Updates from September, 2020 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Charles Schulz, Erma Bombeck, , , , , John Lewis, , , , Saint Augustine   

    DON’T ASK 

    You Asked For It (according to my previous post) — but this post is a different story, so….

     

    By a weird coincidence, ASK ME NO QUESTIONS AND I’LL TELL YOU NO LIES (a quote attributed to 18th century Irish novelist, playwright and poet Oliver Goldsmith) is my springboard for this post of “Don’t Ask” quotes — thus sparing you the fate of my last post, which subjected you to some questionable poems.

    Let’s plunge right in with perhaps the most famous DON’T ASK quote (at least in America):

    “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” –John F. Kennedy

    Here’s another famous one (in jazz circles), leveled at squares:

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis Armstrong

    If you have a humorous bone in your body, the next three should bring a smile to your face:

    “Sometimes I lie awake at night and ask, Why me? Then a voice answers, Nothing personal, your name just happened to come up.” –Charles M. Schulz

    “Some people see things that are and ask, Why? Some people see things that never were and ask, Why not? Some people have to go to work and don’t have time for all that.” –George Carlin

    “When your mother asks, “Do you want a piece of advice?’, it is a mere formality. It doesn’t matter if you answer yes or no. You’re going to get it anyway.” –Erma Bombeck

    Now for some serious stuff:

    “What then is time? If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know.” –Saint Augustine

    “If you ask me whether the election of Barack Obama is the fulfillment of Dr. King’s dream, I say, ‘No, it’s just a down payment.” –John Lewis

    To close, here’s a quote I like which is a stretch to fit the category, but since it’s the birthday of the author, don’t ask me to re-think its inclusion here:

    “Thinkers think and doers do. But until the thinkers do and the doers think, progress will be just another word in the already overburdened vocabulary.” –Francois de La Rochefoucauld (9/15/1613–3/17/1680)

    I think that does it for now. How’s that for progress?

     

     

     
    • rawgod 2:39 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If you don’t want to know the answer, please, don’t ask the question.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:51 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That would seem to be the badge of honor for Trump followers: you don’t want to know the answers because he already has them all.

        Liked by 2 people

        • rawgod 7:58 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          Pretty much.
          I just completed a musical rewrite of an old song. I’m not publishing it yet, but if you send me an email I will let you be the first to tell me what you think of it. g-e-w-c-o-l-o-@-g-m-a-i-l-.-c-o-m. I think they call them parodies.

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 2:45 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol left me scratching my head, good one … love the song with the accordion!

      Now what is jazz? and what is time?
      must be the cue for a new rhyme …

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 7:21 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Lawrence Welk must be turning over in his grave at such accordion blasphemy!

        This DON’T ASK post means mistermuse needn’t address such questions….
        However & nonetheless, Kate, if in distress, I’m open to readers’ suggestions.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:36 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          Well not being one to miss opportunities … the best female jazz artists? thank Mr M

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 6:56 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink

          Kate, when it comes to “best female jazz artists,” I’ll start with a name almost all jazz lovers agree on: ELLA FITZGERALD. The rest of my (personal opinion) list will be names you’ve probably never heard of, belonging as they do to the long-past Golden Age of Popular Music: Mildred Bailey, The Boswell Sisters, Bea Wain, Midge Williams, Helen Forrest, Ethel Waters, Martha Tilton and of course, Billie Holiday (who you probably have heard of). A bit later (but still ancient history to those under 60), Peggy Lee and Dinah Washington were probably my post-WWII favorites.

          I sure I’ve left out a few names I should include, but the above will have to do for now..

          Like

    • JosieHolford 7:18 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice haunting bit of accordion there.

      And then there’s this from Alice. B.Toklas on the last words of Gertrude Stein:
      In a letter she wrote about those last words

      “She said upon waking from a sleep—What is the question. And I didn’t answer thinking she was not completely awakened. Then she said again—What is the question and before I could speak she went on—If there is no question then there is no answer.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:47 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for that thought-provoking comment, Josie. I’m thinking there is no answer, question or no question. Perhaps that’s why my favorite quote in the post is that of Charles M. Schulz (of PEANUTS fame).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 7:56 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent selection. The down payment Lewis quote is sadly relevant again.

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 8:47 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I see you’ve mastered the new interface…

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:36 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The answer to Kennedy has been rendered simple by recent history–what you can do for your country is vote Trump and all his enablers out of office.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 3:15 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        If there’s any justice left in this world, nothing less than “out of office” and into prison will suffice (but I’ll settle for just “out of office”).

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:55 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love the video! And the quotes!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:23 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, mm. I wasn’t looking for that video — I stumbled across it while looking for something else, so it was a ‘happy accident.’

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 1:39 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes Another answer to Charlie Brown: Because there’s just something about you that pisses me off.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:33 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyed your post 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:12 am on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, my friend. 😉

      Like

    • Elizabeth 7:05 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “Ask not what you can do for your country, ask what your country can do for you,” attributed to Jared Kushner(probably apocryphal)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:57 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know if Jared Kushner was quoted correctly, but we know that JFK was:

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 12:09 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink

          Yup. I remember that speech. I am that old.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:48 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink

          Likewise, Elizabeth. At our age, it’s like humorist Fred Allen (remember him?) once said: “I always have trouble remembering three things: faces, names, and — I can’t remember what the third thing is.”

          Like

    • annieasksyou 5:00 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I think the Jared Kushner quote was “Ask not what your country can do for you because it’s not your country; it belongs to us.”

      I found the video chilling but enjoyable.

      The John Lewis quote made me teary.

      A very thought-provoking post, mistermuse! And a VERY belated happy birthday to your friend Francois (I’m too lazy to type his full name, but I’m pondering his thought).

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:21 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think the John Lewis quote is even more chilling (than the video) in the context of the Trump presidency, because Trump is doing his best to take back the “down payment.”

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:05 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Peter Pan, , , , ,   

    YOU ASKED FOR IT! YOU GOT IT! 

    My last post featured poetry which one of you commented that you wanted more of. So, it is by popular demand (who am I to deny my adoring readers?) that my Fats friend and I are bound to reply:

    The initials of that reader are mm. No, mistermuse isn’t the mm who asked for more. If you must know, it was magicmermaid, who I assume is a real person (not that mistermuse isn’t real — as real, at least, as magicmermaid….or as you, for that matter). You are real, aren’t you? — if not, just pretend you are, because mistermuse can use the reassurance.

    THE FAUX PAS OF POSITIVE THINKING

    “Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one.” –Voltaire

    I can live with
    Uncertainty and doubt —
    It’s know-it-alls
    I have my doubts about.

    THE PETER PRINCIPLE

    “I am not young enough to know everything.” –Sir James M. Barrie (author of the play subtitled The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up)

    Sorry that things didn’t quite Pan out
    (except in Neverland….or thereabout).

    HOW TO BETTER CULTIVATE KNOWLEDGE

    “Scholars esteem knowledge not for its use in attaining other values, but as a value in itself.” –Max Eastman

    Know,
    Weigh,

    Hoe
    Say.

    KNOW PROBLEM

    “If reality wants to get in touch, it knows where I am.” –Phil Proctor

    But if reality says,
    “Hello there, it’s me” —
    How would you know
    Absent a show of real ID?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • Notes To Ponder 2:14 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Most excellent. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 3:03 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyed the wordplay muchly. May I add an offering on Peter Pan?
      See Ya Late-
      Pity poor pre-adolescent Peter Pan,
      Never fated to become a full grown man-
      Sadly remembered as a smart-mouthed juvenile,
      NOW he’d say ‘kids, don’t ever bait the crocodile.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:15 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “I’m not young enough to know everything” is a wonderful quote!

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:34 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, MisterMuse! I wish everyone would follow my suggestions so readily. 😀
      Yet another reason why I don’t have a webcam. All and sundry would have seen me hopping around the livingroom to the Fats Waller tune! If he can’t make you dance, no one will!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:13 pm on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love them all, MisterMuse, especially “The Faux Pas of Positive Thinking” 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:36 pm on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise, Rosaliene. I was kind of partial to “Know Weigh Hose Say”….but when José say “No way!”, I changed my mind.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 11:11 pm on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      When magickmermaid, the Siren
      Called mistermuse to play
      The result was a fun environ
      So, “yes way,” I say.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:47 am on September 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I didn’t know you’re a poet —
        Or should I say, a poetess.,,,
        But any way you weigh it,
        You’re no damsel in distress.

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:14 am on September 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      very clever … I’m sure I’ve asked for more overtime … guess I dont have the magic touch!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:56 pm on September 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I am not sure if I like the first one best or not. Better not be sure!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:09 pm on September 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m not sure how to respond to that, Elizabeth — but I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt. 😉

      Like

    • masercot 8:45 am on September 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The outcome is most obscure
      unless I’m sure

      When my confidence is at its height
      I probably haven’t done anything right…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:42 am on September 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Compared to Trump,
      you’re ahead of the game —
      he NEVER does anything right
      and he’s never ever to blame.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:32 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If there ever was a year that reality got in touch, it’s this one, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 3:49 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I fear the worst of the year is yet to come after Nov. 3, no matter the election results.

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:01 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: groundhog, , , platitudes, , , ,   

    FOR THE TIME BEING 

    It’s been some time since I laid some poetry on you, but all good things must end (i.e., your luck has run out). What I’m getting at is, I’ve decided to resurrect a few old poems, as well as come up with a new one or two. If you object, you have the right to remain Soylent* because….

    *Soylent: foodstuff made of soybeans and lentils

    A POEM OF EXCEPTIONAL TASTE

    Soybeans and lentils — what a treat!
    I can think of nothing I’d rather eat!*
    Just savor the flavor — they can’t be beat*….
    But then, I’m a groundhog, so I don’t eat meat.

    *except for watermelon: https://riversworld.live/2020/09/04/summer-means-watermelon/

    I’LL TAKE A BRAINCHECK

    “The difference between intelligence and wisdom is that intelligence is knowing half of what you hear or read is garbage, and wisdom is knowing which half.” –Seymour Fisher

    From dilemmas of that class,
    You’ll have to exempt me —
    I’m still stuck on “Is the glass
    Half full or half empty?”

    WISE-ASS PLATITUDES

    Utmost is the wisdom of the platitude —
    But most, sadly, are lacking in latitude.
    Is there never need for deviance?
    I think I shall file a grieviance!
    The grounds? Let’s just say they have an ATTITUDE.

    LONG TIME, NO SEE

    Youth is the stuff of time and place
    The race of years cannot erase,
    Seen through eyes too unwise to see
    That all was not what it seemed to be.

    Age is the stuff of hedging bets,
    Of things undone and old regrets,
    Seeing ourselves as others do,
    Thinking “And so, what else is new?”

     

     
    • blindzanygirl 1:17 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant. I love ‘em

      Liked by 5 people

    • calmkate 2:48 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      give me lentils and soybeans any day … love SFs quote, says it all!
      Like the clip 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:56 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That’s not the first time I’ve used that song. Here’s the clip of I DON’T CARE (sung by Judy Garland) in a post from Jan. 2019:

        Liked by 2 people

    • rawgod 4:03 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      • Just curious, was the soylent green? or just silent?

      And might I suggest ATTITUDE with an ATTTITTUDDE, dude?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:17 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Maybe this answers your first question:

        Your second question is a bit of a stretch, in my HUMBLE opinion.

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:05 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ode to a woodchuck?
      Love it!

      Liked by 2 people

      • rawgod 9:38 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Actually, Owed to a Woodchuck! But as usual for non-humans, the woodchuck never got the royalties…

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:00 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink

          Rivergirl did share her watermelon with the woodchucks, to whom I’m sure watermelon in the paws is worth royalties in the bush.

          Like

    • Rivergirl 7:13 am on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Immortalized in poem?
      The woodchucks are honored.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 5:35 pm on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This made me smile
      I like the definition of wisdom…

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 6:19 pm on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      One of the worst films I’ve ever seen was that terrible one called Soylent Green.
      I didn’t know I had a theme song. 🙂
      More poetry, please!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:56 pm on September 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “More poetry”? You talked me into it, mm — more poetry coming up (but I won’t say how soon, as I don’t want to lose any readers who haven’t recovered from this post yet).

        As for your “theme song,” here’s an alternative in case you want to upgrade from I DON’T CARE:

        Like

    • arekhill1 4:39 pm on September 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nicely written, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:19 pm on September 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Gracias, Ricardo. As the lyrics of the above song say, “I should care — and I do.”

        Like

    • Ana Daksina 1:41 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I have no grieviance with this work!

      PS — The reader who wants “more poetry” is a keeper

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:11 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ana. Actually, all my readers (including you) are keepers….and even though I enjoy my job as a “you” keeper and get well paid in Likes and Comments, I wouldn’t object to an occasional cash bonus! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • Ana Daksina 9:17 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          You’d have no greviance with it? 🤣

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:09 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          If by “it”, you mean my previous comment, I do have second thoughts, in that (unlike “grieviance” in the WISE-ASS PLATITUDES poem in the post) it didn’t come off as well as I intended. Even so, I won’t turn down an “additional cash bonus” for trying.

          Like

    • masercot 11:47 am on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      That first one had Rivergirl written all over it…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:34 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You got that ‘write’ — her SUMMER MEANS WATERMELON post of Sept. 4 was my ‘inspiration’ for the first poem.

        Like

  • mistermuse 9:45 pm on August 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A.A. Milne, , , Clifford Odets, , , , Jack Warner, movie memories, , , , ,   

    IT’S ABOUT A QUOTER TO NINE 

    Several days ago, one of my readers said she’s partial to humorous quotes, so I’ve been thinking about spending a whole lot of time thinking about devoting a post to things others have said which are funnier than what I say….but after searching high (brow) and low (brow), eye gave up. See what I mean?

    Ha ha! Just kidding. Believe it or not, I was able to find nine selections funnier-than-mine (well, maybe somewhat funnier), though I’m sure I would’ve said them first if I’d thought of them first. Some of the nine guys & gals I’m about to quote said what they said before I was even born, thus taking unfair advantage of circumstances beyond my control. But this is my blog, so as a quoter of quotes, I at least get to determine the subject matter of the quotes I quote, and the quotes I’ve chosen to quote are quotes about quotes….and I quote:

    “A quotation is a handy thing to have about, saving one the trouble of thinking for oneself – always a laborious business.” –A. A. Milne

    “I googled the quote ‘Power means not having to respond.’ Nothing happened.” –John Alejandro King [what “Power means” sounds like something Trump might say, except nothing Trump says is worth quoting]

    “Quotation: The act of repeating erroneously the words of another.” –Ambrose Bierce

    “There are two kinds of marriages: where a husband quotes the wife, and where the wife quotes the husband.” –Clifford Odets

    “You can tell a really wonderful quote by the fact that it’s attributed to a whole raft of wits.” –Anna Quindlen

    “I have made it a rule that whenever I say something stupid, I immediately attribute it to Dr. Johnson, Marcus Aurelius or Dorothy Parker.” –George Mikes

    “That woman speaks eighteen languages and can’t say ‘No’ in any of them.” –Dorothy Parker

    “You can always depend on children to quote you correctly, especially when it’s something you shouldn’t have said.” –Evan Esar

    “I can’t see what Jack Warner [Warner Bros. movie mogul] can do with an Oscar – it can’t say Yes.” –Al Jolson

    :

     
    • calmkate 2:05 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I must remind myself not to eat whilst reading your posts … I nearly choked to death!

      Those women look far more sexy in those slinky dresses than most gals these days in next to nothing!

      … see you at 8.30, I don’t want to miss anything 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:00 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m kind of partial to “next to nothing” (especially when I’m next to my wife when she’s wearing nothing), Kate — not that I have anything against sexy women in slinky dresses. 😉

        As for “see you at 8:30,” I don’t know what time zone you’re in, but in 45 minutes it’ll be 12 hours since I posted this post (note the time at the top of this post). Can you guess my time zone?

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 10:14 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          no idea, I though the states?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:41 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          Eastern Standard (Eastern Daylight) time.
          BTW, I neglected to apologize for causing you to nearly choke to death. That would’ve been hard for me to swallow, knowing that my puns are killers (I thought the worst they might do is make some readers ill).

          Like

    • rawgod 3:32 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I can agree with phrase one of this quote, “There are two kinds of marriages: where a husband quotes the wife, and where the wife quotes the husband.” –Clifford Odets, but my take on the rest of it is, “those that end indivorce, or those that end in death.” Which is your preference?

      As for the A.A. Milne quote, I can truthfully say my fafourite person to quote is myself. That way, if I misquote myself, it is not a misquote, but merely a change of time.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’ll have to take a paincheck on choosing between those two alternatives, as I’ve never experienced either one.(though I suspect that avoiding the second would prove more difficult).

        I can’t disagree about your favorite person to quote, although I sometimes wonder if I was myself when I said what I said (in which case, the George Mikes quote might prove useful).

        Like

        • rawgod 11:40 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          Say it, own it, live with the consequences. It’s not really that hard.
          The main thing is be true to yourself. Say what you mean, mean what you say (maybe you can tell me who first said that?).
          If someone midreads you, or misinterprets you, that is beyond your control.
          The hard part is using sarcasm. You are purposely writing to mislead to make a point. Many readers, unfortunately including myself, miss sarcasm. We read it straight up. Then where do we go? My above quote about marrige/death/divorce is full of sarcasm, but can still be read straight up. Ooooohhh, wny do we write in the first place?
          Because we have to!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:57 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          I Don’t Know WHO FIRST SAID THAT — but I do know Who’s on first and I Don’t Know is on third….not to mention What’s on second. If you ask the name of the shortstop, I Don’t Give a Damn. The rest of That routine, I don’t remember. The rest of your comment: Thumb’s up!

          Like

        • rawgod 2:06 am on September 4, 2020 Permalink

          Funny, but Bud and Lou never once mentioned the right fielders’ name. Here is a good example, https://youtu.be/4t4PzWSLhqQ of them at their greatest. BTW, I know who is in right field, but I made them a promise never to reveal his name, so, I can’t tell ya.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:46 am on September 4, 2020 Permalink

          Something tells me the right fielder’s name is Lefty. I hope Lefty’s right, or Something’s in big trouble!

          Like

    • Rivergirl 8:09 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Quotes about quotes … very circular, that. And you can’t beat Dorothy Parker!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:32 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed! If it weren’t for the fact that I’d be dead by now, I would love to have been within earshot of the Algonquin Round Table when Dorothy and her fellow wits had at each other.

        Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 1:33 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Tubularsock has always found that a quotable quote carries no risk. So where’s the fun in that?
      Great post.

      Cheers.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mistermuse 3:23 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        With some quotes, there’s the risk of an insight which may cause a reader to THINK (if he or she can stand the strain)….but granted, “where’s the fun in that?”
        Whatever the case, thanks for the “Great post” compliment, which is fun (for me, at any rate) to quote.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Susan 2:24 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Good selection!

      Liked by 4 people

    • arekhill1 2:38 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “There are no stupid questions, just stupid people asking questions everybody else already knows the answer to.”

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        ,,,,and then there’s Trump, who never asks questions, which is why he’s stupid (or, more accurately, ignorant).

        Like

    • Eliza 2:20 am on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      💕 Number 3 and 8 made me giggle.
      Thank you………….

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:49 am on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Number 3 is from Ambrose Bierce’s THE DEVIL’S DICTIONARY, which is definitely funnier than Webster’s Dictionary (although it’s much less ‘weighty’ than Webster’s….and takes up less room on the bookshelf too). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 12:02 pm on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I was surprised that Lauren Bacall wasn’t in the video. Funny quotes! I think your own writing is extremely funny. (You may quote me.) 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, mm. I have to be funny as long as Trump is King — I mean, President — otherwise, I’d lose my sanity (and if Trump is any example of what becomes of a man, I certainly don’t want to lose my sanity).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:47 pm on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Can I quote you on that?

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 9:57 am on September 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So, quotes about quotes?

      Shame on you!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:19 pm on September 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It would be shame on me if I quoted Trump (& his supporters’) quotes about quotes, but I will only stoop so low.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Marietta Rodgers 11:35 am on September 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You can absolutely depend on children repeating something you shouldn’t have said and constantly forgetting the things you want them to remember.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:58 pm on September 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Very true. The first part of your comment is reflected in a number of DENNIS THE MENACE cartoons (still appearing every day in the local newspaper) which show Dennis repeating discomfiting things his father or mother had said about people (now, in their presence). As for forgetting things, I find that to be more manifest in old age — at least, I personally DON’T REMEMBER it being a problem as a child!

        Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 1:01 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Don Redman, , Jo Trent, Lazy Weather, luxury, Peter DeRose, relaxation, , Thomas More,   

    RELAX REDUX / IN THE LAP OF LUX 

    After my last post (“RELAX”), the title of a possible sequel (“RELAX REDUX”) came to me….however, further inspiration waned, leaving me a title in search of a post. But fear not. We artistes are too artiste-tic to give up a half-asinine idea without a fight….and, in time, a way forward hit me: if RELAX REDUX became the asinine half of a whole post, the whole post would be half-asinine if the second half of the whole were also half-asinine. In other words, the second half of the whole must be better than half-asinine, or the whole post is half-asinine.

    In short, to half or not to half — that was the question. The answer came to me when I asked myself what can be logically paired with relaxation to buttress a less asinine whole, and I answered myself: luxury, that’s what. Hence I appoint IN THE LAP OF LUX to serve as my better half….whether my wife likes it or not.

    So, Weather* you’re weady or not, it’s time to welax — er, RELAX. That’s half the battle.

    *LAZY WEATHER was one of a number of songs written by white composer Peter DeRose and black lyricist Jo Trent in the late 1920s (a time when such bi-racial collaboration was almost unheard of)

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Now on to IN THE LAP OF LUX:

    “Living in the lap of luxury isn’t bad, except that you never know when luxury is going to stand up.” –Orson Welles

    “If your neighbor has it, a luxury immediately becomes a necessity.” –Evan Esar

    “The older I get, the more I realize that the ultimate luxury is time.” –Michael Kars

    “Someone loving you back with all they’ve got is perhaps the greatest luxury of this rotten modern times, when lovers are easy but love is rare.” –Nitya Prakash

    “Contentment is natural wealth; luxury [is] artificial poverty.” –Socrates

    “Authentic luxury flourishes in the untying of self-worth from popular opinion.” –Ann Brasco

    “Utility is when you have one telephone, luxury is when you have two, opulence is when you have three — and paradise is when you have none.” –Doug Larson

    “It is only to the happy that tears are a luxury.” –Thomas More

    So….

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 2:12 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      great quotes and love the music … the last is even this century, most unusual 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:44 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That song is actually late 20th century, but still more recent than most of the music clips I post. In any case, who could “Don’t Worry Be Happy” as long as Trump is President!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 5:18 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink

          well at least you are trying to stay more upbeat despite the current disaster!

          Liked by 1 person

    • equipsblog 9:34 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Punultimate luxe-out.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:24 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great song!
      Awesome quotes too. 🙂
      Thanks for starting my day with a smile.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 12:06 pm on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Tbanks, Diana. I didn’t think I’d find that many great quotes about luxury, so you might say it turned out to be an unexpected luxury of riches.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 11:55 am on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I like your artiste tic! A fine affliction. But it sounded as though you were settling into your wife’s lap, so I hope the weight difference isn’t too deluxe ( in ad-speak).

      The a capella arrangement was great, though there were times when the burden of singing seemed to outweigh the ability to look happy. Not to stereotype, but all these guys look alike. Was this a tricky solotet (solo quartet)— or was it just my aging eyes?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:28 pm on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Actually, it might be a bigger deal if my wife sat on my lap — but let’s keep that to ourselves, shall we?

        After playing that A Cappella clip again, I can’t answer your question definitively, but I don’t think they’re all the same guy. I used another video by the same group (or guy) in a post months ago, but I don’t remember which one, or I’d check it out.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 2:32 pm on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes and music. To Kars, “The older I get, the more I realize that the ultimate luxury is time”, I would like to add ‘and health’

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:45 pm on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyed the musical clip by Cappella. Amazing how we can use technology today to clone ourselves! Randy Rainbow uses the technique to great effect in his song parodies.

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 4:12 pm on August 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed. i would use technology to clone myself but I inflict enough suffering as it is.

        Love Randy Rainbow. They should play one of his song parodies of Trump ‘virtually’ every night of the Democratic convention.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 8:18 pm on August 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I was delighted by the video and more so with the Randy Rainbow “Gee, Dr. Fauci,” sung to Officer Krupke from West Side Story.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 4:00 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: African Queen, Beat The Devil, , , , , , , , , , The Treasure of the Sierra Madre,   

    THE TREASURE OF JOHN HUSTON 

    Huston would have agreed with [Orson] Welles, who declared, “I’m awfully tired of old men saying they have no regrets. We’re loaded with, burdened with, staggering under, regrets.” –Jeffrey Meyers, from his biography JOHN HUSTON: COURAGE AND ART

    * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I must admit that JOHN HUSTON (born August 5, 1906) is not the kind of human being I admire — however, he IS the kind of film maker I admire. Yes, he made his share of clunkers, but few directors made more of my all-time favorite films than he: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The Maltese Falcon, The African Queen, Beat The Devil — and yet, he had more than his share of things to regret, as he himself admitted (more on that shortly).

    But first, here are two classic scenes from THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE:

    The second scene features the great actor Walter Huston (father of John) doing his incomparable dance in the gold-flecked dirt of the Sierra Madre mountains:

    Getting back to John Huston’s regrettable qualities, Jeffrey Meyers (in his excellent bio) compares Huston to Ernest Hemingway: “Hemingway had four wives, Huston had five (and all of his marriages ended badly). Each married increasingly younger women and, while married, fell in love with a series of women even younger than their wives. Huston, however, [unlike Hemingway] was unashamedly promiscuous. Both had three children and were difficult, demanding and frequently absent fathers.”

    “In the last paragraph of his autobiography, Huston brooded over his guilty regrets about family, finances, alcohol, tobacco and matrimony. Huston could be noble, generous and kind, as well as selfish, callous and cruel. But he should be remembered for his intellect, his imagination and his charm.”

    I, of course, cannot remember him thusly because I did not know him. But I can remember him for his films, and so I do. Who could forget the black bird….

    ….or The African Queen:

    One of those clunkers I mentioned was THE BIBLE (1966), an ungodly bad epic which he both directed and starred in. But those can be forgiven in light of the above trinity of masterpieces. If that doesn’t Beat The Devil….

     

     

     

     
    • magickmermaid 4:33 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Maltese Falcon and African Queen are two of my favourite films. Strange, but I’ve never hear of Beat the Devil. I always learn something new on your blog. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:51 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Beat the Devil probably belongs in the category CULT CLASSIC, in that it’s not widely known but has a modest following of devoted fans. I haven’t seen it in years, even on TCM, which I watch regularly.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 5:40 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love those old Bogey films. But yes, Huston was an odd duck.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:16 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Bogey may have been in more classic films than any actor I can think of, from HIGH SIERRA (screenplay by John Huston) and CASABLANCA to THE AFRICAN QUEEN and THE HARDER THEY FALL (his final film). There was only one Bogey!

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:56 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      what a trip down memory lane, always learn something new and enjoyed these clips!

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:11 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I just watched The African Queen with my parents a few weeks ago. Huston was quite a good director, but I’m also glad I didn’t know him. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:26 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I just read in another book that Huston was driving drunk in 1933 when he struck and killed a passerby, but it was hushed up and he never paid the consequences. So much for the farce that “no man is above the law.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 10:50 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink

          Ugh. Oh, to be rich and powerful. We see what happens when someone is above the law, don’t we?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:32 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink

          Considering that Huston didn’t include that incident among his “guilty regrets” in his autobiography, he must have still thought of himself as a privileged character.

          Like

    • The Coastal Crone 6:18 pm on August 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love all these old guys!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:01 pm on August 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved the trailer for “The Maltese Falcon.” Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:42 am on August 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re very welome. I love that trailer too. What great character actors there were in that film!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 3:38 pm on August 9, 2020 Permalink

          Every winter exam period in college we attended a Bogart festival, so I saw that film four times.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:10 pm on August 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I own a copy of John Huston’s memoirs, but have not been able to bring myself to read it. I think, deep down, I just don’t want to know too much.

      However, he was one of the great filmmakers, and some of his films are among my faves.

      So glad you featured his work on your site today. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:16 am on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I ‘get’ how you feel about Huston, SS. Sometimes we must separate the art from the artist. If we can’t do that, we only truncate our capacity to objectively appreciate artistry as it stands, on its own terms.

        Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 7:50 pm on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Dang, MM, the list of movies I need to see keeps growing. Maltese Falcon, Sierra Madre, African Queen and Casablanca. Okay. Now I need to find the time to sit down and watch them all! Mona

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:58 pm on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Mona, all I can say is that you won’t be wasting your time with any of those movies. If I were you, I’d start with Casablanca because becoming a classic film buff begins with the gold standard for classic films (Casablanca). Happy viewing!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , H.G. Wells, , I Could Have Danced All Night, , , , , , , socialism   

    I COULD HAVE ROMANCED ALL NIGHT…. 

    I could have….that is, if I were fifty years younger. But why bemoan it if Mother Nature no longer shores up the animal in me? Still, she’s no spring chicken herself, so you’d think she’d cut old geezers like me some slack.

    Moving on from my love life of fond memory: Wouldn’t it be loverly if I instead celebrated the 164th birthday of my near-contemporary George Bernard Shaw with a selection of songs from MY FAIR LADY (based on his play PYGMALION), followed by a bit of biography, a serving of Shaw quotes, and a nightcap of Shavian brew-haha.

    From “Wouldn’t It Be” to “I Could Have”….

    In this scene, Stanley Holloway is seen lifting his spirits on his last night of ‘freedom’:

    Next in line, the bit of bio:

    https://www.biography.com/writer/george-bernard-shaw

    Now sink your teeth into the quotes:

    I was a freethinker before I knew how to think.

    Lack of money is the root of all evil.

    Beware of the man whose god is in the skies.

    The worst sin toward our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them; that’s the essence of inhumanity.

    You’ll never have a quiet world till you knock the patriotism out of the human race.

    There is only one sort of genuine Socialism, the democratic sort, by which I mean the organization of society for the benefit of the whole people.

    We should have had socialism already, but for the socialists.

    ….which leads us to the brew-haha / brouhaha between Shaw and fellow socialist H.G. Wells (click on the title below the cartoon caricature):

    ….which takes us at a social difference to

    THE END

     
    • calmkate 3:43 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      those quotes have incredible insight, thanks for the share!

      Could play those songs as they ring in my head just hearing the name MFL … was traumatised by my parents torturing us with constant replays until we finally left home!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:47 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      We just watched My Fair Lady the other day. I believe it rained in Spain…

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:29 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My parents also played the My Fair Lady LP frequently so I knew many of the songs before I saw the film.
      I wonder what Shaw and Wells would think of the current world situations.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:19 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think both Shaw and Wells would be even more appalled than they were in their lifetimes. If socialism was a dirty word to conservatives then, it’s no less so now. As the old saying goes: The more things change, the more they remain the same.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:50 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So true!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:20 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m down with the socialist hellhole, Sr. Muse. Sign me up.

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 9:04 am on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m more of a George Orwell socialist…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:47 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m probably a ‘practical socialist,’ in that I want what Bernie Sanders wants, but not in a “my way or the highway” sense. I believe in take what you can get now and live to fight another day, rather than all or nothing at all. When the other side has the power and the votes, half a loaf is better than none (if that doesn’t work, then screw everything I just said).

        Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 3:53 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      MM,
      I love all of the references to movies and their quotes. I’m making a list of movies I’ve never seen that you’ve showcased on your site so that when I have the time, I can look them up on Netflix and catch up. My Fair Lady is one. Finnigan’s Rainbow, another. 🙂 Mona

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:05 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mona. I expect that I’ll be adding more movies (especially musicals) to your list in upcoming posts. Enjoy!

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 7:37 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My Fair Lady is one of my favorite musicals. Amazing the way the capitalists have demonized the word ‘socialism.’

      Liked by 3 people

    • thewanderingempath 10:10 pm on July 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This was so much fun to read. It was like a meander through someone’s brain. Loved it. Thanks!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:24 pm on July 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope your comment which appreciates someone’s brainpower doesn’t go to my head….if, by “someone’s,” you mean mine. In any case, I thank you very much! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Kally 1:10 pm on July 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh this is so fun for me to read. Cheer me up tremendously !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:02 pm on August 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Bahaha! Your “near contemporary” George Bernard Shaw!

      I’m not a huge fan of My Fair Lady, but I do love the music, and it was lovely to listen to these pieces again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I especially enjoyed the rendition of I COULD HAVE DANCED ALL NIGHT from Lincoln Center, which I’d not heard before. The vocalist has a lovely voice and put a lot of emotion into her performance without overdoing it.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 6:11 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Clarence Darrow, , , half-truths, , , , , , , ,   

    WHERE THE TRUTH LIES 

    lie, n. a false statement known to be false by the person who makes it.
    liev. to be in a horizontal or flat position; to exist; have its place.  –World Book Dictionary

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    So, where does the truth lie? Attempts to address that question, it seems to me, lie in the assumption that we know objectively what truth is. Should we settle for the negative defining of truth as being the opposite of “lie, n“? I don’t know that most of us want to — or need to — go deeper into the jungle of truth than that, but if you’re of a mind to take the path of beast resistance, you can start here:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hide-and-seek/201808/what-is-truth

    In our dystopian sub-culture of “fake news,” half-truths, whole-cloth fabrications and false narratives in which truth is what President Trump says it is and science is fiction, it isn’t always simple to disentangle truth from the deluge of prevarication and misrepresentations which is Trump’s stock in trade  — and he knows it. Who can fact check it all fast enough? The old saying remains relevant: “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes.”

    And speaking of quotes which remain relevant, try these on for wise:

    Carlyle said, “A lie cannot live.” It shows he did not know how to tell them. –Mark Twain

    If at first you’re not believed, lie, lie again.–Evan Esar (not Trump, believe it or not)

    The pursuit of truth shall set you free, even if you never catch up with it. –Clarence Darrow

    It is twice as hard to crush a half-truth as a whole lie. –Austin O’Malley

    Truth is more important than facts. –Frank Lloyd Wright

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Marquis de Vauvenargues

    And so it goes. Would I lie to you?

     

     
    • calmkate 6:24 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      well I was hoping for a glimmer of truth but am sadly disappointed .. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:37 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well, you can always fall back on Trump — there may be “a glimmer of truth” somewhere in his deep, dark past.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:38 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          somehow doubt that … hope his parents have passed, how humiliating to have given birth to that …

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:49 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          His late father would be proud, not humiliated. ‘Like father, like son,’ by all accounts (including the new book by The Donald’s niece, Mary Trump).

          Like

    • obbverse 7:02 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Trump Hound- mouth of a Rottweiler, brain of a Shi Tzu. Temperament? Whiney, disloyal lazy, comfortable to simply lay around the House and lie, lie lie and lie. Barking? Mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 7:07 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If someone proves to be a liar in one instance, then I find it extremely difficult to believe anything else they may say. Resist the beast! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 8:34 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Since he sticks in my craw can I spit out another?
      Bad mad dogs of his kind
      Growlingly protect their address,
      When evicted they sure do leave behind
      Nothing but a nasty mess.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:40 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        There’s no guarantee he’ll leave —
        He has many tricks up his sleeve.
        Who knows what deviltry he’ll try?
        We only know it’ll be a monstrous lie.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rebecca Wallick 10:16 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thirty-plus years in the legal profession taught me this truth: almost everyone lies, with a straight face, even after swearing an oath to tell the truth.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:25 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        According to Mark Twain (and others), there are three kinds of lies: LIES, DAMNED LIES, AND STATISTICS. I don’t know about the legal profession, but I think it’s safe to say the political profession encompasses all three. Oddly enough, no one mentioned the fourth (and saddest) kind of lie:

        Like

    • jilldennison 1:11 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Politically, there is a very simple way to separate fact from fiction, truth from lie. If Donald Trump or ANY of his hand-picked sycophants say it, it is a lie. I think that for tonight I shall have to pass on the path of beast resistance, for my mental acuity is about fried. Perhaps tomorrow!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:42 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You ain’t lyin’, Jill.
        And I don’t blame you for passing on the path of beast resistance if you’re mental acuity is fried, because it’s a lot to digest. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 4:54 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The only acceptable lies are on the golf course.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:33 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Though I constantly call him a moron, his one clever move was to undermine faith in the media, journalism and the news in general. Alternative truth has served him well.
      😡

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        No doubt he has a certain amount of ‘street smarts,’ but no doubt the road to hell is jammed with big talkers.

        Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:39 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a fun post. This one needs a late night and a few bottles of wine. Almost everything is subjective, right? So we each will have our own versions of truth even when we are committed to the concept. It seems to me, that humans are best served by getting as close to the truth as we can and peeling away the lies whenever possible. Just ask the poor souls who believed Trump’s lies about the virus.

      I’m not sure that Trump actually believes he’s lying. His narcissistic personality borders on psychosis and it’s impossible for him to not be perfect. The mere idea that he might have a flaw feels like annihilation, which is why he reacts so viciously or ridiculously lies. He’s learned over the years to manipulate others so he never has to be imperfect. I can’t wait until he’s gone.

      Great quotes too!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:19 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana. I think you’ve ‘psychoanalyzed’ Trump perfectly. From what I hear of TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH, the new book about Trump by his niece Mary Trump (a professional psychologist), her diagnosis is much the same. The election can’t come soon enough.

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 4:06 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink

          No, it can’t. What he’s doing in Portland is outrageous. What I want to know is where are all the 2nd Amendment rights militias who are supposed to be saving us from our government’s oversteps??? (Not really, but isn’t this why they say they need their guns?)
          Gah! You can get me ranting for hours. Lol

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:23 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      A liar will be the first to accuse you of lying. My contribution to the literature of mendaciousness, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’d recommend that Trump reflect on your comment, Ricardo, but the guy (who claims he knows more than anyone) wouldn’t know the meaning of mendaciousness

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:25 am on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Jules Feiffer, , ,   

    PIED FEIFFER 

    pied, adj.  of two or more colors in blotches — Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Another post, another autobiography (or memoir, going by the book) to review — this one titled BACKING INTO FORWARD, by Jules Feiffer. But I am not so much going to review this 2010 book as pass along some thoughts from it, which, I think, are worth thinking about — relevant, at least in part, to current backward, black and white, regressive times.

    First, a brief introduction: FEIFFER (born Jan. 26, 1929), is a Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and writer who was born and grew up ‘between a blotch (of angsts) and a hard place’ in the Bronx. Having a controlling mother, little interest in school and no athletic ability whatsoever, “Fear was the principal emotion of my childhood. I hid in my sleep. I hid in my dreams. I revealed myself only in comics, which were the embodiment of my dreams.”

    In his teens, he was influenced by his older sister, whose “crowd was fast-talking, fast-quipping, mischievous, left, meaning far left in their politics, their taste in books, art, movies, and just about everything else.” Marry this influence with his passion for cartoons, and you have the seeds of the man and cartoonist he was to become (the engrossing details of which you will have to read in the book).

    Now for some of those thoughts I previously mentioned and now quote:

    Over the years I have been asked how I came to make certain choices. How did I know? This choice as opposed to that, this direction or that? Much of my life as a young man was spent ignoring or delaying choices. The choices I made were due to running out of time. Backed into a corner, a choice was made because I no longer had a choice not to. Having nowhere to go, I spot the one open window and jump through. Choice to me is much like Butch Cassidy and Sundance escaping a posse by jumping off a cliff. They jumped. And survived. It was the right choice. But when it’s not, you’re dead.

    Up until I was drafted, I had found that I could survive under any circumstance, no matter how unnerving, degrading, humiliating, or demoralizing, if I could understand the unwritten rules, i.e., the culture that was beating up on me. Whether it was family, school, sports, work, sex, I was accustomed to getting knocked down, picking myself up, and starting all over again. But in the army I was on unknown ground. After five months something went terribly wrong. They transferred me to train me to operate and repair radios on the [Korean] front line–in other words, to be killed. Radio repair was indecipherable to me. I saw no good reason [for] this assignment. As Vice President Dick Cheney explained when asked by the press why he hadn’t fought in the Vietnam War, “I had other priorities.” Yes! Yes! Me too!

    It was heartbreaking to watch [Jerome] Robbins go into his HUAC dance. The acting chair of the House Un-American Activites Committee, a somber, ministerial-looking fake, asked Robbins at the start of his sworn testimony what he did for a living. Robbins stated that he was a choreographer. The chair did not understand the unfamiliar word. “A chori–chori–chori–what exactly is that, Mr. Robbins.?” Robbins explained that it was something like a dance director and named shows he had choreographed, from On The Town, his first musical, to The King And I. The members of the committee seemed delighted to have this fancy new word to play with. As each one took his turn questioning Robbins, he took a crack at pronouncing “choreographer.” The point, made to the cameras for the heartland, was that loyal American don’t need highfalutinn words. No! Loyal Americans needed but one thing, fealty to God and country. Loyal Americans wrapped themselves in the flag.

    Called soft on Communism, liberals quieted down about witch hunts and loyalty oaths. Called eggheads, they dumbed themselves down. Displays of wit were repressed as too highbrow. Accused of cowardice in the Cold War, liberals began appraising countries to invade. Vietnam was a liberal war. The Republican Dwight Eisenhower refused to be sucked in. But Eisenhower was a general, a war hero, he didn’t have to prove his manhood. John F. Kennedy, although a war hero, was a liberal Democrat. He had to prove his manhood. Kennedy couldn’t afford to let the Russians think he was incompetent and inconsequential, which they might well have concluded after the Bay of Pigs. The Soviets might move on Berlin because of Kennedy’s perceived weakness. Before they could make such a move, Kennedy moved on Vietnam. As much of a disaster as the war proved itself to be, Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, after him, could not get out. To cut and run was not an option for Democrats because it would make them open to attacks from Republicans.

    Enough. Or was/is it? Politics being politics and the American electorate being the American electorate, we now have the grotesquely cartoonish Donald Trump….so let us close with this (for what it’s worth):

     
    • masercot 4:45 am on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      He had a monthly multi-panel cartoon in Playboy. It was almost worth buying the magazine just for that…

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 5:21 am on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I can see why you’d be attracted to this character, thanks for sharing him!

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 1:31 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m tired of being a grown-up! I could use one of those. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:08 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved your post! Thanks for the introduction to Jules Feiffer. The cartoon video clip about “the grown-up” is priceless 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:05 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Rosaliene. That same set of “grown-up” cartoons is in his book (page 319). I would like to have included more in this post from the book (a chapter titled CLOSET AMERICA is worth a post in itself), but I don’t want to try my readers’ patience, so I try to keep to a reasonable length (an arbitrary judgment, I admit).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:50 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And at the moment the culture police are starting to remind me of the HUAC hearings. No one can be pure enough for some of them. I am not talking about confederate statues, but rather trying to find any earlier American who didn’t have failings. Good luck folks.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:11 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I am not a fan of extremists of either the far left or (especially) the far right. I cut ideologues of the far left some slack because they may have their hearts in the right place, but far right ideologues have nothing in the right place, as far I can see. Unfortunately, with both, it’s “My way or the highway” — that’s simply not going to work in a pluralistic, multi-cultural democracy.

        Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 9:37 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 10:54 pm on July 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Josie, for sharing that interesting memory and link, which I notice is from 2008 (two years before the publication of his book BACKING INTO FORWARD). I enjoyed your post and gave it a like because….well, I liked it!

        Like

    • waywardsparkles 11:37 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Life often does feel like I’m backing into forward…with a lot of resistance. Ha! Enjoyed this. What an engaging artist! BTW, my grownup eventually shows up when all else fails. She leaves as quickly as possible so I can enjoy life without dealing with too many rules and fuss. Mona

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:44 pm on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I sometimes feel the same, Mona — but, at least, “backing into forward” beats backing into backward, which it appears the whole country is doing under our retrograde President Trump.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:44 pm on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for reminding us the Trumpsters have always been with us, Sr. Muse. They just weren’t always called that.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:59 pm on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        To paraphrase what Jesus said 2,000 years ago, “The Trumpsters [by whatever name] we will always have with us.”

        Like

    • Don Ostertag 9:55 pm on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I have always liked Fieffer, but he’s totally wrong about Eisenhower and Nam. I was in the 82nd when Ike the prez asked for volunteers to go to Nam as advisors. Our involvement started with Ike and would have ended with JFK who was going to end our involvement as soon s he got back from Dallas.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:57 pm on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. One of the things I like (and respect) about Feiffer is his objectivity despite being very liberal — as shown by the quoted paragraph in which he castigates JFK, Johnson, and the Democrats for how he views their handling of the Vietnam War. By contrast, few, if any, very conservative Republicans have had the courage and/or character to call out Donald Trump for his handling of the war against the Corona virus (or any other of his myriad failings and corrupt acts, for that matter).

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 8:43 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: beacon of hope, , , David Niven, , , , ,   

    WAR GAMES 

    “War is nothing more than a catalogue of mistakes and misfortunes.” –Winston Churchill

    ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * ** * **

    It’s funny– well, not literally funny — how one thing can lead unexpectedly to another. I’m half-way through another biography….but, unlike the others I’ve been reading recently, this one has led to the sort of post I didn’t anticipate writing when I began reading it.

    Its title is THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOON (A BIOGRAPHY OF DAVID NIVEN) by Sheridan Morley. NIVEN (1910-83), as you may know, was an American actor who was born/raised in England and came to the U.S. in 1932. When WW II broke out in Europe, he returned to England to serve in the military. In 1941 he wrote a letter to a fellow British-born actor friend back in Hollywood, part of which I quote here from the book:

    Thank God we have now got a real government and in Churchill a real leader at last, but there is going to be a little scalp-hunting when the smoke has cleared off the battlefields. I am unimportant, but besides cousins and relations, I have now lost practically all my old friends, and all in the past few weeks….they need never have been sacrificed if the people then at the top had been doing their jobs as well as they said they were doing them [emphasis mine].

    Sound familiar? Today, with the corona virus, we have a different kind of world war, but the same (and even more lame) kind of sophistry, gas-baggery, and incompetence resulting in unnecessary casualties:

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=trump+coronavirus+down+to+zero&docid=607986001098770809&mid=730D607688499A94FB45730D607688499A94FB45&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

    And so I ask you: How on earth does the most morally corrupt President in U.S. history not belong behind bars or in a mental institution rather than in the White House? How is it, after 3 1/2 years of reigning the swamp, that roughly 40% of the American people either cannot, or will not, see through this pathetic con man of a President — a President who thinks he is not only above the law, but thinks he IS the law, who tries to subvert the law to his own ends? Are his supporters deaf, dumb and blind….or simply incapable/too much in denial to look behind the curtain and see that the mighty Oz is the very hoax he labels all that exposes him?

    Come November 3, we must turn from the dark side to the other side of the moon, or America will have surrendered all claim to being the “beacon of hope” for the world.

     

     
    • Rivergirl 8:51 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I have no answers. His appeal to the right, and their unwavering support of him is mystifying.

      Liked by 4 people

    • equipsblog 9:00 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Amen. I agree with what Rivergril said.

      Liked by 4 people

    • BACK ROADS AND OTHER STORIES 10:12 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s mind boggling how this can go on for so long. I hope November will bring change!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 11:51 am on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi. Many times on your blog I’ve slammed Trump. I once said this, and it remains true: Trump is an enemy of democracy. Ditto for anybody who supports him.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 5:18 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It is to the Senate Republicans’ shame that it took this pandemic — and thousands of lives — to bring Trump down (assuming he is defeated Nov. 3). If they had voted to impeach him when they had the chance, Pence would probably have become President and, as a former governor, would likely have been more inclined to listen to the states pleas for federal help. Or not.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Yeah, Another Blogger 6:06 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          Here’s the thing: Trump is evil. This was obvious to me way before he took office. If he wins in November, he will do far more damage in his second term than he already has.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:53 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          I agree. It was obvious when he was just one of many Republicans running for the nomination that he was evil. More recently, it has become obvious that he is a mental case: a bad man and a mad man rolled into one. God (or fate) help us.

          Liked by 1 person

    • pendantry 12:15 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      One thing I find mighty peculiar is that every post about Trump that I read on WordPress has much the same to say about this obnoxious, egotistical, narcissistic windbag, yet he clearly has many supporters. I guess that there are very few, if any, of his followers on this platform… but that would seem odd.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:53 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Maybe Trump’s followers have too limited a vocabulary for WordPress. They’re more accustomed to the grade school bombast of Trump on Twitter.

        Liked by 1 person

        • pendantry 5:59 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          … I nearly said something like that (but more acerbic)… but restrained myself.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Paulie 1:25 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Trump certainly BELONGS behind bars but the system failed. I guess that the framers never saw it coming; a Senate that would, in a brazen act of partisan politics, essentially abdicate it’s responsibility when it came to an impeachment trial. As for the 25th amendment, the reverend Mike Pence would no more move to declare Trump incapable than he would covet his neighbor’s wife.

      As it stands now, the system is too cumbersome and too dependent on politics and will never, ever be changed. I would be shocked to see a new amendment during my lifetime but there has to be some mechanism introduced that can address the crisis of an incompetent president.

      As for the 40%, I’ve stopped trying to figure it out. In 2017 I read three books to try and gain some understanding as to why people voted for Trump and I suppose that I did gain some small insight. Why Trump still has any support beyond 10% (because we’ll never rid ourselves of the tinfoil hat faction) is completely beyond me. I guess I’ll never know because I’ve cut ties with anyone who supports Trump. That’s with the exception of some cousins and I simply don’t discuss it with them.

      In any other occupation, Trump would be fired for failing to do his job and/or creating a hostile work environment.

      Right now we are limping towards January and god knows what Trump will do between November and January as a lame brain (er duck) president.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:03 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I see that Trump’s approval rating is now down to 37% in one poll (Gallup, if I recall correctly). Some of that 40% is apparently starting to erode, but I’m not counting my trends before they’re matched (by other polls)..

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:59 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      As I see it, our minds are very malleable, making us easy prey for those who seek to manipulate and control our beliefs and behavior. We are all susceptible. We are all under mind control of some form or the other, for example, think of our consumption habits. Our 45th president has successfully managed to capture and hold a particular mindset among us.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:43 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think that is true in one sense, Rosaliene, but only to the point (for many of us) where minds become made up and set in concrete for the rest of our lives (like Trump). Meaningful malleability requires an openness to (and weighing of) challenges to what we have been indoctrinated or conditioned to believe….which, I suppose, is just a fancy way of describing GROWTH or MATURITY. All I know is I’m not the same person I was in my 20s and 30s — but that’s another story for another day.

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 4:33 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      His followers are deaf dumb and blind. Even worse, wilfully pig-headedly so.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:31 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your your word “pig-headedly” — between that and “gas-baggery” in my post, we may be starting a whole new lexicon-ery.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 5:11 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Gov. Cuomo today appropriately called him out for enabling the pandemic. That sadly is too true.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Gov. Cuomo is almost as good at ‘telling it like it is’ as Trump is at telling it like it isn’t.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 5:36 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink

          He just flat out said “Trump lies.” Very refreshing compared to the toadies around Trump.

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 6:53 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If British incompetency lost a few of Nivens family … we wont try to count the number of Aussies they slaughtered! Landing them in the wrong place eg Gallipoli, etc … we were sent in first sheep to the slaughter …

      He says what they want to hear and fear renders them deaf dumb and blind …

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:29 pm on July 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        When I was growing up, American (and I assume British) history books were written as if our political and military leaders were almost uniformly great and noble figures and our countries acted in good faith in almost all cases. Hopefully we’ve learned our lesson and Trump will go down in history as the worst of the worst.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 3:41 am on July 7, 2020 Permalink

          lol all our history books need rewriting, massive correction … let’s see how your election goes …

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 12:43 pm on July 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Niven wrote a book called “The Moon’s a Balloon”. What is it with him and the Moon and Balloons?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:03 pm on July 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Niven’s 1971 memoir THE MOON’S A BALLOON was originally to be titled THREE SIDES OF A SQUARE, but was changed due to a title conflict….and the biography THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MOON was written after Niven’s death. The only other “moon” connection with Niven I’m aware of is his role in the 1953 film THE MOON IS BLUE, which was considered so risqué at the time that it was refused the seal of approval by the Motion Picture Production Code. I haven’t finished reading the biography, so perhaps there is more ‘moonshine still’ to be uncovered.

        Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 6:30 am on July 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Haven’t heard about the “Moon” book but read Niven’s Bring on the Empty Horses years ago. I respected him for going home to fight for his country, unlike John Wayne, who wriggled out of the war and later showed his disloyalty to his colleagues by promoting McCarthy. It’s one of those ironic instances when a coward and a gasbag was made into an American hero. A friend of mine made a movie with him and had his heart broken when he discovered the “true” Wayne.
      On another note, I LOVE gasbaggery!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:51 am on July 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      One of the reasons I like biographies and autobiographies is that that they often reveal another side of famous contemporaries the writer knew. Of course, it’s prudent to be aware that opinions of others are only as good as the character and judgment of the writer (who, for example, would believe anything Trump says, good or bad, about anyone?).

      I appreciate that you love “gasbaggery.” That helps me feel better about the dreadful “moonshine still” that I pun-ished masercot with in my reply to his comment. 😉

      Like

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