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  • mistermuse 1:01 am on July 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Angela Lansbury, , Be A Clown, Bozo the Clown, clown history, , Danny Kaye, , , , , National Clown Day, , , wordplay   

    CLOWNING AROUND 

    Tomorrow is NATIONAL CLOWN DAY and also marks the start of INTERNATIONAL CLOWN WEEK (August 1-7).  Clowns have a long and interesting history, as chronicled in this scholarly(?) introduction to the subject:

    No doubt you noticed in the above video (unless you were clowning around while it was playing) that the first clowns were court jesters.  In the Middle Ages — as can be seen in this scene from the middle of a bygone century — THE COURT JESTER* typically played the fool and looked uncannily like Danny Kaye:

    Who knew film — technicolor, no less — existed way back then to record such scenes? But nowadays, clowns have a farcical role model who is an amalgamation of Court Jester, Bozo the Clown, and Tyrant-osaurus Rex:

    https://imgflip.com/memegenerator/77899773/Donald-Trump-Clown

    The moral of the amoral story is that, if you asspire to the highest office in the land, you could hardly do worse than pattern yourself a-Round-Old Mc-Donald Trump. All Hail to the Cheat  er, Chief!

    ….so BE A CLOWN!

    *THE COURT JESTER is a 1956 feature film starring Danny Kaye as a fatuous faux court jester (co-starring Angela Lansbury, Basil Rathbone, and Glynis Johns, among others).

     

     
  • mistermuse 6:11 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Clarence Darrow, , , half-truths, , , , , , , , wordplay   

    WHERE THE TRUTH LIES 

    lie, n. a false statement known to be false by the person who makes it.
    liev. to be in a horizontal or flat position; to exist; have its place.  –World Book Dictionary

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    So, where does the truth lie? Attempts to address that question, it seems to me, lie in the assumption that we know objectively what truth is. Should we settle for the negative defining of truth as being the opposite of “lie, n“? I don’t know that most of us want to — or need to — go deeper into the jungle of truth than that, but if you’re of a mind to take the path of beast resistance, you can start here:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hide-and-seek/201808/what-is-truth

    In our dystopian sub-culture of “fake news,” half-truths, whole-cloth fabrications and false narratives in which truth is what President Trump says it is and science is fiction, it isn’t always simple to disentangle truth from the deluge of prevarication and misrepresentations which is Trump’s stock in trade  — and he knows it. Who can fact check it all fast enough? The old saying remains relevant: “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes.”

    And speaking of quotes which remain relevant, try these on for wise:

    Carlyle said, “A lie cannot live.” It shows he did not know how to tell them. –Mark Twain

    If at first you’re not believed, lie, lie again.–Evan Esar (not Trump, believe it or not)

    The pursuit of truth shall set you free, even if you never catch up with it. –Clarence Darrow

    It is twice as hard to crush a half-truth as a whole lie. –Austin O’Malley

    Truth is more important than facts. –Frank Lloyd Wright

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Marquis de Vauvenargues

    And so it goes. Would I lie to you?

     

     
    • calmkate 6:24 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      well I was hoping for a glimmer of truth but am sadly disappointed .. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:37 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well, you can always fall back on Trump — there may be “a glimmer of truth” somewhere in his deep, dark past.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:38 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          somehow doubt that … hope his parents have passed, how humiliating to have given birth to that …

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:49 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          His late father would be proud, not humiliated. ‘Like father, like son,’ by all accounts (including the new book by The Donald’s niece, Mary Trump).

          Like

    • obbverse 7:02 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Trump Hound- mouth of a Rottweiler, brain of a Shi Tzu. Temperament? Whiney, disloyal lazy, comfortable to simply lay around the House and lie, lie lie and lie. Barking? Mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 7:07 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If someone proves to be a liar in one instance, then I find it extremely difficult to believe anything else they may say. Resist the beast! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 8:34 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Since he sticks in my craw can I spit out another?
      Bad mad dogs of his kind
      Growlingly protect their address,
      When evicted they sure do leave behind
      Nothing but a nasty mess.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:40 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        There’s no guarantee he’ll leave —
        He has many tricks up his sleeve.
        Who knows what deviltry he’ll try?
        We only know it’ll be a monstrous lie.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rebecca Wallick 10:16 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thirty-plus years in the legal profession taught me this truth: almost everyone lies, with a straight face, even after swearing an oath to tell the truth.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:25 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        According to Mark Twain (and others), there are three kinds of lies: LIES, DAMNED LIES, AND STATISTICS. I don’t know about the legal profession, but I think it’s safe to say the political profession encompasses all three. Oddly enough, no one mentioned the fourth (and saddest) kind of lie:

        Like

    • jilldennison 1:11 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Politically, there is a very simple way to separate fact from fiction, truth from lie. If Donald Trump or ANY of his hand-picked sycophants say it, it is a lie. I think that for tonight I shall have to pass on the path of beast resistance, for my mental acuity is about fried. Perhaps tomorrow!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:42 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You ain’t lyin’, Jill.
        And I don’t blame you for passing on the path of beast resistance if you’re mental acuity is fried, because it’s a lot to digest. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 4:54 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The only acceptable lies are on the golf course.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:33 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Though I constantly call him a moron, his one clever move was to undermine faith in the media, journalism and the news in general. Alternative truth has served him well.
      😡

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        No doubt he has a certain amount of ‘street smarts,’ but no doubt the road to hell is jammed with big talkers.

        Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:39 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a fun post. This one needs a late night and a few bottles of wine. Almost everything is subjective, right? So we each will have our own versions of truth even when we are committed to the concept. It seems to me, that humans are best served by getting as close to the truth as we can and peeling away the lies whenever possible. Just ask the poor souls who believed Trump’s lies about the virus.

      I’m not sure that Trump actually believes he’s lying. His narcissistic personality borders on psychosis and it’s impossible for him to not be perfect. The mere idea that he might have a flaw feels like annihilation, which is why he reacts so viciously or ridiculously lies. He’s learned over the years to manipulate others so he never has to be imperfect. I can’t wait until he’s gone.

      Great quotes too!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:19 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana. I think you’ve ‘psychoanalyzed’ Trump perfectly. From what I hear of TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH, the new book about Trump by his niece Mary Trump (a professional psychologist), her diagnosis is much the same. The election can’t come soon enough.

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 4:06 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink

          No, it can’t. What he’s doing in Portland is outrageous. What I want to know is where are all the 2nd Amendment rights militias who are supposed to be saving us from our government’s oversteps??? (Not really, but isn’t this why they say they need their guns?)
          Gah! You can get me ranting for hours. Lol

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:23 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      A liar will be the first to accuse you of lying. My contribution to the literature of mendaciousness, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’d recommend that Trump reflect on your comment, Ricardo, but the guy (who claims he knows more than anyone) wouldn’t know the meaning of mendaciousness

        Like

  • mistermuse 7:30 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Handful Of Stars, , , The 5th Dimension, The Age of Aquarius, The Starlit Hour, The Stars Will Remember, Vera Lynn, vocalists, wordplay   

    LEFTOVER STARS 

    A lot of stars have flown over the bridge since my last stars turn (June 8), which I abandoned mid-post, and which was to be continued when browsers no longer go on the blink and Jupiter aligns with Mars — like, maybe after the dawning of the….

    With so much happening in our wayward world, you’re forgiven if you’ve forgotten my intention to follow up. But that doesn’t mean you’re spared these leftovers — because it dawned on me even back then that….

    Speaking of remembering, I’d like to note the passing eight days ago of Vera Lynn at age 103. I know of no more popular English female vocalist, especially during WW II when she toured Egypt, India, and Burma entertaining British troops, who named her their favorite musical artist. A brilliant new star shines in the heavens this month.

    You may have gathered by now, friends, that the Firefox fix is finally in. Actually (and unbelievably), as I was preparing this post yesterday, I stumbled upon a way to copy music videos to my blog — so, between today’s fix and yesterday’s good fortune (my technological ignorance notwithstanding), I’m feeling so sky high, I could reach up and grab….

    With a shout out of appreciation to those readers who offered possible solutions to my tech problems, I’ll close out this series of star songs with THE star female vocalist of the 20th century:

     
    • Rivergirl 7:40 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Glad it’s finally fixed on your end. Sadly two of the three videos were unavailable to me. Computers are a strange thing…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Rg. Actually, I posted four videos: AGE OF AQUARIUS, THE STARS WILL REMEMBER, A HANDFUL OF STARS, and THE STARLIT HOUR. Hopefully, the unavailable (to you) videos will appear when my daughter completes her “fix” later today.

        Liked by 1 person

      • calmkate 8:28 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        all four worked fine for me, they took a while to start but all good!

        Fancy making it to 103, what a legend ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:51 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for advising me that all four worked for you — it’s a relief to know that the ‘no-shows’ aren’t no-shows universally!

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:41 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          no occasionally I’m block from videos on d’Verse poetry site but yours always seem to work fine!

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 8:24 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      oh joy of joy, you sound like the MrM I know … all done and dusted!

      You’ve not only conquered the technology challenges you’ve also brought back some lovely memories with this collection 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:33 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry to temper your joy, Kate, but any “high” I’m on now is strictly short term as long as Trump is Pres..When he goes, we can all thank our lucky stars!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:44 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          we don’t even live there but will feel the same relief … if he stays we will all be trembling in fear!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:25 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Firefox to the rescue!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:44 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I managed to solve my video clip issue yesterday, but that was only one of my problems. Hopefully the Firefox installation today will “rescue” me from the rest of them.

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 1:44 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      All the videos worked for me! My grandmother’s favourite stars were Tony Martin and Tyrone Power. 🙂
      I’m wishing on a star that all your internet troubles will be gone today! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:08 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks, mm. I haven’t forgotten your 6/21 comment regarding my “Like” problem, which I said I’d pass on to my daughter when she came to install Foxfire. She’s working on something else at present, but I’ll show it to her later to see if it can help me. Hopefully, by the end of the day, my internet troubles will indeed be gone! .

        Liked by 1 person

        • magickmermaid 4:47 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          The “like” problem was happening to me until I worked out what the problem was.
          Soon you can be over the moon that all your stars are aligned. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:36 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          The “fix” is in, and so far, so good — “Like” is working on replies to my comments on various blogs. My daughter said your 6/21 suggestions are incorporated in Firefox, so she didn’t need to do anything extra. It’s all Greek to me, so I’ll take her word for it!

          Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:15 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So happy that you’re back among the stars once again! I was happily able to listen to all four of your video clips. Nostalgia of my father who had records of your featured singers in his large musical collection.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:16 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate that, Rosaliene. I too once had a large musical collection including thousands of 78s, but had to sell that part of it and am left with hundreds of LPs. No doubt your father and I would’ve had a ball if we could have checked out each other’s collections!

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 5:02 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      All four played, no problems. Hope the Firefox fix sticks.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 10:06 am on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So how is it that Firefox is your friend and not mine? Can you tell me how you grabbed those videos bc I now can’t do it with the sly singed one.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:12 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        The easiestt way is still the way I “stumbled” upon (as mentioned in my post) the day BEFORE Firefox was installed, which is to bring up the Youtube video you want to use, go to the URL in the address bar at the very top, then copy and paste as you would anything else you want to copy and paste. It’s so simple that I can’t believe I didn’t think of it before!

        I hope this works for you as well as it works for me.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 11:13 am on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Believe it or not, my son and I were talking about Vera Lynn just last night. We were watching Pink Floyd’s The Wall. We both know a lot of her music and about her life.

      Synchronicity…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:02 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for your comment. Although I’ve long liked Vera Lynn’s voice, i didn’t know much about her until I was putting this post together and learned of her recent death….which led me to Wikipedia to learn more. I think she was under-appreciated in the U.S., despite her popularity in England.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 1:58 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t want to take up more of your time with this browser stuff, but that was and is precisely what I do with Safari, but freakin’FF won’t comply. So I guess I shall have to remain bibrowsual. No need to respond; there are worse things in life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:54 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t mind responding again, Annie. If anyone knows it often takes two or more times to ‘get the job done,’ it’s me!

        In any case, here’s how my daughter told me to do it on Firefox: Bring up the music video you want to copy and, after starting to play it, right-click on the right hand side of the clip, which brings up a menu. Left-click the 4th item down, which is “Copy embedded code,” and you’re ready to paste the clip unto your post. I tried it once and it worked, so now I have my choice of two ways to post videos.

        Like

    • dunnasead.co 10:10 am on June 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sometimes you hear such a beauty of voice you just want to listen, irregardless of what the orchestra, arrangements, tap dancers etc are doing. you are focused. this is focus music. thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 am on June 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well said. No doubt the orchestral accompaniments to the Vera Lynn and Tony Martin vocals sound hoary to modern ears, but the “beauty of voice” is timeless.

        Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 12:24 am on June 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello Mistermuse, video does not sow. Vera Lynn has the same occupation simultaneously, as did Edith Piaf!. Cheers and well wishes for a great Summer!💕☕️☕️

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:56 am on June 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry about the video not showing, AOC. Most of the previous commenters have reported being able to see all four videos, so the problem is apparently at your end. Hope you were able to view the other three.

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: actors, , , book rview, , , , , , , wordplay   

    THE FIX IS OFF (for now) 

    Something has come up to postpone my out-of-town daughter’s Father’s Day visit until the following weekend ….so my browser problem will remain on hold, and without resolution, until the (offspring’s) fix is in. Meanwhile, back at the rant, I’ve finished reading the outspoken CARROLL O’CONNOR’s autobiography wherein he vents about many things. So, to fill in, let’s take up where my last post left off. After all, it’s All In The Family.

    O’Connor had a very varied pre-Archie Bunker life. Like many in their early adult years, he couldn’t find his niche. “I could not shake off a feeling of foolishnessa man of 26 plodding through the days and months with no plan, no answer for anyone who might ask “What are you going to do with yourself?” The eventual answer, after many dead-end turns, turned out to be acting….and, finally, stardom (which came with an Archie Bunker mentality).

    I — no doubt like most who read autobiographies — do so primarily to learn more about the author, his/her life and times. But I’ll also admit to the guilty pleasure of learning what the author thought of well-known contemporaries — in fact, such opinions may offer insights into other personalities and professions, which broaden (for better or worse) what I thought I knew about them. So, what were O’Connor’s impressions of….

    JOHN WAYNE: “He perceived America as the preeminent hero-nation, virtually a land of heroes in which he himself felt heroic (and actually was, as I knew him) and infused that perception into all his roles as naturally as if it were one of the primary  emotions.”

    JEAN STAPLETON: “Jean’s idea of Edith Bunker was not only original and perfectly suited to the American audience, but very comical and emotionally moving. If ever anything on television changed the country, not radically, not even obviously, it was the performance of Jean and the example of Edith. Did our series effectively attack bigotry and racism? We thought so at the time –”

    HARRY TRUMAN: “Nobody expected Truman to take part in a Korean civil war, if one should begin. His military chiefs had no battle plan; on the contrary, they had a plan for getting out of the way — withdrawing to Japan. I thought Truman was totally wrong — his political vision faulty, his practical leadership unintelligent, his moral justification false. For me, the issue of morality in war– whether or not it is a “just war” — turns on the question of choice. When you wage war because you have no choice you are acting justly. But when you have a reasonable choice and choose to wage war, you can’t call your war just.”

    MOVIE WRITERS, “though marvelously reliable in inventing space creatures — shriveled humanoids and hugely swollen insects — are unreliable in depicting intelligent life on earth.”

    AGENTS “are generally shrewd, knowing, clever people; good company, good friends. They have made my career; they make all careers; they are the most important people in the business.”

    ACTORS: “I shall never forget my first professional play rehearsal at The Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, in the spring of 1951 — the immediate cordiality of my new friends the actors: they greeted me like an intimate. Now after all these years I am still unfailingly comforted, encouraged and elated in the company of actors. There is something about the work these dear neurotics do, investigating every kind of human character, that  develops in them an extraordinary tolerance, forgiveness and good humor. I commend their company even to normal folk.”

    ….and I commend this book of Carroll’s to you.

     
    • waywardsparkles 1:50 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Those were the days watching All in the Family, The Jeffersons, and Maude! Ya know, I can’t remember a single episode of any of them; but I loved how Archie continued to open up as the show went on. Wait a minute, do you remember the episode when Archie had to get a transfusion? I do remember that episode. That was genius! Thanks for sharing about Carroll O’Connor’s autobiography, MM. Mona

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I vaguely remember that episode, Mona, but like you, I mainly remember the series in general, as a whole, not for individual programs. The same, I think, applies to MASH, although re-runs appear regularly on local TV and refresh memories of specific episodes much more readily.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 2:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Aww. Sad your fix is off. But this is a very interesting post

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sorry your daughter is delayed, but she will get there!

      So JW was just being himself, explains why he was monotonously the same in everything he appeared in … Carroll’s shares some good insights, particularly about war! Thanks for the review 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. I have several dozen biographies/autobiographies on my bookshelves, and O’Connor’s is one of the best.

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 4:03 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t panic! Help sounds like its on the way. Autobiographies seem to become more interesting the older we get. Something to do with the human condition, or trying to understand it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:08 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, o.v. The ‘search’ for understanding is never-ending (until the end), but to paraphrase an old saying, “’tis better to have searched and come up short than never to have searched at all.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 6:44 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      That book sound very interesting — what a character! Hope you get your fix soon, mister muse! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:57 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope so too, Carmen. The problems are getting worse (for example, my computer is increasingly ‘freezing’ on me — usually in the middle of writing a post or comment — requiring that I shut down and re-start). I wonder if it would help if I put my computer outside in the hot weather? 😉

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:15 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People always think of Archie when they think of O’Connor, but he really was so much more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg. If he were still alive today, it’s not hard to imagine Archie supporting King Trump and O’Connor railing against him as the emperor who has no clothes.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 10:44 pm on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I spent a week at Leonard Nimoy’s house which was across the street from O’Connor’s. That entire week, Carroll O’Connor cut his grass. He would finish with the lawn and start over again. I wanted to go and meet him, I heard he was a kind and intelligent person, but I never had the time. The Nimoys said he was a great neighbor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:42 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Very interesting. The Nimoys must have had the fast growing grass in town. I mow my lawn once a year whether it needs it or not. 😉

        Like

        • Don Ostertag 1:17 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Not the Nimoy’s lawn.., It was Carroll O’Connor cutting the O’Connor lawn.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:47 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the clarification — I took “cut his grass” to mean that, because he was “a great neighbor,” O’Connor cut Nimoy’s lawn while Nimoy was away for a week. Out of even lesser misunderstandings, yards have been known to turn into battlefields!

          Like

    • annieasksyou 12:01 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting, mistermuse—especially O’Connor’s takes on Truman and John Wayne. Did he say why he felt Wayne was heroic?

      I don’t think computers like hot weather one whit, but I’m perhaps a tad more tech-adept than you, based on your description, so don’t byte a single bit of info I provide.
      Enjoy Father’s Day. Is this an actual —as opposed to virtual—visit?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:16 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        When he knew Wayne, O’Connor wasn’t as liberal as he later became, so I assume that was how he felt then, before he ‘matured.’

        My daughter’s visit will be “actual” in order to install a new browser, as I am virtually blogging “up a creek without a paddle” on my outdated browser (at least, I assume that’s the cause of the problems I’m having — if not, I’m thinking of drowning my sorrow, and I don’t mean in the creek).

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:21 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope your daughter rescues you forthwith. If not, I assume you mean drowning your sorrow in a “spirited” manner, to which I say “bottoms up.”
      I switched from Safari to Firefox at WP’s suggestion, only to learn that Firefox, for reasons I can’t comprehend, will not let me grab images the way Safari does. So I do my image search with Safari and my writing with Firefox. I am way beyond creek depth now with no daughter available to paddle me to safe land. Best of luck!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It so happens that my daughter plans to switch me to Firefox. Before she does, I’ll bring your experience to her attention. She’s the head computer technician at the university where she works, but she doesn’t blog, so she may not be familiar with the idiosyncrasies of the various browsers when it comes to blogging. Thanks for the ‘heads-up.’

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 2:35 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You’re welcome. It happened to me with Google Advanced Image Search, which I use a lot, and with YouTube. But maybe your daughter the pro will be able to show you how to overcome my problem. And then maybe you can tell me!

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 5:20 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you are having a nice Father’s Day!
      There was a Microsoft update this past week in which the new version of the Edge browser was installed. Much to my surprise it’s super-fast!
      I forgot to mention something regarding the “like” problem. If you have your Enhanced Tracker Setting for your browser set for “custom” or “strict”, that prevents “liking” on certain blogs. Just click on the shield icon in the address bar and you can uncheck the tracking. You will then be able to “like”. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:08 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. I AM having a nice Father’s Day — made all the nicer by my neighbor mowing my lawn this weekend (he is the father of the (no longer) little girl my wife and I took care of years ago while he and his wife worked). Now that’s what I call a good neighbor!

        P.S. I will pass your tip on to my daughter next weekend when she installs a new browser, as I will not be publishing any more posts until then.

        Liked by 1 person

    • josephurban 3:57 pm on June 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice article. If you like autobiographies I suggest the Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant. I am currently reading it after watching a History Channel 3 part series on Grant. Fascinating.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:23 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This looks like a truly interesting, well-written book with lots of insight. I think I need to find a copy.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:42 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t think you’ll be disappointed, SS. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked the book.

      Like

  • mistermuse 9:13 am on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , One Morning In May, Pied Pipers, , wordplay   

    MAY DAYS 

    What do you say — may I interest you in the music of May? You see, I haven’t posted for a spell, but I don’t think I want to disturb a single brain cell — though I fear somewhere in my sphere the strain’s already rung a bell, as near I can tell. So, before I go too far, let’s get to the tunes, most of which may be before your time….but at least you won’t have to suffer (much) more of my rhyme.

    I’ll start with two versions of my favorite May song, the first sung by the great Mel Tormé:

    This second (and earlier) version is by British crooner Al Bowlly, who was tragically killed in a German air raid on London during WW II:

    Now, let’s see — where are we? Oh, yes — we’re….

    Let us say ‘fini’ appropriately:

     
    • Ashley 11:05 am on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Another cracking post. Mel Torme…sooo smooth! Ever heard of Matt Munroe? He had a voice like that. Al Bowlly….. my Granny loved him! And Michael Buble….brilliant! I’ve never heard of the Pied Pipers but for some reason, the picture reminded me of Ben Lyons & Bebe Daniels….!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:44 am on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Ashley. Yes, I’ve heard of — and heard — Matt Munroe. I don’t own any of his albums, but I do own a ton of Al Bowlly and Mel Tormé albums, as well as two of the Pied Pipers (they were voted top vocal group of the mid-to-late 1940s in the annual Downbeat and Metronome magazines polls, surpassing even the very popular Mills Brothers and Ink Spots).

        Liked by 3 people

        • Ashley 10:56 am on May 24, 2020 Permalink

          You may not have registered my comment about Ben & Bebe Lyons. It was a radio show here in the UK.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:58 pm on May 24, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the clarification, Ashley. Yes, I heard of old-time American movie stars Ben Lyon and Bebe Daniels (his wife), but I couldn’t relate them with the Pied Pipers picture, so I let it pass. I also didn’t know they had a radio show “here in the UK” — which tells me why your Granny loved Brit Al Bowlly!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 1:18 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I think my favourite was the Pied Piper piece. . it would have been a great dance tune! (Nice to see the inclusion of a Canuck!)

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 4:14 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      How do you get a handle like “The Velvet Fog” anyway? Sounds like a name for a whiskey, not a singer.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:24 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        A disc jockey gave him that nickname in honor of his smooth vocal style (the disc jockey may have been under the influence of whiskey at the time, but in any case, the name stuck).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 5:23 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      May I just say… well done.
      😊

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:34 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You May indeed, Rg….and just to show my appreciation, I’m going to resist the temptation you say you’re well done yourself. Not that you’re not well done, but….maybe I’d better quit while I’m ahead (or am I?). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • Rivergirl 6:47 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink

          At this point in my life? I’d say I’m approaching medium well.
          😉

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 8:21 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink

          The best I can say for myself is that I’m well preserved (and that may be stretching it).

          Like

        • Carmen 9:03 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink

          Well preserved or well pickled? 😉

          Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 5:33 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The change of the seasons has been an inspiration since forever. I too, never heard of the Pied Pipers. Strange how some very popular acts of the day just don’t have ‘legs.’

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:47 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It is said that Fame is fickle, but it’s probably more accurate to say that Fame is selectively fickle. Most entertainers of lasting fame probably deserve it, but IMHO, many others deserve it but don’t have it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:40 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      enjoyed the pied pipers, and like their name! But michael wins hands down, what a voice!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:13 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        We’ll have to agree to disagree on this one. Mel is the man!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:54 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink

          na crooners leave me cold Michael .. wow!

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 11:15 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink

          Kate, I don’t know where you got the idea that Mel is a crooner. He is first and foremost a jazz-influenced singer (even when he sings ballads). And when he sings straight jazz – well, judge for yourself:

          Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 11:49 pm on May 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Those who are unfamiliar with Mel Torme, the great one, probably never watched Night Court on TV either. And the Pied Pipers, great on their own or backing up Frank Sinatra in his Dorsey Years. And out of that group came Jo Stafford, one of the best ‘girl singers’ ever.
      Al Bowelly, so sad.
      And then you even got my second favorite stunt man, Yakima.
      Nice mixture.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:40 am on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I couldn’t agree more about Jo Stafford. And if there has ever been a better and more unforgettable name in movie history than Yakima Canutt, I don’t remember it. 😉

        Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 8:29 am on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I tried to play Torme and Bowlly at the same time but they did NOT synchronize…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:13 am on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        There aren’t too many jazz-influenced singers (like Tormé) and crooners (like Bowlly) I can think of who “synchronize” — unless they’re combined in one man, like the YOUNG (late 1920s-early 1930s) Bing Crosby. However, if it’s synchronization you want, try playing two orchestras’ versions of the same song at the same time, like the sophisticated Spike Jones

        and jazz man Duke Ellington

        Liked by 2 people

    • annieasksyou 10:26 am on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Your guided May tour was very pleasing, of course—

      But not quite as much as Mel’s Ella scat de force!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 2:45 pm on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love the (new to me) Pied Piper version! Thanks for sharing it.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ball Of Fire, , Dixieland jazz, , Firehouse 5 + 2, Hotter Than That, , International Jazz Day, , , Old MacDonald Had A Farm, , wordplay   

    INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY 

    April 30 is INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY. Mistermuse could write a book about jazz, but many books have already been authored by jazz writers more authoritative than he, so mistermuse will settle for doing a post — and on this post, he has a chick who can sing a lick here, scat a lick there, wing a lick everywhere:

    You may think that’s hotter than a chicken wing or a pig on a spit — but here’s a cat who can scat too, and when he blows his bugle, he’s even….

    Is your computer smoking yet? We don’t want to alarm the Firehouse brigade, so before your pc bursts into a

    ….let’s do one number more and stop at four, because….

     

     

     
    • calmkate 2:25 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      ah you managed to warm my heart on a cold wet winters day!
      Thanks Mr M … everyday should be jazz day 😎

      Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 3:37 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 12:05 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 2:59 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the link. Haven’t heard that version, but I know the song — it was recorded by the great Bessie Smith in 1928. I love the vocal on your clip — who is the vocalist?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 12:22 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      gives me an excuse to play my jazz collection, as if I needed an excuse. Bit of trivia – Firehouse 5 had a day job. The were animators for Disney.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:18 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Don. Actually, I did know about the Disney connection. I own a few of their record albums, and the notes on one of them say that band founder trombonist Ward Kimball and tin whistle player Walt Kelly (of Pogo fame) first met at Disney Studios in 1934. They’re not my fav Dixieland band, but I still enjoy listening to them.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 7:32 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Who says that’s a plenty? I wouldn’t my have minded several more. And a Happy International Jazz Day to you, mistermuse. Sure glad I got to this today; otherwise it wouldn’t have had the same cachet.

      And that chick Ella (my feathers were a little ruffled by your so naming her til the song began): anyone who can elevate a children’s nursery rhyme to art…well, she’s one cool scat.
      Such delight!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:51 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        it was a feather in my cap, not only to have found the Ella clip, but the clip which is my favorite of the four: HOTTER THAN THAT. The “cat who can scat” in that recording is of course Louis Armstrong, and I’ve never heard him scat better than he does starting one minute and twenty seconds into the clip. It doesn’t get any hotter than that!

        Liked by 1 person

        • annieasksyou 8:15 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink

          At a high school reunion years ago, I was talking with the guy who was my senior prom date. He insisted that after the dance, we went into New York and saw Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. I was appalled at myself: how could I have NO recollection of such a significant event? Just months ago, I found an old scrapbook I’d made (we did that in those days), and I’d written how awful my date was and noted the performers we’d seen: much lesser lights than those two musical giants.
          I shall revisit your Satch video to see if I’ll be further tickled by his scats.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:54 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for that interesting remembrance.

          For decades, I’ve owned well over a dozen Louis LPs, at least one of which includes HOTTER THAN THAT….and I’M appalled at myself that I didn’t recollect how great his scatting was on that 1920s recording (until I found the video). Of course, he was at the peak of his creative power (both playing and scatting) back then, and that was only one of many unbelievable performances, so I suppose I should forgive myself for forgetting one of them.

          Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:01 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Right—I think we both have to stop being appalled at ourselves…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:32 pm on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It would have been wonderful to have had Ella as a grandmother entertaining us with that version. I wonder what she could do with the other standard nursery rhymes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:11 am on May 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Wonder no more, Elizabeth. As a matter of fact, her first big hit record was a song she co-wrote in 1938 based on the nursery rhyme A-TISKET A-TASKET. Here, she sings it in a clip from the 1942 Abbot & Costello film RIDE ‘EM COWBOY:

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 9:19 pm on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:14 am on May 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Moorezart for more jazz, and more jazz for moorezart. I dig it!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 10:14 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for including that great scene from Ball of Fire! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:28 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Any scene with Barbara Stanwyck is a pleasure to watch — though I must say (when it comes to screwball comedies) that I liked THE LADY EVE (with her and Henry Fonda) better than BALL OF FIRE.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Silver Screenings 8:39 am on May 5, 2020 Permalink

          Agreed. I prefer The Lady Eve, too. Stanwyck is perfectly cast in that film – I can’t imagine anyone else in that role.

          Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 8:49 pm on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love jazz covers today which are going in many directions and genre incorporations. I wonder too,if Scat is the grandparent of rap…🤔

      Like

    • lorraineanne 11:10 am on May 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      this is amazing~ thank you for sharing.
      If you get a chance, I’d really appreciate if you can check out my music/ art blog.
      It would mean a lot!
      https://thehighsnlows.com

      lo

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:47 pm on May 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment. I read your latest (Jazz Festivals) post, but currently have too much on my plate to read more. At this point, I can only say I liked what I saw and will try to check out a few more of your posts when I have time.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bunk Johnson, Dyngus Day, , I'm A Ding Dong Daddy From Dumas, , , Lowdown Blues, Mississippi John Hurt, Monday Morning Blues, New Orleans jazz, , wordplay   

    LOWDOWN MONDAY MORNING BLUES 

    I don’t know how many jazz fans I have among my readers — or, for that matter, how many blues buffs I have among my jazz fans — but just between me and you (no matter how few), today I’m in a LOWDOWN and BLUE musical mood. To my non-jazz followers tried and true, you’re welcome to listen in too….with no apologies due if you decide to bid me adieu ’til my next post’s in view.

    So, without further ado, here’s the LOWDOWN — BLUES, that is, played by a legendary New Orleans jazz man….and that’s no Bunk (I beg your pardon: it is Bunk) :

    For my next selection this Monday morning, what else but the….

    Some blues songs are a bit dirty, but I offer one that will leave you cleaner than a flushed toilet with a clogged drain….and, it’s conveniently in the same room:

    Today is Easter Monday which, I’m sure you’re aware, is also DYNGUS DAY, which is big in Poland. Other than that, I don’t know a dang thingus about Dyngus, so I checked it out and found that it’s celebrated like St. Patrick’s Day is in Ireland, with drinking, parades, drinking, parties, drinking, dancing, and drinking. Of course, the Poles are open all night on Dyngus Day, so I’d like to close with a song apropos for the occasion — but unlike St. Patrick’s Day, I can’t show a Dyngus song because I don’t know a Dyngus song. Luckily, a melodious American opus will serve the purpose if we substitute DYNGUS for DUMAS:

    Just between us, I thinkest that’s the dangest Dyngus/Dumas anyone could sing us to bring us to the finus. Thank goodness for Louis.

     
    • Garfield Hug 1:11 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I learnt something new from your mistermuse – Dyngus! I did not know you are in Poland. I am sorry you are feeling blue. Cheer up….Garfield, my inanimate furball send you the “highs” to blow away the Monday blues!! Take care and stay safe.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:02 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry if I gave you the impression I’m in Poland, G.H. — I’m not. There are a few towns named Poland here in the USA, but I’m not in any of those either. One of those towns is in the state of Maine, where a certain follower of this blog lives, but probably not in that town….and it wouldn’t be Pole-ite to ask.

        Take care, and give Garfield a “high-five” for me.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Garfield Hug 6:39 am on April 16, 2020 Permalink

          Garfield gave a “high-five” back at you. I appreciated the advice you gave me for my dad. It does seem to be vertigo, although his blood pressure was really high. He is back in hospital again. Sigh.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:39 am on April 16, 2020 Permalink

          Over the years, I’ve lost my mom, dad, and only (and younger) sibling, so I can relate to what you’re going through, GH. If people can’t have empathy for each other in times like this, when can they?

          Take care.

          Like

    • calmkate 2:44 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      not feelin blue coz the sun is shinin … but any jazz is acceptable! Great selection Mr M 🙂

      How can anyone feel blue jivin to that ❤

      Liked by 3 people

    • blindzanygirl 3:14 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ah! Wonderful.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:20 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love the blues, especially on scratchy old records. Excellent choices… I was unfamiliar with the bath water, fun!
      It is wrong to say Happy Dyngus? It seems like it should be.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not sure what Dyngus is, RG, but it sounds like a word one shouldn’t use in Pole-ite company. Anyone who has a dyngus is probably well advised to keep it private except on special occasions.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:42 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi. The Armstrong recording is funny. Somewhere he mentions that he forgot the words. Hardly matters!

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re right, Neil — but just for the “record,” the words are scrolled across the bottom of this clip, starting about 35 seconds in:

        There are additional lyrics and many other renditions of this song on youtube, in case anyone’s interested.

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:24 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Dyngus Day, although no partying and parading outside the house. Thanks for the musical Monday. Stay well and have a lovely week. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:55 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re welcome, Diana. Take care, and don’t do anything I wouldn’t do (especially since I’m getting too old to do much anyway). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • summerhilllane 11:46 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for sharing this incredible music. I enjoyed it and this surprises me because I don’t usually like Jazz music. I like Blues sometimes. Guess I have the Monday morning blues. Much love.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:30 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for your comment, which I approved hours ago, but it disappeared into cyberspace until suddenly appearing here a little while ago. Glad you enjoyed the music.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 2:02 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I thoroughly enjoyed this bluesy quartet, especially because it’s a rainy, blowsy day outside. Tuba Skinny (an oxymoron?) was unknown to me, so a special thank you for that.

      As a lover—and occasionally shameless creator of—bad puns, I am most appreciative of your narration/responses as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 2:52 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You got us all a-foot tapping here, Mr Muse! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:45 pm on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t know about Dyngus Day, but it sure reminded me of “My Ding-a-Ling” with Chuck Berry who I had the delight of seeing perform it in Harlem in 1966.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 8:00 pm on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I thought the first “can” was deliberate, so I riffed on a fine Presidential slogan.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:30 pm on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Annie — I didn’t even notice it until you pointed it out….but now that you mention it, I can(‘t) honestly say that my “can” was an improvement over the “can’t” I’d intended to say.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:02 am on April 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      John Hurt’s piece shows that fifties rock and roll was taken from blues guitar…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:02 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, it’s been too long since I’ve listened to the blues. Thanks for this!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , wordplay, Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:08 am on February 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Night at the Opera. Duck Soup, , , , , , wordplay   

    A NIGHT AT THE (SOAP) OPERA – Act IV 

    As the curtain rises on Act IV, we pick up where we left off in Act III:

    We’ve come at long last to the denouement (aka the point in the presentation where it’s time to wrap up the plot before the popcorn runs out): Fiorello and Tomasso abduct and gag lead tenor Alasprairie during the onstage uproar and take him to a site out of sight, where he’s fit to be tied. Gottliebchen is in a bind: a replacement tenor is needed to quiet the affronted audience, as well as those seated in the rear. Ricardo Macaroni happens to be handy. Gottliebchen gives in. Ricardo and the lovely Rosa Grossa sing an aria. The audience is enthralled. Miraculously, everything has worked out in….

    THE END?

    But as we all know, it’s not the end until the fat lady sings — a requisite which is unaccountably missing in this opera. Fortunately for our fannies, the fat lady who doesn’t sing in this opera did sing to end this earlier opera, which will serve our purpose here:

    Now that’s what I call leaving on borrowed time.

     

     
    • mlrover 8:58 am on February 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love that they aimed the fruit over her head. My favorite was always when Harpo played.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:56 am on February 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Harpo’s playing always provided just the right balance of “catch-our-breath” between what would otherwise have been non-stop zaniness — not to mention that his playing was excellent in itself.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tubularsock 1:50 pm on February 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Tubularsock loved that as well and found it interesting how she showed such confidence they’d miss. Wonder how many times they had to run through that without a mistake hit.

        Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 9:23 pm on February 16, 2020 Permalink

          They did hit their initial target (Trentino) several times without noticeable effect before turning their attention to her, so I suspect that the “fruit” was made of something relatively soft (I was going to say foam rubber, but I checked and found that foam rubber wasn’t invented until 1937 — 3 years after DUCK SOUP was filmed). In any case, it does look like they missed her on purpose.

          Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 6:17 pm on February 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Marx Brothers were unequaled! Still just as funny today. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:43 pm on February 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely! And A NIGHT AT THE OPERA lends itself perfectly to being satirized like a soap opera. I can’t think of another film which could as easily “inspire” the writing of these posts.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 8:22 am on February 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just leave out the sanity clause next time…

      Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 8:45 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Not for nothing they were known as comic genius.

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 10:26 pm on February 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      love the Marx bros…the first Beatles. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:58 am on February 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I guess you could make that comparison, though I’ve never thought of the Beatles’ films in that way before.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Badkward Day, , , January, , palindromes, , , wordplay   

    TODAY IS BACKWARD DAY (aka YAD DRAWKCAB) 

    31 January >> ?know you don’t >> DAY BACKWARD is >> say sources so

    Not so fast! If you backward the numbers, today is only 13 January….which means that we’re not even halfway though the month yet. Who wants that many more winter days on top of the 29 — make that 92 — days of February (this being leap year) and 81 days of March (winter officially ends 18 March). So screw backwards!

    Of course, if you live below the equator, there’s the added downside of being upside down on top of being backward (no offense intended). But at least it’s summer down below, so you’re not freezing your backside off. Where I live, it’s so cold, I have to leave my refrigerator door open to warm up my igloo.

    Speaking of cold, have you heard the one about the mama who got the blues she can’t lose due to her feet being colder than frozen meat ‘neath an ice-cold sheet in a bed missing papa’s heat?

    Back to YAD DRAWCAB: DO GEESE SEE GOD? Whether they do or don’t, the question reads the same spelled forward and backward. This is known as a PALINDROME (which isn’t a palindrome because it’s EMORDNILAP spelled backward). However, in Alaska, they call it a SARAHPALINDROME (which is EMPTYHEADED spelled in any direction).

    Assuming you can stand more (if not, remain seated):

    Looking back on Backward Day, it dawns on me not to leave this day behind without a backward song to turn backward to when it would be a drawback not to turn backward:

    In closing, I hope today isn’t your birthday, because I wouldn’t like to think you’re a backward baby — but just in case you are, in addition to wishing you a Happy Birthday, I wish you a….

    !YAD DRAWKCAB YPPAH

     

     

     
    • The Whitechapel Whelk 1:17 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I can see you’ve heard about Brexit.

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 5:29 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoyed you post from end to beginning…

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 9:12 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 9:22 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          That’s funny. I was listening to the Andrews Sisters and you had to pull the modern music out on me…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:38 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          Sinatra recorded that song as vocalist with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in March 1940, when the Andrews Sisters were at the peak of their popularity and Frank was just becoming the idol of the bobbysoxers. Not exactly the “modern” Frank most people remember today, which is just as well, because I think his mature voice and style beat the way he sang this (and other early-in-his-career songs) any day.

          Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 2:58 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          Ouch! That’ll leave a mark…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:15 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          No “mark” on you intended. The Swing era (mid 1930s-mid 1940s) just happens to be the musical era I was born in and am most familiar with.

          Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 4:21 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          The music and movies from the forties are great. I’m a big Myrna Loy fan… and, Ella of course…

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 5:45 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol great one, that Palindrome one really made me laugh loudly … and hey don’t rubbish us for standing on our heads! The skirt creates a breeze that way 🙂
      oooh for impeachment, what is the hold up …

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:22 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Far be it from me to knock a lady’s breezeway, Kate, but standing on one’s head would rub me the wrong way ’cause I don’t have any hair on top for a cushion. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 4:44 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          I think your head might be large enough to withstand the trauma 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:14 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          That reminds me of a song (written by a guy from the same city as I) which describes my head perfectly:

          Like

    • Ashley 8:09 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      According to the Celtic calendar today is the last day of winter! Tomorrow is the beginning of spring. You’re a bit behind things aren’t you?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:42 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Looking out the window as I write this comment, I see it’s snowing outside, so I hope the Celtic calendar is right, Ashley.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:22 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Do geese see God?
      The more important question… is God a goose?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:48 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Could be, R g. I’m pretty sure God’s not a chick or a duckling, because I’ve never heard a peep out of Her.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 2:48 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Tsop Nuf !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:02 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Especially fond of “not now won ton.” Thanks for the laugh.

      Liked by 2 people

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