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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bucket truck, feet, Footloose and Fancy Free, , kick the bucket, , one foot in the grave, poem, , , Richard Himber Orchestra (Stuart Allen vocal), , song,   

    ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOT TALK? 

    When I was young, I never thought about getting old (a stage of life known as having one foot in the grave — almost curtains). So, having two feet in the grave was the last thing on my mind. Now I’m a senior citizen, and I’m still not ready to kick the bucket, but my feet are killing me like I am about to kick bucket — or, with my luck it (this bucket) kicks me:

    Foot cramps, ingrown toenails, fungus among-us, smelly feet (you know this from my last post) — it’s like I got my feet at the Bad Feet Store. You name it, my feet are treating me like a heel. Don’t laugh — someday you may walk in my shoes, and then you’ll know the agony of de feet and be the sole of remorse for not seeing fit to empathize. But I guess you’ll cross that footbridge when you come to it.

    Having retired from a desk job, I didn’t spend most of my life upon my feet, so my tootsies aren’t letting me down because of being mistreated. Likewise, I’ve seldom, if ever, worn high heels (I may have BEEN a heel a time or two, but that’s a different story). I don’t know — maybe I’m finally footing the bill for writing such poems as this:

    All humans have more than one foot,
    Unless one has less than two.
    One can trust I count two on me —
    More or less, can one count on you?

    Groan. I guess my days of being this are over:

     

     

     
    • Paul Sunstone 1:35 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I was forced to forward your post to the proper authorities on the grounds it was exceeding the legal pun limit.

      Liked by 4 people

    • calmkate 7:17 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      how footuitous that you have both feet in the grave, are down in the heel and obviously in need of a swift shoe up the posterior IMHO 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:36 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Fortunately, I only have one foot in the grave, calmkate. When I have two feet in the grave, I won’t be replying to your comments (or anyone else’s, for that matter). 🙂

        BTW, “one foot in the grave” is an expression which dates back to the 17th century, which makes it almost as old as I am. It means ‘near death’ (like most of my puns).

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:47 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink

          had no idea the term or you were so prehistoric, nice chatting with a dinosaur 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 8:23 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “You need feet, to stand up straight with,
      You need feet, to kick your friends,
      You need feet, to keep your socks up,
      And stop your legs from, fraying at the ends.” – “You Need Feet” Edwin Carp

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Not to Carp, masercot, but did you have to come up with a poem that’s more better than mine in the post (not that difficult to do, I admit)? But I appreciate it, nonetheless. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • rivergirl1211 8:24 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My name is River… and I have bunions. Don’t get me started on feet! My issues started when I was 40 and that’s just not fair!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:51 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I wish I could tell you a cure, River, but when it comes to bunions, I don’t know my onions. I can only hope that these punions are so bad, they make you forget your bunions for a while.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 12:08 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s living in Ohio that’s hurting your wheels, Sr. Muse. Move to a warmer clime, like I’ve lived in most of my life, and liberate those tootsies from the confines of shoes at, least nights and on weekends. Flip-flops never gave anybody bunions.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 2:47 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Unfortunately, a move to a warmer clime isn’t in my foreseeable future, Ricardo, but if I can just hang around for another century or so, global warming will have moved to me, thereby saving me the trouble.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:03 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My sympathy. We have frequent user discounts at the podiatrist!

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 6:43 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A great post and a toe-tapper of a tune! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:43 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad you liked both. The composer of the tune was Carmen Lombardo, brother of Guy Lombardo. He was the lead saxophonist in Guy’s orchestra, which you may remember because it was one of the most popular dance bands of all time for many years.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 9:49 am on March 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The song you posted, “Footloose and Fancy Free”, is a great start to the day. Thanks for that!

      And thanks for the Bucket Truck video – I mean it. It’s fascinating! Now I want to ride in one.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:48 pm on March 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad you enjoyed both the song and the Bucket Truck video, which I was lucky to stumble upon as a good fit for this post. Some amusement park should come up with a version of the Bucket Trucks for a kids’ ride (including us adult kids)!

        Liked by 1 person

    • equipsblog 5:51 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d hate to foot the bill for this entertaining post, because if we have to pay by the pun, it’s very expensive.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:06 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I see that the latest post on your blog is titled “ImPUNity” (my caps) — a pun so bad that I should probably pay you. But by recommending that my readers check out your blog, suppose we call it even. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:31 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Actually, “Its” is pronounced “Itz”….but it’s the pits in both cases, so I’ll call it a night before I get in any deeper. 😩

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:16 am on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , poem, , , vanity, virtue   

    LET US PRAY…. 

    that the malaise of Donald Trump’s moral vacuity
    doesn’t linger like a curse in oral (and worse) perpetuity
    so when his term on his bully stage is o’er, we
    see that our humanity (which his vanity tested sore-ly)
    has withstood base attacks based on our credulity,
    as we pray virtue is its own reward (virtus ipsa pretium sui).

     
    • Carmen 6:48 am on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Even this atheist would pray for that, mistermuse. But I can’t help but wonder if the Supreme Court is going to be the next bastion of the destructive Christian Right. It’s not looking good. 😩

      Liked by 4 people

      • mlrover 8:11 am on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I’m Christian and can’t help but gag at the hypocrisy of groups like the CR and Moral Majority. They have no understanding of the Constitution which gives them the right to be bullies.

        Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:31 am on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You got that Right, Carmen (sorry, I couldn’t resist a pun, even when the subject’s not fun).

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:10 pm on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Pretty soon Trump-supporters are going to start feeling the economic pain. (And it will be Obama’s fault, of course.)

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:20 pm on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        And in that case, Diana, you can count on most Trump supporters believing him (that it’s Obama’s fault).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 1:44 pm on July 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Amen.
      Thanks for the follow 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • America On Coffee 4:48 am on July 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Prayer is the answer. There are no presidents or prime minister’s worldwide. The courts rule. The courts are misleading to form a one world gov thru the UN is the big possibility. Nice post.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:59 am on July 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        A.O.C., the title of this post was meant figuratively rather than literally, but you’re free to take it literally if you wish. Deists, of which I am one, have a different “take” on prayer (for the ‘reason,’ click “World Union of Deists” under BLOGROLL (right column)….but take care, because it is said the devil is in the details. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 3:58 pm on July 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I understand. Consider still.– And, have a great day.

      Like

    • The Coastal Crone 10:54 pm on July 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I like your style! Thanks for the visit to my humble blog!

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 6:15 pm on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , poem,   

    A PASSING EXAMPLE OF ROAD SAGE 

    BUMPER STICKER:
    TIME IS WHAT KEEPS EVERYTHING FROM HAPPENING AT ONCE

    I hate to be
    the one to tell you,
    but everything IS
    happeningatonce.

    Such being the case, I am taking a few weeks off from blogging* to catch up on what happens when one gets behind from blogging. Be back some time in mid-to-late June. Meanwhile….

    *other than replies to comments, & checking in on your blogs from time to time

     

     
    • arekhill1 6:18 pm on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Happy trails, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 5:10 am on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      enjoy your break .. missin you already 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Kate, if my wife sees your comment, she may break my neck, which I won’t enjoy. This may end up costing me a barely convincing denial, a dozen roses, and a big box of chocolates.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 5:23 pm on June 2, 2018 Permalink

          ah hang the expense … she deserves them anyway 🙂 then delete these comments …

          Liked by 2 people

    • Lisa R. Palmer 8:11 am on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoy your blog-free-ish vacation, Mr. Muse! May you find much to laugh at accompanied by beautiful music! (Who says payback HAS to be a bitch? Lol!)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:47 am on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Lisa. Speaking of payback, I wonder if Kate would consider paying me back for the roses and chocolates I’ll have to buy to save my skin?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Lisa R. Palmer 11:37 pm on June 2, 2018 Permalink

          If she does, you should use it towards taking your wife out for dinner and dancing. Lol! A happy wife trumps a loyal blogging friend every time… ;D

          Liked by 1 person

    • nicknicklambert 6:23 pm on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Wishing you a very productive few weeks!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:03 pm on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, after you take time off, there is time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:26 am on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You surprised me with that one, Don — first, that you would ‘Cyndi Lauper’ me, and second, that her TIME AFTER TIME is not the same song as this one:

        P.S. Sorry, but my “Like” of the Lauper clip was premature. My bad.

        Like

    • pjlazos 11:41 pm on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Have fun!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 1:46 pm on June 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Funny Sinatra was my first thought but then I decided to shake it up a little.

      Like

      • mistermuse 2:23 pm on June 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        No ‘biggie,’ Don. If it had been the same song as the oldie that Sinatra sang, I might have found it interesting to see/hear Lauper’s interpretation, but I’m simply not interested in contemporary Lauper.

        Like

    • markscheel1 11:59 pm on June 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Well, I’ve been behind on my blog, but not voluntarily. Gallbladder surgery can have that effect. Enjoy your hiatus. Is Andre Rieu your cup of tea? Heard his concert tonight from Holland and it blew me away.

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:14 am on June 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Mark, you certainly have a lot of gall, undergoing surgery without warning. But as long as you came through with flying colors, all is forgiven. In fact, you can color me pink. 🙂

        As for Andre Rieu as a conductor, he’s a bit of a showman, but (except for showgirls) who isn’t these days? Even I, as a ‘pun-ductor,’ seem afflicted — but unfortunately, it doesn’t do me any good, SHOW-me-the-money wise. Color me blue. 😩

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 4:29 pm on May 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: deceit, , , , , , , Mildred Bailey, poem, , , ,   

    LIAR, LIAR, RANTS ON FIRE 

    One of my readers, who is obviously a glutton for punishment, recently expressed disappointment that I haven’t posted more of my poems lately. At the risk of triggering that old axiom BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR, I thank her for having inspired me to address the deficiency thusly:

    DECEIT DON’T STAND

    As the twig is bent,
    so grows the tree.
    As the die is cast,
    so shall it be.

    If these be true,
    why is it wise:
    The Donald gets a pass
    when he tells those lies?

    Of course, I should also thank the President, without whose daily rants my inspiration for this poem would doubtless lie dormant. And now for a word from the truly wise about lies:

    Carlyle said, “A lie cannot live”; it shows he did not know how to tell them. –Mark Twain

    A man comes to believe in the end the lies he tells about himself to himself. –George Bernard Shaw

    I admire liars, but surely not liars so clumsy they cannot fool even themselves. –H. L. Mencken

    Pretending that you believe a lie is also a lie. –Arthur Schnitzler

    If at first you’re not believed, lie, lie again. –Evan Esar

    Not sure why the video is black. Maybe because the lies it laments aren’t white ones. But the sound is clear, and the voice shines through the darkness.

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 4:31 am on May 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      ah a poem a post will suit me fine thanks … great quotes! GBSs describes some I know … lets speak the truth! Altho I doubt your president would know it if it bit him on the nose 😩

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:27 am on May 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate, for being the one who “inspired me” to write the poem. I should also mention (for those who don’t know) that the title of the post is based on LIAR, LIAR, PANTS ON FIRE, a children’s taunt that goes back to the 1930s (some versions add NOSE AS LONG AS A TELEPHONE WIRE). There is also this song:

        Liked by 2 people

    • dunelight 8:06 pm on May 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Goodnexx, look at Mrs. Howell boogie!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Tidbits 6:01 am on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The risk was worth it … nice poem ! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Invisibly Me 12:56 am on June 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting quotes, I particularly like the George Bernard Shaw one. And a nice shout out of thanks to Trump, he’s certainly a source of inspiration for many a rant! 🙂
      Caz x

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 4:21 pm on June 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:34 pm on June 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you truly, moorezart. I’m always glad to get more exposure (within limits, of course).

        Like

        • moorezart 7:16 pm on June 8, 2018 Permalink

          You’re welcome though know I try avoid the hottest hours between noon and say 2. ! Cheers!

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Irwin Shaw, , , poem, , silence, whispering   

    THE DEAD HAVE SPOKEN…. 

    There are too many books I haven’t read, too many places I haven’t seen, too many memories I haven’t kept long enough. –Irwin Shaw, playwright, screenwriter, novelist and author of Bury The Dead

    The dead have spoken….
    but the living have moved on.
    Hear their voices left in your mind,
    keep their memories in the images
    that are reborn in shared solitude.
    Who among us has not known the haunting fear,
    whispering we might not survive the silence?

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:18 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Good share Mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:37 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said Mr. Shaw.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:23 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The living have also spoken — thank you both.

      I started this post without the well-said Shaw quote, then decided it complemented my poem reasonably well, so I welcomed the ‘help’ — especially since I didn’t have to pay for it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • pendantry 2:39 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Who among us has not known the haunting fear,
      whispering we might not survive the silence?

      *shivers*

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:18 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        The warmth and reborn life of approaching spring offer the hope of an alternative to winter’s shivers. At least, that’s what I’d say if I were an optimist (and even sometimes as a poet).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Lisa R. Palmer 11:27 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Beautiful… compelling… and oddly comforting, knowing we are not alone in grief, sorrow, fear or healing.

      Bravo, mistermuse!! Bravo!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:08 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Lisa, they say a picture is worth a thousand words, but I say a bravo (or two) can be worth a thousand pictures. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 2:49 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
      No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
      And makes us rather bear those ills we have
      Than fly to others that we know not of?
      Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,”

      And you thought I’d send you this as the quintessential recording of In My Solitude.

      Ooops I guess I did.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:59 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Shakespeare couldn’t have said it better.

        I’m glad you sent the Billie Holiday recording of SOLITUDE, because I was torn between that one and Duke Ellington’s recording. I finally decided on Duke’s, mainly because he’s the composer.

        Like

    • tref 4:24 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Two great songs!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:19 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Tref. WHISPERING is a real oldie dating back to 1920, when Paul Whiteman’s recording became hugely popular and propelled him and his orchestra to fame. The Comedian Harmonists (a German vocal group) rendition is typical of their very appealing style. Unfortunately several members of the group were Jewish, and after Hitler came into power….well, I highly recommend a 1997 film which tells their story. Here’s an excerpt from the movie:

        Liked by 1 person

    • tref 5:38 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Moreover, I have just added the Comedians version to my playlist. Thanks, MM!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:04 am on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Angel Eyes, , , , , , , poem, ,   

    ANGELS HAVE EYES 

    ANGELS HAVE EYES

    “Sex is sacred,”
    some humans say —
    but they still do
    it anyway.

    Why they do so
    beats us above….
    They’re not, you know,
    so easy to love.

    Yet angels know
    man needs no shove,
    dreams you’d be so….
    How does it go?

    Oh, yes! It’s — so….

     

     
    • arekhill1 1:24 pm on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Humans may be hard to love, Sr. Muse, but they’re easy to fuck. Many a song has been written about that, too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:12 pm on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Unfortunately, even Cole Porter couldn’t get away with writing a song titled “Easy To Fuck” (though he did write one called “Love For Sale”). I guess that’s why he settled instead for “”Easy To Love.” Even so, the puritanical Hayes Office censored the lyric “so sweet to awaken with” in the Jimmy Stewart clip.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 5:12 pm on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      While this does not belong here musically, it just makes a point about how someone can look like an angle, talk like an angel and yet…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:18 pm on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I’ll see your DEVIL IN DISGUISE and “raise” you one with ANGEL IN DISGUISE, which was written in 1940 and became a Marine favorite in the Pacific theater in WWII:

        P.S. The vocalist is Ann Sheridan from the soundtrack of IT ALL CAME TRUE (1940) (among her co-stars in the film was Humphrey Bogart).

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:19 am on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter, , poem, ,   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 02) 

    Part 02 is such sweet sorrow,
    I could not wait till it be morrow
    To bring to you 02 before
    I bring to you Parts 03 and 04.
    Beyond 04 I cannot see,
    But two to one it won’t be 03.

    It’s not every day you see a poem co-authored by Shakespeare and Mistermuse….or a post about a man (Fats Waller) who was born in May and died in December, three days after my previous post featured a man (Spike Jones) who was born in December and died in May. A bit odd, perhaps, but hardly more noteworthy than a May-December romance….so, just for laughs, let’s call it a May-December Much Ado About Nothing.

    Thomas “Fats” Waller, for those whose knowledge of jazz history is thin, was born May 21, 1904 in NYC. His father, a minister, was strict and tried to restrict his son to church music, but Fats was more attracted to popular music, and after his mother died, he moved in with a man who befriended him, stride pianist James P. Johnson. At age 15, Waller was hired by the Lincoln Theatre as house organist, providing improvisational background music for silent movies. Thus began his career as one of the most beloved jazz musicians and prolific song writers of his time, ending with his premature death at age 39.

    Perhaps Waller is best remembered (if at all) for is his jovial personality and humorous way with popular songs such as this….

    ….and this:

    But Fats could do ’em straight, too, as with this 1936 classic:

    It’s only fitting to close with his 1929 composition and most famous song, which he often performed tongue-in-cheek, but took (mostly) seriously here:

    Until the next post in this series, behave yourself.

     

     
    • Don Frankel 10:44 am on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The Muse and The Bard is to me like George and Ira or Oscar and Lorenz. I know I told you that I saw ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’ on Broadway and it’s a great musical. There are not too many people whose lives are rich enough to make a musical about but Fats Waller’s was.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 12:11 pm on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Don. Measure for Measure, that’s the best compliment I’ve had since the Twelfth Night of my marriage, which was 49 years ago.

        You did indeed tell me you saw AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’ on Broadway, and you’re absolutely right about Fats Waller’s life. To quote jazz author Warren VachĂ©: “Fats Waller died tragically young. Although he left us a priceless heritage of songs that will be appreciated by generations to come, we will never know how much greater that heritage might have been if he had lived longer.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 1:14 pm on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Had no idea Fats Waller died so young… considering he was such an American icon and had such an influence on music, I always imagined him living well into old age.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:42 pm on January 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You might say that Fats ‘lived large’ in his short life, eating and drinking like there’s no tomorrow….until one day in his 39th year, there WAS no tomorrow. But he remains a bigger-than-life figure to this day, and rightly so.

        Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 6:04 pm on January 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The piano work in Ain’t Misbehaving is beautiful. These songs are like jazz and blues waltzing down the avenue. Serious and fun, just like Mr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:37 pm on January 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Mary. Not to make Don Frankel jealous, but you just tied (the first sentence in his comment) for best compliment. On second thought, I’ll give you the edge because a gentleman should always defer to a lady (before de fur flies). 🙂

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bad Day at Black Rock, , , , , , , poem, , , ,   

    What’s In YOUR Toilet? 

    In his incisive biography of Spencer Tracy, author Bill Davidson tells of a problem which arose during planning stages of a Tracy film based on a short story titled BAD DAY AT HONDO. He quotes Millard Kaufman, who was writing the screenplay, as follows:

    Our picture still was called Bad Day at Hondo, when, to everyone’s surprise, there came the release of a John Wayne movie called HONDO. So our title went out the window.

    Davidson continues, “Such coincidental flaps can cause weeks of delays at a studio, while everyone tries to think of a new title. In this case, Kaufman was out in Arizona looking for locations for another picture, when [he] stopped for gas at one of the bleakest places [that] was not even a ‘wide place in the road’, just a gas station and a post office. Kaufman looked at the sign on the post office. The name was Black Rock, Arizona. Kaufman rushed to the phone and called the studio. ‘I’ve got the title for the Tracy picture,’ he said. “We’ll call it “Bad Day at Black Rock.”

    You may be wondering what the foregoing has to do with the title of this post….and the answer is diddly-squat (or just squat, for short). So what’s the deal? Simply to serve as a pun-gent example of a title’s potential to entice you in to a creative work, whether it be film, story, poem or poop. Did the serendipitous (and delay-saving) spotting of the Black Rock post office sign lead to a perfect fit for the title of the movie? Perhaps this scene will tell you all you need to know to answer that question (Tracy plays a one-armed WW II officer, just returned from the service, who goes to a middle-of-nowhere desert town to present a posthumous medal to the father of one of his soldiers):

    But suppose, after chewing it over endlessly, you still can’t come up with a killer title for your opus delicti? Friends, just swallow the bitter pill that there are times indiscretion is the better part of valor, and settle for a title such as this post’s. And what if even doo-doo doesn’t do the trick? There’s still the when-all-else-fails last resort I used when I titled this poem….

    UNTITLED

    This poem’s title is Untitled —
    Not because it is untitled,
    But because I am entitled
    To entitle it Untitled.

    If I’d not titled it Untitled,
    It would truly be untitled….
    Which would make me unentitled
    To entitle it Untitled.

    So it is vital, if untitled,
    Not to title it Untitled,
    And to leave that title idled,
    As a title is entitled.

    NOTE: This is the Random poem leftover from my previous post

     

     
    • calmkate 12:11 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      ha ha ha love your play on words … and titles do make a difference as to whether something is read or not .. but hey I’ve already done the squat loo post, no peeking 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • geo. raymond 12:23 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great word play. (Excellent movie, too)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 12:26 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      LOL! I loved your Untitled poem😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 6:50 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m just thankful they didn’t title it “Bad Day on the Toilet”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:09 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, you’re entitled to be untitled. But this reminds me of a Country Western song writer named Ray Whitley and he’d written a bunch of songs for Gene Autry and he was told they needed one more. So he sighed and headed for the studio. His wife asked him what was the matter and he told her. She said. “Guess you’re back in the saddle again.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:36 am on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I didn’t know the story behind it, but I remember the song well, Don. Odd that the clip portrays the likeness of Roy Rogers (Autry’s biggest rival for most popular screen cowboy in those days).

        Like

    • christie jones 1:26 pm on June 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love the way you play with words! And btw, you have a great blog🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:39 am on June 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry for the tardy reply to your comment, Christie, but modest fellow that I am, your compliment made me so red in the face that I got a bad case of blisters, which may have improved my appearance, but I still didn’t know what to say. Anyway, now that I’ve recovered, I’m ready to be embarrassed again, whether I deserve it or not. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • christie jones 2:30 pm on June 6, 2017 Permalink

          While two-thirds of the words are twisters, I didn’t mean to provoke any blisters. I’m happy you’re now recovered, and hope never again embarrassed. All the best! Christie

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 11:32 pm on June 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      May all your titles be short ones, and your un-titleds even shorter, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        That’s a Capital (One) proposal, Ricardo. It even has commercial possibilities connected to the title of this post.

        Like

    • RMW 1:12 pm on June 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As a frequenter of art museums, I am always bemused by the pieces labeled “Untitled.” Worse yet they are titled “Untitled Number 3” or “Untitled March, 1987″… is this SUPPOSED to be ironic and I’m not getting it? Now I think about it, “Toilet Number 3” or “Toilet March, 1987” would work much better… and in many cases, be more appropriate!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:05 pm on June 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        At the very least, they should title their restroom toilets Number 1 or Number 2 based, of course, on whether you have to go Number One or Number 2. They could even have Number 3 for those who have to do both, otherwise you’d have to move from Number One to Number Two or vice versa, depending on order of priority.

        How this would be enforced I don’t know — I can’t think of everything!

        Like

        • RMW 12:35 am on June 8, 2017 Permalink

          I’m sure North Carolina could come up with an idea to handle it!

          Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bards, folk songs, , , , , , My Old Kentucky Home, poem, , , ,   

    THIS POST IS FOR THE BARDS 

    Larry was writing rhyme at the age of six; by 1910 [age 15], he’d been christened “Shakespeare” by friends. [He had] a passion for Shakespeare, a delight in wordplay, and a fondness for anachronistic juxtaposition. Not for nothing was Hart known as “Shakespeare.” –Dominick Symonds, author of WE’LL HAVE MANHATTAN (subtitled THE EARLY WORK OF RODGERS & HART)

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    My previous post featured the words and music of Richard Rodgers and Larry Hart, which — along with the above — conveniently serve as segue into Shakespearean speculation:

    BARD’S TUNE

    What would William
    have done with jazz?
    Would he take jazz
    where no one has?

    Would jazz-you-like-
    it, he accost?
    Would he find jazz
    love’s labor lost?

    Would he have played
    jazz instrument
    measure for meas-
    ure, or hell bent?

    Or would he have,
    a jazz voice, been —
    the ‘King of Sing’
    of noted men?

    No! Peerless bard,
    writer of wrongs —
    if you dug jazz….
    you’d write the songs.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    BARDSTOWN

    is an itty-bitty city in my neighboring state of Kentucky, voted “Most Beautiful Small Town in America” and noted for its annual KENTUCKY BOURBON FESTIVAL, MUSEUM OF WHISKEY, and MY OLD KENTUCKY HOME STATE PARK, site of the farm which inspired Stephen Foster to write “My Old Kentucky Home” (the state song of Kentucky).

    Homepage

    I find the story of Stephen Foster most interesting, starting with the date of his birth: July 4, 1826 — the same day that John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died hours apart. Foster was a dreamer whose love of music trumped more profitable ways of earning a living. Though he composed almost 200 songs (many of them popular in his own time), his last years were marked by poverty, a craving for liquor, and suffering from what may have been tuberculosis, dying 153 years and one week ago today (Jan. 13, 1864).

    Foster can truly be considered the original bard of American music, as this 1946 quote by the late American composer and music critic, Deems Taylor, suggests:

    What quality have they [Foster’s songs] that gives them such tremendous staying power? After all, other men in his day wrote songs that were as popular as his, possibly more so. What was his secret? It was, I think, that he helped fill a gap that had always existed in our musical culture. Our ancestors, coming here from all quarters of the globe, brought with them the folk songs of their native lands, but they were not peculiarly ours. It is ironic that the only race that developed a folksong literature in this country is the race that was brought here against its will, and was and has been the most brutally exploited of all — the Negro. The Negro spirituals and Stephen Foster’s songs are the nearest to completely indigenous folksongs that we have. Nor is it a coincidence that most of the best of his songs are in Negro dialect and sing the woes of the Negro. 

    But I will close, in keeping with the theme of recent posts, with one of Foster’s love songs:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:29 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love your articles – and always learn something new. (the tunes ain’t bad either) 🙂
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
      – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:43 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, mgh. It’s too bad that more people don’t have the willingness to “always learn something new.” It is said that “curiosity killed the cat,” but, for humans, curiosity should be “the spice of life.” You (and other readers like you) are much appreciated!

        Liked by 3 people

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:34 pm on January 20, 2017 Permalink

          Thanks, Muse – and ditto re: appreciation.

          We who continue to learn will be the ones who keep our brains sharp ’til the end, more able to engage with life in general (which may not always be a good thing – lol – but it beats the alternative in MY book!)
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 2 people

    • scifihammy 4:35 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice poem and interesting post. 🙂
      I’m sure Shakespeare would still be coming up with brand new words, if he was here today.
      Now to look for the song on Youtube, as your clip won’t play for me here.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:47 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. There are quite a few clips of COME WHERE MY LOVE LIES DREAMING on Youtube. The one I chose (sung by Frank Patterson) seemed to best fill the bill here.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:03 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Love that poem Muse.

      Sometimes Rap music or its many different types sound like iambic pentameter to me. So perhaps the Bard would be rappin’ for Jay Z. Which of course made me think of the Bob Dylan line. “Shakespeare he’s in the alley with his pointy shoes and his bells. Talkin to some French girl who says she knows me well.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:06 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Don. I’m not into Rap music, so I’ll have to take your word that perhaps he “would be rappin’ for Jay Z” (whoever he is)….but your Bob Dylan comment is more up my alley (or at least not down my dead-end street).

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:52 am on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      From the top of the charts to the bottom of the barrel…the more things change, etc. But enough cliches for one comment.

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 6:38 pm on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ha ha!

      What would William
      have done with jazz?
      Would he take jazz
      where no one has?

      Ah, so Shakespearian. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:35 pm on January 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, so! 🙂

      Like

    • Moony 8:14 pm on January 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I find the paradox in Taylor’s appraisal of spirituals really intriguing, actually. Maybe acts of displacement inspire ever more concerted attempts to create meaning and identity? Definitely gives me a lot to think about. But who knows what sort of lyrics Shakespeare would have spun if he was alive in our time!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:56 pm on January 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      To a large extent, we are creatures — even captives — of the culture in which we grew up or in which we live. Perhaps equally as interesting as the speculation about Shakespeare in our time is how differently would each of us think if we were alive in his time.

      Like

    • eths 11:03 pm on January 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I truly enjoyed this song. Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:56 pm on January 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You’re welcome. It’s a beautiful song, beautifully sung.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , poem, , ,   

    SET IN STONE 

    I think, therefore I am. –RenĂ© Descartes

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    You will (hopefully) recall that my last post, STONE COLD DEAD, featured some of my favorite epitaphs published 4 years ago on SWI (a blog due to bite the dust in November). Ah, but the best laid plans….  The SWI editor announced on 9/1 that he would now need to pull the plug first thing on Sept. 6; thus today becomes SWI’s last full day on this earth.

    This sudden passing prompts me to salvage another of my previously published posts from that body of work: a poem which poses a question I believe naturally arises out of STONE COLD DEAD. Unlike that post, it ain’t funny, but perhaps the poem’s saving grace is that what it lacks in humor, it makes up in brevity. It’s the least I can do on Labor Day.

    LUCKY STIFFS

    Are the faithful
    dead better positioned
    to be saved
    than those who
    lived with doubt?
    Even a God
    can’t help being
    what He thinks.

     

     

     
    • painkills2 12:13 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Saved from what? After you’re dead, no one can save you. But if this is about hell, then I don’t want to be saved — that’s where all the fun people go. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:44 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Think of this poem as if it were written by an agnostic. Then the question becomes: If there is a God and an afterlife, is He any more morally fit to judge you than you are to judge Him? If there is no afterlife, it’s irrelevant whether or not there is a God, because we will never know either way.

      I might add that the God(s) of religions and myth only muddy the waters of how to think about this whole business of a possible Creator. The word “God” itself seems to me to be an impediment to rational thinking about life and all that it may imply.

      Liked by 2 people

      • painkills2 1:09 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I suppose those who believe in a god also believe that this god is always right and shouldn’t be questioned. As for anyone — supernatural or not — who thinks they have the right to judge me, well, they’re wrong. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 7:12 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Nice one 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:26 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      They say it takes one to know one, so you’re a “nice one” too. 🙂

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 9:41 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “God is dead.” —Nietzsche, 1883

      “Nietzsche is dead.” —God, 1900

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:51 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “We’re all dead.” –Kismet, sooner or later 😩

      Liked by 3 people

    • arekhill1 11:42 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, death is the ultimate way of fitting in.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:32 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d call it forced integration God’s way….except for Christians, who make Book on to a different afterlife divide: heaven or hell.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:02 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      All things come to an end but nothing really dies on the internet. It just spins somewhere throughout the universe. And, since we’re doing some oldies I can’t help but recall once again my favorite Epitaph on a Tombstone in Tombstone.

      Here Lies Lester Moore
      4 slugs from a .44
      No Les
      No More

      Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 6:18 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I can never think about this topic (death) without this song running through my mind. I heard it for the first time when I was a teenager and it has stuck in my head ever since. Like this post, it’s remarkable for its brevity.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:14 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the song clip. When it comes to war and brevity, it took William Tecumseh Sherman only three words to tell it like it is: “War is hell.”

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:28 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know why God would punish our authenticity. Job is an interesting book to read on this topic.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:01 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, this subject would take an entire post to address in depth, including (for starters) whether or not one accepts the story of Job as having a basis in reality. For atheists and agnostics, it’s a non-starter to begin with, because if you disbelieve or doubt that God exists, Job is meaningless. Personally, as a deist who believes in a Creator but not the so-called “revealed God” of most religions, it is not my job to take Job seriously (pun intended).

      Like

      • Carmen 5:18 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Besides which, if you do read about poor old Job – and take the ‘lesson’ seriously-, you end up wondering why anyone would think Yahweh had any redeeming qualities.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Superduque777 7:49 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply


      CARPET DIEM

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:09 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You would never guess from that photo what the girl is actually saying to the pope: “Ubi possum potiri petasi similis isti?” (“Where can I get a hat like that?”)

      Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 10:12 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      . . .and he’s probably saying, “Go now and spin no more”. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:39 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No doubt Jim Beam had something to say about it too, but it looks like the pope is keeping it close to his vest-ments.

      Liked by 2 people

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