Tagged: quotes Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 4:00 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: African Queen, Beat The Devil, , , , , , , , quotes, , The Treasure of the Sierra Madre,   

    THE TREASURE OF JOHN HUSTON 

    Huston would have agreed with [Orson] Welles, who declared, “I’m awfully tired of old men saying they have no regrets. We’re loaded with, burdened with, staggering under, regrets.” –Jeffrey Meyers, from his biography JOHN HUSTON: COURAGE AND ART

    * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I must admit that JOHN HUSTON (born August 5, 1906) is not the kind of human being I admire — however, he IS the kind of film maker I admire. Yes, he made his share of clunkers, but few directors made more of my all-time favorite films than he: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The Maltese Falcon, The African Queen, Beat The Devil — and yet, he had more than his share of things to regret, as he himself admitted (more on that shortly).

    But first, here are two classic scenes from THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE:

    The second scene features the great actor Walter Huston (father of John) doing his incomparable dance in the gold-flecked dirt of the Sierra Madre mountains:

    Getting back to John Huston’s regrettable qualities, Jeffrey Meyers (in his excellent bio) compares Huston to Ernest Hemingway: “Hemingway had four wives, Huston had five (and all of his marriages ended badly). Each married increasingly younger women and, while married, fell in love with a series of women even younger than their wives. Huston, however, [unlike Hemingway] was unashamedly promiscuous. Both had three children and were difficult, demanding and frequently absent fathers.”

    “In the last paragraph of his autobiography, Huston brooded over his guilty regrets about family, finances, alcohol, tobacco and matrimony. Huston could be noble, generous and kind, as well as selfish, callous and cruel. But he should be remembered for his intellect, his imagination and his charm.”

    I, of course, cannot remember him thusly because I did not know him. But I can remember him for his films, and so I do. Who could forget the black bird….

    ….or The African Queen:

    One of those clunkers I mentioned was THE BIBLE (1966), an ungodly bad epic which he both directed and starred in. But those can be forgiven in light of the above trinity of masterpieces. If that doesn’t Beat The Devil….

     

     

     

     
    • magickmermaid 4:33 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Maltese Falcon and African Queen are two of my favourite films. Strange, but I’ve never hear of Beat the Devil. I always learn something new on your blog. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:51 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Beat the Devil probably belongs in the category CULT CLASSIC, in that it’s not widely known but has a modest following of devoted fans. I haven’t seen it in years, even on TCM, which I watch regularly.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 5:40 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love those old Bogey films. But yes, Huston was an odd duck.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:16 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Bogey may have been in more classic films than any actor I can think of, from HIGH SIERRA (screenplay by John Huston) and CASABLANCA to THE AFRICAN QUEEN and THE HARDER THEY FALL (his final film). There was only one Bogey!

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:56 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      what a trip down memory lane, always learn something new and enjoyed these clips!

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:11 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I just watched The African Queen with my parents a few weeks ago. Huston was quite a good director, but I’m also glad I didn’t know him. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:26 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I just read in another book that Huston was driving drunk in 1933 when he struck and killed a passerby, but it was hushed up and he never paid the consequences. So much for the farce that “no man is above the law.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 10:50 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink

          Ugh. Oh, to be rich and powerful. We see what happens when someone is above the law, don’t we?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:32 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink

          Considering that Huston didn’t include that incident among his “guilty regrets” in his autobiography, he must have still thought of himself as a privileged character.

          Like

    • The Coastal Crone 6:18 pm on August 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love all these old guys!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:01 pm on August 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved the trailer for “The Maltese Falcon.” Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , H.G. Wells, , I Could Have Danced All Night, , , , , quotes, , socialism   

    I COULD HAVE ROMANCED ALL NIGHT…. 

    I could have….that is, if I were fifty years younger. But why bemoan it if Mother Nature no longer shores up the animal in me? Still, she’s no spring chicken herself, so you’d think she’d cut old geezers like me some slack.

    Moving on from my love life of fond memory: Wouldn’t it be loverly if I instead celebrated the 164th birthday of my near-contemporary George Bernard Shaw with a selection of songs from MY FAIR LADY (based on his play PYGMALION), followed by a bit of biography, a serving of Shaw quotes, and a nightcap of Shavian brew-haha.

    From “Wouldn’t It Be” to “I Could Have”….

    In this scene, Stanley Holloway is seen lifting his spirits on his last night of ‘freedom’:

    Next in line, the bit of bio:

    https://www.biography.com/writer/george-bernard-shaw

    Now sink your teeth into the quotes:

    I was a freethinker before I knew how to think.

    Lack of money is the root of all evil.

    Beware of the man whose god is in the skies.

    The worst sin toward our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them; that’s the essence of inhumanity.

    You’ll never have a quiet world till you knock the patriotism out of the human race.

    There is only one sort of genuine Socialism, the democratic sort, by which I mean the organization of society for the benefit of the whole people.

    We should have had socialism already, but for the socialists.

    ….which leads us to the brew-haha / brouhaha between Shaw and fellow socialist H.G. Wells (click on the title below the cartoon caricature):

    ….which takes us at a social difference to

    THE END

     
    • calmkate 3:43 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      those quotes have incredible insight, thanks for the share!

      Could play those songs as they ring in my head just hearing the name MFL … was traumatised by my parents torturing us with constant replays until we finally left home!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:47 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      We just watched My Fair Lady the other day. I believe it rained in Spain…

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:29 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My parents also played the My Fair Lady LP frequently so I knew many of the songs before I saw the film.
      I wonder what Shaw and Wells would think of the current world situations.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:19 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think both Shaw and Wells would be even more appalled than they were in their lifetimes. If socialism was a dirty word to conservatives then, it’s no less so now. As the old saying goes: The more things change, the more they remain the same.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:50 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So true!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:20 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m down with the socialist hellhole, Sr. Muse. Sign me up.

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 9:04 am on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m more of a George Orwell socialist…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:47 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m probably a ‘practical socialist,’ in that I want what Bernie Sanders wants, but not in a “my way or the highway” sense. I believe in take what you can get now and live to fight another day, rather than all or nothing at all. When the other side has the power and the votes, half a loaf is better than none (if that doesn’t work, then screw everything I just said).

        Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 3:53 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      MM,
      I love all of the references to movies and their quotes. I’m making a list of movies I’ve never seen that you’ve showcased on your site so that when I have the time, I can look them up on Netflix and catch up. My Fair Lady is one. Finnigan’s Rainbow, another. 🙂 Mona

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:05 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mona. I expect that I’ll be adding more movies (especially musicals) to your list in upcoming posts. Enjoy!

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 7:37 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My Fair Lady is one of my favorite musicals. Amazing the way the capitalists have demonized the word ‘socialism.’

      Liked by 3 people

    • thewanderingempath 10:10 pm on July 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This was so much fun to read. It was like a meander through someone’s brain. Loved it. Thanks!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:24 pm on July 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope your comment which appreciates someone’s brainpower doesn’t go to my head….if, by “someone’s,” you mean mine. In any case, I thank you very much! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Kally 1:10 pm on July 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh this is so fun for me to read. Cheer me up tremendously !

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 6:11 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Clarence Darrow, , , half-truths, , , , quotes, , , ,   

    WHERE THE TRUTH LIES 

    lie, n. a false statement known to be false by the person who makes it.
    liev. to be in a horizontal or flat position; to exist; have its place.  –World Book Dictionary

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    So, where does the truth lie? Attempts to address that question, it seems to me, lie in the assumption that we know objectively what truth is. Should we settle for the negative defining of truth as being the opposite of “lie, n“? I don’t know that most of us want to — or need to — go deeper into the jungle of truth than that, but if you’re of a mind to take the path of beast resistance, you can start here:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hide-and-seek/201808/what-is-truth

    In our dystopian sub-culture of “fake news,” half-truths, whole-cloth fabrications and false narratives in which truth is what President Trump says it is and science is fiction, it isn’t always simple to disentangle truth from the deluge of prevarication and misrepresentations which is Trump’s stock in trade  — and he knows it. Who can fact check it all fast enough? The old saying remains relevant: “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes.”

    And speaking of quotes which remain relevant, try these on for wise:

    Carlyle said, “A lie cannot live.” It shows he did not know how to tell them. –Mark Twain

    If at first you’re not believed, lie, lie again.–Evan Esar (not Trump, believe it or not)

    The pursuit of truth shall set you free, even if you never catch up with it. –Clarence Darrow

    It is twice as hard to crush a half-truth as a whole lie. –Austin O’Malley

    Truth is more important than facts. –Frank Lloyd Wright

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Marquis de Vauvenargues

    And so it goes. Would I lie to you?

     

     
    • calmkate 6:24 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      well I was hoping for a glimmer of truth but am sadly disappointed .. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:37 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well, you can always fall back on Trump — there may be “a glimmer of truth” somewhere in his deep, dark past.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:38 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          somehow doubt that … hope his parents have passed, how humiliating to have given birth to that …

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:49 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          His late father would be proud, not humiliated. ‘Like father, like son,’ by all accounts (including the new book by The Donald’s niece, Mary Trump).

          Like

    • obbverse 7:02 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Trump Hound- mouth of a Rottweiler, brain of a Shi Tzu. Temperament? Whiney, disloyal lazy, comfortable to simply lay around the House and lie, lie lie and lie. Barking? Mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 7:07 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If someone proves to be a liar in one instance, then I find it extremely difficult to believe anything else they may say. Resist the beast! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 8:34 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Since he sticks in my craw can I spit out another?
      Bad mad dogs of his kind
      Growlingly protect their address,
      When evicted they sure do leave behind
      Nothing but a nasty mess.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:40 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        There’s no guarantee he’ll leave —
        He has many tricks up his sleeve.
        Who knows what deviltry he’ll try?
        We only know it’ll be a monstrous lie.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rebecca Wallick 10:16 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thirty-plus years in the legal profession taught me this truth: almost everyone lies, with a straight face, even after swearing an oath to tell the truth.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:25 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        According to Mark Twain (and others), there are three kinds of lies: LIES, DAMNED LIES, AND STATISTICS. I don’t know about the legal profession, but I think it’s safe to say the political profession encompasses all three. Oddly enough, no one mentioned the fourth (and saddest) kind of lie:

        Like

    • jilldennison 1:11 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Politically, there is a very simple way to separate fact from fiction, truth from lie. If Donald Trump or ANY of his hand-picked sycophants say it, it is a lie. I think that for tonight I shall have to pass on the path of beast resistance, for my mental acuity is about fried. Perhaps tomorrow!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:42 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You ain’t lyin’, Jill.
        And I don’t blame you for passing on the path of beast resistance if you’re mental acuity is fried, because it’s a lot to digest. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 4:54 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The only acceptable lies are on the golf course.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:33 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Though I constantly call him a moron, his one clever move was to undermine faith in the media, journalism and the news in general. Alternative truth has served him well.
      😡

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        No doubt he has a certain amount of ‘street smarts,’ but no doubt the road to hell is jammed with big talkers.

        Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:39 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a fun post. This one needs a late night and a few bottles of wine. Almost everything is subjective, right? So we each will have our own versions of truth even when we are committed to the concept. It seems to me, that humans are best served by getting as close to the truth as we can and peeling away the lies whenever possible. Just ask the poor souls who believed Trump’s lies about the virus.

      I’m not sure that Trump actually believes he’s lying. His narcissistic personality borders on psychosis and it’s impossible for him to not be perfect. The mere idea that he might have a flaw feels like annihilation, which is why he reacts so viciously or ridiculously lies. He’s learned over the years to manipulate others so he never has to be imperfect. I can’t wait until he’s gone.

      Great quotes too!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:19 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana. I think you’ve ‘psychoanalyzed’ Trump perfectly. From what I hear of TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH, the new book about Trump by his niece Mary Trump (a professional psychologist), her diagnosis is much the same. The election can’t come soon enough.

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 4:06 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink

          No, it can’t. What he’s doing in Portland is outrageous. What I want to know is where are all the 2nd Amendment rights militias who are supposed to be saving us from our government’s oversteps??? (Not really, but isn’t this why they say they need their guns?)
          Gah! You can get me ranting for hours. Lol

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:23 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      A liar will be the first to accuse you of lying. My contribution to the literature of mendaciousness, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’d recommend that Trump reflect on your comment, Ricardo, but the guy (who claims he knows more than anyone) wouldn’t know the meaning of mendaciousness

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: actors, , , book rview, , , , , quotes, ,   

    THE FIX IS OFF (for now) 

    Something has come up to postpone my out-of-town daughter’s Father’s Day visit until the following weekend ….so my browser problem will remain on hold, and without resolution, until the (offspring’s) fix is in. Meanwhile, back at the rant, I’ve finished reading the outspoken CARROLL O’CONNOR’s autobiography wherein he vents about many things. So, to fill in, let’s take up where my last post left off. After all, it’s All In The Family.

    O’Connor had a very varied pre-Archie Bunker life. Like many in their early adult years, he couldn’t find his niche. “I could not shake off a feeling of foolishnessa man of 26 plodding through the days and months with no plan, no answer for anyone who might ask “What are you going to do with yourself?” The eventual answer, after many dead-end turns, turned out to be acting….and, finally, stardom (which came with an Archie Bunker mentality).

    I — no doubt like most who read autobiographies — do so primarily to learn more about the author, his/her life and times. But I’ll also admit to the guilty pleasure of learning what the author thought of well-known contemporaries — in fact, such opinions may offer insights into other personalities and professions, which broaden (for better or worse) what I thought I knew about them. So, what were O’Connor’s impressions of….

    JOHN WAYNE: “He perceived America as the preeminent hero-nation, virtually a land of heroes in which he himself felt heroic (and actually was, as I knew him) and infused that perception into all his roles as naturally as if it were one of the primary  emotions.”

    JEAN STAPLETON: “Jean’s idea of Edith Bunker was not only original and perfectly suited to the American audience, but very comical and emotionally moving. If ever anything on television changed the country, not radically, not even obviously, it was the performance of Jean and the example of Edith. Did our series effectively attack bigotry and racism? We thought so at the time –”

    HARRY TRUMAN: “Nobody expected Truman to take part in a Korean civil war, if one should begin. His military chiefs had no battle plan; on the contrary, they had a plan for getting out of the way — withdrawing to Japan. I thought Truman was totally wrong — his political vision faulty, his practical leadership unintelligent, his moral justification false. For me, the issue of morality in war– whether or not it is a “just war” — turns on the question of choice. When you wage war because you have no choice you are acting justly. But when you have a reasonable choice and choose to wage war, you can’t call your war just.”

    MOVIE WRITERS, “though marvelously reliable in inventing space creatures — shriveled humanoids and hugely swollen insects — are unreliable in depicting intelligent life on earth.”

    AGENTS “are generally shrewd, knowing, clever people; good company, good friends. They have made my career; they make all careers; they are the most important people in the business.”

    ACTORS: “I shall never forget my first professional play rehearsal at The Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, in the spring of 1951 — the immediate cordiality of my new friends the actors: they greeted me like an intimate. Now after all these years I am still unfailingly comforted, encouraged and elated in the company of actors. There is something about the work these dear neurotics do, investigating every kind of human character, that  develops in them an extraordinary tolerance, forgiveness and good humor. I commend their company even to normal folk.”

    ….and I commend this book of Carroll’s to you.

     
    • waywardsparkles 1:50 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Those were the days watching All in the Family, The Jeffersons, and Maude! Ya know, I can’t remember a single episode of any of them; but I loved how Archie continued to open up as the show went on. Wait a minute, do you remember the episode when Archie had to get a transfusion? I do remember that episode. That was genius! Thanks for sharing about Carroll O’Connor’s autobiography, MM. Mona

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I vaguely remember that episode, Mona, but like you, I mainly remember the series in general, as a whole, not for individual programs. The same, I think, applies to MASH, although re-runs appear regularly on local TV and refresh memories of specific episodes much more readily.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 2:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Aww. Sad your fix is off. But this is a very interesting post

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sorry your daughter is delayed, but she will get there!

      So JW was just being himself, explains why he was monotonously the same in everything he appeared in … Carroll’s shares some good insights, particularly about war! Thanks for the review 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. I have several dozen biographies/autobiographies on my bookshelves, and O’Connor’s is one of the best.

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 4:03 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t panic! Help sounds like its on the way. Autobiographies seem to become more interesting the older we get. Something to do with the human condition, or trying to understand it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:08 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, o.v. The ‘search’ for understanding is never-ending (until the end), but to paraphrase an old saying, “’tis better to have searched and come up short than never to have searched at all.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 6:44 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      That book sound very interesting — what a character! Hope you get your fix soon, mister muse! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:57 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope so too, Carmen. The problems are getting worse (for example, my computer is increasingly ‘freezing’ on me — usually in the middle of writing a post or comment — requiring that I shut down and re-start). I wonder if it would help if I put my computer outside in the hot weather? 😉

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:15 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People always think of Archie when they think of O’Connor, but he really was so much more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg. If he were still alive today, it’s not hard to imagine Archie supporting King Trump and O’Connor railing against him as the emperor who has no clothes.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 10:44 pm on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I spent a week at Leonard Nimoy’s house which was across the street from O’Connor’s. That entire week, Carroll O’Connor cut his grass. He would finish with the lawn and start over again. I wanted to go and meet him, I heard he was a kind and intelligent person, but I never had the time. The Nimoys said he was a great neighbor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:42 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Very interesting. The Nimoys must have had the fast growing grass in town. I mow my lawn once a year whether it needs it or not. 😉

        Like

        • Don Ostertag 1:17 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Not the Nimoy’s lawn.., It was Carroll O’Connor cutting the O’Connor lawn.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:47 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the clarification — I took “cut his grass” to mean that, because he was “a great neighbor,” O’Connor cut Nimoy’s lawn while Nimoy was away for a week. Out of even lesser misunderstandings, yards have been known to turn into battlefields!

          Like

    • annieasksyou 12:01 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting, mistermuse—especially O’Connor’s takes on Truman and John Wayne. Did he say why he felt Wayne was heroic?

      I don’t think computers like hot weather one whit, but I’m perhaps a tad more tech-adept than you, based on your description, so don’t byte a single bit of info I provide.
      Enjoy Father’s Day. Is this an actual —as opposed to virtual—visit?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:16 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        When he knew Wayne, O’Connor wasn’t as liberal as he later became, so I assume that was how he felt then, before he ‘matured.’

        My daughter’s visit will be “actual” in order to install a new browser, as I am virtually blogging “up a creek without a paddle” on my outdated browser (at least, I assume that’s the cause of the problems I’m having — if not, I’m thinking of drowning my sorrow, and I don’t mean in the creek).

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:21 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope your daughter rescues you forthwith. If not, I assume you mean drowning your sorrow in a “spirited” manner, to which I say “bottoms up.”
      I switched from Safari to Firefox at WP’s suggestion, only to learn that Firefox, for reasons I can’t comprehend, will not let me grab images the way Safari does. So I do my image search with Safari and my writing with Firefox. I am way beyond creek depth now with no daughter available to paddle me to safe land. Best of luck!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It so happens that my daughter plans to switch me to Firefox. Before she does, I’ll bring your experience to her attention. She’s the head computer technician at the university where she works, but she doesn’t blog, so she may not be familiar with the idiosyncrasies of the various browsers when it comes to blogging. Thanks for the ‘heads-up.’

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 2:35 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You’re welcome. It happened to me with Google Advanced Image Search, which I use a lot, and with YouTube. But maybe your daughter the pro will be able to show you how to overcome my problem. And then maybe you can tell me!

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 5:20 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you are having a nice Father’s Day!
      There was a Microsoft update this past week in which the new version of the Edge browser was installed. Much to my surprise it’s super-fast!
      I forgot to mention something regarding the “like” problem. If you have your Enhanced Tracker Setting for your browser set for “custom” or “strict”, that prevents “liking” on certain blogs. Just click on the shield icon in the address bar and you can uncheck the tracking. You will then be able to “like”. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:08 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. I AM having a nice Father’s Day — made all the nicer by my neighbor mowing my lawn this weekend (he is the father of the (no longer) little girl my wife and I took care of years ago while he and his wife worked). Now that’s what I call a good neighbor!

        P.S. I will pass your tip on to my daughter next weekend when she installs a new browser, as I will not be publishing any more posts until then.

        Liked by 1 person

    • josephurban 3:57 pm on June 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice article. If you like autobiographies I suggest the Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant. I am currently reading it after watching a History Channel 3 part series on Grant. Fascinating.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:23 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This looks like a truly interesting, well-written book with lots of insight. I think I need to find a copy.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:42 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t think you’ll be disappointed, SS. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked the book.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Machiavelli, , , , quotes, , ,   

    PHILOSPHER STONED 

    If there’s one thing I think we can all agree on about Donald Trump, it’s that he isn’t a philosopher. If, however, he can be said to have one guiding precept remotely resembling a philosophy, it has to be IT’S ALL ABOUT ME….or, secondarily, DON’T BLAME ME (which happens to be the title of a song I was going to link here until — faster than you can say Niccollo Machiavelli — Google removed share, embed & copy from their music clips, leaving technologically-challenged mistermuse at a loss as to how to post them).

    Be that as it may, I got to thinking that if THE DONALD were a lit-wit (rather than a nitwit) who wished to appear philosophical, there must be any number of wise philosophical quotes he might plagiarize to his greater glory (or, if he were stoned, learn from). Here are some I drug up which could fill the (Duck’s) bill:

    There is nothing so absurd that it cannot be believed if repeated often enough. — William James, American philosopher

    Philosophy teaches us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of others. –Oscar Wilde, Irish wit, poet and playwright

    Any man can be a philosopher if he only thinks enough about his own foolishness. –Edgar Watson Howe, American novelist and editor

    Philosophers have only interpreted the world. The point, however, is to change it. –Karl Marx, German philosopher, political theorist and socialist revolutionary

    If I killed everyone who was stupid, I wouldn’t have time to sleep. –Tamora Pierce, American fantasy fiction writer

    Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something. –Plato, Greek philosopher

    Always recognize that human individuals are ends, and do not use them as means to your end. — Immanuel Kant, German philosopher

    Philosophers before Kant had a tremendous advantage over philosophers after Kant, in that they didn’t have to spend years studying Kant.  –Bertrand Russell, British philosopher, writer and social critic

    Only one philosopher in history had a perfect alibi for doing nothing, and his name was I. Kant. –Evan Esar, American humorist

     
  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Blaise Pascal, Erica Jong, , Lenin, , , opera, quotes, , ,   

    TRUTH BE TOLD….so it is said 

    When I come across a quote I love, and which is so true that it hits home (home being where the heart is), I often tell Cupid to get lost while I grab a pen, because in my heart….

    Yes, I want to be alone so I can write down said truth on whatever scrap of paper is handy before I get distracted and forget it….even then, I often don’t recall where I left that lovely quote, and Cupid will call me stupid (but then, aren’t we all when Cupid is involved?).

    Anyway, I haven’t written a post since I got home from the (soap) opera six days of our lives ago, so today I thought I’d seek out and gather up some of the bold and beautiful quotations I misplaced, for you alone (you ARE alone, aren’t you?):

    I don’t want to be alone, I want to be left alone.” –Audrey Hepburn, actress

    “In Genesis, it says that it is not good for a man to be alone, but sometimes it is a great relief. –John Barrymore, actor

    “Solitude is un-American.” –Erica Jong, novelist and poet

    All men’s miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone.” –Blaise Pascal, writer, inventor, and theologian

    “The trouble with opera in the United States is that it is trying to sell caviar to a hamburger-eating country.” –Helen Traubel, opera singer

    “Opera: a play about life in another world whose inhabitants have no speech but song, no motions but gestures, and no postures but attitudes.” –Ambrose Bierce

    Opera: where anything that is too stupid to be spoken, is sung.” –Voltaire

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad.” –Aldous Huxley

    It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.” –Mark Twain

    There is a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure the truth.” –Maya Angelou

    I will close with a timely quote in which the words alone, opera, and truth do not appear….but I would say that truer words were never spoken (despite who said them):
    “Democracy counts heads without regard to what’s in them.” –Lenin

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:38 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved your quotes herein Mistermuse! Good share and always nice to read your posts. Looks like you must watch more soap (operas) to encourage you to pen more, on whatever scraps of paper – Hmm even gum wrappers perhaps? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:43 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t watch soap operas, GH, but my wife and daughters did years ago, and I got a whiff of a few of them in passing. These days, just following the intrigues of Trump and his cast of sycophants is like watching a soap opera — a VERY BAD soap opera.

      Liked by 2 people

    • blindzanygirl 2:02 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Some of them made me giggle. And anything that makes me giggle at 4 o’ clock in the morning MUST be good!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:14 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m never up at 4 o’clock in the morning unless nature calls — which doesn’t make me giggle (though I may end up with a jiggle).

        Liked by 2 people

        • blindzanygirl 10:20 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink

          Lol mistermuse. I usually wake up at 4 a.m. for a wee, then can’t get back to sleep again! So I rebd to come in here!

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 3:06 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol great collection of misplaced quotes! I also had a giggle all alone 😎
      but then my neighbour came knocking to ask what was the matter … lol
      sadly I loathe opera with a passion so some of these were written for me!

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 3:55 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Mr Twain nails it again And should life give you Lenin, make a Collective.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:28 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Life has given the country a “Lenin” with Trump, and needs a collective of enough voters to make the November election his last stand.

        Like

    • Rivergirl 9:03 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoy being alone. Why wouldn’t I? I’m marvelous company…
      😉

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg — you and the rocks (non-followers of Rivergirl’s blog will have to go there to get that). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:24 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Voltaire’s is hilarious.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:40 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I agree. “Boogie! Boogie! Boogie!” (to quote Groucho Marx in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA).

      Like

    • magickmermaid 12:18 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Although I have to disagree with Voltaire, I like all the other quotes. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:50 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not an opera lover, but if I had to choose, I’d take opera over soap opera because who needs soap when he only takes a bath/shower once a year, whether he needs it or not?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:04 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I find Angelou’s quote confusing. What sense do you make of it?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Perhaps the most common use of “Facts [to] obscure the truth” is political spin. See below:

        https://www.britannica.com/topic/political-spin

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 6:10 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. That makes sense. I really couldn’t understand her quote. Now I do.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:23 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          You’re very welcome, Elizabeth. If Trump & Company were as good at telling the truth as they are at spinning and/or twisting it, his followers wouldn’t know what to believe….and it might even give them second thoughts (not that they do any profound thinking in the first place).

          Like

    • mlrover 8:17 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Helen Traubel was on to something,especially when one keeps in mind that most TV watchers consider the singers on “Idol” talented. They may be but they’re certainly not trained and wouldn’t know a well-structured measure from a mordent.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I remember Helen Traubel well. Though a big (in more ways than one) opera star, she was no stuffed shirt — well, maybe physically, but not culturally — and made many guest appearances on TV back in the day, often on comedy shows like Jimmy Durante’s.

        As for today’s singers (and I mordently and mordantly use the term loosely), I can’t stand to listen to most of them, but as a product of today’s culture, what else would we expect? I suspect that some of them would’ve been good singers if they had grown up several generations ago….but not knowing any better, are they really to blame?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:25 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes here! Some made me frown but mostly they made me smile. Can’t be bad and now the sun has come out! Hoooray!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:09 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Voltaire’s comment on the opera made me laugh out loud. It sounds so irreverent!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:36 pm on February 24, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Every time I watch DUCK SOUP and A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, it’s amazing how funny Groucho’s lines still are today.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:45 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Being alone is ok for some…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E9ydw_aDMg

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:46 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I vote (ready to vote already) Mark Twain followed close by Huxley.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:16 am on February 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I can’t argue with those votes, Mary. Another one I really like is the Lenin quote, because it goes a long way toward explaining why Trump got millions of votes.

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 10:52 pm on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      here’s my original quote; “question is the answer.” continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:14 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, Tony, but would you kindly answer a question that has puzzled me for some time: your comments always end with the word “continue…” but continue where? At first I thought that if I clicked “continue,” it was a link which led to something….but nothing happens. What do you intend by “continue”?

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 5:16 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      i mean keep on going MM…keep on doing…just keep on. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • kutukamus 2:08 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Especially love those ones by Traubel and Lenin. 🍸

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:52 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Truth Be Told, the Lenin quote is my fav….but I like them all.

      Like

    • annieasksyou 11:44 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, Mistermuse. I just stopped by to welcome you to annieasksyou; I’m delighted to have you join me. And since I love bad puns, dislike opera, and have written my share of tirades about a certain White House occupant, I am now following you as well. So cheers!

      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:10 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, about which I have just one quibble: I would call Trump the White House disaster, rather than White House occupant. 😉

        Like

        • annieasksyou 9:25 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink

          I would agree—and even “disaster” doesn’t capture what his egomaniacal ineptitude has wrought on us now…

          But since we all need to keep our immune systems strong because of this plague he’s dramatically worsened, I’m putting a moratorium on myself to try to think of him as little as possible, focusing instead on things that cheer me—such as our budding new crocuses and the bird serenade outside my window.

          Liked by 1 person

    • skullGhost 8:03 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Simply amazing. And to add further, it seems this Lenin has captured the practical utilitarian essence of democracy well in those few words.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:13 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ironic, but true.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , quotes,   

    YOU NEED TO READ SWIFT TO GET UP TO SPEED 

    I don’t recall how old I was — probably no later than my early teens — when I first read Jonathan Swift’s satirical masterpiece Gulliver’s Travels; all I know is it made a lasting impression on my unworldly-wise perception of the world. If you haven’t read the book, this summary will at least give you the bare bones:

    Several films have been made based on the novel; here is the trailer for the version I remember seeing (the book was what made me think; the movie served as entertaining afterthought):

    JONATHAN SWIFT, born this day (Nov. 30) in 1667 in Dublin, led a multi-faceted life between Ireland and England (his place of residence often depended on events beyond his control). For the meaty details of  his life, you might consider taking time to go Googling; here, I offer a dozen of his quotes, the first two of which are from Gulliver’s Travels:

    Based on Gulliver’s descriptions of their behavior, the King describes Europeans as “the most pernicious race of little odious vermin that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.

    The tiny Lilliputians surmise that Gulliver’s watch may be his God, because it is that which, he admits, he seldom does anything without consulting.

    When the world has once begun to use us ill, it afterwards continues to use the same treatment with less scruple or ceremony, as men do to a whore.

    I never wonder to see men wicked, but I often wonder to see them not ashamed.

    Words are the clothing of our thoughts.

    Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it, so that when men come to be undeceived, it is too late; the jest is over, and the tale hath had its effect: like a man who hath thought of a good repartee when the company departed.

    Happiness is the perpetual possession of being well deceived.

    We of this age have discovered a shorter, and more prudent method to become scholars and wits, without the fatigue of reading or of thinking.

    We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.

    I wonder what fool it was that first invented kissing.

    It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

    Nothing is so hard for those who  abound in riches as to conceive how others can be in want.

    Almost 300 years have passed since Swift completed Gulliver’s Travels, and the world still doesn’t seem to have gotten the word. Too bad.

     
    • calmkate 1:00 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      yes I always thought he was profound beyond measure … these quotes perfectly demonstrate that!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:56 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Among other things, he was a clergyman, but wasn’t above criticizing religion (as shown by one of the quotes). Now there’s a man you can have faith in!

        Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 2:52 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      ‘Words are the clothing of our thoughts’, that’s a wonderful quote.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree — but I think we should take it cautiously, in the sense that judging someone by how they dress would require a perfect judge, and none of us are that (except me — ha ha).

        Like

    • Rivergirl 4:12 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Sadly, there are some lessons we never learn….

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:54 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It must be something in the air. If we’d all stop breathing, maybe people would stop killing and doing other bad things to each other.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:05 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The essay by Swift that always got to my students was “A Modest Proposal.” It is pretty timely again too, given the attitude towards struggling refugees world wide at the moment.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:18 am on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’m against eating poor children, as modestly (and satirically) proposed by Swift, but I’m not opposed to eating the likes of Donald Trump by anyone who has the stomach for it.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 6:26 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wow – three hundred years old! And as timely as ever.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 8:53 am on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Haha! I nearly spewed my morning cup o’ tea on the keyboard when I read your reply.

      Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 5:16 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a brilliant skewering of all our pretensions and hypocrisies.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed it is….and after thousands of years of human history, my guess is that if we haven’t shed our pretensions and hypocrises by now, we never will.

        Like

    • magickmermaid 6:07 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Seems like there are quite a few descendants of the Yahoos in today’s world 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 9:01 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Everyone was required to read Gulliver’s Travels in my high school days, and they should be again Sr. Muse. That’s a modest proposal.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:07 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Ricardo — or at least watch the movie, for those who have made it to high school unable to read.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Harpo Marx, , Paul Simon, quotes, , silence is golden, silent films, , The Sound of Silence,   

    THE SOUND OF SILENTS 

    You sure you can’t move? –what Harpo Marx “said” to the tied-up hero (Richard Dix) before punching him in the 1925 film TOO MANY KISSES (fortunately, the film survived)

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Italicized above are the only words ever “spoken” (but not heard) on film by the man whose birthday we note today, HARPO MARX. The audience didn’t hear those five words because the film was a “silent” — “talkies” didn’t come on the scene until 1927, two years before the first of thirteen Marx Brothers movies (1929-49). Harpo spoke in none of them.

    But why, oh why-o, should I try-o to “bio” Harpo, when here-o you can click on the official thing from his offspring:

    https://www.harposplace.com/

    Because Harpo associated with Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and other wits in the famed Algonquin Round Table repartee, I expected to turn up a number of witty Harpo Marx quotes for this piece. No such luck — I found only one I enjoyed enough to post here (both the “she” referred to in the quote, and who it is addressed to, are unknown):

    “She’s a lovely person. She deserves a good husband. Marry her before she finds one.”

    One quote being three quotes short of a gallon, I shall return to giving you “the silent treatment” with a quota of four quotes of silence said by forethoughtful others:

    “Listen to the sound of silence.” –Paul Simon, American singer, songwriter, and actor

    “Silence is golden unless you have kids, then it’s just plain suspicious.” –anonymous

    “If nobody ever said anything unless he knew what he was talking about, what a ghastly hush would descend upon the earth!” –A. P. Herbert, English humorist, writer, and politician

    “I believe in the discipline of silence and can talk for hours about it.” –George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright and critic

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Since I didn’t give Harpo the last word, I’ll let him give his audience the last laugh….and though he doesn’t speak, you’ll hear captivating sounds escape his lips 2:42 into this clip:

    Bravo, Harpo!

    EPILOGUE: Listen — 90+ years after the “silents” ended*, you can still hear….

    *with the exception of two Charlie Chaplin masterpieces in the 1930s, CITY LIGHTS and MODERN TIMES

     
    • calmkate 4:24 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      wow Harpo is actually playing that harp! Love his whistle 🙂
      SnG’s song is a real favourite … thanks for the memories!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:25 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’re welcome, Kate. I too love Harpo’s whistling in the Marx Brothers Musical clip, and I can’t imagine anyone not loving Simon & Garfunkel’s THE SOUND OF SILENCE (except Trump, who is incapable of appreciating the sound of silence if you paid him).

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 5:09 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink

          doubt he even knows what ‘silence’ means … not much between his ears except fluffy hair!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Don Ostertag 8:40 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink

          When i am in a funk I watch a Marx Brothers movie or listen to a favorite song like Sound of Silence.

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 7:47 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m a HUGE Marx Brothers fan.

      Harpo adopted several children because he and his wife couldn’t have any of their own. His aim was, in his words, when he got home he’d have a child looking at him “from every window”…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:35 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise about the Marx Brothers. If they had made no other films than A NIGHT AT THE OPERA and DUCK SOUP, they would still be remembered forever (I hope).

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 8:32 am on November 24, 2019 Permalink

          My favorite, not to be contrary, is A Day at the Races. Why? The great jazz number in the middle of the movie as well as the Tootsie-Frootsie Ice Cream Scene…

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 am on November 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Although Races isn’t my fav Marx Bros. movie, I’m always up for a jazz number, though this one has a very brief “bug-eyed” shot or two that might be regarded as racist today:

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 10:15 am on November 24, 2019 Permalink

          I agree with that but I’ll put up with a little light racism to see a wonderful performance by a jazz artist who died far too young…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:40 pm on November 24, 2019 Permalink

          I assume you’re referring to vocalist Ivie Anderson, whose gig in this film was one of her rare appearances apart from the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Her performance here (as well as on the many recording she made with the Duke) was indeed wonderful.

          Like

    • Rivergirl 8:46 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My father loved the Marx brothers and I grew up on all the films. Thanks for the memories!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Rg. Now I know (at least part of) why you grew up to be who you are (that’s wholly a compliment, btw).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:07 am on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing to see and hear Harpo playing the harp. Captivating! So much talent!

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 9:19 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Silence is golden unless you have kids, then it’s just plain suspicious.” So true! Lol. Fun quotes and clips and a beautiful song from Paul Simon. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:49 pm on November 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        “Fun quotes and clips and a beautiful song” — three for the price of one! Who says I don’t offer bargains? Thanks for the testimonial, Diana!

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 3:31 pm on November 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Another big Marx Brothers fan here! Classic laugh fest!

      Liked by 1 person

    • tref 9:43 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Harpo playing the song “Alone” in night at the opera the very height of cinema. I could never grow tired of watching it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:25 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That is one of many great moments in the movie that I never tire of watching, such as the stateroom scene. The 1930s was truly the height of film making.

        Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 3:57 am on December 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Priceless MM. Priceless. continue…

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:49 am on December 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you. I’d give your comment a Like, but it doesn’t “take” when I click it.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Busy Doing Nothing, human behavior, , , party poopers, quotes, , , , , wage slaves,   

    RETIREMENT TIME 

    Hard as it may be (for me, at least) to fathom, it seems that many people approaching retirement don’t look forward to it because they don’t know what they’ll do with all the time they’ll have when they have no job. That has never struck me as a problem, what with books to be read, writing to be written, learning to be learned (unless you already know everything), trips to plan, music to enjoy, sports to follow, chores to avoid, mislaid items to look for, naps to take, etc….not to mention human behavior forever to be baffled by.

    Believe me, friends, if I had half the time my once-upon-a-time fellow wage slaves assume I have, I would be posting a post almost every day instead of once a week or so (which, I concede, may still be too often for you malcontents and party poopers out there).

    So, how busy am I?

    Oops — how did that clip get there? Fact is, I’m so busy, I don’t even have time to think of more to say about the subject….so I’ll avoid that chore by passing it on to others:

    I have never liked working. To me, a job is an invasion of privacy. –Danny McGoorty

    I’ve crunched the numbers in your retirement account. It’s time to figure out who will be wearing the mask and who will be driving the getaway car. –Unknown financial advisor

    My retirement plan is to get thrown into a minimum security prison in Hawaii. –Julius Sharpe

    I will not retire while I’ve still got my legs and my make-up box. –Bette Davis

    The trouble with retirement is that you never get a day off. –Abe Lemons

    I find the biggest trouble with having nothing to do is you can’t tell when you’re done. –Unknown

    As for me, except for an occasional heart attack, I feel as young as I ever did. –Robert Benchley

    I can’t wait to retire so I can get up at 6 a.m. and drive around real slow and make everybody late for work. –Unknown

    What do you call a person who is happy on Monday? Retired. –Unknown

    When a professional golfer retires, what does he retire to? –Evan Esar

    When you retire, you switch bosses — from the one who hired you to the one who married you. –Unknown

    Time’s up. COMING, DEAR!

     

     

     

     
    • obbverse 1:11 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I still am weighed down by the joy(?) of work, so need to dole out my time, of which, there is never enough. I believe retirement will soak up all these drudgery hours wasted at work. Thanks for the light at the end of the tunnel.

      Liked by 3 people

    • calmkate 2:50 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      lol retirement is a struggle for the other half who already has a well established routine .. good luck with yours!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:25 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. Actually I’ve been retired for some time, but I can still use the good luck!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:36 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink

          lol I thought you must have been … don’t I remember you telling me you were 110?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:03 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink

          Some days I feel like I’m 110, Kate — it must have been one of those days when I told you that.

          Like

      • mistermuse 5:18 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Kate, I’ve been trying repeatedly to enter a comment on your “Friday Fun – restful” post but it won’t ‘take.’ Sorry to trouble you, but here it is, if you can use it:

        Since I retired, I run from quarrels —
        because I’m resting….on my laurels.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:10 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink

          just posted it, sorry about those WP gremlins, others have posted comments ok 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • emergingfromthedarknight 3:28 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Having ‘retired’ early due to an injury I can relate to most of those quotes and I love the one on work being an invasion of privacy. I also love it when people ask me. “what do you DO all day?” They have no idea 🙂 The happy fact is the day is free to spend however your heart desires.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:33 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You nailed it! When people ask me “what do you DO all day?”, I feel like saying, When you retire, I’ll be more than happy if you to give me all the time you don’t know what to do with.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Ashley 4:31 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Retirement is great! Busy busy busy, doing the things I like, well most of the time! When I was “working” we all used to say “have a great weekend” to each other. Nowadays the weekend lasts for at least 7 days! La la la-la-la-la, la-la, la-la, la la la la la la………
      Great post!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. Among the perks of retirement is that it doesn’t matter what day of the week it is, they’re all the same. Like me, you obviously don’t have a problem with that!

        Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:39 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m just trying to retire before the sun becomes a red giant and incinerates the Earth… If I live frugally, I think I can manage…

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 8:40 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Even with Trump & Friends accelerating the process, you will probably still make it to retirement age. Hang in there!

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 6:25 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Having just retired in June (but having summers off anyway) I must say it’s been great so far! :). Hope your retirement’s been great, too!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:45 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Carmen. Taking early retirement was the best decision I ever made (except, of course, for getting married, having children, and meeting you online. Keep up the good work….I mean, the good retirement!

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:41 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      With my husband it’s not a lack of things to do in retirement… it’s a mixed bag of having a great paying job with wonderful benefits, enjoying the social aspect of working, having a purpose to getting up every day and the simple joy of seeing his TSP ( government version of IRA ) grow. Personally I wish he’d just chuck it all and relax!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:51 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If, and as long as, your hubby loves his job, I don’t blame him. It’s when your job is (or becomes) a pain in the butt that it’s time to bail ASAP.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 7:58 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Chores to avoid — I am totally on board with that.

      Good essay. See ya.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 8:39 am on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I couldn’t agree more. Other than writing, I’m retired, and I’m so busy! As soon as my husband retires we’ll be even busier! Lol. Thanks for the laughs this morning. Great one-liners.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Christie 2:35 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the good laugh!
      I love this one: “I can’t wait to retire so I can get up at 6 a.m. and drive around real slow and make everybody late for work”
      Enjoy your retirement!
      🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:25 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love the quote from Abe Lemons: “The trouble with retirement is that you never get a day off.” I refuse to retire and have chosen to continue writing until the “headman” says enough. I’m the boss, so I make sure that I enjoy the holidays off and do fun things on my weekend breaks.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:13 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        “Boss Bacchus” has a good alliterative ring to it — even better than “Rosaliene the Riveter” which you might have been called back in WW II days (not that you’re anywhere near that old, of course). 🙂

        Like

    • Elizabeth 5:49 pm on September 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love being retired. I only fear that I might flunk the question in the emergency room some day about what day it is. I often have no idea. And I try to forget the answer to who is President.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Infidel753 10:24 pm on September 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I tend to agree with you. It seems to me that most people who think they’ll have nothing to do with their time when they retire must be very lacking in intellectual interests.

      Even if I’d have trouble filling up time occasionally, I don’t see why the preferred alternative would be still engaging in some form of drudgery so onerous that I would never have considered doing it if I didn’t need the money. Even being bored for a while would be preferable. At least it doesn’t sap your energy in the same way.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:02 am on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Another alternative for retirees lacking in intellectual interests, hobbies, or other pursuits would be to volunteer their time with a non-profit organization to help those in need. I would think that making oneself useful to others not only helps others, but would give purpose to one’s own life.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 6:22 pm on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These are great quotes, but the one about the professional golfer retiring made me laugh out loud.

      I’m pleased to hear your retirement seems to be a time of productiveness and fulfillment. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:17 pm on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, SS. Fulfillment is something almost everyone seeks in some form or another, but attaining it in full measure is often dependent on fate and factors beyond our control. I can’t claim ‘full-fillment’– but I’m not complaining (much).

        Liked by 1 person

    • luisa zambrotta 1:01 pm on September 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      😉😉🤗

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:08 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I like all of these. I’d like a day off, I’m busier than ever. I’ve un-retired a lot of things I wanted to do.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:26 pm on October 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I wish I could un-retire some of the things I wanted to do, but these old bones will no longer cooperate, so they’ll just have to stay retired. No matter — I don’t have time for them anyway (at least, that’s what my head tells me, and my body doesn’t argue….or is it the other way around?).

        Like

    • holliedoc 5:29 am on October 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I started my blog in my retirement, to assist in writing down my thoughts and feelings. Originally I wasn’t sure how much I’d enjoy retirement but have since taken up learning Spanish and playing the guitar amongst other things. It’s amazing how quickly you fill up your time in retirement.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:53 pm on October 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’ve got that right! My time is not only filled up, but overflowing.

        Like

    • Kally 10:22 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This is simply so well written! I love it. May I reblog this out and link it back to your blog please?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Robert Smith 7:16 am on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Relatable post! Thanks for sharing such an amazing article.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:54 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Robert. Sharing is caring, as someone once said (maybe it was me — ha ha).

      Like

    • live an untethered life 7:37 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Live an Untethered Life and commented:
      I don’t intend to go from 60 to 0. I plan to leap over to a new highway and keep or increase my speed!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Paul Hannah 1:52 pm on December 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hmmm…I avoided retirement like I avoided kids with snotty noses at the grocery store. When I was finally there I saw a flat, endless plain of nothing-to-do. So just this week I started a blog, Retirement-TheSnarkSide. Now I’ve got something fun to do, once I get the hang of WordPress. Thanks Robert.

      Liked by 5 people

    • mistermuse 4:05 pm on December 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Paul, I’ve been blogging on WordPress for over ten years, and I still don’t get the hang of their shenanigans (see my posts of Dec. 11th and 15th to give you an idea of one of the problems I have with WP). I hope you have more technological expertise than I, otherwise it may not be as much fun as you anticipate. In any case, good luck…..and Merry Christmas/Happy New Year.

      Like

    • holliedoc 6:07 pm on February 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Well if you happen to get time in your retirement, please do have a look at my retirement blog. I’d be keen to hear your thoughts and would welcome any comments on my articles.
      https://itsthetimeofyourlife.com/

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:53 pm on February 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I attempted to leave a comment on your Nov. 25 2019 post, but apparently it didn’t take. I’ll try to give it another try when I have time, but it won’t be today.

        Like

      • mistermuse 12:15 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I tried again today to leave a comment on your Nov. 25 post, but again, it apparently didn’t go through. I’m sorry, but I’m not tech-savvy enough to figure out why, and I can’t keep wasting time trying.

        Like

        • holliedoc 5:43 pm on February 18, 2020 Permalink

          Hmm that’s a shame. I wonder why myself. I’ll have a look into why it’s not possible. Many thanks for your reply!

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Give Me That Old Time Religion, , , , It Ain't Necessarily So, longevity, , , oldest living man, , quotes, , ,   

    SENIOR MUSE SOUNDS OFF FOR OLD TIMERS SAKE 

    In 1984, members of the Oxford Library Club for Retired Professional People were especially looking forward to hearing a guest speaker on “Old Age, Absent-Mindedness, and Keeping Fit.” Unfortunately, the speaker forgot to show up. –excerpted from the book 1,000 UNFORGETTABLE SENIOR MOMENTS

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    MAY being OLDER AMERICANS MONTH, and ME being an older American, I’ve decided to post a post predicated on passing on — make that on passing along — hoary words of wisdom concerning a subject I’m surpassingly qualified to write about, namely …. ….hmmm….uh….ah…. longevity (ha ha — you thought I forgot what I was going to write about, didn’t you?).

    Actually, I must admit to being a bit of a senior citizen-slouch when it comes to longevity — at least, compared to this guy:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/worlds-oldest-man-146-birthday-long-life-location-country-name-celebrates-old-age-a7505401.html

    And of course, that there this guy is himself a slouch compared to this here this guy:

    Methuselah, as all my bible-believing brethr’n and sistern know, was said to have lived 969 years (Genesis 5:27), so you might think this song is my inspiration to keep marching on:

    But (and I quote) “Who calls that livin’ when no gal’s gonna give in to no man what’s 900 years?”

    So there you have it from Bobby Darin singing the lyrics of Ira Gershwin. Or you can take it from Senior Muse quoting the words of Oscar Wilde: “The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is not young.”

     

     

     

     
    • mlrover 8:03 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It Ain’t Necessarily So is one of my favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 9:18 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      love it .. our resident ‘expert’ on longevity ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 2:08 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You must have read my mind. I think that at least a dozen times a day (or is I think it for the first time, a dozen times a day?)

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Well, there’s being “only as old as you feel” — and then there’s this:

        Like

    • Eliza 4:15 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Imagine being young for eternity??

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Being old, I find it hard to imagine. But innocence is for the young, and who am I to throw a sour note into their song?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:29 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d like to live to 969 years old… if only to piss off the Social Security office.
      😈

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:34 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If the extreme right wing ever gains control of all branches of government, it may not matter how long you live — there probably won’t be a Social Security office (but not to worry; charity will take care of you).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 12:22 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always thought the world’s oldest man (or woman) to be the ultimate temp job, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:00 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I have laughed about a song that promises “I will love you until you’re 70.” Then what? Thanks for the opening laugh.

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:19 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Incredible!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:20 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video not available.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:55 pm on May 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know which video you mean. The first is METHUSELAH, the second is GIVE ME THAT OLD TIME RELIGION, and the third is IT AIN’T NECESSARILY SO. If you can’t get the latter two, there are many other versions. If you can’t get METHUSELAH, the name is really all you need to know, so it ain’t necessarily worth the trouble of trying to find a substitute.

        Like

        • America On Coffee 1:38 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink

          Bobby Darin and Methuselah. I found Methuselah and its a great video as well as the old time religion which the world and I really need. Thank you mistermuse for all of your inspirings. Have a great week!

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:58 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The OLD TIME RELIGION clip is a scene from the 1960 movie INHERIT THE WIND based on the notorious 1925 “Scopes Monkey Trial” of a Tennessee schoolteacher for teaching evolution. It’s a great film (starring Spencer Tracy) and I highly recommend it.

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 4:49 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      146 years! Good grief!

      Also, I love a post that includes “Inherit the Wind” and Bobby Darin. Nicely done.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:53 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        INHERIT THE WIND was on TCM again last night. Since I hadn’t seen it in several years, I watched it again and enjoyed it as much as ever (though I think Gene Kelly is a bit miscast as the reporter).

        Like

        • Silver Screenings 1:00 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Agreed. I want to like Gene Kelly in that role, but I never quite buy it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:24 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Fortunately, Spencer Tracy, Fredric March and the rest of the cast are so spot-on that Kelly’s off-key performance can be given a pass (though not by much).

          Like

      • mistermuse 3:33 pm on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Bobby Darin is all but forgotten today but was one of the great singers of his tragically short time in the spotlight.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:36 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Getting old ain’t for wimps, but a sense of humor goes a long way.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:32 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, Diana. If I didn’t have a sense of humor, I probably wouldn’t have any sense at all!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 1:32 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Growing old is better than the alternative – not growing old any longer.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:05 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I said that to an old relative in a nursing home years ago, and she said “How do you know — we don’t know what the alternative is.” Now that I’m old myself, I must admit there’s a sense in which she was right. Nonetheless, I plan on living to reach 100 if it kills me.

      Like

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel