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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Blaise Pascal, Erica Jong, , Lenin, Mark Twain, , opera, , , ,   

    TRUTH BE TOLD….so it is said 

    When I come across a quote I love, and which is so true that it hits home (home being where the heart is), I often tell Cupid to get lost while I grab a pen, because in my heart….

    Yes, I want to be alone so I can write down said truth on whatever scrap of paper is handy before I get distracted and forget it….even then, I often don’t recall where I left that lovely quote, and Cupid will call me stupid (but then, aren’t we all when Cupid is involved?).

    Anyway, I haven’t written a post since I got home from the (soap) opera six days of our lives ago, so today I thought I’d seek out and gather up some of the bold and beautiful quotations I misplaced, for you alone (you ARE alone, aren’t you?):

    I don’t want to be alone, I want to be left alone.” –Audrey Hepburn, actress

    “In Genesis, it says that it is not good for a man to be alone, but sometimes it is a great relief. –John Barrymore, actor

    “Solitude is un-American.” –Erica Jong, novelist and poet

    All men’s miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone.” –Blaise Pascal, writer, inventor, and theologian

    “The trouble with opera in the United States is that it is trying to sell caviar to a hamburger-eating country.” –Helen Traubel, opera singer

    “Opera: a play about life in another world whose inhabitants have no speech but song, no motions but gestures, and no postures but attitudes.” –Ambrose Bierce

    Opera: where anything that is too stupid to be spoken, is sung.” –Voltaire

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad.” –Aldous Huxley

    It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.” –Mark Twain

    There is a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure the truth.” –Maya Angelou

    I will close with a timely quote in which the words alone, opera, and truth do not appear….but I would say that truer words were never spoken (despite who said them):
    “Democracy counts heads without regard to what’s in them.” –Lenin

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:38 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved your quotes herein Mistermuse! Good share and always nice to read your posts. Looks like you must watch more soap (operas) to encourage you to pen more, on whatever scraps of paper – Hmm even gum wrappers perhaps? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:43 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t watch soap operas, GH, but my wife and daughters did years ago, and I got a whiff of a few of them in passing. These days, just following the intrigues of Trump and his cast of sycophants is like watching a soap opera — a VERY BAD soap opera.

      Liked by 2 people

    • blindzanygirl 2:02 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Some of them made me giggle. And anything that makes me giggle at 4 o’ clock in the morning MUST be good!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:14 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m never up at 4 o’clock in the morning unless nature calls — which doesn’t make me giggle (though I may end up with a jiggle).

        Liked by 2 people

        • blindzanygirl 10:20 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink

          Lol mistermuse. I usually wake up at 4 a.m. for a wee, then can’t get back to sleep again! So I rebd to come in here!

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 3:06 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol great collection of misplaced quotes! I also had a giggle all alone 😎
      but then my neighbour came knocking to ask what was the matter … lol
      sadly I loathe opera with a passion so some of these were written for me!

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 3:55 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Mr Twain nails it again And should life give you Lenin, make a Collective.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:28 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Life has given the country a “Lenin” with Trump, and needs a collective of enough voters to make the November election his last stand.

        Like

    • Rivergirl 9:03 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoy being alone. Why wouldn’t I? I’m marvelous company…
      😉

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg — you and the rocks (non-followers of Rivergirl’s blog will have to go there to get that). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:24 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Voltaire’s is hilarious.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:40 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I agree. “Boogie! Boogie! Boogie!” (to quote Groucho Marx in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA).

      Like

    • magickmermaid 12:18 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Although I have to disagree with Voltaire, I like all the other quotes. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:50 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not an opera lover, but if I had to choose, I’d take opera over soap opera because who needs soap when he only takes a bath/shower once a year, whether he needs it or not?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:04 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I find Angelou’s quote confusing. What sense do you make of it?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Perhaps the most common use of “Facts [to] obscure the truth” is political spin. See below:

        https://www.britannica.com/topic/political-spin

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 6:10 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. That makes sense. I really couldn’t understand her quote. Now I do.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:23 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          You’re very welcome, Elizabeth. If Trump & Company were as good at telling the truth as they are at spinning and/or twisting it, his followers wouldn’t know what to believe….and it might even give them second thoughts (not that they do any profound thinking in the first place).

          Like

    • mlrover 8:17 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Helen Traubel was on to something,especially when one keeps in mind that most TV watchers consider the singers on “Idol” talented. They may be but they’re certainly not trained and wouldn’t know a well-structured measure from a mordent.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I remember Helen Traubel well. Though a big (in more ways than one) opera star, she was no stuffed shirt — well, maybe physically, but not culturally — and made many guest appearances on TV back in the day, often on comedy shows like Jimmy Durante’s.

        As for today’s singers (and I mordently and mordantly use the term loosely), I can’t stand to listen to most of them, but as a product of today’s culture, what else would we expect? I suspect that some of them would’ve been good singers if they had grown up several generations ago….but not knowing any better, are they really to blame?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:25 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes here! Some made me frown but mostly they made me smile. Can’t be bad and now the sun has come out! Hoooray!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:09 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Voltaire’s comment on the opera made me laugh out loud. It sounds so irreverent!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:36 pm on February 24, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Every time I watch DUCK SOUP and A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, it’s amazing how funny Groucho’s lines still are today.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:45 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Being alone is ok for some…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E9ydw_aDMg

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:46 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I vote (ready to vote already) Mark Twain followed close by Huxley.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:16 am on February 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I can’t argue with those votes, Mary. Another one I really like is the Lenin quote, because it goes a long way toward explaining why Trump got millions of votes.

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 10:52 pm on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      here’s my original quote; “question is the answer.” continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:14 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, Tony, but would you kindly answer a question that has puzzled me for some time: your comments always end with the word “continue…” but continue where? At first I thought that if I clicked “continue,” it was a link which led to something….but nothing happens. What do you intend by “continue”?

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 5:16 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      i mean keep on going MM…keep on doing…just keep on. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • kutukamus 2:08 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Especially love those ones by Traubel and Lenin. 🍸

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:52 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Truth Be Told, the Lenin quote is my fav….but I like them all.

      Like

    • annieasksyou 11:44 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, Mistermuse. I just stopped by to welcome you to annieasksyou; I’m delighted to have you join me. And since I love bad puns, dislike opera, and have written my share of tirades about a certain White House occupant, I am now following you as well. So cheers!

      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:10 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, about which I have just one quibble: I would call Trump the White House disaster, rather than White House occupant. 😉

        Like

        • annieasksyou 9:25 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink

          I would agree—and even “disaster” doesn’t capture what his egomaniacal ineptitude has wrought on us now…

          But since we all need to keep our immune systems strong because of this plague he’s dramatically worsened, I’m putting a moratorium on myself to try to think of him as little as possible, focusing instead on things that cheer me—such as our budding new crocuses and the bird serenade outside my window.

          Liked by 1 person

    • skullGhost 8:03 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Simply amazing. And to add further, it seems this Lenin has captured the practical utilitarian essence of democracy well in those few words.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:13 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ironic, but true.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:06 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Mark Twain, , , rain rain go away, , SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, , weather,   

    THE RAIN IN TWAIN FALLS MAINLY ON THE BRAIN 

    It is best to read the weather forecast before we pray for rain. –Mark Twain

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    It’s funny — April is NATIONAL HUMOR MONTH, but soddenly I don’t feel very humorous. It’s coming down in buckets out there, and some of what’s in the buckets is making its way into my basement. I hope whoever’s praying for rain is satisfied — now how about praying for it to stop? It’s bad enough that Mother Nature keeps raining on my head when I go outside — I don’t need her to greet my feet as a dweller in my cellar when I go down in the dungeon.

    ‘s no use. No letup in sight. Keeps rainin’ all the time….

    But am I going to let a reign of rain ruin what I’m doin’? No way! Others can be a Debbie Downer, despairing in the deluge. It’s in my Genes to be….

    P.S. The title of this post is word play on a song from a hit 1956 Broadway musical later made into a movie starring Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn. Can you name the song?

     

     
    • rivergirl1211 12:56 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Please go splash in your cellar puddles while imitating Gene Kelly…. we’ll wait.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:14 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, r.g.. I could dance up a storm if I weren’t feeling under the weather. I’ll let you know when I feel up to it (which will be about as long as it takes you to forget the whole thing). 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 1:12 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Singin’ in the Rain by Gene Kelly is one of my oldie’s favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 4:31 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe you could soak your feet in the basement!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Elizabeth 4:58 pm on April 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        No you have written about your feet, not your head. My husband was soaking his feet at the time I replied which probably influenced my response!

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:04 pm on April 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Elizabeth, I’m glad you didn’t tell me to go soak my head, because I would’ve had to take off my wig (instead of my shoes), which would be embarrassing because it’s glued on to my bald spot with Elmer’s Glue, and I’d have to get more glue from Elmer. 😦

        Like

    • calmkate 11:22 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      the rain in spain stays mainly in the plain ….

      Love your play of words and emotions here, great song picks!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 2:15 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Congrats for knowing the song in answer to my “P.S.” question, Kate! For those who don’t know, the song is from MY FAIR LADY, Lerner and Loewe’s great Broadway musical based on George Bernard Shaw’s PYGMALION.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 7:08 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink

          know it very well, my parents used to torture us as children with My Fair Lady and South Pacific!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 3:50 am on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Not true! I loved your post and laughed heartily, especially at your tweaked quotation! Good one Mistermuse and happy weekend ahead.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, G.H. — same to you, and give Garfield an extra big hug for me. 🙂

        Like

    • America On Coffee 10:38 pm on April 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wetheads are bad. Good that the seasons change. But then, there are the hotheads and airheads .😕

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:45 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and then there are the snotheads and the potheads, not to mention the roundheads and the squareheads, and the rumpheads and the Trumpheads (the last of whom has been known to dump heads, as in “You’re fired!”).

        Like

    • Marietta Rodgers 3:15 pm on April 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had no idea there were so many songs about rain. Sorry about all the rain, but you know what Longfellow says, “The best thing one can do when it’s raining, is to let it rain.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • awisewomansjourney 6:44 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This was a great play on a lot of words! Thank you for the songs I especially love that oldie but goodie Stormy Weather! ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 8:35 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for including Gene’s version of singing in the rain. I love, LOVE that scene and the way Gene dances in the rain.

      I hope the rain will end soon in your area and bring lovely spring flowers in its stead. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:59 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That scene is indeed a classic, as is the whole film (SINGING IN THE RAIN). Some consider it the best musical of all time. I wouldn’t go that far, but I’d include it AMONG the best musicals.

        As for the rain, we’ve had a reprieve the past several days, but tonight stars a new round which will test whether my hydraulic cement repairs hold. If not, maybe I’ll grow some aquatic plants in the basement rather than seek spring flowers. 🙂

        Like

    • moorezart 7:42 pm on April 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 4:29 pm on May 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: deceit, , , , , , Mark Twain, Mildred Bailey, , , , ,   

    LIAR, LIAR, RANTS ON FIRE 

    One of my readers, who is obviously a glutton for punishment, recently expressed disappointment that I haven’t posted more of my poems lately. At the risk of triggering that old axiom BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR, I thank her for having inspired me to address the deficiency thusly:

    DECEIT DON’T STAND

    As the twig is bent,
    so grows the tree.
    As the die is cast,
    so shall it be.

    If these be true,
    why is it wise:
    The Donald gets a pass
    when he tells those lies?

    Of course, I should also thank the President, without whose daily rants my inspiration for this poem would doubtless lie dormant. And now for a word from the truly wise about lies:

    Carlyle said, “A lie cannot live”; it shows he did not know how to tell them. –Mark Twain

    A man comes to believe in the end the lies he tells about himself to himself. –George Bernard Shaw

    I admire liars, but surely not liars so clumsy they cannot fool even themselves. –H. L. Mencken

    Pretending that you believe a lie is also a lie. –Arthur Schnitzler

    If at first you’re not believed, lie, lie again. –Evan Esar

    Not sure why the video is black. Maybe because the lies it laments aren’t white ones. But the sound is clear, and the voice shines through the darkness.

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 4:31 am on May 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      ah a poem a post will suit me fine thanks … great quotes! GBSs describes some I know … lets speak the truth! Altho I doubt your president would know it if it bit him on the nose 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:27 am on May 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate, for being the one who “inspired me” to write the poem. I should also mention (for those who don’t know) that the title of the post is based on LIAR, LIAR, PANTS ON FIRE, a children’s taunt that goes back to the 1930s (some versions add NOSE AS LONG AS A TELEPHONE WIRE). There is also this song:

        Liked by 2 people

    • dunelight 8:06 pm on May 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Goodnexx, look at Mrs. Howell boogie!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Tidbits 6:01 am on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The risk was worth it … nice poem ! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Invisibly Me 12:56 am on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting quotes, I particularly like the George Bernard Shaw one. And a nice shout out of thanks to Trump, he’s certainly a source of inspiration for many a rant! 🙂
      Caz x

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 4:21 pm on June 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:34 pm on June 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you truly, moorezart. I’m always glad to get more exposure (within limits, of course).

        Like

        • moorezart 7:16 pm on June 8, 2018 Permalink

          You’re welcome though know I try avoid the hottest hours between noon and say 2. ! Cheers!

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 2:05 am on May 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Iago, , Mark Twain, , , , Taming of the Shrew   

    THE BARD ON THE DONALD 

    My April 22 post (MARK TWAIN ON DONALD TRUMP) was so well received that I’ve decided to give that theme (of holding up a mirror to The Tempest of Trumpian self-glorification) another go….this time, with the reflections of an even greater giant of literature: the Bard of Avon taking aim at the target of Twain and giving us his measure of the Tweeter of Twaddle. So, in case you haven’t given The Bard a second thought of late: straight from TAMING OF THE SHREW (filmed as KISS ME KATE), what say you….

    and we’ll all know how….the Bard’s words speak to the Iago of Mar-a-Lago:

    Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides. Who cover faults, at last shame them derides.

    False face must hide what the false heart doth know.

    Go to your bosom: Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know.

    God has given you one face, and you make yourself another.

    It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.

    When we are born we cry that we are come to this great stage of fools.

     

     

     

     
    • arekhill1 8:37 pm on May 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown,” Sr. Muse. Also, “Woe to the land that’s governed by a child. It’s bad news when a country is ruled by a child.”

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:45 pm on May 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know how uneasy the head is, Ricardo, but it certainly lies….and lies….and lies.

      Like

    • calmkate 9:35 am on May 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      that an insane idiot is in charge is unbearable …
      But hey the Bard, or sing and dance like that and you might be in with a chance 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:22 am on May 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        KISS ME KATE (the movie, not a personal request) is one of my fav musicals, with great songs….and why wouldn’t they be great? They’re by Cole Porter! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 5:40 pm on May 6, 2018 Permalink

          Those two were just magical together, so joyful! Must try and watch the movie sometime … 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:31 pm on May 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Ha ha, this is good: Iago of Mar-a-Lago!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:24 am on May 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mary. It’s a good thing I brushed up my Shakespeare before writing this post!

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Albert Einstein, , , Mark Twain, , , , , TV quiz shows,   

    TRUTH BE TOLD 

    When in doubt, tell the truth. –Mark Twain

    Truth be told, I just found out that July 7 was TELL THE TRUTH DAY.  Better late than never?  That may or may not be true, but today I’m in the mood to post, and at this “late” juncture, truth is doubtless as good a thesis as any (if you believe Mark Twain).

    Friends, I don’t claim to be in the same league as such legendary and current truth-tellers as Pinocchio and Donald Trump, but I am (almost) always in favor of telling the truth. In fact, one of my favorite TV quiz shows back in the day was TO TELL THE TRUTH. But before we go there, I need to set it up with a clip from a quiz show I featured in a previous post (I’VE GOT A SECRET)….the reason being that one of the panelists on the latter program (a humorist who is little-remembered today) plays a big part in the surprise ending of the TO TELL THE TRUTH clip, and it helps if you know he was once famous.

    Assuming you can abide a bit more truth-telling, I will close with some quotes on the subject:

    The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and simple. –Oscar Wilde

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. –Aldous Huxley

    If you are out to describe the truth, leave elegance to the tailor. –Albert Einstein

    Beware of a half-truth: you may have gotten hold of the wrong half. –Evan Esar

    A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes. –Charles Spurgeon

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Luc de Clapiers

    Doubt thou the stars are fire,
    Doubt that the sun doth move.
    Doubt truth to be a liar,
    But never doubt I love.
    –William Shakespeare

     

     
    • GP Cox 6:45 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My mom and her best friend had tickets for 3 to go to the taping of “To Tell the Truth”. It was interesting and fun, something I obviously still remember despite being so young.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:20 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate your comment, GP. You have the honor of being the first person I know who’s ever been to the taping of a TV program. Good show, old chap! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • GP Cox 7:43 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink

          How about that!! I also saw “What’s My LIne” and got a private tour of NBC in NYC [only because the secretary for Tom Synder was a childhood friend of my parents and I was in NYC to see the Pope and we ended up on the news that night.]

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 11:11 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Truth is mighty and will prevail. There is nothing the matter with this, except that it ain’t so.” Would that Mark Twain could be resurrected for this age of Trump.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:53 am on July 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It’s too bad Trump’s nose doesn’t grow like Pinocchio’s every time he tells a lie. He’d have to get a nose job every day to cut it back to size, but at least he has so much money he wouldn’t have to worry if his health insurance didn’t cover it.

      Like

    • Mark Scheel 4:28 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      muse,

      Wow! That brings back some memories. But makes me feel really old. Well, I AM old! I note one famous quote you didn’t use–“Then you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” (I’ll leave the attribution to you.) ; – )

      Mark

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:56 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, if you think those clips make you feel old, I was already in my twenties at that time. 😦

      As for the quote you noted, attribution is easy: I attribute it to Mark Scheel. 🙂

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:46 pm on July 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Friends, I don’t claim to be in the same league as such legendary and current truth-tellers as Pinocchio and Donald Trump”

      Odd that his followers saw him as authentic. I guess authentic for them is a willingness to be hurtful to others. Or babbling on.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:12 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        “Authentic,” as in telling it like it is — but any fool can tell it like (he thinks) it is. By that standard, , we should admire Hitler or any “authentic” leader who tells it like (he thinks) it is.

        Like

    • moorezart 11:25 am on July 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gettysburg Address, , , intellectual stimulation, Mark Twain, , , , Twenty Questions   

    20/20 BEHINDSIGHT 

    When the world ends, I want to be in Cincinnati because it’s always 20 years behind the times. –Mark Twain

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Today being the 20th day of the month, and me being a Cincinnatian of long standing (and other less upright positions), what better time than now and what better person than your humble scribe to put history in context with 20/20 hindsight, and delve into stuff you need to know. Why? You don’t want to go out as an ignoramus when the world comes to an end (20 years sooner for you than me), do you?

    Starting with the basics, are you aware of the etymology of  the word TWENTY? It’s from ye olde English twënig (literally “two tens”). I hope you agree that lacking this knowledge makes it evident that your imagination was in need of intellectual stimulation. For example, now you should be able to see how much more memorable Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address could have been had it begun: Four twënigs and seven years ago….

    Speaking of “two tens,” by counting the letters of the alphabet on the digits of your two meat hooks twice, you will find (unless you’re missing a finger) that the twënigth letter is T, which may come in handy in situations where you wouldn’t want to take off your stinky shoes and socks (not that counting on your toes is anything to be ashamed of).

    Moving on as I sit on my behind, there was once a quiz show on radio and TV titled TWENTY QUESTIONS, based on an old-timey traditional game called TWËNIG QUESTIONS. While I am not quite ancient enough to give eyewitness to the latter, I was around in the 1950s when the former appeared weekly (or weakly, if you had bad reception) on the DuMont Television Network. If you are too dilatory to have been around at that time, here’s a DuMontstration of what you missed:

    I could go on, but my vast research team and I don’t want to feed you more knowledge than you can digest at one sitting. Tune in again May 25, when (if I feel like it) I shall once again attempt to enlighten you with more of same. Remember, you heard it here last, because we are committed, and you can be too.

     

     
    • calmkate 12:29 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      oh oh MrM now you are starting to sound like TrulyUnplugged .. not daring to refer to your committed status, I refer to another blogger who writes in a similar vein! Look her up as I feel you two have a great deal in common!
      Can find an interview with her plus a link to her blog on my 2nd site Meet the Bloggers …

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:29 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the reference to TrulyUnplugged. I liked her blog, but based on her three most recent posts, I’m not convinced that we “have a great deal in common.” For one thing (make that two), I see myself as more private and less loquacious (please don’t take that negatively — it’s just different strokes for different folks). But that’s based on just three posts — when I have time, I’ll read more of her work and perhaps find that “similar vein” (or at least give it a shot). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:32 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          I think you will find it .. she is dealing with some personal stuff just now, so reading some earlier posts is a good idea.

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:35 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          she may be more chatty but she weaves music in and out of her posts and has some interesting twists .. each to our own

          Liked by 1 person

      • trulyunplugged 9:32 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I thought the very same thing, Kate….wordplay, “twisted sense of humour”…my “Ebony And Irony” post is likely a better example of commonalities 🙂
        (and, thanks for the plug 🙂 )

        Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 3:06 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Enjoyed EBONY AND IRONY — especially the part about Kramer and Seinfeld. Overall, I thought the post was a bit too rambling — but when you’re “truly unplugged,” I can’t say you’re not being true to your name. In any case, my opinion is only a matter of taste — “each to our own,” as Kate put it — just as I know that the way I write isn’t everyone’s cup of tea (or cup of “T” as in “Twënig”).

          Liked by 1 person

        • trulyunplugged 3:24 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Yes, Kramer reference was my fav part, too. And, you’re right, to each their own–I appreciate your candor 🙂 As for the “rambling” that is my fav brand of creative expression…I find it freeing and fun. It’s open-minded of you to read that which goes against your grain…which I’m sure gives you a richer appreciation for “your cup of tea” tastes 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:12 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          hey now he might get it if he reads that post .. glad you could see it

          Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:53 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Well THAT was a highly amusing intro to a little piece of broadcast history – black and white, even. I’m not sure I ever saw this show, but it reminds me of What’s My Line, which I recall dimly and To Tell the Truth (which my father was on when I was a child — the other contestants were supposed to be him). TV has certainly changed quite a bit over the years, hasn’t it? Measured intellect has been replaced by reality brawn and fast pace car chases – in color!

      Since I am currently residing in Cincinnati myself, I guess I will be the beneficiary of those twënig extra years as well – but I’m not sure that’s such a pleasant proposition, given the direction we seem to be headed of late.

      Great post!
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:04 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        PS. Early this evening I was invited by a friend and colleague to my first Meetup (Boomer edition), where I spoke to a man who may well show up on your blog ere long. It came up during the obligatory “What do you do?” conversation. He teaches music history at the college level – not the classics, btw, popular music. My next question seemed at first a non-sequitur: “Do you blog?”

        I had hoped that perhaps I had run into the Muse himself. When the answer was no, I sent him your way.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:39 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Thanks, Madelyn. I’m glad you didn’t run into me because bones break much more easily at my age. Hopefully he’ll identify himself if he shows up on my blog, otherwise we shall be as two ships that pass in the night without giving each other the time of day.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 10:25 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          ::groan:: — his lack of punning might have been a clue. 🙂

          If I go to another of their events and see him again I’ll make sure to tell him to let you know I said hello.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 6:53 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Madelyn,
      I can see why you’d think the guy was Mr. Muse. Was he brilliant and funny, too? 🙂

      Mr. Muse –
      1953 – the year of hubby’s birth! Also the year our house was built, which we purchased in 1978. A good year, to be sure.

      That film clip — wow! Have ads regressed, eh? I don’t know about you, but I often have no idea what product is being pushed with the ads on TV these days; they leave me wondering what was going on. .. I just shake my head. I mean, I still think of monkeys swinging on chandeliers when I see Red Rose tea. And remember, “Never – no never – put water in a Habitat soup!”
      Here in Canada, we watched ‘Front Page Challenge’ for years, which was obviously based on ‘Twenty Questions’.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:05 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Good observation about the film clip and ads, Carmen. My wife and I feel likewise (“no idea what product is being pushed”) about some of the commercials on TV….but my reaction is to grab the remote, change channels and return to the program in a minute or two, which (for some reason) she doesn’t appreciate. Apparently she’s afraid I won’t get back in time, that that only happens about 9 times out of 10. 😦

        Like

        • Carmen 9:13 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Oh, my. Are you related to my husband? 😉

          Liked by 1 person

    • trulyunplugged 9:32 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love this post…just delightful…thanks for sharing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 9:39 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Your research team is far vaster than mine, Sr. Muse

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:47 am on May 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      20 questions is an old parlor game that people would play before video games, TV and radio. It doesn’t translate well into a TV show but it obviously morphed into What”s My Line and To Tell the Truth.

      What I remember of old TV and this bears it out, is they had no idea what to put on the air most of the time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:48 am on May 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re right, Don — it is an old parlor game (dating back to the 1800s) and didn’t translate well into a TV show, as that clip makes evident….though the subsequent What’s My Line did a much better job along the same lines.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , humor quotes, , , Mark Twain, , , , Tina Fey, Virginia Woolf, ,   

    FOR YOU, MORE HUMOR 

    N’yuk-n’yuk-n’yuk! –Curly Howard, The Three Stooges

    April being NATIONAL HUMOR MONTH, I thought I’d humor you with humor-us woids of wisdom from some of my favorite humor-ists. I’d have begun with a self-sample, but thought it best to start on a higher plane — and who in comedic history soared higher than Curly when it comes to debonair comedy? So it is written that I must take second place in my own post (third, if you count comedienne Joan Rivers’ intro to my poem):

    THE DIVINE COMEDY CLUB

    Humor is God’s gift to all of us.
    –Joan Rivers

    Thank God for funny
    because seriously
    we could be
    dying out there.

    Being a comedian is a lonely occupation; you stand on the stage talking to yourself, being overheard by audiences. –Fred Allen

    Humor is merely tragedy standing on its head with its pants torn. –Irvin S. Cobb

    Humor is just another defense against the universe. –Mel Brooks

    When humor works, it works because it’s clarifying what people already feel. It has to come from someplace real. –Tina Fey

    Humor is the first of the gifts to perish in a foreign tongue. –Virginia Woolf

    Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. –W. C. Fields

    The secret source of humor is not joy but sorrow; there is no humor in Heaven. –Mark Twain

    Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is. –Francis Bacon

    I don’t want to run for office; there’s already too many comedians in Washington. –Will Rogers

    Without a sense of humor, I don’t know how people make it. –Marlo Thomas

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    We close on an upbeat note from this laughing-at-life jazz great whose birthday is April 7:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:13 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love Will Rogers – and his is my fav among the quotes above. I clicked here expecting funnies, but finding the quotes was even better. Thanks for sharing.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to transform a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for commenting, Madelyn. When searching for good quotes, it usually pays to look in Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mél@nie 3:22 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      MERCI, Mr Muse: you’ve made my mornin’… 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • linnetmoss 7:05 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      If there is no humor in heaven, I hope at least there is wit…

      Liked by 3 people

    • Garfield Hug 9:11 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      👍👍👍

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:15 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As a dabbler in the humor field for some years now, Sr. Muse, the mystery of it to me is how nobody laughs at the same jokes. Some people love clever puns, others refuse to laugh unless they are watching an old lady being pushed down the stairs.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:40 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Will Rogers always cracks me up. The Twain one is pretty evocative too. Thanks for the smiles. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:31 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Some of the quotes (like Twain’s) aren’t exactly humorous, but are just as pungent (such as Bacon’s). Needless to say (so why am I saying it?), I like them all. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 4:30 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Look at yourself if you had a sense of humor..”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:23 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the clip, Don. Until I checked, I didn’t realize (or had forgotten) that this is a Rodgers & Hart song. In all honesty, though, Billie sounds to me like she was past her prime when she sang this. Too bad she didn’t record it when R & H wrote it back in 1937.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 9:30 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      FINALLY was home long enough to insert a link here from the Friday Funnies about writers.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:59 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the Friday Funnies link, Madelyn. I hope to get the work week off to a funny Monday start with my next post.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 11:30 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink

          I shall look forward to it – and you are most welcome for the link. Next time, drop it with your comment and I’ll move it up – meanwhile it will be there for anybody wanting a bit more humorous inspiration.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 12:08 am on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      These are some insightful quotes on humor.

      Lately I’ve been looking at the political humor of Saturday Night Live and some of the other shows and thinking of them as court fools of old who spoke truth to power.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:17 am on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Nowadays we might think of them as speaking truth to TOWER (Trump Tower). 😦

        Like

    • Lavinia Ross 12:08 pm on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That is a great Billie Holiday song!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:43 pm on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed! Billie recorded that song (LAUGHING AT LIFE) June 1940, accompanied by such jazz greats as Teddy Wilson on piano and Lester Young on tenor sax.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: First day of Spring, , , , , Mark Twain, , Robet Louis Stevenson, , , spring cleaning,   

    SPRING CLINGING 

    There’s something bad in everything good: when spring comes, can spring cleaning be far behind? — Evan Esar

    Spring has come, but in my sequestered domain, this doesn’t mean spring cleaning must follow. Though my closets be crammed and my drawers be loaded — make that cluttered — I’ll have no problem leaving spring cleaning far behind (even if others stink otherwise).

    Now, I’m not saying that spring cleaning doesn’t have its place. For example, it might be worth the bother if you’re young and in love:

    Speaking of “young love,” how old do you think the above song is? If you guessed it dates back to the ‘Golden Age’ of popular music (1920s, 30s, 40s), welcome to one of my happy places. If you’re thinking I’m clinging to the best of those romantic old songs out of naught but nostalgia, nothing could be further from the youth — my guileless youth that Father Time gradually re-placed. But suppose the mature me were unable to relate to the ever-young work of, say, Twain, Stevenson and Swift — it wouldn’t be that their writing has become outdated.  I would simply have lost the capacity to appreciate its timelessness.

    In like manner, whether it be seen as ‘gilding the lily’ of youth or burnishing the harmony of maturity, I still think of the oldies as younger than springtime….and on that note, I’ll tune out:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 3:35 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My happy place too . What every happened to harmony — and words you could understand – and “girl singers” who sang without belting out most of the song – dressed, even? But don’t think its because I’m growing old. I’ve said the same thing since I was in my 30s.

      But I’m with you – and Quentin Quisp – on spring cleaning, “There is no need to do any housework at all. After four years the dirt doesn’t get any worse.”

      Another one from him (Naked Civil Servant):
      “Keeping up with the Joneses was a full-time job with my mother and father. It was not until many years later when I lived alone that I realized how much cheaper it was to drag the Joneses down to my level.”
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:53 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I like the quotes. As for “girl singers belting out most of the song” — that wasn’t unheard of (get it? — ha ha) in the ‘old days.’ Remember Ethel Merman, for example? She wasn’t one of my favs, but she was definitely loud (and dressed)! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 4:47 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink

          Good point. I guess I was thinking more of the singers who fronted the Big Bands. I never was sure if Merman was actually “singing” lol – but that voice was perfect for Broadway, and she could certainly sell a number like nobody else. And I do like some of the female performers today – just not as much as I loved the ones from the 30s-40s-50s (even as a teen in the 60s).
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:21 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink

          Merman may have been the loudest, but she wasn’t the earliest girl singer who belted out songs. One of the first (and probably most well known) pre-Merman belters was Sophie Tucker, heard here in in a 1926 recording of her most famous song:

          Like

    • Don Frankel 6:32 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Can I say The Girls From Mars, they send me? But Spring cleaning is in the same league as New Year’s Resolutions as it much talked about but seldom accomplished.

      Richard Rogers what a treasure.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:08 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I thought girls were supposed to be from Venus, men from Mars. But “supposed to be” is no longer in the stars — girls can be from wherever they want to be, and more power to them! And you’re right about Spring cleaning and New Year’s Resolutions.

        Richard Rodgers is indeed a treasure, and Oscar Hammerstein ain’t bad either (though I’m more partial to Rodgers’ original lyricist partner, Lorenz Hart).

        Like

    • Carmen 6:34 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great tunes, Mr. Muse! As soon as I started listening to the second one, I thought, “I’ve heard that guy before!” Sure enough, he does “Bring Him Home” (Les Mis)

      First day of spring here and – what do you know! – school is cancelled. (I think for the 13th day since December) Icy roads, apparently! Means I’m on my 3rd cup of coffee. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the heads up about Isaac Benelli. I couldn’t place him despite the fact he has such a beautiful voice that he must have been on Broadway. I need to start paying more attention to today’s (and not just yesterday’s) Broadway scene!

        Like

    • scifihammy 7:21 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You can’t beat these old well written and well sung songs. 🙂
      Enjoy your Springtime – the cleaning can wait! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:27 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. This must be the start of fall where you are in South Africa, so to return the favor, I’ll say Enjoy your autumn — the leaf raking can wait! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 11:04 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink

          Oh for sure the leaf raking can wait. And if I wait long enough, a good wind will blow it all away! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:22 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Living in the Golden State, as well as during my time in Hawaii, cleaning can be accomplished any time of year. When the filth and dreck of one’s home becomes too much to tolerate even when drunk, it is subject to scouring no matter the season.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carmen 11:33 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Geez, I’d love to see my husband THAT drunk. . . 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:55 pm on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Some might say your attitude lowers the standard in ‘standard of living,’ Ricardo, but as long as you can get to the beer in the fridge without undue difficulty, it seems like a workable concept to me.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:10 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m with you about leaving Spring cleaning in the dust! 🙂 Thanks for the tunes!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:27 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Diana. I like your “cleaning in the dust” pun so much that I can’t wipe the smile off my face! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 5:54 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Something beautiful to brighten my day is always available on your blog 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:15 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Any and all appreciation is always appreciated (and your blog will likewise have a brightening effect on any reader who wishes to check it out). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 9:33 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Spring renewal! Yay!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Little Monster Girl 10:08 pm on March 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi mistermuse! Would you like to answer questions with me on my weekly Friendly Chat on my blog? I’m going to post it in a short while.I get the questions from Cee’s Share Your World and I share my answers every week with another blogger, and I’d like you to do it this week if you like! 😀 Here’s the questions for this week: https://ceenphotography.com/2017/03/20/share-your-world-march-20-2017/

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:28 am on March 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Many thanks for thinking of me, but due to very limited time (not to mention computer skills), I don’t feel I can commit to such an undertaking for the foreseeable future. Please accept my regrets and apologies.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dorothy Lamour, February 29, Hannibal Missouri, , , , Karen Carpenter, Leap Day birthdays, Leap Year, , Mark Twain, , ,   

    OF LOVERS AND LEAPERS 

    On Leap Day (Feb. 29), according to an ancient Irish custom, a woman is permitted to propose to a man, who must accept, or pay a penalty. Thus, being of part-Irish descent, my thoughts this day turn — or should I say, leap— to love. Ah, L’AMOUR! Ah, LAMOUR (Dorothy Lamour, that is — she of silver screen memory and part-Irish descent). Sure, and I  still don’t know why she didn’t propose to this dear boy back in those saronged “ROAD” movie days, being as close as the first row of the darkened theater, and I only 22 years younger than she. When love dreams have gone so cruelly unrequited, ’tis THE END OF THE WORLD — one might just as well d(r)ive off a suitable cliff. For example:

    Click LOVE ROCKS

    Now, if I were a cynic, I might postulate that the daring young man in the flying machine was under the influence of something more substance-tive than love that didn’t click. But this happened in the hallowed Hannibal of our beloved Mark Twain, who coincidentally wrote of a Lover’s Leap called Maiden’s Rock (named for a beautiful Sioux maiden) in his book LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI….so let us not jump to judgment.

    Maiden’s Rock and the Lover’s Leap in Hannibal are, of course, but two of many such sites in America and beyond (including one of legendary leaps from a rocky waterfall on the Glencree River, County Wicklow, Ireland). If your love dreams are on the rocks and you’re thinking of taking the plunge, but don’t know where you’d make the biggest splash,

    look here BEFORE YOU LEAP

    On a happier note, Feb. 29 is a good day to be born because your birthday only comes around every four years. That may put a serious crimp in the number of birthday presents you get, but who wouldn’t exchange that shortfall for quadruple the longevity? I’ll admit I don’t personally know anyone who’s lived to near age 400, probably because such persons cheat and celebrate their non-leap year birthdays on Feb.28 or March 1. Oh, well — who can blame them for not wanting to depend on Depends for the last 300 years of their lives?

    But I do know of some of the statistically 1 in 1461 people born on Feb. 29 — people like Jimmy Dorsey, the 1930s-40s Big Band leader; Dinah Shore, the 1940s band vocalist and 1950s-60s TV & recording star; and Michèle Morgan, a French actress who came to the U.S. when Germany invaded France in 1940, and returned after the war. Though little known outside France, she has the distinction of having played opposite Frank Sinatra in his first starring role in the film Higher and Higher (1943), and she almost landed the female lead in Casablanca opposite Humphrey Bogart, but RKO wouldn’t release her to Warner Bros. for the sum of money offered. She is still with us on this, her 96th birthday.

    Should we end where we started, leaving the dashed dreams of life and romance on the precipice, as lamented here by Karen Carpenter (born March 2nd)? Don’t they know it’s THE END OF THE WORLD?

    Or, should we get a grip, and tell February 29 to take a flying leap? Forward, March!

     

     
    • Midwestern Plant Girl 6:04 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Ah 2/29.
      It sure gets its fanfare!
      Happy leap day!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 7:57 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Didn’t know about the Lover’s Leap in Co. Wicklow. They must be universal. Even Sappho talks about a Lover’s Leap…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:10 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      One would think Lover’s Leaps are universal, but I googled Lover’s Leaps in France during my research for this post, and came up empty. No doubt, my readers from the land of l’amour know more than Google, and can-can leap to fill in the gap.

      Like

    • ladysighs 8:43 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I love your posts and how you tie your words/thoughts together. You always give interesting and little know facts ( Michèle Morgan — for one) and end the presentation with ….. well The End. Karen Carpenter or course is sad. But she somehow made the sadness she sang about seem a little less sad.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:28 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate your comment (it’s always good to be appreciated). And what you say about Karen Carpenter is so true. Such a beautiful voice and such a young age to meet her maker. I recommend to those who aren’t familiar with the details of her life and death, to Google her name.

        Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:44 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Leap Day, to my mind, is the least of the February holidays, dwarfed by the immensely more significant Groundhog Day, which at least has the decency to come around every year. But thanks for the clip of “Don’t Say No,” which happens to be the first song I ever slow-danced to.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:47 am on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If nothing else, Groundhog Day is a helluva great movie, and Leap Day has yet to make a title appearance on film….an oversight which some creative director and writers should look into.

      Like

    • carmen 1:01 pm on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Wouldn’t you know it? There’s a Lover’s Leap very close to where I live! 🙂 Happy Leap Day to you, mistermuse!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 3:06 pm on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      And to you as well, Carmen. If I may make a suggestion, why don’t you write a post sometime about that nearby Lover’s Leap, complete with pix? No doubt there is a history there, and perhaps you could dig up a legend or story or two which I’m sure your readers (including me) would find interesting. 🙂

      Like

      • carmen 4:33 pm on February 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Food for thought! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Michaeline Montezinos 7:10 am on March 1, 2016 Permalink

          I don’t think Ground Hog Day is as significant a holiday as Valentine’s Day. I have not heard of a Lovers Leap yet here in Florida. Chances are if one would jump off a small hill he or she would land in the water. My Grandmother, Joanna Blajda, was born on February 29 but I don’t think she ever celebrated her birthday at all. She was one of many immigrants from Poland , probably because of the war. A no nonsense lady who treated her grandchildren with great care and much love..

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:16 am on March 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      How do you know when it’s a leap year? We elect President’s in leap years. Talk abut look before you leap.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:39 am on March 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Excellent point, Don. I’d never thought about the fact that Presidential election years and Leap Years coincide (as if the campaign season wasn’t long enough without the extra day).

        Like

    • mistermuse 9:31 am on March 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Michaeline, there are molehills in my back yard higher than almost any promontories in Florida. I leveled one that would’ve caused instant death to any lovelorn mole contemplating a leap from its summit, and several others that would’ve resulted in crippling injuries. But do those moles appreciate my solicitude? No, they just keep making more mountains out of molehills like they’re in a competition to impress the objects of their affections by the size of their protuberances.

      I guess bigger is better, even among moles.

      Like

    • Mél@nie 11:46 am on March 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      ah, l’amour… encore et toujours l’AMOUR!!! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Christopher Marlowe, , , Mark Twain, , Patrick Henry, , , , , , , ,   

    MISTER MUSE AND MISS QUOTES 

    I have made it a rule that whenever I say something stupid, I immediately attribute it to Dr. Johnson, Marcus Aurelius or Dorothy Parker. –George Mikes, British author

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Fellow and female Americans: In case you’re not old enough — as I am — to remember the Father of our Country, George Birthington’s washday was February 22nd. OK, I admit that after all these years, I may have a hard time recalling names and certain words correctly, but what does it matter? As Christopher Shakespeare (or was it William Marlowe) famously wrote, a ruse by any other name would smell anyway.

    Anyway, my point is that quotes may frequently get mis-attributed, but Miss Attributed couldn’t care less, so why should we? Well, I’ll tell you why — because we’re righters, that’s why, and we righters deserve credit where credit is dubious. Therefore, with the aid of my busty — I mean, trusty — aide, Miss Quotes, the objective here was to do an extensive investigation into the subjective and dig up our quota of misquotes (our quota being whenever we decided to quit) . You are now about to be the beneficiary of our research, which we bent over backwards to have ready for this post (just to make it a bit more fun, I’ll throw in a few correctly-attributed quotes; can you pick them out of the pack?):

    1. “I cannot tell a lie.” –George Washington
    2. “Give me liberty, or give me death.”  –Patrick Henry  
    3. “The British are brave people. They can face anything except reality.” –George Mikes
    4. “Anybody who hates dogs and children can’t be all bad.” –W.C. Fields
    5. “Our comedies are not to be laughed at.” –Samuel Goldwyn
    6. “I never said most of the things I said.” –Yogi Berra
    7. “Let them eat cake.” –Marie-Antoinette
    8. “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics.” –Mark Twain
    9. “Elementary, my dear Watson.” –Sherlock Holmes (in the stories of A. Conan Doyle)
    10. “I am the greatest!” –The Donald

    Here are the misattributions:

    1. The quote itself is a lie. An Anglican minister, Mason Locke, ascribed it to our first President in his pietistic biography of Washington as part of the made-up ‘Who chopped down the cherry tree’ story: “I can’t tell a lie, Pa; I did cut it with my hatchet.”
    2. Possibly another biographical fiction, though not as clear-cut as the cherry tree story. Biographer Wm. Wirt based his attribution on the memory of two Henry contemporaries. The phrase resembles a passage from CATO, a 1713 play written by Joseph Addison.
    4. Actually said by humor writer Leo Rosten in introducing Fields at a dinner.
    5. An old Hollywood gag, not said (at least originally) by Goldwyn.
    7. By all accounts, Marie-Antoinette never uttered those words. Several years before she supposedly said them, they appeared in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s THE CONFESSIONS.
    8. Although Twain used this quote in his autobiography, he credited it to Benjamin Disraeli.
    9. Doyle never put those words in the great detective’s mouth in any of his four novels and 56 short stories about Holmes between 1887-1927.  It was actor Basil Rathbone, playing Holmes in the late 1930s-1940s, who spoke those words and made them famous.
    10. Donald Trump may think it, but it was Muhammad Ali who said it.

    As a bonus, I leave you with this quote:

     

     

     

     
    • mistermuse 12:04 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      NOTE: By virtue of February having less than 30 days (even in this year of the leap), my post-every-fifth-day schedule is doomed to run into “the best laid plans of mice and men” by the end of the month. Thus, my last Feb. post will be on the 29th, and I’ve opted to move this post up to Feb. 24.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Joseph Nebus 1:37 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Coincidentally, the old Roman calendar treated the 24th as the leap day. That is, in a leap year, they had two days that were both what we’d call the 24th of February. This sounds confusing, but it’s honestly better than what they had before, which was to in some years stick a whole extra month in between the 24th and 25th of February.

        Anyway, point being, having a post on the 24th so that you have a post timed for Leap Day works nicely. Somehow.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 8:56 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I knew that was Ali at the end there as I’m not only old enough to remember but I know Trump said. “It’s huge.” Which is now being pronounced as Yyyyuge. But it might get miss quoted or I might be miss quoting as Bernie Sanders also says Yyyuge as does Larry David and well most of us here in New York City.

      My favorite miss quote is General Sherman’s. “War is all hell.” He didn’t say it but when he found out he said it, he kept saying it, till he said it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:44 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “When in trouble, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout.” That’s my favorite quote. Google can’t really tell us its origin, although some people attribute it to the neo-Nazi science fiction author Robert Heinlein.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:25 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, when Trump said “It’s huge,” I thought he was referring to his ego (or the unbelievable gullibility of his followers).
      Good comment about Sherman. He certainly turned Atlanta into hell when he burned it.

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 11:33 am on February 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like the quote, Ricardo….though I must admit I haven’t heard it before and don’t know who said it. It couldn’t have been The Donald, because he’s never in doubt about anything (& wouldn’t admit it if he was).

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mél@nie 11:08 am on February 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      over here, in “old Europe”, we just can’t imagine the fair-wigged ignorant racist as the POTUS!!! same for ted cruz(doesn’t deserve capitals!!!)

      • * *

      oh, it seems that Marie-Antoinette never stated that sentence… it’s been invented, as the French people didn’t like “the snobbish Austrian waster”… 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • tomorrowdefinitely 1:51 pm on March 4, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Nice one! I especially like the quote at the top 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 12:40 am on June 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,
      Now that was educational. I knew only a few for certain. Makes you wonder if anybody ever really says anything! Ha.

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 7:20 am on June 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, all my posts are educational — even those expose that, unlike quote #10, I’m not the greatest (just the 3rd greatest, behind The Donald and Muhammad Ali). 😦 😦 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • dbmoviesblog 12:16 pm on August 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thought-provoking post. The number nine made me smile because most people will swear they read it in the novel haha. I kinda always hoped that people know that the quote “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics” belongs to Disraeli, and I also know that there are so many things that Marie-Antoinette allegedly said which are not just not true. The whole French Revolution seems to have a bunch of slogans and quotes which were simply made up afterwards to heighten the effect.

      Liked by 1 person

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