opera: where anything that is too stupid to be spoken, is sung.” –Voltaire

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad.” –Aldous Huxley

    It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.” –Mark Twain

    There is a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure the truth.” –Maya Angelou

    I will close with a timely quote in which the words alone, opera, and truth do not appear….but I would say that truer words were never spoken (despite who said them):
    “Democracy counts heads without regard to what’s in them.” –Lenin

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:38 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved your quotes herein Mistermuse! Good share and always nice to read your posts. Looks like you must watch more soap (operas) to encourage you to pen more, on whatever scraps of paper – Hmm even gum wrappers perhaps? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:43 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t watch soap operas, GH, but my wife and daughters did years ago, and I got a whiff of a few of them in passing. These days, just following the intrigues of Trump and his cast of sycophants is like watching a soap opera — a VERY BAD soap opera.

      Liked by 2 people

    • blindzanygirl 2:02 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Some of them made me giggle. And anything that makes me giggle at 4 o’ clock in the morning MUST be good!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:14 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m never up at 4 o’clock in the morning unless nature calls — which doesn’t make me giggle (though I may end up with a jiggle).

        Liked by 2 people

        • blindzanygirl 10:20 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink

          Lol mistermuse. I usually wake up at 4 a.m. for a wee, then can’t get back to sleep again! So I rebd to come in here!

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 3:06 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol great collection of misplaced quotes! I also had a giggle all alone 😎
      but then my neighbour came knocking to ask what was the matter … lol
      sadly I loathe opera with a passion so some of these were written for me!

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 3:55 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Mr Twain nails it again And should life give you Lenin, make a Collective.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:28 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Life has given the country a “Lenin” with Trump, and needs a collective of enough voters to make the November election his last stand.

        Like

    • Rivergirl 9:03 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoy being alone. Why wouldn’t I? I’m marvelous company…
      😉

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg — you and the rocks (non-followers of Rivergirl’s blog will have to go there to get that). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:24 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Voltaire’s is hilarious.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:40 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I agree. “Boogie! Boogie! Boogie!” (to quote Groucho Marx in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA).

      Like

    • magickmermaid 12:18 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Although I have to disagree with Voltaire, I like all the other quotes. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:50 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not an opera lover, but if I had to choose, I’d take opera over soap opera because who needs soap when he only takes a bath/shower once a year, whether he needs it or not?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:04 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I find Angelou’s quote confusing. What sense do you make of it?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Perhaps the most common use of “Facts [to] obscure the truth” is political spin. See below:

        https://www.britannica.com/topic/political-spin

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 6:10 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. That makes sense. I really couldn’t understand her quote. Now I do.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:23 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          You’re very welcome, Elizabeth. If Trump & Company were as good at telling the truth as they are at spinning and/or twisting it, his followers wouldn’t know what to believe….and it might even give them second thoughts (not that they do any profound thinking in the first place).

          Like

    • mlrover 8:17 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Helen Traubel was on to something,especially when one keeps in mind that most TV watchers consider the singers on “Idol” talented. They may be but they’re certainly not trained and wouldn’t know a well-structured measure from a mordent.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I remember Helen Traubel well. Though a big (in more ways than one) opera star, she was no stuffed shirt — well, maybe physically, but not culturally — and made many guest appearances on TV back in the day, often on comedy shows like Jimmy Durante’s.

        As for today’s singers (and I mordently and mordantly use the term loosely), I can’t stand to listen to most of them, but as a product of today’s culture, what else would we expect? I suspect that some of them would’ve been good singers if they had grown up several generations ago….but not knowing any better, are they really to blame?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:25 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes here! Some made me frown but mostly they made me smile. Can’t be bad and now the sun has come out! Hoooray!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:09 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Voltaire’s comment on the opera made me laugh out loud. It sounds so irreverent!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:36 pm on February 24, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Every time I watch DUCK SOUP and A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, it’s amazing how funny Groucho’s lines still are today.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:45 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Being alone is ok for some…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E9ydw_aDMg

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:46 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I vote (ready to vote already) Mark Twain followed close by Huxley.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:16 am on February 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I can’t argue with those votes, Mary. Another one I really like is the Lenin quote, because it goes a long way toward explaining why Trump got millions of votes.

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 10:52 pm on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      here’s my original quote; “question is the answer.” continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:14 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, Tony, but would you kindly answer a question that has puzzled me for some time: your comments always end with the word “continue…” but continue where? At first I thought that if I clicked “continue,” it was a link which led to something….but nothing happens. What do you intend by “continue”?

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 5:16 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      i mean keep on going MM…keep on doing…just keep on. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • kutukamus 2:08 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Especially love those ones by Traubel and Lenin. 🍸

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:52 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Truth Be Told, the Lenin quote is my fav….but I like them all.

      Like

    • annieasksyou 11:44 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, Mistermuse. I just stopped by to welcome you to annieasksyou; I’m delighted to have you join me. And since I love bad puns, dislike opera, and have written my share of tirades about a certain White House occupant, I am now following you as well. So cheers!

      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:10 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, about which I have just one quibble: I would call Trump the White House disaster, rather than White House occupant. 😉

        Like

        • annieasksyou 9:25 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink

          I would agree—and even “disaster” doesn’t capture what his egomaniacal ineptitude has wrought on us now…

          But since we all need to keep our immune systems strong because of this plague he’s dramatically worsened, I’m putting a moratorium on myself to try to think of him as little as possible, focusing instead on things that cheer me—such as our budding new crocuses and the bird serenade outside my window.

          Liked by 1 person

    • skullGhost 8:03 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Simply amazing. And to add further, it seems this Lenin has captured the practical utilitarian essence of democracy well in those few words.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:13 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ironic, but true.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    YOU NEED TO READ SWIFT TO GET UP TO SPEED 

    I don’t recall how old I was — probably no later than my early teens — when I first read Jonathan Swift’s satirical masterpiece Gulliver’s Travels; all I know is it made a lasting impression on my unworldly-wise perception of the world. If you haven’t read the book, this summary will at least give you the bare bones:

    Several films have been made based on the novel; here is the trailer for the version I remember seeing (the book was what made me think; the movie served as entertaining afterthought):

    JONATHAN SWIFT, born this day (Nov. 30) in 1667 in Dublin, led a multi-faceted life between Ireland and England (his place of residence often depended on events beyond his control). For the meaty details of  his life, you might consider taking time to go Googling; here, I offer a dozen of his quotes, the first two of which are from Gulliver’s Travels:

    Based on Gulliver’s descriptions of their behavior, the King describes Europeans as “the most pernicious race of little odious vermin that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.

    The tiny Lilliputians surmise that Gulliver’s watch may be his God, because it is that which, he admits, he seldom does anything without consulting.

    When the world has once begun to use us ill, it afterwards continues to use the same treatment with less scruple or ceremony, as men do to a whore.

    I never wonder to see men wicked, but I often wonder to see them not ashamed.

    Words are the clothing of our thoughts.

    Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it, so that when men come to be undeceived, it is too late; the jest is over, and the tale hath had its effect: like a man who hath thought of a good repartee when the company departed.

    Happiness is the perpetual possession of being well deceived.

    We of this age have discovered a shorter, and more prudent method to become scholars and wits, without the fatigue of reading or of thinking.

    We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.

    I wonder what fool it was that first invented kissing.

    It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

    Nothing is so hard for those who  abound in riches as to conceive how others can be in want.

    Almost 300 years have passed since Swift completed Gulliver’s Travels, and the world still doesn’t seem to have gotten the word. Too bad.

     
    • calmkate 1:00 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      yes I always thought he was profound beyond measure … these quotes perfectly demonstrate that!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:56 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Among other things, he was a clergyman, but wasn’t above criticizing religion (as shown by one of the quotes). Now there’s a man you can have faith in!

        Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 2:52 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      ‘Words are the clothing of our thoughts’, that’s a wonderful quote.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree — but I think we should take it cautiously, in the sense that judging someone by how they dress would require a perfect judge, and none of us are that (except me — ha ha).

        Like

    • Rivergirl 4:12 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Sadly, there are some lessons we never learn….

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:54 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It must be something in the air. If we’d all stop breathing, maybe people would stop killing and doing other bad things to each other.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:05 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The essay by Swift that always got to my students was “A Modest Proposal.” It is pretty timely again too, given the attitude towards struggling refugees world wide at the moment.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:18 am on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’m against eating poor children, as modestly (and satirically) proposed by Swift, but I’m not opposed to eating the likes of Donald Trump by anyone who has the stomach for it.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 6:26 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wow – three hundred years old! And as timely as ever.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 8:53 am on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Haha! I nearly spewed my morning cup o’ tea on the keyboard when I read your reply.

      Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 5:16 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a brilliant skewering of all our pretensions and hypocrisies.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed it is….and after thousands of years of human history, my guess is that if we haven’t shed our pretensions and hypocrises by now, we never will.

        Like

    • magickmermaid 6:07 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Seems like there are quite a few descendants of the Yahoos in today’s world 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 9:01 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Everyone was required to read Gulliver’s Travels in my high school days, and they should be again Sr. Muse. That’s a modest proposal.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:07 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Ricardo — or at least watch the movie, for those who have made it to high school unable to read.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Harpo Marx, , Paul Simon, , , silence is golden, silent films, , The Sound of Silence,   

    THE SOUND OF SILENTS 

    You sure you can’t move? –what Harpo Marx “said” to the tied-up hero (Richard Dix) before punching him in the 1925 film TOO MANY KISSES (fortunately, the film survived)

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Italicized above are the only words ever “spoken” (but not heard) on film by the man whose birthday we note today, HARPO MARX. The audience didn’t hear those five words because the film was a “silent” — “talkies” didn’t come on the scene until 1927, two years before the first of thirteen Marx Brothers movies (1929-49). Harpo spoke in none of them.

    But why, oh why-o, should I try-o to “bio” Harpo, when here-o you can click on the official thing from his offspring:

    https://www.harposplace.com/

    Because Harpo associated with Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and other wits in the famed Algonquin Round Table repartee, I expected to turn up a number of witty Harpo Marx quotes for this piece. No such luck — I found only one I enjoyed enough to post here (both the “she” referred to in the quote, and who it is addressed to, are unknown):

    “She’s a lovely person. She deserves a good husband. Marry her before she finds one.”

    One quote being three quotes short of a gallon, I shall return to giving you “the silent treatment” with a quota of four quotes of silence said by forethoughtful others:

    “Listen to the sound of silence.” –Paul Simon, American singer, songwriter, and actor

    “Silence is golden unless you have kids, then it’s just plain suspicious.” –anonymous

    “If nobody ever said anything unless he knew what he was talking about, what a ghastly hush would descend upon the earth!” –A. P. Herbert, English humorist, writer, and politician

    “I believe in the discipline of silence and can talk for hours about it.” –George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright and critic

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Since I didn’t give Harpo the last word, I’ll let him give his audience the last laugh….and though he doesn’t speak, you’ll hear captivating sounds escape his lips 2:42 into this clip:

    Bravo, Harpo!

    EPILOGUE: Listen — 90+ years after the “silents” ended*, you can still hear….

    *with the exception of two Charlie Chaplin masterpieces in the 1930s, CITY LIGHTS and MODERN TIMES

     
    • calmkate 4:24 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      wow Harpo is actually playing that harp! Love his whistle 🙂
      SnG’s song is a real favourite … thanks for the memories!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:25 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’re welcome, Kate. I too love Harpo’s whistling in the Marx Brothers Musical clip, and I can’t imagine anyone not loving Simon & Garfunkel’s THE SOUND OF SILENCE (except Trump, who is incapable of appreciating the sound of silence if you paid him).

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 5:09 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink

          doubt he even knows what ‘silence’ means … not much between his ears except fluffy hair!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Don Ostertag 8:40 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink

          When i am in a funk I watch a Marx Brothers movie or listen to a favorite song like Sound of Silence.

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 7:47 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m a HUGE Marx Brothers fan.

      Harpo adopted several children because he and his wife couldn’t have any of their own. His aim was, in his words, when he got home he’d have a child looking at him “from every window”…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:35 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise about the Marx Brothers. If they had made no other films than A NIGHT AT THE OPERA and DUCK SOUP, they would still be remembered forever (I hope).

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 8:32 am on November 24, 2019 Permalink

          My favorite, not to be contrary, is A Day at the Races. Why? The great jazz number in the middle of the movie as well as the Tootsie-Frootsie Ice Cream Scene…

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 am on November 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Although Races isn’t my fav Marx Bros. movie, I’m always up for a jazz number, though this one has a very brief “bug-eyed” shot or two that might be regarded as racist today:

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 10:15 am on November 24, 2019 Permalink

          I agree with that but I’ll put up with a little light racism to see a wonderful performance by a jazz artist who died far too young…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:40 pm on November 24, 2019 Permalink

          I assume you’re referring to vocalist Ivie Anderson, whose gig in this film was one of her rare appearances apart from the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Her performance here (as well as on the many recording she made with the Duke) was indeed wonderful.

          Like

    • Rivergirl 8:46 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My father loved the Marx brothers and I grew up on all the films. Thanks for the memories!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Rg. Now I know (at least part of) why you grew up to be who you are (that’s wholly a compliment, btw).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:07 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing to see and hear Harpo playing the harp. Captivating! So much talent!

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 9:19 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Silence is golden unless you have kids, then it’s just plain suspicious.” So true! Lol. Fun quotes and clips and a beautiful song from Paul Simon. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:49 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        “Fun quotes and clips and a beautiful song” — three for the price of one! Who says I don’t offer bargains? Thanks for the testimonial, Diana!

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 3:31 pm on November 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Another big Marx Brothers fan here! Classic laugh fest!

      Liked by 1 person

    • tref 9:43 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Harpo playing the song “Alone” in night at the opera the very height of cinema. I could never grow tired of watching it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:25 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That is one of many great moments in the movie that I never tire of watching, such as the stateroom scene. The 1930s was truly the height of film making.

        Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 3:57 am on December 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Priceless MM. Priceless. continue…

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:49 am on December 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you. I’d give your comment a Like, but it doesn’t “take” when I click it.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Busy Doing Nothing, human behavior, , , party poopers, , , , , , wage slaves,   

    RETIREMENT TIME 

    Hard as it may be (for me, at least) to fathom, it seems that many people approaching retirement don’t look forward to it because they don’t know what they’ll do with all the time they’ll have when they have no job. That has never struck me as a problem, what with books to be read, writing to be written, learning to be learned (unless you already know everything), trips to plan, music to enjoy, sports to follow, chores to avoid, mislaid items to look for, naps to take, etc….not to mention human behavior forever to be baffled by.

    Believe me, friends, if I had half the time my once-upon-a-time fellow wage slaves assume I have, I would be posting a post almost every day instead of once a week or so (which, I concede, may still be too often for you malcontents and party poopers out there).

    So, how busy am I?

    Oops — how did that clip get there? Fact is, I’m so busy, I don’t even have time to think of more to say about the subject….so I’ll avoid that chore by passing it on to others:

    I have never liked working. To me, a job is an invasion of privacy. –Danny McGoorty

    I’ve crunched the numbers in your retirement account. It’s time to figure out who will be wearing the mask and who will be driving the getaway car. –Unknown financial advisor

    My retirement plan is to get thrown into a minimum security prison in Hawaii. –Julius Sharpe

    I will not retire while I’ve still got my legs and my make-up box. –Bette Davis

    The trouble with retirement is that you never get a day off. –Abe Lemons

    I find the biggest trouble with having nothing to do is you can’t tell when you’re done. –Unknown

    As for me, except for an occasional heart attack, I feel as young as I ever did. –Robert Benchley

    I can’t wait to retire so I can get up at 6 a.m. and drive around real slow and make everybody late for work. –Unknown

    What do you call a person who is happy on Monday? Retired. –Unknown

    When a professional golfer retires, what does he retire to? –Evan Esar

    When you retire, you switch bosses — from the one who hired you to the one who married you. –Unknown

    Time’s up. COMING, DEAR!

     

     

     

     
    • obbverse 1:11 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I still am weighed down by the joy(?) of work, so need to dole out my time, of which, there is never enough. I believe retirement will soak up all these drudgery hours wasted at work. Thanks for the light at the end of the tunnel.

      Liked by 3 people

    • calmkate 2:50 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      lol retirement is a struggle for the other half who already has a well established routine .. good luck with yours!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:25 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. Actually I’ve been retired for some time, but I can still use the good luck!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:36 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink

          lol I thought you must have been … don’t I remember you telling me you were 110?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:03 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink

          Some days I feel like I’m 110, Kate — it must have been one of those days when I told you that.

          Like

      • mistermuse 5:18 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Kate, I’ve been trying repeatedly to enter a comment on your “Friday Fun – restful” post but it won’t ‘take.’ Sorry to trouble you, but here it is, if you can use it:

        Since I retired, I run from quarrels —
        because I’m resting….on my laurels.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:10 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink

          just posted it, sorry about those WP gremlins, others have posted comments ok 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • emergingfromthedarknight 3:28 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Having ‘retired’ early due to an injury I can relate to most of those quotes and I love the one on work being an invasion of privacy. I also love it when people ask me. “what do you DO all day?” They have no idea 🙂 The happy fact is the day is free to spend however your heart desires.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:33 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You nailed it! When people ask me “what do you DO all day?”, I feel like saying, When you retire, I’ll be more than happy if you to give me all the time you don’t know what to do with.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Ashley 4:31 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Retirement is great! Busy busy busy, doing the things I like, well most of the time! When I was “working” we all used to say “have a great weekend” to each other. Nowadays the weekend lasts for at least 7 days! La la la-la-la-la, la-la, la-la, la la la la la la………
      Great post!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. Among the perks of retirement is that it doesn’t matter what day of the week it is, they’re all the same. Like me, you obviously don’t have a problem with that!

        Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:39 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m just trying to retire before the sun becomes a red giant and incinerates the Earth… If I live frugally, I think I can manage…

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 8:40 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Even with Trump & Friends accelerating the process, you will probably still make it to retirement age. Hang in there!

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 6:25 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Having just retired in June (but having summers off anyway) I must say it’s been great so far! :). Hope your retirement’s been great, too!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:45 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Carmen. Taking early retirement was the best decision I ever made (except, of course, for getting married, having children, and meeting you online. Keep up the good work….I mean, the good retirement!

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:41 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      With my husband it’s not a lack of things to do in retirement… it’s a mixed bag of having a great paying job with wonderful benefits, enjoying the social aspect of working, having a purpose to getting up every day and the simple joy of seeing his TSP ( government version of IRA ) grow. Personally I wish he’d just chuck it all and relax!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:51 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If, and as long as, your hubby loves his job, I don’t blame him. It’s when your job is (or becomes) a pain in the butt that it’s time to bail ASAP.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 7:58 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Chores to avoid — I am totally on board with that.

      Good essay. See ya.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 8:39 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I couldn’t agree more. Other than writing, I’m retired, and I’m so busy! As soon as my husband retires we’ll be even busier! Lol. Thanks for the laughs this morning. Great one-liners.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Christie 2:35 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the good laugh!
      I love this one: “I can’t wait to retire so I can get up at 6 a.m. and drive around real slow and make everybody late for work”
      Enjoy your retirement!
      🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:25 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love the quote from Abe Lemons: “The trouble with retirement is that you never get a day off.” I refuse to retire and have chosen to continue writing until the “headman” says enough. I’m the boss, so I make sure that I enjoy the holidays off and do fun things on my weekend breaks.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:13 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        “Boss Bacchus” has a good alliterative ring to it — even better than “Rosaliene the Riveter” which you might have been called back in WW II days (not that you’re anywhere near that old, of course). 🙂

        Like

    • Elizabeth 5:49 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love being retired. I only fear that I might flunk the question in the emergency room some day about what day it is. I often have no idea. And I try to forget the answer to who is President.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Infidel753 10:24 pm on September 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I tend to agree with you. It seems to me that most people who think they’ll have nothing to do with their time when they retire must be very lacking in intellectual interests.

      Even if I’d have trouble filling up time occasionally, I don’t see why the preferred alternative would be still engaging in some form of drudgery so onerous that I would never have considered doing it if I didn’t need the money. Even being bored for a while would be preferable. At least it doesn’t sap your energy in the same way.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:02 am on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Another alternative for retirees lacking in intellectual interests, hobbies, or other pursuits would be to volunteer their time with a non-profit organization to help those in need. I would think that making oneself useful to others not only helps others, but would give purpose to one’s own life.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 6:22 pm on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These are great quotes, but the one about the professional golfer retiring made me laugh out loud.

      I’m pleased to hear your retirement seems to be a time of productiveness and fulfillment. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:17 pm on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, SS. Fulfillment is something almost everyone seeks in some form or another, but attaining it in full measure is often dependent on fate and factors beyond our control. I can’t claim ‘full-fillment’– but I’m not complaining (much).

        Liked by 1 person

    • luisa zambrotta 1:01 pm on September 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      😉😉🤗

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:08 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I like all of these. I’d like a day off, I’m busier than ever. I’ve un-retired a lot of things I wanted to do.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:26 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I wish I could un-retire some of the things I wanted to do, but these old bones will no longer cooperate, so they’ll just have to stay retired. No matter — I don’t have time for them anyway (at least, that’s what my head tells me, and my body doesn’t argue….or is it the other way around?).

        Like

    • holliedoc 5:29 am on October 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I started my blog in my retirement, to assist in writing down my thoughts and feelings. Originally I wasn’t sure how much I’d enjoy retirement but have since taken up learning Spanish and playing the guitar amongst other things. It’s amazing how quickly you fill up your time in retirement.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:53 pm on October 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’ve got that right! My time is not only filled up, but overflowing.

        Like

    • Kally 10:22 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This is simply so well written! I love it. May I reblog this out and link it back to your blog please?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Robert Smith 7:16 am on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Relatable post! Thanks for sharing such an amazing article.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:54 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Robert. Sharing is caring, as someone once said (maybe it was me — ha ha).

      Like

    • live an untethered life 7:37 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Live an Untethered Life and commented:
      I don’t intend to go from 60 to 0. I plan to leap over to a new highway and keep or increase my speed!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Paul Hannah 1:52 pm on December 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hmmm…I avoided retirement like I avoided kids with snotty noses at the grocery store. When I was finally there I saw a flat, endless plain of nothing-to-do. So just this week I started a blog, Retirement-TheSnarkSide. Now I’ve got something fun to do, once I get the hang of WordPress. Thanks Robert.

      Liked by 5 people

    • mistermuse 4:05 pm on December 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Paul, I’ve been blogging on WordPress for over ten years, and I still don’t get the hang of their shenanigans (see my posts of Dec. 11th and 15th to give you an idea of one of the problems I have with WP). I hope you have more technological expertise than I, otherwise it may not be as much fun as you anticipate. In any case, good luck…..and Merry Christmas/Happy New Year.

      Like

    • holliedoc 6:07 pm on February 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Well if you happen to get time in your retirement, please do have a look at my retirement blog. I’d be keen to hear your thoughts and would welcome any comments on my articles.
      https://itsthetimeofyourlife.com/

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:53 pm on February 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I attempted to leave a comment on your Nov. 25 2019 post, but apparently it didn’t take. I’ll try to give it another try when I have time, but it won’t be today.

        Like

      • mistermuse 12:15 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I tried again today to leave a comment on your Nov. 25 post, but again, it apparently didn’t go through. I’m sorry, but I’m not tech-savvy enough to figure out why, and I can’t keep wasting time trying.

        Like

        • holliedoc 5:43 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink

          Hmm that’s a shame. I wonder why myself. I’ll have a look into why it’s not possible. Many thanks for your reply!

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 9:40 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Hickory dickory dock, , , , , ,   

    THE ART OF BAD POETRY 

    Oscar Wilde quote: “All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling.” Maybe so, but you can’t blame a guy for trying.

    A few days ago, in pondering the possibility of posting a post of putrid poetry for BAD POETRY DAY (August 18th), I took the precaution of reviewing a decade (my blog began in 2009) of August posts to make sure I hadn’t previously perpetrated poetic perfidy on unsuspecting readers on this day. Unluckily for you , I found that I’ve never posted a post on Aug. 18, so we’re good to go….make that, I’m good to go. Or bad to go. You have to stay, because if you don’t, you’ll break my poor art — and that wouldn’t be polite.

    Perhaps you think that my calling bad poetry an art
    doesn’t pass the smell test, like calling passing gas a fart.

    Not to put you on the spot, but was that a bad-ass poem, or what?
    Granted, it has a perfect rhyme, but is that such a crime?
    As bad poetry, I still say it’s sublime….speaking of which, I’ll have you know there are actually high-class contests to determine how low a bad poem can get, such as:

    With that behind us, it’s time we get back to sum-more of my cool august poetry:

    CLOCKING OUT

    Hickory, dickory, dock,
    The doc ran up the rock.
    The rock was more slippery
    Than doc’s hickory dickory,
    So down he fell, which cleaned his clock.

    HAIR APPARENT

    A Whig party wig
    Is my saving grace —
    It diverts your gaze
    Away from my face.

    I WILL ONLY STOOP SO LOW

    I don’t do windows,
    I don’t do lawns —
    But when I doo-doo,
    I do do johns.

    And with that, I bid you a fond adieu-doo.

     

     
    • Carmen 10:20 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      • she chuckles *

      Of course you know I’ll have to offer my favourite poem (by Sheree Fitch, of Nova Scotia)

      TOES IN MY NOSE

      I stuck my toes in my nose and couldn’t get them out
      It looked a little strange and people began to shout
      “Why would you ever?”
      “My goodness I never!”
      They got in a terrible snit.

      “It’s simple” I said, as they put me to bed –
      “I just wanted to see if they FIT!”

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 10:45 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for that beautiful bad poem, Carmen. It calls to mind this golden oldie:

        You’re a poet
        though you don’t know it
        but your feet show it —
        they’re Longfellows.

        HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

        Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 11:29 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Your last poem is so bad it’s actually good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:46 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      To quote the late author and critic D.B. Wyndham Lewis, “There is bad Bad Verse and good Bad Verse.” Hopefully he would have agreed with you that my last poem fits the latter category.

      Like

    • Rivergirl 1:22 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      When it comes to bad… you’re very good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:48 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Chelsea Owens here on WP runs a weekly terrible poetry contest that is a total hoot. Much in line with the rhymes you posted. Lol. If you ever need a laugh in these dark days of Trump, there are plenty of bad poets willing to share their terribleness. 😀 Thanks for the clip about intolerable moo too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:20 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Only you could pull off bad poetry with such aplomb!

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 7:21 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Always a pleasure to read bad poetry- or so my proof reader tells me. Seriously, it is a pleasure to read. No doubt you’re aware of William McGonagle, the high/low mark of all bad poets He tried so hard to write well, in his so earnest po-faced way. That makes it all the more hilarious.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:12 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. McGonagall had this in common with all bad poets: he was clueless that his poetry was bad. Still, I don’t mean that uncharitably — bad poets ‘gotta live too,’ and for all I know, maybe it keeps many of them out of trouble (although we all know a certain very bad tweeter who makes a lot of trouble for others).

        Like

    • America On Coffee 2:36 am on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I kind of like bad poetry. Composition charisma is what it has. 💕

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 12:04 pm on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hooray for bad poetry! Groaning 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 4:17 am on August 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      oy!
      oh boy!
      hoy hoy floy floy
      i may just be the hoi polloi
      but i really truly did enjoy.

      continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , con man, , , , gullible, , , Keep Cool Fool, , , , , , , the economy, truism   

    FOOL PROOF 

    fool’s paradise, a state of contentment based on delusive or false hopes. –WEBSTER’S NEW COLLEGE DICTIONARY

    A fool’s paradise is a wise man’s hell! –Thomas Fuller, English churchman/historian

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    July 13 is FOOL’S PARADISE DAY. If ever there was a day to get a handle on the “state” Donald Trump adherents live in, this is that day. Other than living in a “Fool’s Paradise,” how else to account for them being oblivious to what is patently obvious: The Donald is a sick excuse for a human being (much less a President) whose lies, corrupt morality, bullying, ethical poverty, and colossal narcissism do not matter because the economy happens to be booming (“booming” to whose benefit is apparently beside the point).

    Fortunately for America, I know a few eye-opening songs to bring a “fool proof” Trump adherent to his/her senses if he/she will only give the songs’ words an ear and take them to heart….which shouldn’t be asking too much because, as we all know, Trumpies would give an arm and a leg to do the ‘right thing for their country. Left with this admonition….

    ….how can the devoted Don fan of November 2016 (having now been exposed to cool cats, and hopefully less gullible) not begin to think in terms of Don the Con Man and ask….

    Cool cat or cool fool, still believe The Donald hasn’t played you for a total sucker? Pause and consider this Trumpian truism come election day, November 3, 2020:

    Fool me once, shame on you.
    Fool me twice, shame on me.

     

     
    • calmkate 3:54 am on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m very glad someone is onto him … it is truly scary and only goes from bad to worse 😦

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:57 am on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Unfortunately, I don’t have anywhere near the “bully” pulpit Trump has. I only wish the media would stop giving him so much of a pulpit. Why must they televise his every staged appearance and give his every inane utterance TV time? We can only hope that such over-exposure will make more and more people sick of him and result in voter backlash.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 7:49 pm on July 13, 2019 Permalink

          yes considering the media feigns disgust they give him more free publicity than Princess Di ever had … and that’s saying something!
          I sincerely believe they should stonewall him eg report nothing, let him vanish in his own bile!

          Liked by 3 people

    • Rivergirl 8:02 am on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      He’s their horse and they’ll ride him into the dirt. Switching now would force them to admit they were wrong about him.. and that’s something they just won’t do. Except Paul Ryan. Now the weasel writes a book and says how uninformed and awful Trump is. Now. When it means nothing. So brave.

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 10:13 am on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I absolutely agree….with one caveat. Paul Ryan’s Wisconsin, which Trump narrowly won in 2016, will be a critical state in the next election. If Ryan suddenly and belatedly seeing the light convinces several thousand Wisconsin fence-sitters and independent ex-Obama voters (who turned to Trump) to do the same, it could make a difference.

        Liked by 3 people

    • arekhill1 1:32 pm on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      If the economy burps even a little, Sr Muse, he’s toast. So default on something–it’s your patriotic duty.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’d like to default on my part of taxes that go toward paying the White House electric bill, but then Trump would probably move the Oval Office to Trump Tower or Mara Lago. Maybe I’ll just take a nap until the next election. Wake me when it’s over (or before, if Ohio looks close).

        Like

    • Elizabeth 6:35 pm on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I hope the Democrats can get their act together and find a moderate alternative to Trump. Sadly I remember 1968 when McCarthy drew support away from Humphrey and we(young adults) thought Humphrey was no different from Nixon. Hate to see that repeated in 2020.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:17 pm on July 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If you’re hoping for “a moderate alternative to Trump,” you’re probably pleased that Joe Biden is still the Democratic frontrunner, though not by as large a margin as before the debates. Personally, I think he is the safest bet to beat Trump because the Dems need to win back states (like Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin) that Trump narrowly won in 2016, and Biden is big in Pennsylvania and stronger in the Midwest than more liberal democrats. Nonetheless, I like a lot of the Dem candidates, and while I think all of them would make a better Pres than Trump, I don’t think all of them could beat Trump — not even Bernie, because middle America isn’t ready to elect a socialist Pres, in my opinion. If you believe in the dictum “Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good,” Biden and a few others have a leg up at this point.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 3:49 pm on July 16, 2019 Permalink

          I am with you. But I am 72, so I am not in the majority I don’t think.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:00 pm on July 16, 2019 Permalink

          In the end, I think (or at least hope) that even the most liberal Dems will accept that beating Trump trumps everything else, and unite behind the Democratic nominee, even if it’s Biden. I don’t even want to think about four more years of Trump.

          Like

    • masercot 6:07 am on July 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I hate Trump but I LOVE the Ink Spots… not as much as the Mills Brothers, but a lot…

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:07 am on July 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I love both groups too, but since they had different styles, I hesitate to say I love one over the other….though I will say that the 1930s Mills Brothers were ‘jazzier’ than they later became, so I have a slight preference for the early Mills Bros. compared to, say, the 1950s & later Mills Bros.

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 9:05 am on July 16, 2019 Permalink

          I think, after hearing “How’m I doin’?”, from the Mills Brothers, I was hooked… Or, maybe Tiger Rag sold it. The Ink Spots ended up in the soundtrack of a popular video game…

          Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 7:16 pm on July 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Fools paradise actually sounds like a fun place to live

      Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 8:50 am on July 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I used to be proud to have been born in WI, a Cheesehead through and through, but on that fateful night of the presidential election debacle of eternity, I sat with my best friend in Madison watching the returns. We stared at each other in disbelief, our state voting for a man who had no respect for, hadn’t even read the Constitution? In the end, a lot had to do with redistricting and agri big business. I have no sympathy for those immense farms now losing their shirts for backing a fool playing with world economy. Reminds me of the C. Chaplin movie with Hitler bouncing the world. The shame is that our country is tolerating and looking away from Trump’s version of Kristallnacht.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:28 pm on July 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I think the majority of the country stared at the election results in disbelief (remember, Trump lost the nationwide count by almost 3,000,000 votes). That’s why it will be crucial for the Dems to reclaim Wisconsin, Michigan and PA in 2020. As much as I like Elizabeth Warren, Kamela Harris and Mayor Pete, they need to show me they can win those 3 states (without losing any of the states the Dems won in 2016) to convince me that Biden isn’t the best choice to beat Trump (though, of course, it goes without saying that I would vote for any one of them over Trump in any case).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 2:15 pm on July 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know there was such a thing as Fool’s Paradise Day, so I looked it up. Thanks as always for the fab music!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:45 pm on July 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’re more than welcome, SS. I collected 78 rpm records from the early years of the 20th Century to the early 1950s for over sixty years, which is why I am familiar with that “fab music” and have a good idea of what songs to look for on YouTube.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 1:46 pm on July 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

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