Tagged: Billie Holiday Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Billie Holiday, Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:03 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Billie Holiday, Bob Crosby, Cozy Cole, , , Johnny Hodges, Jonah Jones, , , Tot Seymour, Vee Lawnhurst   

    WHAT VEE/TOT BEGOT, BE WHAT WE GOT (AND THEN SOME) 

    In a comment to my last post (on composer Kay Swift), a certain mister mused that more posts should follow devoted to women songwriters of the 1920s-30s, of whom there were too few. I’ve since found that two of those few got together to form what was the era’s only successful female songwriting partnership: VEE LAWNHURST (composer) and TOT SEYMOUR (lyricist). We shall proceed accordingly forthwith….or forthwith accordingly. Whatever.

    Let’s start with their biggest hit, a #1 bestseller for 11 weeks in 1935, AND THEN SOME:

    VEE LAWNHURST (1905-92), born in NYC, was a pianist, singer, teacher, and a pioneer in radio broadcasting. She worked with several lyricists before teaming with Tot to write a lot of hits in the mid to late 1930s, including the title song from the 1935 film ACCENT ON YOUTH, played here by the DUKE ELLINGTON Orchestra (Johnny Hodges on alto sax):

    TOT SEYMOUR (1889-1966), also born in NYC, was a multi-talented writer, including special material for such stars of the day as Fannie Brice and Mae West, then turning to popular song writing in 1930, working with various composers until teaming with Vee Lawnhurst. Among their many fine songs is this 1937 Billie Holiday classic featuring such jazz greats as Jonah Jones, Ben Webster, Teddy Wilson and Cozy Cole:

    Apparently Vee and Tot wrote no Christmas songs, which is just as well because you’ve probably already had more than your fill. So I’ll just close by wishing you a Happy Humbug….and then some.

     

     
    • obbverse 1:52 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      So over the bellowing carols and mindless Merry Christmases, roll on blessed silence and boxing day sales!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:02 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and then some!

        Thanks for the comment, o.b., and may I be the last to wish you a mindless Merry Christmas..

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 4:01 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      do enjoy your posts … is it my hearing, I didn’t catch any words in #2?

      Happy Humbug keep on toe tappin 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:19 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Your hearing isn’t failing you, Kate. I posted the Ellington instrumental version because I dig Duke and Johnny Hodges’ gorgeous alto sax solo late in the recording. But never fear –you can hear the words here, in this non-jazz record:

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 5:23 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink

          who doesn’t love the Duke, but as you were talking about her song writing … appreciate the link!

          Like

      • mistermuse 8:19 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Kate, I placed the Duke Ellington instrumental to go with the Vee Lawnhurst paragraph because she wasn’t the lyricist half of the team It fit there better there because the other two links had vocals.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 11:04 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink

          lol no need to defend yourself, your post!
          But I had expected lyrics so probably didn’t absorb the magic music as much as I should have, my fault entirely 🙂

          Like

    • Elizabeth 6:35 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love their ambiguous first names which may have allowed them more success.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:44 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s possible, Elizabeth, but I’d like to think that their intelligence and talent had more to do with it. For example, there’s the common name of Dorothy Parker, the famed wit and writer in the 1920s & 30s (who, btw, also wrote the lyrics to a few good songs, such as I WISHED ON THE MOON) .

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 3:01 pm on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had never heard of Bob Crosby and when I looked him up I see that he had many children one of them called Harry, better known as Bing. (Wow! When I was first reading your post my dear wife was looking over my shoulder and later said something like “that looks very like a young Bing Crosby!” You see we work as a team and usually sort most things out). Have a wonderful Yuletide yourself.

      Like

      • mistermuse 4:31 pm on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Ashley, the Bob Crosby in my first clip was actually Bing’s younger brother. There may have been another Bob somewhere in the Crosby family tree, but this Bob was born in 1913 and looked and sounded somewhat like his older brother. In 1935, he became the front man and vocalist for the band which recorded AND THEN SOME, and which went on to become one the best big bands in the business until 1942, when it disbanded, and Bob served in the military in WW II

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:22 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always loved 20s and 30s tunes! And old films!

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:24 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, mm….and speaking of 1930s tunes, here’s a Christmas tune from 1934. Enjoy!

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, French kissing, getting hitched, , , kissing, , , ,   

    THE KISSING POST 

    I am in favor of preserving the French habit of kissing ladies’ hands–after all, one must start somewhere. –Sacha Guitry, French actor, playwright and film maker

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    The title of today’s post is THE KISSING POST– not to be confused with THE HITCHING POST, which would be a post about the ceremony of getting hitched (after kissing went to the hand-kisser’s head). Alternatively, THE HITCHING POST could be a post about a post to which you tether your horse….as opposed to your spouse (pardon my horse play).

    Be that as it may, it may interest you to know that anthropologists believe kissing is a learned behavior. But they believe above all in science, so what competence could anthropologists possibly have in the field of kissing….with the likely exception of Parisian anthropologists, who are said to have French kissing down to an art….in the interest of science? C’est une bonne planque!*

    Knowing that many of my readers are serious about science, you would no doubt like to know where I came up with what “it may interest you to know” — so, just so you know:

    https://people.howstuffworks.com/kissing2.htm

    As for the romantic barbarians among you, far be it from me to kiss you off. Kiss on!

    *Nice work if you can get it!

     
  • mistermuse 12:02 am on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, bully, , , Don't Explain, , , , , , pity, , , suffering   

    DON’T EXPLAIN 

    It does not matter much what a man hates provided he hates something. –Samuel Butler

    Some time ago, after I’d written a number of posts lampooning America’s vainglorious leader, I was asked by a reader why I “hate” Donald Trump. I replied that I didn’t hate him, I pitied him — pitied him for being the kind of human being he is. In hindsight, I should have asked the reader, Does Trump hate those he insults? — i.e. “Pocahontas” Elizabeth Warren, “Little Marco” Rubio, “Lightweight” Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (I suppose the Senator should be grateful Trump didn’t call her heavyweight), etc., etc., etc. My answer (and, I assume, that reader’s) is no — hate is something deeply felt, not a juvenile slur. Trump’s mocking is strictly gratuitous, like a bully who must put down anyone who, in his world, is a “loser” — someone in his way; an inconvenient object to be diminished or pushed aside. It’s not even personal (a “loser” is but an abstraction).

    So, in deference to Samuel Butler, should I apologize for not hating Trump — or anyone, for that matter? Truth be known, the closest I come to hating anyone is God….that is, if I believed in God — the biblical God, the invented God of wrath, innocent suffering and mystifying absence. But I am a ‘default’ deist, left with a creator God, an impersonal God, a God with nothing to explain — at least, not until the next life (if there is one). The creator God never said a word or promised us anything — not on earth or after. Perhaps I should be jealous, for, unlike the creator God, there are times (like now) when this only-human creator feels the need to explain what I create. And yet, I get not deigning to explain — explaining ain’t easy. If I were God or Trump, I might not explain myself either.

     

     

     

     

     
    • Lisa R. Palmer 9:22 am on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Yes!! I get this. And I feel this. And I am sincerely moved by the “truth” of it. I have spent much of my adult life attempting to define and explain the “God” of my understanding, and how it works, and here you put the matter so simply and so rationally, it blows my mind. Lol! Thank you for the glimpse behind the curtain, both universally and personally, for this is yet another side of you showing through…

      On another note, hatred seems like such a huge investment to make in someone; it’s very much like love in that regard. Most of these hate-able people, like insecure bullies, are not worth such investment from me. But perhaps my willingness to dismiss them so eagerly is part of the “problem,” in that my experience teaches that the more you ignore the ego-driven, the more they cry out to be acknowledged…

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:13 am on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I very much appreciate your comment, Lisa. It’s rewarding to have dialogues with fellow ‘searchers’ (as opposed to ‘dialogues’ with ideologues).

      I think your second paragraph is right on the money, especially “the more you ignore the ego-driven, the more they cry out to be acknowledged.” That describes Trump to a T, and is the reason he is more to be pitied than hated. In a certain sense, one can’t help but pity a man who seemingly can’t help being what he is and is incapable of even reflecting on the matter. Multiply him by millions like him, and you see the world through the eyes of an objective visitor from another planet.

      P.S. I’ll return to my space ship shortly and get back to my usual blogging routine of disgustingly humorous posts.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:55 pm on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      According to conventional theology, Sr. Muse, it’s God’s will that we have Trump, which bolsters one of my theological observations–this God character does some shady shit.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 2:44 pm on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Ricardo, that’s only the will of the religious/biblical God — not of the creator/deistic God, who has left man to his own devices since emerging from the primordial soup (which apparently wasn’t that long ago for some of us, if The Donald and his crackers are any indication).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 9:37 pm on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Your reply to Ricardo reminds me of the question, “What’s the difference between an invisible god and a non-existent one?” 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:30 pm on February 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        No difference whatsoever in this life, Carmen….except that with a non-existent one, there’s absolutely no possibility of a next life, and with an invisible one, who knows? Of course, we can hope for the invisible one and an afterlife, but even if both of those things turn out, one has to wonder (assuming we’ll ‘see’ our invisible maker, ourselves and each other as we really are) how in the hell we’ll be able to live with ourselves, each other, and an oblivious God. 😦

        Liked by 2 people

        • Carmen 6:57 am on February 19, 2018 Permalink

          The only thing we DO know for certainty is we get this life. Thankfully, there are those people who try to brighten someone else’s day by being pleasant, doing whatever they can to make others’ lives better, and filling the airwaves with wonderful music and sharp wit. 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

    • Don Frankel 8:15 am on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Assuming I’m that reader since I asked you that let me explain. It seems a waste of time and energy to get all bent out of shape over something or someone, you will have nothing to do with and can do nothing about. Doesn’t matter who it is, they can’t hear you and they don’t much care. You’re the one who is upset.

      There was this guy in the local Diner and it’s Jan 10, 2017 and he explains to me that President Obama was born in Kenya and isn’t an American citizen. Now the reason I remember the date is because President Obama was not going to be President in 10 days, so what was the guy on the stool’s point? He hates President Obama like really bad. So he spent 8 years of his life hating some guy who didn’t even know he was alive. And, it doesn’t seem to have effected or affected President Obama too much either. Maybe it did something for the guy sitting on that stool but I don’t get it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:44 am on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, if I were the only one who is upset, I’d agree with you. But this goes beyond politics. I’m just one of millions who see the unfettered narcissism and uncivil tone (to put it generously) set by Trump inexorably becoming the ‘new normal’ in this country unless enough of us stand up to him. If you think this doesn’t matter, what more is there to say?.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 10:01 am on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Okay I get it and good luck.

      Now you might imagine by living in New York I run into this with some of my very close friends so my new routine is to sing a little ditty from the movie The Producers. The original one and it’s the scene where Dick Shawn comes out on stage as Hitler for the first time and he is sitting at the piano and singing. “I’m gonna crush Poland and then take France. Then I’ll cross the English Channel and kick that guy in the pants.” Only I sing “that gal” because Theresa May is the current Prime Minister. There is no clip of this on youtube so consider it sung and imagine we’re both laughing.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:57 am on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well, at least with Theresa May, we may laugh. Even Hitler, that personification of evil, begged to be caricatured. But there’s no longer anything remotely funny to be found about Trump….though God knows I’ve tried.

      As local standup comedian Mark Chalifoux put it in Jan. 2017, “There’s too much to focus on. Our attention span rarely allows us to move past his tweets to anything of substance. His presidency….is going to be exhausting. Trump is simply too easy to make fun of, [what with] years of hearing the same jokes about hair, orange skin, small hands and where you can grab women. Anyone with a keyboard will be beating a dead horse until long after it becomes a bag of bones.”

      As I said before, we’ve reached a point where this goes beyond politics. This is about how we treat others and that old-fashioned notion of role model. I hope such values haven’t become associated with ‘losers.’ I think, or at least hope, these things still matter in New York; they still matter where I come from.

      Liked by 2 people

    • The Coastal Crone 9:30 pm on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I pity our vainglorious leader also. He has thrown the presidency away with both hands.

      Liked by 1 person

    • markscheel1 9:37 pm on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,

      Well, I read an article awhile ago that pointed out the Democrats said similar things of ridicule about Reagan, sonny Bush and now Trump. Also I heard a radio commentator assert recently that Trump is stupid—-“like a fox.” And went on to enumerate ways he’s outplayed the opposition and the media. Remember, if you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you always got. And concede this–Trump is in no way an ordinary politician! And we’re certainly getting something different! Ha.
      Speaking of religion and “God concepts,” have you tried “panentheism”? (Not pantheism.) From that point of view, Trump might actually be divine! The thought! But no, not the Second Coming. Let’s not get carried away. LOL
      I’d never heard Lady sing “Don’t Explain.” Thanks for that treat!

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carmen 9:44 pm on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        The ‘something different’ that your country is getting is in no way funny. 😦

        Liked by 2 people

        • markscheel1 2:21 am on February 20, 2018 Permalink

          Hi Carmen,

          The “laugh” wasn’t meant to refer to what the country is getting, but rather the irony of the whole situation and the differing opinions regarding it. A booming economy, stock market up, red-tape regs cut so business can produce, vital SCOTUS appointment, real tax relief–those are things I’m not “laughing” about.

          Mark

          Like

    • mistermuse 10:59 pm on February 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, when it comes to religion, I haven’t “tried” any of them in the sense of shopping around for one. I was born into Catholicism, but after years — decades, really — of growing increasingly unable to believe what the church believed, fell into deism (which is why I called myself a “default deist” in my post). I wasn’t looking for another religion, it was simply that I found that ‘where I was now at’ aligned with what deists like Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, and (some say) Thomas Jefferson believed….at least, in meeting-of-the-minds terms (deism isn’t even a religion in the doctrinal sense).

      You referred to Trump, but I’ve had my fill for now, so I’ll pass. As for the Lady Day (Billie Holiday) clip, she was well past her prime in 1958. There are recordings of her singing the song when she was much younger, but I opted for the clip I showed. Why? I defer to the title of this post.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:13 am on February 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        But at what cost, Mark? (re your reply to Carmen.) At what cost?

        Liked by 1 person

        • markscheel1 4:38 pm on February 20, 2018 Permalink

          Well, muse, with the currency I employ, I’d say it’s a bargain. Hmmmmm. Now, figure that one out. 😉

          Mark

          Like

    • mistermuse 12:20 am on February 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mark, I’m guessing that you deferred to the title of this post too.

      Like

      • markscheel1 3:39 pm on February 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        muse,

        That would be an appropriate assumption! 🙂 I’ve resolved to do memoir, not politics, as you know. Now, as an aside, Dee and I are back from the hospital. The heart procedure yesterday went well. (Ablation.) Great doctor. Wonderful nurses. Just wanted to let you know–“the beat goes on,” now normally! And I feel nothing but gratitude.

        Mark

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:14 pm on February 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Glad to hear it, Mark. Great doctors aren’t always easy to come by. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 4:13 pm on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Never apologize for hating Donald J. Trump. he is only worthy of hate – and nothing else. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, , , ,   

    POST TIME 

    When last we met on June 30, I left open whether my future posts would be on an every-ten-days schedule or on a when-the-spirit-moves-me non-schedule. Seeing as how most of us live in a democracy (not to be confused with a demagogracy?), I decided to put the matter to a secret vote. My fellow Americans, base supporters, and gulliblites everywhere, I hereby and now and forever proclaim that the outcome is in!

    Yes, friends, the results are in, and doubtless you are on tenterhooks, dying to learn the winner — as well you should be — but kindly hang in there. After all, I’m trying to build up a little suspense here.

    DRUM R-O-L-L, please. It is my dis-stinked honor and privilege to announce that 100% of the eligible voters, consisting of me, myself and I (in cahoots with Charlie Barnowl — who? — let’s stop for a spell: it’s Barnet), have opted to vote for….

    I confess that Barnet, being deceased, could vote in spirit only. But spirits are flighty, to say the least. Will the spirit stick around, pushing me to act when inspiration is at a peak to post? Other-wise, my frequency of posting will most likely depend on….

    However, if my mood is down in the dumps, that doesn’t mean I can’t soar. You see, although I brook no Prohibition on drowning my sorrows — easy for me (not to mention myself & I) to speak — there are times….

    Until next time, then — whenever that may be (ye know not the day or the hour) — me leaves myself and I with this reminder:

    “The higher a drunk feels in the evening, the lower he feels in the morning.” –Evan Esar

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
     
    • Garfield Hug 3:30 am on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for a monday laugh Mister Muse…this is really hilarious 😂😂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:26 am on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you! Garfield appears to have enjoyed it too (though he probably always has that lovably silly look on his face). 🙂

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:46 am on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great selection here Muse. I vote for whenever the spirit moves you too. I write whenever someone does something that makes me laugh.

      BTW we don’t live in a democracy. It’s a republic. There is a huge difference. And, the dead I am told have been known to vote. And, why shouldn’t they?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:44 am on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, maybe we don’t live in a democracy here in America (at least while Trump is in charge), but my following is universal — or at least, FAR OUT, ha ha — so some followers no doubt do (live in a democracy). And with 20/20 hindsight in 2020, I predict Americans will vote the Republicans out, Democrats in, and the “republic” will again be a “democracy.”

        Like

    • Ricardo 10:17 am on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I may have to go to the “when the spirit moves me” schedule myself soon, Sr. Muse, so I sympathize

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:03 pm on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Good luck with your hatred for Trump. I’m not sure what it is going to get you other than angry, frustrated and maybe indigestion. But the country is a Republic and always has been regardless of who the President was. The President any President does a lot in the eyes of the media but the actual running of the government goes on without him.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 pm on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I told you before that I don’t hate Trump, but it seems you’ve either forgotten or you don’t believe me. Yes, I hate what he says and how he acts, but that’s not the same as hating the human being. Judging by the way that you overlook and excuse what he says and how he acts, one might think you love Trump, but I don’t accuse you of it.

        I recently promised you I won’t mention Trump when I comment on your posts. Maybe it’s time for you to return the favor when commenting here, as I don’t feel anything is to be gained (and something may be lost) by further exchanging unshakeable opinions about you-know-who.

        Like

    • Carmen 8:18 pm on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Well, I have to tell you that it’s always better to act when the spirit moves you as opposed to a kick in the arse. (err. . .metaphorically speaking, that is) 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:18 pm on July 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Carmen, I might consider that an arsenine statement if I didn’t appreciate your down-to-earth sense of humus. 🙂

      P.S. I’d say more, but it’s time to imbibe some spirits (metaphorically speaking, of course).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:46 am on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah you told me hate the sin but not the sinner. But that’s religious double speak. We are the things we do. So if you hate what someone does, you hate them.

      Perhaps I’m wrong but you seem to be absolutely seething with hatred so much so that any mention of something vaguely related to the Presidency looses forth a tirade from you.

      I don’t love or hate any of these public people. From reading history I’ve learned that what we might think of a President while he’s in office, can be 180 degrees from what they are actually like. And that’s both good and bad. For example and this is nothing good or bad and had no effect on his Presidency but FDR was confined to wheelchair most of the time and most Americans had no idea. Leaving politics and history for a moment, Bill Cosby used to be America’s favorite Dad. Anyone’s public image is something they negotiate.

      But I’m not going to mention you know who here. I am actually a little worried about you. Being angry and hurling invective doesn’t seem to be who you are.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:37 am on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, if I believed in religious double speak, I’d still be Catholic. What I DO believe is that your opinion of my “seething with hatred” is nothing more than your opinion. Sad (as you-know-who would say).

      Like

      • Carmen 10:08 am on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I don’t know whose blogs you frequent, but mistermuse has been very diplomatic regarding Trump, in my opinion. If you’d like me to link to some other bloggers who DO display ‘seething hatred’, I’d be happy to do that! In fact, a scroll through Noseybook reveals the aforementioned quite readily.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:33 am on July 11, 2017 Permalink

          Hey, Carmen, I appreciate your comment (but I forget how much I promised to pay you for making it!). 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 3:47 pm on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Okay Muse and Carmen maybe I read the comments wrong. I like to remember that half the time I’m wrong and the other half of the time I just don’t know what I’m talking about. Most of all I’m exhausted and bored to tears by the subject. I’m onto other things, more important things like Emily Ratajkowski and people engaging in clamorous coitus. This is at nyuge.com.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carmen 4:11 pm on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don,
        I must admit I clicked on that link with great trepidation. . . you know, because of mistermuse’s ‘family’ blog and all. 🙂
        (oh, and P.S. I don’t know what I’m talking about most of the time, so you got me beat!)

        Like

      • mistermuse 4:40 pm on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, let’s just chalk this up as two people looking at the same guy and seeing him with different eyes. Since neither of us can change where we’re coming from, continuing on that course would be an exercise in futility. So, as you New Yawkers might say, let’s forgeddaboudit.

        I read your post on “clamorous coitus” but can’t think of anything interesting or clever to say aboudit, so my long commenting streak on your posts, I regret to say, has come to an end. Hopefully I can start a new streak next time.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 3:49 pm on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      BTW I love the Speakeasy Three and intend to keep an eye out for them. Another great find Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:55 pm on July 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The song the trio sings dates back to the early 1930s. They do a great job with it, and the whole production is well staged. I’ve already listened to it 3 or 4 times.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 4:35 pm on July 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You don’t have to comment on every article. Sometimes there is nothing to say. In one of the comments I added. “There are 8 million stories in The Naked City. This has been one of them.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 6:11 pm on July 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m so slow. It took me three reads to figure this out. Clever, clever. 🙂 Thanks for the entertainment!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, , , , , lemonade out of lemons, , , rain, , Where is the Sun?   

    IT’S RAINING MUSIC, SON 

    He picked up the lemons that Fate had sent him and started a lemonade stand. –Elbert Hubbard, American author and philosopher, 1915

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Man can indeed make lemonade out of lemons, but is just as prone to do the reverse — for example, when a relationship turns sour. Such is life, my son. Wait a minute….I don’t have a son. Anyway — whoever you are, nowhere is love-gone-wrong more poignantly expressed than in rainy regrets captured in song, as rendered here by three of the most expressive singers in popular music history:

    In my previous post last week, I might have asked Mother Nature this question:

    Finally, it is right as the rain that the last of our three songs be sung by the one and only Ella Fitzgerald, who was born on this day (April 25, 1918):

    NOTE: Stormy Weather was composed by Harold Arlen, who also composed the 1944 show tune Right as the Rain and many other all-time standards.

     
    • calmkate 1:54 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Wow three of my favourite performers, well selected!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:51 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Three great songs sung by three great vocalists, backed by three great bands — it doesn’t get any better, if you’re a lover (of Golden Age music and classic jazz). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 7:31 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, the great Harold Arlen–how about “Come Rain or Come Shine”?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:05 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Right on! Speaking of Harold Arlen, he also wrote a little-known song titled SPEAKING OF THE WEATHER (not to mention the very well known OVER THE RAINBOW).

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 8:47 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful songs. But I could do without the rain!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 9:05 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse you’re three for three today. I didn’t have that particular recording of Billie Holiday but I do now. Thank you.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 9:35 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Where’s “Rainy Night in Georgia?” Oh, here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFatAWbKow4

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:25 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for this Ray Charles classic, Ricardo. Here’s another outstanding rendition of the song by Brook Benton, one of my favorite singers of the sixties (it was his last major hit):

        Like

    • Garfield Hug 10:15 am on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mistermuse…thank you! So apt and descriptive of my lemony life thus far😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 6:58 pm on April 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      In California rain is looking more like lemonade than lemons after five years of drought.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:04 am on April 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The funny thing about California’s weather is that there are enough different climates for half-a-dozen states, due to its length (770 miles from Mexican border to Oregon border) and topography (from 14,500 ft. above sea level at Mt. Whitney to -279 ft. below sea level at Badwater Basin in Death Valley). Thus. there can be a drought in one area at the same time it’s pouring in another.

        But generalizing about California’s weather apparently didn’t bother Lorenz Hart when he wrote this lyric: “hates California — it’s cold and it’s damp; that’s why The Lady Is A Tramp.” He obviously had San Francisco in mind, to the exclusion of LA LA LAND!

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, , , humor quotes, , , , , , , Tina Fey, Virginia Woolf, ,   

    FOR YOU, MORE HUMOR 

    N’yuk-n’yuk-n’yuk! –Curly Howard, The Three Stooges

    April being NATIONAL HUMOR MONTH, I thought I’d humor you with humor-us woids of wisdom from some of my favorite humor-ists. I’d have begun with a self-sample, but thought it best to start on a higher plane — and who in comedic history soared higher than Curly when it comes to debonair comedy? So it is written that I must take second place in my own post (third, if you count comedienne Joan Rivers’ intro to my poem):

    THE DIVINE COMEDY CLUB

    Humor is God’s gift to all of us.
    –Joan Rivers

    Thank God for funny
    because seriously
    we could be
    dying out there.

    Being a comedian is a lonely occupation; you stand on the stage talking to yourself, being overheard by audiences. –Fred Allen

    Humor is merely tragedy standing on its head with its pants torn. –Irvin S. Cobb

    Humor is just another defense against the universe. –Mel Brooks

    When humor works, it works because it’s clarifying what people already feel. It has to come from someplace real. –Tina Fey

    Humor is the first of the gifts to perish in a foreign tongue. –Virginia Woolf

    Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. –W. C. Fields

    The secret source of humor is not joy but sorrow; there is no humor in Heaven. –Mark Twain

    Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is. –Francis Bacon

    I don’t want to run for office; there’s already too many comedians in Washington. –Will Rogers

    Without a sense of humor, I don’t know how people make it. –Marlo Thomas

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    We close on an upbeat note from this laughing-at-life jazz great whose birthday is April 7:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:13 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love Will Rogers – and his is my fav among the quotes above. I clicked here expecting funnies, but finding the quotes was even better. Thanks for sharing.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to transform a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for commenting, Madelyn. When searching for good quotes, it usually pays to look in Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Mél@nie 3:22 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      MERCI, Mr Muse: you’ve made my mornin’… 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • linnetmoss 7:05 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      If there is no humor in heaven, I hope at least there is wit…

      Liked by 3 people

    • Garfield Hug 9:11 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      👍👍👍

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:15 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As a dabbler in the humor field for some years now, Sr. Muse, the mystery of it to me is how nobody laughs at the same jokes. Some people love clever puns, others refuse to laugh unless they are watching an old lady being pushed down the stairs.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:40 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Will Rogers always cracks me up. The Twain one is pretty evocative too. Thanks for the smiles. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:31 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Some of the quotes (like Twain’s) aren’t exactly humorous, but are just as pungent (such as Bacon’s). Needless to say (so why am I saying it?), I like them all. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 4:30 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Look at yourself if you had a sense of humor..”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:23 pm on April 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the clip, Don. Until I checked, I didn’t realize (or had forgotten) that this is a Rodgers & Hart song. In all honesty, though, Billie sounds to me like she was past her prime when she sang this. Too bad she didn’t record it when R & H wrote it back in 1937.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 9:30 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      FINALLY was home long enough to insert a link here from the Friday Funnies about writers.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:59 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the Friday Funnies link, Madelyn. I hope to get the work week off to a funny Monday start with my next post.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 11:30 pm on April 8, 2017 Permalink

          I shall look forward to it – and you are most welcome for the link. Next time, drop it with your comment and I’ll move it up – meanwhile it will be there for anybody wanting a bit more humorous inspiration.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 12:08 am on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      These are some insightful quotes on humor.

      Lately I’ve been looking at the political humor of Saturday Night Live and some of the other shows and thinking of them as court fools of old who spoke truth to power.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:17 am on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Nowadays we might think of them as speaking truth to TOWER (Trump Tower). 😦

        Like

    • Lavinia Ross 12:08 pm on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That is a great Billie Holiday song!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:43 pm on April 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed! Billie recorded that song (LAUGHING AT LIFE) June 1940, accompanied by such jazz greats as Teddy Wilson on piano and Lester Young on tenor sax.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on December 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, , , , Harold Adamson, hit songs of the 1920s-1940s, , , , , , , , V-Discs   

    HIGHER AND HIGHER 

    This post isn’t about what you may think it’s about (like maybe mountain climbing, drugs or seduction). No, friends — just as you can’t judge a book by its cover, you shouldn’t judge the title of a post by its lover.

    And what am I a lover of? Faithful readers know that from time to time, I indulge my love for 1920s-1940s popular music/jazz with a post honoring a songwriting giant of that era (forgotten though he or she may be today). Dec. 10 is the birthday of one such songwriter, and this is such a post (sorry about the letdown).

    Lyricist Harold Adamson was born on this date in 1906. He studied law at Harvard, but songwriting had a greater appeal and, as luck (and talent) would have it, his first published song became an all-time standard: Time On My Hands, written for the 1930 stage show SMILES, starring Fred and Adele Astaire….and who better to do it justice than Billie Holiday, backed by Teddy Wilson, Lester Young & other jazz greats:

    Working with such composers as Jimmy McHugh, Vincent Youmans, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, Vernon Duke and Victor Young, Adamson went on to write lyrics to such hits as Manhattan Serenade, Everything I Have Is Yours, It’s A Wonderful World, It’s A Most Unusual Day and many more. Here, from the 1936 film SUZY starring Jean Harlow and a very young Cary Grant, is one of Adamson’s lesser known songs (and the only time Cary Grant ever sang in a movie):

    In 1943 (at the height of WW II), Adamson teamed with McHugh to write the songs for Frank Sinatra’s first starring movie, HIGHER AND HIGHER. Quoting McHugh:

    Adamson and I trekked into our office at RKO and found the script glaring coldly at us from the top of the piano. It informed us that there’d be a minor lover’s quarrel in the story, also the need of a big production number. Nothing happened with us that first day, but at 3 a.m. the next morning, Adamson phoned me and said he’d been listening to a musical shortwave program that suddenly had been cut off for a news announcement.
    “There’s our title for the production number, Jim,” he said, “The Music Stopped.”
    Then I began concentrating on the lovers’ spat and came down with insomnia. As the thousandth  sheep jumped over the fence, both tune and title landed: “I Couldn’t Sleep a Wink Last Night.”

    But to my mind, the best of the McHugh-Adamson songs from that film is this one:

    Note that the above recording is a V-Disc, which is a story in itself. James Petrillo, head of the American Federation of Musicians (AFM), had called a national ban on recording by its members in 1942, meaning no new recordings could be made by commercial record companies using AFM musicians. To get around this ban, songs were recorded a capella, without instrumental accompaniment. However, there was an exception for records, called V-Discs, made for American troops overseas….thus the orchestral accompaniment for this song from the film’s CBS rehearsal session was recorded as a V-Disc. This, and many other V-Discs, survive to this day because, although such discs were supposed to be off-limits in the U.S., this edict was largely ignored by returning GIs.

    I close at the bottom of  this HIGHER AND HIGHER post with the title song from TOP OF THE TOWN, a film with screenplay co-written by humorist Robert Benchley:

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • linnetmoss 7:45 am on December 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful! Especially the incomparable Cary Grant. I didn’t realize he ever sang in a film 🙂 He’s not bad! Also love the Axel Stordahl years of Sinatra. My kind of music.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:10 am on December 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I agree – Cary Grant’s singing of “Did I Remember?” is not only “not bad,” it’s a sheer delight. And it was indeed Alex Stordahl who arranged and conducted the orchestra in the Sinatra V-Disc.

      Glad you enjoyed the post.

      Like

    • Resa 4:40 pm on December 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      A truly fabulous post! Enjoyed Billie & Jean & Cary immensely.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:14 pm on December 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you so much!

      Like

    • Don Frankel 8:07 am on December 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Where did it go? I posted a comment here and poof. Maybe I didn’t hit the right button.

      Anyway I was surprised to hear Cary Grant sing and I wondered what army he was in. I mean it looked like he was wearing one of Major Strasser’s uniforms.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:46 am on December 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, as someone who has had his share of comments disappear into cyberspace, I offer my makes-my-blood-boil-to-think-of-it condolences. May the cyberspace gods become blinded by the brilliance of our missing comments and get lost forever in the netherworld of their perfidious malevolence (or worse — if this comment doesn’t get through).

      As for Cary Grant, he played a French aviator in the film, and Jean Harlow is an American showgirl in Paris as WW I begins. As I recall, the film isn’t as good as it should’ve been (given that it was co-scripted by Dorothy Parker), but the song “Did I Remember” did get an Academy Award nomination.

      Like

    • literaryeyes 10:05 pm on December 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I saw a film last night, apropos of the 1920s-40s, starring Deanna Durbin. She sang “Night and Day” and hit the right tone on the nuances. Some of those old “movie stars” could sing.

      Like

    • mistermuse 12:49 am on December 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I own well over a dozen Deanna Durbin records (both 78s & LPs) and love her voice. I don’t think NIGHT AND DAY is her best song, though I like the “big finish” she gives it in the film (her orchestral accompaniment doesn’t seem right for the song, which doesn’t help). It’s not that she doesn’t sing it well – it’s just that I’ve heard it sung better by others.

      Like

    • RMW 2:55 pm on December 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Just listening to Cary Grant sing made me high… too bad he didn’t sing in more movies… he was one of a kind!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:53 pm on December 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      And to think his real name was Archibald Leach!
      But you’re right – he was a “peach.”

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 4:42 pm on July 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, , Don't Blame Me, , I'm In The Mood For Love, , , , ,   

    I’M IN THE MOOD FOR McHUGH 

    Yes, music lovers, it’s time for another birthday salute to a great songwriter from the Stardust Age of popular music. Actually, two such greats were born this day (in 1900 & 1894), but I already dusted off the star of the youngest of them (Mitchell Parish) a year ago.
    The other is Jimmy McHugh — if you’ve never heard of him, Don’t Blame Me ….and don’t blame his collaborator, Dorothy Fields, who wrote lyrics to the 1933 hit song of that title, as well as I Can’t Give You Anything But Love, I’m In The Mood For Love, and many others.

    Rather than detail McHugh’s songwriting career in this post, I’m going to cut right to the Happy Times (another (McHugh/Fields composition) and invite you to join me in enjoying the music, beginning with  vocal (Mills Bros.) and instrumental (tenor sax legend Coleman Hawkins) versions of Don’t Blame Me:

    The last clip is the all-time standard I Can’t Believe You’re In Love With Me (written by McHugh in 1927 before his collaboration with Dorothy Fields), vocal by Billie Holiday. It doesn’t get any better than this:

     
    • BroadBlogs 4:51 pm on July 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      It’s great being introduced to all these oldies. I’ve heard of them, but never heard them (that I know of).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 1:56 pm on July 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Great stuff Muse. Another guy I don’t think I ever heard of. I know his music but I didn’t know it was his.

      Like

    • Joseph Nebus 6:53 pm on July 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, that’s wonderful. Thanks.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:12 pm on July 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, guys (and gal)….and btw, I’ve switched to a different Billie Holiday clip of the same recording because the first one gave the wrong recording date (1933). It was actually recorded Jan 1938.

      Like

  • mistermuse 10:40 am on June 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billie Holiday, , I Wished On The Moon, , When You Wish Upon A Star   

    EXCUSE MY DUST 

    Time goes, you say? Ah no! Alas, time stays, we go. –Austin Dobson

    Busy weekend. So much to do, so little time. What can I post that will take little time? Maybe if I wished upon a star for all the time in the world….but When You Wish Upon A Star, your dreams are but dust — unless you’re Pinocchio, and Walt Disney is pulling the strings. No, that song is a lie. Perhaps my chances would be better if….

    Yes, that’s it. I’ll Wish On The Moon. I’ll wish for a dream or two. I’ll Wish On The Moon for Billie Holiday to be with us still, singing songs with lyrics by Dorothy Parker. Yes, Dorothy Parker wrote I WISHED ON THE MOON, and Billie Holiday was one of the first to sing it. But Billie was born exactly one hundred years and two months ago today, and Dorothy died today, June 7, in 1967….leaving this epitaph on her tombstone: EXCUSE MY DUST.

     
    • Michaeline Montezinos 1:00 am on June 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoyed this great story and the pictures behind it, thanks mister muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 4:53 am on June 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      We’re all tying to make some sense out of this mess. We struggle with our words trying to grasp onto something and we fall down all over the place but Billie Holiday just glides. She is the best. And, she can sing too.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:51 am on June 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      “Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy ride.”
      “My consolation is in the stardust of a song.”

      That about sums up “this mess” for many of us. The first quote (Bette Davis) is a popular misquote – it actually ends with “bumpy night.” The second quote is of course from the lyrics of STARDUST by Hoagy Carmichael.

      Like

    • arekhill1 9:47 am on June 9, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Any excuse to mention the immortal Ms. Parker fine by me.

      Like

    • mistermuse 3:04 pm on June 9, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I thought about doing a whole posting on Dorothy Parker, but I’ve already been there and done that, so I settled for taking a Holiday along with Ms. Parker.

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 6:32 pm on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well, I didn’t know Dorothy Parker was a lyricist too.

      The lyrics to this song are lovely and haunting. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

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