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  • mistermuse 1:02 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Charles Schulz, Erma Bombeck, , , , , John Lewis, , , quotes, Saint Augustine   

    DON’T ASK 

    You Asked For It (according to my previous post) — but this post is a different story, so….

     

    By a weird coincidence, ASK ME NO QUESTIONS AND I’LL TELL YOU NO LIES (a quote attributed to 18th century Irish novelist, playwright and poet Oliver Goldsmith) is my springboard for this post of “Don’t Ask” quotes — thus sparing you the fate of my last post, which subjected you to some questionable poems.

    Let’s plunge right in with perhaps the most famous DON’T ASK quote (at least in America):

    “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” –John F. Kennedy

    Here’s another famous one (in jazz circles), leveled at squares:

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis Armstrong

    If you have a humorous bone in your body, the next three should bring a smile to your face:

    “Sometimes I lie awake at night and ask, Why me? Then a voice answers, Nothing personal, your name just happened to come up.” –Charles M. Schulz

    “Some people see things that are and ask, Why? Some people see things that never were and ask, Why not? Some people have to go to work and don’t have time for all that.” –George Carlin

    “When your mother asks, “Do you want a piece of advice?’, it is a mere formality. It doesn’t matter if you answer yes or no. You’re going to get it anyway.” –Erma Bombeck

    Now for some serious stuff:

    “What then is time? If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know.” –Saint Augustine

    “If you ask me whether the election of Barack Obama is the fulfillment of Dr. King’s dream, I say, ‘No, it’s just a down payment.” –John Lewis

    To close, here’s a quote I like which is a stretch to fit the category, but since it’s the birthday of the author, don’t ask me to re-think its inclusion here:

    “Thinkers think and doers do. But until the thinkers do and the doers think, progress will be just another word in the already overburdened vocabulary.” –Francois de La Rochefoucauld (9/15/1613–3/17/1680)

    I think that does it for now. How’s that for progress?

     

     

     
    • rawgod 2:39 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If you don’t want to know the answer, please, don’t ask the question.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:51 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That would seem to be the badge of honor for Trump followers: you don’t want to know the answers because he already has them all.

        Liked by 2 people

        • rawgod 7:58 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          Pretty much.
          I just completed a musical rewrite of an old song. I’m not publishing it yet, but if you send me an email I will let you be the first to tell me what you think of it. g-e-w-c-o-l-o-@-g-m-a-i-l-.-c-o-m. I think they call them parodies.

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 2:45 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol left me scratching my head, good one … love the song with the accordion!

      Now what is jazz? and what is time?
      must be the cue for a new rhyme …

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 7:21 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Lawrence Welk must be turning over in his grave at such accordion blasphemy!

        This DON’T ASK post means mistermuse needn’t address such questions….
        However & nonetheless, Kate, if in distress, I’m open to readers’ suggestions.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:36 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink

          Well not being one to miss opportunities … the best female jazz artists? thank Mr M

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 6:56 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink

          Kate, when it comes to “best female jazz artists,” I’ll start with a name almost all jazz lovers agree on: ELLA FITZGERALD. The rest of my (personal opinion) list will be names you’ve probably never heard of, belonging as they do to the long-past Golden Age of Popular Music: Mildred Bailey, The Boswell Sisters, Bea Wain, Midge Williams, Helen Forrest, Ethel Waters, Martha Tilton and of course, Billie Holiday (who you probably have heard of). A bit later (but still ancient history to those under 60), Peggy Lee and Dinah Washington were probably my post-WWII favorites.

          I sure I’ve left out a few names I should include, but the above will have to do for now..

          Like

    • JosieHolford 7:18 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice haunting bit of accordion there.

      And then there’s this from Alice. B.Toklas on the last words of Gertrude Stein:
      In a letter she wrote about those last words

      “She said upon waking from a sleep—What is the question. And I didn’t answer thinking she was not completely awakened. Then she said again—What is the question and before I could speak she went on—If there is no question then there is no answer.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:47 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for that thought-provoking comment, Josie. I’m thinking there is no answer, question or no question. Perhaps that’s why my favorite quote in the post is that of Charles M. Schulz (of PEANUTS fame).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 7:56 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent selection. The down payment Lewis quote is sadly relevant again.

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 8:47 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I see you’ve mastered the new interface…

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:36 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The answer to Kennedy has been rendered simple by recent history–what you can do for your country is vote Trump and all his enablers out of office.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 3:15 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        If there’s any justice left in this world, nothing less than “out of office” and into prison will suffice (but I’ll settle for just “out of office”).

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:55 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love the video! And the quotes!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:23 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, mm. I wasn’t looking for that video — I stumbled across it while looking for something else, so it was a ‘happy accident.’

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 1:39 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes Another answer to Charlie Brown: Because there’s just something about you that pisses me off.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:33 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyed your post 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:12 am on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, my friend. 😉

      Like

    • Elizabeth 7:05 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “Ask not what you can do for your country, ask what your country can do for you,” attributed to Jared Kushner(probably apocryphal)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:57 pm on September 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know if Jared Kushner was quoted correctly, but we know that JFK was:

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 12:09 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink

          Yup. I remember that speech. I am that old.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:48 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink

          Likewise, Elizabeth. At our age, it’s like humorist Fred Allen (remember him?) once said: “I always have trouble remembering three things: faces, names, and — I can’t remember what the third thing is.”

          Like

    • annieasksyou 5:00 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I think the Jared Kushner quote was “Ask not what your country can do for you because it’s not your country; it belongs to us.”

      I found the video chilling but enjoyable.

      The John Lewis quote made me teary.

      A very thought-provoking post, mistermuse! And a VERY belated happy birthday to your friend Francois (I’m too lazy to type his full name, but I’m pondering his thought).

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:21 pm on September 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think the John Lewis quote is even more chilling (than the video) in the context of the Trump presidency, because Trump is doing his best to take back the “down payment.”

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:05 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Peter Pan, , quotes, , ,   

    YOU ASKED FOR IT! YOU GOT IT! 

    My last post featured poetry which one of you commented that you wanted more of. So, it is by popular demand (who am I to deny my adoring readers?) that my Fats friend and I are bound to reply:

    The initials of that reader are mm. No, mistermuse isn’t the mm who asked for more. If you must know, it was magicmermaid, who I assume is a real person (not that mistermuse isn’t real — as real, at least, as magicmermaid….or as you, for that matter). You are real, aren’t you? — if not, just pretend you are, because mistermuse can use the reassurance.

    THE FAUX PAS OF POSITIVE THINKING

    “Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one.” –Voltaire

    I can live with
    Uncertainty and doubt —
    It’s know-it-alls
    I have my doubts about.

    THE PETER PRINCIPLE

    “I am not young enough to know everything.” –Sir James M. Barrie (author of the play subtitled The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up)

    Sorry that things didn’t quite Pan out
    (except in Neverland….or thereabout).

    HOW TO BETTER CULTIVATE KNOWLEDGE

    “Scholars esteem knowledge not for its use in attaining other values, but as a value in itself.” –Max Eastman

    Know,
    Weigh,

    Hoe
    Say.

    KNOW PROBLEM

    “If reality wants to get in touch, it knows where I am.” –Phil Proctor

    But if reality says,
    “Hello there, it’s me” —
    How would you know
    Absent a show of real ID?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • Notes To Ponder 2:14 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Most excellent. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • obbverse 3:03 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoyed the wordplay muchly. May I add an offering on Peter Pan?
      See Ya Late-
      Pity poor pre-adolescent Peter Pan,
      Never fated to become a full grown man-
      Sadly remembered as a smart-mouthed juvenile,
      NOW he’d say ‘kids, don’t ever bait the crocodile.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 7:15 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “I’m not young enough to know everything” is a wonderful quote!

      Liked by 3 people

    • magickmermaid 10:34 am on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, MisterMuse! I wish everyone would follow my suggestions so readily. 😀
      Yet another reason why I don’t have a webcam. All and sundry would have seen me hopping around the livingroom to the Fats Waller tune! If he can’t make you dance, no one will!

      Liked by 4 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:13 pm on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love them all, MisterMuse, especially “The Faux Pas of Positive Thinking” 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:36 pm on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise, Rosaliene. I was kind of partial to “Know Weigh Hose Say”….but when José say “No way!”, I changed my mind.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 11:11 pm on September 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      When magickmermaid, the Siren
      Called mistermuse to play
      The result was a fun environ
      So, “yes way,” I say.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 12:47 am on September 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I didn’t know you’re a poet —
        Or should I say, a poetess.,,,
        But any way you weigh it,
        You’re no damsel in distress.

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:14 am on September 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      very clever … I’m sure I’ve asked for more overtime … guess I dont have the magic touch!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:56 pm on September 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I am not sure if I like the first one best or not. Better not be sure!

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:09 pm on September 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m not sure how to respond to that, Elizabeth — but I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt. 😉

      Like

    • masercot 8:45 am on September 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The outcome is most obscure
      unless I’m sure

      When my confidence is at its height
      I probably haven’t done anything right…

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:42 am on September 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Compared to Trump,
      you’re ahead of the game —
      he NEVER does anything right
      and he’s never ever to blame.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:32 am on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If there ever was a year that reality got in touch, it’s this one, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 3:49 pm on September 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I fear the worst of the year is yet to come after Nov. 3, no matter the election results.

      Like

    • Ana Daksina 11:41 pm on October 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Really is as really does, so I’m really glad I’m not really sure that I’m real. But here’s some reassurance anyway, for ya: “There, there, dear…” 🤤

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 9:45 pm on August 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A.A. Milne, , , Clifford Odets, , , , Jack Warner, movie memories, , quotes, , ,   

    IT’S ABOUT A QUOTER TO NINE 

    Several days ago, one of my readers said she’s partial to humorous quotes, so I’ve been thinking about spending a whole lot of time thinking about devoting a post to things others have said which are funnier than what I say….but after searching high (brow) and low (brow), eye gave up. See what I mean?

    Ha ha! Just kidding. Believe it or not, I was able to find nine selections funnier-than-mine (well, maybe somewhat funnier), though I’m sure I would’ve said them first if I’d thought of them first. Some of the nine guys & gals I’m about to quote said what they said before I was even born, thus taking unfair advantage of circumstances beyond my control. But this is my blog, so as a quoter of quotes, I at least get to determine the subject matter of the quotes I quote, and the quotes I’ve chosen to quote are quotes about quotes….and I quote:

    “A quotation is a handy thing to have about, saving one the trouble of thinking for oneself – always a laborious business.” –A. A. Milne

    “I googled the quote ‘Power means not having to respond.’ Nothing happened.” –John Alejandro King [what “Power means” sounds like something Trump might say, except nothing Trump says is worth quoting]

    “Quotation: The act of repeating erroneously the words of another.” –Ambrose Bierce

    “There are two kinds of marriages: where a husband quotes the wife, and where the wife quotes the husband.” –Clifford Odets

    “You can tell a really wonderful quote by the fact that it’s attributed to a whole raft of wits.” –Anna Quindlen

    “I have made it a rule that whenever I say something stupid, I immediately attribute it to Dr. Johnson, Marcus Aurelius or Dorothy Parker.” –George Mikes

    “That woman speaks eighteen languages and can’t say ‘No’ in any of them.” –Dorothy Parker

    “You can always depend on children to quote you correctly, especially when it’s something you shouldn’t have said.” –Evan Esar

    “I can’t see what Jack Warner [Warner Bros. movie mogul] can do with an Oscar – it can’t say Yes.” –Al Jolson

    :

     
    • calmkate 2:05 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I must remind myself not to eat whilst reading your posts … I nearly choked to death!

      Those women look far more sexy in those slinky dresses than most gals these days in next to nothing!

      … see you at 8.30, I don’t want to miss anything 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:00 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m kind of partial to “next to nothing” (especially when I’m next to my wife when she’s wearing nothing), Kate — not that I have anything against sexy women in slinky dresses. 😉

        As for “see you at 8:30,” I don’t know what time zone you’re in, but in 45 minutes it’ll be 12 hours since I posted this post (note the time at the top of this post). Can you guess my time zone?

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 10:14 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          no idea, I though the states?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:41 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          Eastern Standard (Eastern Daylight) time.
          BTW, I neglected to apologize for causing you to nearly choke to death. That would’ve been hard for me to swallow, knowing that my puns are killers (I thought the worst they might do is make some readers ill).

          Like

    • rawgod 3:32 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I can agree with phrase one of this quote, “There are two kinds of marriages: where a husband quotes the wife, and where the wife quotes the husband.” –Clifford Odets, but my take on the rest of it is, “those that end indivorce, or those that end in death.” Which is your preference?

      As for the A.A. Milne quote, I can truthfully say my fafourite person to quote is myself. That way, if I misquote myself, it is not a misquote, but merely a change of time.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’ll have to take a paincheck on choosing between those two alternatives, as I’ve never experienced either one.(though I suspect that avoiding the second would prove more difficult).

        I can’t disagree about your favorite person to quote, although I sometimes wonder if I was myself when I said what I said (in which case, the George Mikes quote might prove useful).

        Like

        • rawgod 11:40 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          Say it, own it, live with the consequences. It’s not really that hard.
          The main thing is be true to yourself. Say what you mean, mean what you say (maybe you can tell me who first said that?).
          If someone midreads you, or misinterprets you, that is beyond your control.
          The hard part is using sarcasm. You are purposely writing to mislead to make a point. Many readers, unfortunately including myself, miss sarcasm. We read it straight up. Then where do we go? My above quote about marrige/death/divorce is full of sarcasm, but can still be read straight up. Ooooohhh, wny do we write in the first place?
          Because we have to!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:57 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink

          I Don’t Know WHO FIRST SAID THAT — but I do know Who’s on first and I Don’t Know is on third….not to mention What’s on second. If you ask the name of the shortstop, I Don’t Give a Damn. The rest of That routine, I don’t remember. The rest of your comment: Thumb’s up!

          Like

        • rawgod 2:06 am on September 4, 2020 Permalink

          Funny, but Bud and Lou never once mentioned the right fielders’ name. Here is a good example, https://youtu.be/4t4PzWSLhqQ of them at their greatest. BTW, I know who is in right field, but I made them a promise never to reveal his name, so, I can’t tell ya.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:46 am on September 4, 2020 Permalink

          Something tells me the right fielder’s name is Lefty. I hope Lefty’s right, or Something’s in big trouble!

          Like

    • Rivergirl 8:09 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Quotes about quotes … very circular, that. And you can’t beat Dorothy Parker!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:32 am on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed! If it weren’t for the fact that I’d be dead by now, I would love to have been within earshot of the Algonquin Round Table when Dorothy and her fellow wits had at each other.

        Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 1:33 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Tubularsock has always found that a quotable quote carries no risk. So where’s the fun in that?
      Great post.

      Cheers.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mistermuse 3:23 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        With some quotes, there’s the risk of an insight which may cause a reader to THINK (if he or she can stand the strain)….but granted, “where’s the fun in that?”
        Whatever the case, thanks for the “Great post” compliment, which is fun (for me, at any rate) to quote.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Susan 2:24 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Good selection!

      Liked by 4 people

    • arekhill1 2:38 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “There are no stupid questions, just stupid people asking questions everybody else already knows the answer to.”

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on August 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        ,,,,and then there’s Trump, who never asks questions, which is why he’s stupid (or, more accurately, ignorant).

        Like

    • Eliza 2:20 am on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      💕 Number 3 and 8 made me giggle.
      Thank you………….

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:49 am on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Number 3 is from Ambrose Bierce’s THE DEVIL’S DICTIONARY, which is definitely funnier than Webster’s Dictionary (although it’s much less ‘weighty’ than Webster’s….and takes up less room on the bookshelf too). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 12:02 pm on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I was surprised that Lauren Bacall wasn’t in the video. Funny quotes! I think your own writing is extremely funny. (You may quote me.) 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, mm. I have to be funny as long as Trump is King — I mean, President — otherwise, I’d lose my sanity (and if Trump is any example of what becomes of a man, I certainly don’t want to lose my sanity).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:47 pm on August 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Can I quote you on that?

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 9:57 am on September 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So, quotes about quotes?

      Shame on you!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:19 pm on September 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It would be shame on me if I quoted Trump (& his supporters’) quotes about quotes, but I will only stoop so low.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Marietta Rodgers 11:35 am on September 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You can absolutely depend on children repeating something you shouldn’t have said and constantly forgetting the things you want them to remember.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:58 pm on September 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Very true. The first part of your comment is reflected in a number of DENNIS THE MENACE cartoons (still appearing every day in the local newspaper) which show Dennis repeating discomfiting things his father or mother had said about people (now, in their presence). As for forgetting things, I find that to be more manifest in old age — at least, I personally DON’T REMEMBER it being a problem as a child!

        Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 4:00 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: African Queen, Beat The Devil, , , , , , , , quotes, , The Treasure of the Sierra Madre,   

    THE TREASURE OF JOHN HUSTON 

    Huston would have agreed with [Orson] Welles, who declared, “I’m awfully tired of old men saying they have no regrets. We’re loaded with, burdened with, staggering under, regrets.” –Jeffrey Meyers, from his biography JOHN HUSTON: COURAGE AND ART

    * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I must admit that JOHN HUSTON (born August 5, 1906) is not the kind of human being I admire — however, he IS the kind of film maker I admire. Yes, he made his share of clunkers, but few directors made more of my all-time favorite films than he: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The Maltese Falcon, The African Queen, Beat The Devil — and yet, he had more than his share of things to regret, as he himself admitted (more on that shortly).

    But first, here are two classic scenes from THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE:

    The second scene features the great actor Walter Huston (father of John) doing his incomparable dance in the gold-flecked dirt of the Sierra Madre mountains:

    Getting back to John Huston’s regrettable qualities, Jeffrey Meyers (in his excellent bio) compares Huston to Ernest Hemingway: “Hemingway had four wives, Huston had five (and all of his marriages ended badly). Each married increasingly younger women and, while married, fell in love with a series of women even younger than their wives. Huston, however, [unlike Hemingway] was unashamedly promiscuous. Both had three children and were difficult, demanding and frequently absent fathers.”

    “In the last paragraph of his autobiography, Huston brooded over his guilty regrets about family, finances, alcohol, tobacco and matrimony. Huston could be noble, generous and kind, as well as selfish, callous and cruel. But he should be remembered for his intellect, his imagination and his charm.”

    I, of course, cannot remember him thusly because I did not know him. But I can remember him for his films, and so I do. Who could forget the black bird….

    ….or The African Queen:

    One of those clunkers I mentioned was THE BIBLE (1966), an ungodly bad epic which he both directed and starred in. But those can be forgiven in light of the above trinity of masterpieces. If that doesn’t Beat The Devil….

     

     

     

     
    • magickmermaid 4:33 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Maltese Falcon and African Queen are two of my favourite films. Strange, but I’ve never hear of Beat the Devil. I always learn something new on your blog. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:51 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Beat the Devil probably belongs in the category CULT CLASSIC, in that it’s not widely known but has a modest following of devoted fans. I haven’t seen it in years, even on TCM, which I watch regularly.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 5:40 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love those old Bogey films. But yes, Huston was an odd duck.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:16 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Bogey may have been in more classic films than any actor I can think of, from HIGH SIERRA (screenplay by John Huston) and CASABLANCA to THE AFRICAN QUEEN and THE HARDER THEY FALL (his final film). There was only one Bogey!

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:56 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      what a trip down memory lane, always learn something new and enjoyed these clips!

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:11 pm on August 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I just watched The African Queen with my parents a few weeks ago. Huston was quite a good director, but I’m also glad I didn’t know him. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:26 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I just read in another book that Huston was driving drunk in 1933 when he struck and killed a passerby, but it was hushed up and he never paid the consequences. So much for the farce that “no man is above the law.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 10:50 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink

          Ugh. Oh, to be rich and powerful. We see what happens when someone is above the law, don’t we?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:32 am on August 6, 2020 Permalink

          Considering that Huston didn’t include that incident among his “guilty regrets” in his autobiography, he must have still thought of himself as a privileged character.

          Like

    • The Coastal Crone 6:18 pm on August 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love all these old guys!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:01 pm on August 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved the trailer for “The Maltese Falcon.” Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:42 am on August 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re very welome. I love that trailer too. What great character actors there were in that film!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 3:38 pm on August 9, 2020 Permalink

          Every winter exam period in college we attended a Bogart festival, so I saw that film four times.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:10 pm on August 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I own a copy of John Huston’s memoirs, but have not been able to bring myself to read it. I think, deep down, I just don’t want to know too much.

      However, he was one of the great filmmakers, and some of his films are among my faves.

      So glad you featured his work on your site today. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:16 am on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I ‘get’ how you feel about Huston, SS. Sometimes we must separate the art from the artist. If we can’t do that, we only truncate our capacity to objectively appreciate artistry as it stands, on its own terms.

        Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 7:50 pm on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Dang, MM, the list of movies I need to see keeps growing. Maltese Falcon, Sierra Madre, African Queen and Casablanca. Okay. Now I need to find the time to sit down and watch them all! Mona

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:58 pm on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Mona, all I can say is that you won’t be wasting your time with any of those movies. If I were you, I’d start with Casablanca because becoming a classic film buff begins with the gold standard for classic films (Casablanca). Happy viewing!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , H.G. Wells, , I Could Have Danced All Night, , , , , quotes, , socialism   

    I COULD HAVE ROMANCED ALL NIGHT…. 

    I could have….that is, if I were fifty years younger. But why bemoan it if Mother Nature no longer shores up the animal in me? Still, she’s no spring chicken herself, so you’d think she’d cut old geezers like me some slack.

    Moving on from my love life of fond memory: Wouldn’t it be loverly if I instead celebrated the 164th birthday of my near-contemporary George Bernard Shaw with a selection of songs from MY FAIR LADY (based on his play PYGMALION), followed by a bit of biography, a serving of Shaw quotes, and a nightcap of Shavian brew-haha.

    From “Wouldn’t It Be” to “I Could Have”….

    In this scene, Stanley Holloway is seen lifting his spirits on his last night of ‘freedom’:

    Next in line, the bit of bio:

    https://www.biography.com/writer/george-bernard-shaw

    Now sink your teeth into the quotes:

    I was a freethinker before I knew how to think.

    Lack of money is the root of all evil.

    Beware of the man whose god is in the skies.

    The worst sin toward our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them; that’s the essence of inhumanity.

    You’ll never have a quiet world till you knock the patriotism out of the human race.

    There is only one sort of genuine Socialism, the democratic sort, by which I mean the organization of society for the benefit of the whole people.

    We should have had socialism already, but for the socialists.

    ….which leads us to the brew-haha / brouhaha between Shaw and fellow socialist H.G. Wells (click on the title below the cartoon caricature):

    ….which takes us at a social difference to

    THE END

     
    • calmkate 3:43 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      those quotes have incredible insight, thanks for the share!

      Could play those songs as they ring in my head just hearing the name MFL … was traumatised by my parents torturing us with constant replays until we finally left home!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:47 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      We just watched My Fair Lady the other day. I believe it rained in Spain…

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 10:29 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My parents also played the My Fair Lady LP frequently so I knew many of the songs before I saw the film.
      I wonder what Shaw and Wells would think of the current world situations.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:19 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I think both Shaw and Wells would be even more appalled than they were in their lifetimes. If socialism was a dirty word to conservatives then, it’s no less so now. As the old saying goes: The more things change, the more they remain the same.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:50 am on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So true!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:20 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m down with the socialist hellhole, Sr. Muse. Sign me up.

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 9:04 am on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m more of a George Orwell socialist…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:47 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m probably a ‘practical socialist,’ in that I want what Bernie Sanders wants, but not in a “my way or the highway” sense. I believe in take what you can get now and live to fight another day, rather than all or nothing at all. When the other side has the power and the votes, half a loaf is better than none (if that doesn’t work, then screw everything I just said).

        Liked by 1 person

    • waywardsparkles 3:53 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      MM,
      I love all of the references to movies and their quotes. I’m making a list of movies I’ve never seen that you’ve showcased on your site so that when I have the time, I can look them up on Netflix and catch up. My Fair Lady is one. Finnigan’s Rainbow, another. 🙂 Mona

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:05 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mona. I expect that I’ll be adding more movies (especially musicals) to your list in upcoming posts. Enjoy!

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 7:37 pm on July 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My Fair Lady is one of my favorite musicals. Amazing the way the capitalists have demonized the word ‘socialism.’

      Liked by 3 people

    • thewanderingempath 10:10 pm on July 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This was so much fun to read. It was like a meander through someone’s brain. Loved it. Thanks!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:24 pm on July 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope your comment which appreciates someone’s brainpower doesn’t go to my head….if, by “someone’s,” you mean mine. In any case, I thank you very much! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Kally 1:10 pm on July 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh this is so fun for me to read. Cheer me up tremendously !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:02 pm on August 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Bahaha! Your “near contemporary” George Bernard Shaw!

      I’m not a huge fan of My Fair Lady, but I do love the music, and it was lovely to listen to these pieces again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on August 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I especially enjoyed the rendition of I COULD HAVE DANCED ALL NIGHT from Lincoln Center, which I’d not heard before. The vocalist has a lovely voice and put a lot of emotion into her performance without overdoing it.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 6:11 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Clarence Darrow, , , half-truths, , , , quotes, , , ,   

    WHERE THE TRUTH LIES 

    lie, n. a false statement known to be false by the person who makes it.
    liev. to be in a horizontal or flat position; to exist; have its place.  –World Book Dictionary

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    So, where does the truth lie? Attempts to address that question, it seems to me, lie in the assumption that we know objectively what truth is. Should we settle for the negative defining of truth as being the opposite of “lie, n“? I don’t know that most of us want to — or need to — go deeper into the jungle of truth than that, but if you’re of a mind to take the path of beast resistance, you can start here:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hide-and-seek/201808/what-is-truth

    In our dystopian sub-culture of “fake news,” half-truths, whole-cloth fabrications and false narratives in which truth is what President Trump says it is and science is fiction, it isn’t always simple to disentangle truth from the deluge of prevarication and misrepresentations which is Trump’s stock in trade  — and he knows it. Who can fact check it all fast enough? The old saying remains relevant: “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes.”

    And speaking of quotes which remain relevant, try these on for wise:

    Carlyle said, “A lie cannot live.” It shows he did not know how to tell them. –Mark Twain

    If at first you’re not believed, lie, lie again.–Evan Esar (not Trump, believe it or not)

    The pursuit of truth shall set you free, even if you never catch up with it. –Clarence Darrow

    It is twice as hard to crush a half-truth as a whole lie. –Austin O’Malley

    Truth is more important than facts. –Frank Lloyd Wright

    All men are born truthful and die liars. –Marquis de Vauvenargues

    And so it goes. Would I lie to you?

     

     
    • calmkate 6:24 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      well I was hoping for a glimmer of truth but am sadly disappointed .. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:37 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well, you can always fall back on Trump — there may be “a glimmer of truth” somewhere in his deep, dark past.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:38 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          somehow doubt that … hope his parents have passed, how humiliating to have given birth to that …

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:49 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink

          His late father would be proud, not humiliated. ‘Like father, like son,’ by all accounts (including the new book by The Donald’s niece, Mary Trump).

          Like

    • obbverse 7:02 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The Trump Hound- mouth of a Rottweiler, brain of a Shi Tzu. Temperament? Whiney, disloyal lazy, comfortable to simply lay around the House and lie, lie lie and lie. Barking? Mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 7:07 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If someone proves to be a liar in one instance, then I find it extremely difficult to believe anything else they may say. Resist the beast! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 8:34 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Since he sticks in my craw can I spit out another?
      Bad mad dogs of his kind
      Growlingly protect their address,
      When evicted they sure do leave behind
      Nothing but a nasty mess.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:40 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        There’s no guarantee he’ll leave —
        He has many tricks up his sleeve.
        Who knows what deviltry he’ll try?
        We only know it’ll be a monstrous lie.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rebecca Wallick 10:16 pm on July 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thirty-plus years in the legal profession taught me this truth: almost everyone lies, with a straight face, even after swearing an oath to tell the truth.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:25 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        According to Mark Twain (and others), there are three kinds of lies: LIES, DAMNED LIES, AND STATISTICS. I don’t know about the legal profession, but I think it’s safe to say the political profession encompasses all three. Oddly enough, no one mentioned the fourth (and saddest) kind of lie:

        Like

    • jilldennison 1:11 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Politically, there is a very simple way to separate fact from fiction, truth from lie. If Donald Trump or ANY of his hand-picked sycophants say it, it is a lie. I think that for tonight I shall have to pass on the path of beast resistance, for my mental acuity is about fried. Perhaps tomorrow!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:42 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You ain’t lyin’, Jill.
        And I don’t blame you for passing on the path of beast resistance if you’re mental acuity is fried, because it’s a lot to digest. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 4:54 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The only acceptable lies are on the golf course.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 7:33 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Though I constantly call him a moron, his one clever move was to undermine faith in the media, journalism and the news in general. Alternative truth has served him well.
      😡

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        No doubt he has a certain amount of ‘street smarts,’ but no doubt the road to hell is jammed with big talkers.

        Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:39 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a fun post. This one needs a late night and a few bottles of wine. Almost everything is subjective, right? So we each will have our own versions of truth even when we are committed to the concept. It seems to me, that humans are best served by getting as close to the truth as we can and peeling away the lies whenever possible. Just ask the poor souls who believed Trump’s lies about the virus.

      I’m not sure that Trump actually believes he’s lying. His narcissistic personality borders on psychosis and it’s impossible for him to not be perfect. The mere idea that he might have a flaw feels like annihilation, which is why he reacts so viciously or ridiculously lies. He’s learned over the years to manipulate others so he never has to be imperfect. I can’t wait until he’s gone.

      Great quotes too!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:19 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana. I think you’ve ‘psychoanalyzed’ Trump perfectly. From what I hear of TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH, the new book about Trump by his niece Mary Trump (a professional psychologist), her diagnosis is much the same. The election can’t come soon enough.

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 4:06 pm on July 23, 2020 Permalink

          No, it can’t. What he’s doing in Portland is outrageous. What I want to know is where are all the 2nd Amendment rights militias who are supposed to be saving us from our government’s oversteps??? (Not really, but isn’t this why they say they need their guns?)
          Gah! You can get me ranting for hours. Lol

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:23 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      A liar will be the first to accuse you of lying. My contribution to the literature of mendaciousness, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on July 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’d recommend that Trump reflect on your comment, Ricardo, but the guy (who claims he knows more than anyone) wouldn’t know the meaning of mendaciousness

        Like

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: actors, , , book rview, , , , , quotes, ,   

    THE FIX IS OFF (for now) 

    Something has come up to postpone my out-of-town daughter’s Father’s Day visit until the following weekend ….so my browser problem will remain on hold, and without resolution, until the (offspring’s) fix is in. Meanwhile, back at the rant, I’ve finished reading the outspoken CARROLL O’CONNOR’s autobiography wherein he vents about many things. So, to fill in, let’s take up where my last post left off. After all, it’s All In The Family.

    O’Connor had a very varied pre-Archie Bunker life. Like many in their early adult years, he couldn’t find his niche. “I could not shake off a feeling of foolishnessa man of 26 plodding through the days and months with no plan, no answer for anyone who might ask “What are you going to do with yourself?” The eventual answer, after many dead-end turns, turned out to be acting….and, finally, stardom (which came with an Archie Bunker mentality).

    I — no doubt like most who read autobiographies — do so primarily to learn more about the author, his/her life and times. But I’ll also admit to the guilty pleasure of learning what the author thought of well-known contemporaries — in fact, such opinions may offer insights into other personalities and professions, which broaden (for better or worse) what I thought I knew about them. So, what were O’Connor’s impressions of….

    JOHN WAYNE: “He perceived America as the preeminent hero-nation, virtually a land of heroes in which he himself felt heroic (and actually was, as I knew him) and infused that perception into all his roles as naturally as if it were one of the primary  emotions.”

    JEAN STAPLETON: “Jean’s idea of Edith Bunker was not only original and perfectly suited to the American audience, but very comical and emotionally moving. If ever anything on television changed the country, not radically, not even obviously, it was the performance of Jean and the example of Edith. Did our series effectively attack bigotry and racism? We thought so at the time –”

    HARRY TRUMAN: “Nobody expected Truman to take part in a Korean civil war, if one should begin. His military chiefs had no battle plan; on the contrary, they had a plan for getting out of the way — withdrawing to Japan. I thought Truman was totally wrong — his political vision faulty, his practical leadership unintelligent, his moral justification false. For me, the issue of morality in war– whether or not it is a “just war” — turns on the question of choice. When you wage war because you have no choice you are acting justly. But when you have a reasonable choice and choose to wage war, you can’t call your war just.”

    MOVIE WRITERS, “though marvelously reliable in inventing space creatures — shriveled humanoids and hugely swollen insects — are unreliable in depicting intelligent life on earth.”

    AGENTS “are generally shrewd, knowing, clever people; good company, good friends. They have made my career; they make all careers; they are the most important people in the business.”

    ACTORS: “I shall never forget my first professional play rehearsal at The Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, in the spring of 1951 — the immediate cordiality of my new friends the actors: they greeted me like an intimate. Now after all these years I am still unfailingly comforted, encouraged and elated in the company of actors. There is something about the work these dear neurotics do, investigating every kind of human character, that  develops in them an extraordinary tolerance, forgiveness and good humor. I commend their company even to normal folk.”

    ….and I commend this book of Carroll’s to you.

     
    • waywardsparkles 1:50 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Those were the days watching All in the Family, The Jeffersons, and Maude! Ya know, I can’t remember a single episode of any of them; but I loved how Archie continued to open up as the show went on. Wait a minute, do you remember the episode when Archie had to get a transfusion? I do remember that episode. That was genius! Thanks for sharing about Carroll O’Connor’s autobiography, MM. Mona

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I vaguely remember that episode, Mona, but like you, I mainly remember the series in general, as a whole, not for individual programs. The same, I think, applies to MASH, although re-runs appear regularly on local TV and refresh memories of specific episodes much more readily.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 2:42 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Aww. Sad your fix is off. But this is a very interesting post

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 2:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sorry your daughter is delayed, but she will get there!

      So JW was just being himself, explains why he was monotonously the same in everything he appeared in … Carroll’s shares some good insights, particularly about war! Thanks for the review 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. I have several dozen biographies/autobiographies on my bookshelves, and O’Connor’s is one of the best.

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 4:03 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Don’t panic! Help sounds like its on the way. Autobiographies seem to become more interesting the older we get. Something to do with the human condition, or trying to understand it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:08 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, o.v. The ‘search’ for understanding is never-ending (until the end), but to paraphrase an old saying, “’tis better to have searched and come up short than never to have searched at all.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 6:44 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      That book sound very interesting — what a character! Hope you get your fix soon, mister muse! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:57 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope so too, Carmen. The problems are getting worse (for example, my computer is increasingly ‘freezing’ on me — usually in the middle of writing a post or comment — requiring that I shut down and re-start). I wonder if it would help if I put my computer outside in the hot weather? 😉

        Like

    • Rivergirl 7:15 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People always think of Archie when they think of O’Connor, but he really was so much more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg. If he were still alive today, it’s not hard to imagine Archie supporting King Trump and O’Connor railing against him as the emperor who has no clothes.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Ostertag 10:44 pm on June 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I spent a week at Leonard Nimoy’s house which was across the street from O’Connor’s. That entire week, Carroll O’Connor cut his grass. He would finish with the lawn and start over again. I wanted to go and meet him, I heard he was a kind and intelligent person, but I never had the time. The Nimoys said he was a great neighbor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:42 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Very interesting. The Nimoys must have had the fast growing grass in town. I mow my lawn once a year whether it needs it or not. 😉

        Like

        • Don Ostertag 1:17 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Not the Nimoy’s lawn.., It was Carroll O’Connor cutting the O’Connor lawn.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:47 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the clarification — I took “cut his grass” to mean that, because he was “a great neighbor,” O’Connor cut Nimoy’s lawn while Nimoy was away for a week. Out of even lesser misunderstandings, yards have been known to turn into battlefields!

          Like

    • annieasksyou 12:01 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting, mistermuse—especially O’Connor’s takes on Truman and John Wayne. Did he say why he felt Wayne was heroic?

      I don’t think computers like hot weather one whit, but I’m perhaps a tad more tech-adept than you, based on your description, so don’t byte a single bit of info I provide.
      Enjoy Father’s Day. Is this an actual —as opposed to virtual—visit?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:16 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        When he knew Wayne, O’Connor wasn’t as liberal as he later became, so I assume that was how he felt then, before he ‘matured.’

        My daughter’s visit will be “actual” in order to install a new browser, as I am virtually blogging “up a creek without a paddle” on my outdated browser (at least, I assume that’s the cause of the problems I’m having — if not, I’m thinking of drowning my sorrow, and I don’t mean in the creek).

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:21 am on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope your daughter rescues you forthwith. If not, I assume you mean drowning your sorrow in a “spirited” manner, to which I say “bottoms up.”
      I switched from Safari to Firefox at WP’s suggestion, only to learn that Firefox, for reasons I can’t comprehend, will not let me grab images the way Safari does. So I do my image search with Safari and my writing with Firefox. I am way beyond creek depth now with no daughter available to paddle me to safe land. Best of luck!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It so happens that my daughter plans to switch me to Firefox. Before she does, I’ll bring your experience to her attention. She’s the head computer technician at the university where she works, but she doesn’t blog, so she may not be familiar with the idiosyncrasies of the various browsers when it comes to blogging. Thanks for the ‘heads-up.’

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 2:35 pm on June 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You’re welcome. It happened to me with Google Advanced Image Search, which I use a lot, and with YouTube. But maybe your daughter the pro will be able to show you how to overcome my problem. And then maybe you can tell me!

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 5:20 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope you are having a nice Father’s Day!
      There was a Microsoft update this past week in which the new version of the Edge browser was installed. Much to my surprise it’s super-fast!
      I forgot to mention something regarding the “like” problem. If you have your Enhanced Tracker Setting for your browser set for “custom” or “strict”, that prevents “liking” on certain blogs. Just click on the shield icon in the address bar and you can uncheck the tracking. You will then be able to “like”. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:08 pm on June 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. I AM having a nice Father’s Day — made all the nicer by my neighbor mowing my lawn this weekend (he is the father of the (no longer) little girl my wife and I took care of years ago while he and his wife worked). Now that’s what I call a good neighbor!

        P.S. I will pass your tip on to my daughter next weekend when she installs a new browser, as I will not be publishing any more posts until then.

        Liked by 1 person

    • josephurban 3:57 pm on June 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Nice article. If you like autobiographies I suggest the Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant. I am currently reading it after watching a History Channel 3 part series on Grant. Fascinating.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:23 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This looks like a truly interesting, well-written book with lots of insight. I think I need to find a copy.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:42 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t think you’ll be disappointed, SS. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked the book.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Machiavelli, , , , quotes, , ,   

    PHILOSPHER STONED 

    If there’s one thing I think we can all agree on about Donald Trump, it’s that he isn’t a philosopher. If, however, he can be said to have one guiding precept remotely resembling a philosophy, it has to be IT’S ALL ABOUT ME….or, secondarily, DON’T BLAME ME (which happens to be the title of a song I was going to link here until — faster than you can say Niccollo Machiavelli — Google removed share, embed & copy from their music clips, leaving technologically-challenged mistermuse at a loss as to how to post them).

    Be that as it may, I got to thinking that if THE DONALD were a lit-wit (rather than a nitwit) who wished to appear philosophical, there must be any number of wise philosophical quotes he might plagiarize to his greater glory (or, if he were stoned, learn from). Here are some I drug up which could fill the (Duck’s) bill:

    There is nothing so absurd that it cannot be believed if repeated often enough. — William James, American philosopher

    Philosophy teaches us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of others. –Oscar Wilde, Irish wit, poet and playwright

    Any man can be a philosopher if he only thinks enough about his own foolishness. –Edgar Watson Howe, American novelist and editor

    Philosophers have only interpreted the world. The point, however, is to change it. –Karl Marx, German philosopher, political theorist and socialist revolutionary

    If I killed everyone who was stupid, I wouldn’t have time to sleep. –Tamora Pierce, American fantasy fiction writer

    Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something. –Plato, Greek philosopher

    Always recognize that human individuals are ends, and do not use them as means to your end. — Immanuel Kant, German philosopher

    Philosophers before Kant had a tremendous advantage over philosophers after Kant, in that they didn’t have to spend years studying Kant.  –Bertrand Russell, British philosopher, writer and social critic

    Only one philosopher in history had a perfect alibi for doing nothing, and his name was I. Kant. –Evan Esar, American humorist

     
  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Blaise Pascal, Erica Jong, , Lenin, , , opera, quotes, , ,   

    TRUTH BE TOLD….so it is said 

    When I come across a quote I love, and which is so true that it hits home (home being where the heart is), I often tell Cupid to get lost while I grab a pen, because in my heart….

    Yes, I want to be alone so I can write down said truth on whatever scrap of paper is handy before I get distracted and forget it….even then, I often don’t recall where I left that lovely quote, and Cupid will call me stupid (but then, aren’t we all when Cupid is involved?).

    Anyway, I haven’t written a post since I got home from the (soap) opera six days of our lives ago, so today I thought I’d seek out and gather up some of the bold and beautiful quotations I misplaced, for you alone (you ARE alone, aren’t you?):

    I don’t want to be alone, I want to be left alone.” –Audrey Hepburn, actress

    “In Genesis, it says that it is not good for a man to be alone, but sometimes it is a great relief. –John Barrymore, actor

    “Solitude is un-American.” –Erica Jong, novelist and poet

    All men’s miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone.” –Blaise Pascal, writer, inventor, and theologian

    “The trouble with opera in the United States is that it is trying to sell caviar to a hamburger-eating country.” –Helen Traubel, opera singer

    “Opera: a play about life in another world whose inhabitants have no speech but song, no motions but gestures, and no postures but attitudes.” –Ambrose Bierce

    Opera: where anything that is too stupid to be spoken, is sung.” –Voltaire

    Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad.” –Aldous Huxley

    It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.” –Mark Twain

    There is a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure the truth.” –Maya Angelou

    I will close with a timely quote in which the words alone, opera, and truth do not appear….but I would say that truer words were never spoken (despite who said them):
    “Democracy counts heads without regard to what’s in them.” –Lenin

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:38 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved your quotes herein Mistermuse! Good share and always nice to read your posts. Looks like you must watch more soap (operas) to encourage you to pen more, on whatever scraps of paper – Hmm even gum wrappers perhaps? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:43 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t watch soap operas, GH, but my wife and daughters did years ago, and I got a whiff of a few of them in passing. These days, just following the intrigues of Trump and his cast of sycophants is like watching a soap opera — a VERY BAD soap opera.

      Liked by 2 people

    • blindzanygirl 2:02 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Some of them made me giggle. And anything that makes me giggle at 4 o’ clock in the morning MUST be good!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:14 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m never up at 4 o’clock in the morning unless nature calls — which doesn’t make me giggle (though I may end up with a jiggle).

        Liked by 2 people

        • blindzanygirl 10:20 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink

          Lol mistermuse. I usually wake up at 4 a.m. for a wee, then can’t get back to sleep again! So I rebd to come in here!

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 3:06 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol great collection of misplaced quotes! I also had a giggle all alone 😎
      but then my neighbour came knocking to ask what was the matter … lol
      sadly I loathe opera with a passion so some of these were written for me!

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 3:55 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Mr Twain nails it again And should life give you Lenin, make a Collective.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:28 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Life has given the country a “Lenin” with Trump, and needs a collective of enough voters to make the November election his last stand.

        Like

    • Rivergirl 9:03 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoy being alone. Why wouldn’t I? I’m marvelous company…
      😉

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely, Rg — you and the rocks (non-followers of Rivergirl’s blog will have to go there to get that). 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:24 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. Voltaire’s is hilarious.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:40 am on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I agree. “Boogie! Boogie! Boogie!” (to quote Groucho Marx in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA).

      Like

    • magickmermaid 12:18 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Although I have to disagree with Voltaire, I like all the other quotes. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:50 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not an opera lover, but if I had to choose, I’d take opera over soap opera because who needs soap when he only takes a bath/shower once a year, whether he needs it or not?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:04 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I find Angelou’s quote confusing. What sense do you make of it?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Perhaps the most common use of “Facts [to] obscure the truth” is political spin. See below:

        https://www.britannica.com/topic/political-spin

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 6:10 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. That makes sense. I really couldn’t understand her quote. Now I do.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:23 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink

          You’re very welcome, Elizabeth. If Trump & Company were as good at telling the truth as they are at spinning and/or twisting it, his followers wouldn’t know what to believe….and it might even give them second thoughts (not that they do any profound thinking in the first place).

          Like

    • mlrover 8:17 pm on February 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Helen Traubel was on to something,especially when one keeps in mind that most TV watchers consider the singers on “Idol” talented. They may be but they’re certainly not trained and wouldn’t know a well-structured measure from a mordent.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I remember Helen Traubel well. Though a big (in more ways than one) opera star, she was no stuffed shirt — well, maybe physically, but not culturally — and made many guest appearances on TV back in the day, often on comedy shows like Jimmy Durante’s.

        As for today’s singers (and I mordently and mordantly use the term loosely), I can’t stand to listen to most of them, but as a product of today’s culture, what else would we expect? I suspect that some of them would’ve been good singers if they had grown up several generations ago….but not knowing any better, are they really to blame?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:25 am on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes here! Some made me frown but mostly they made me smile. Can’t be bad and now the sun has come out! Hoooray!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:09 pm on February 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Voltaire’s comment on the opera made me laugh out loud. It sounds so irreverent!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:36 pm on February 24, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Every time I watch DUCK SOUP and A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, it’s amazing how funny Groucho’s lines still are today.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:45 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Being alone is ok for some…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E9ydw_aDMg

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 11:46 pm on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I vote (ready to vote already) Mark Twain followed close by Huxley.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:16 am on February 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I can’t argue with those votes, Mary. Another one I really like is the Lenin quote, because it goes a long way toward explaining why Trump got millions of votes.

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 10:52 pm on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      here’s my original quote; “question is the answer.” continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:14 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, Tony, but would you kindly answer a question that has puzzled me for some time: your comments always end with the word “continue…” but continue where? At first I thought that if I clicked “continue,” it was a link which led to something….but nothing happens. What do you intend by “continue”?

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 5:16 am on March 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      i mean keep on going MM…keep on doing…just keep on. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • kutukamus 2:08 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Especially love those ones by Traubel and Lenin. 🍸

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:52 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Truth Be Told, the Lenin quote is my fav….but I like them all.

      Like

    • annieasksyou 11:44 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, Mistermuse. I just stopped by to welcome you to annieasksyou; I’m delighted to have you join me. And since I love bad puns, dislike opera, and have written my share of tirades about a certain White House occupant, I am now following you as well. So cheers!

      Annie

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:10 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment, about which I have just one quibble: I would call Trump the White House disaster, rather than White House occupant. 😉

        Like

        • annieasksyou 9:25 am on March 17, 2020 Permalink

          I would agree—and even “disaster” doesn’t capture what his egomaniacal ineptitude has wrought on us now…

          But since we all need to keep our immune systems strong because of this plague he’s dramatically worsened, I’m putting a moratorium on myself to try to think of him as little as possible, focusing instead on things that cheer me—such as our budding new crocuses and the bird serenade outside my window.

          Liked by 1 person

    • skullGhost 8:03 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Simply amazing. And to add further, it seems this Lenin has captured the practical utilitarian essence of democracy well in those few words.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:13 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ironic, but true.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , quotes,   

    YOU NEED TO READ SWIFT TO GET UP TO SPEED 

    I don’t recall how old I was — probably no later than my early teens — when I first read Jonathan Swift’s satirical masterpiece Gulliver’s Travels; all I know is it made a lasting impression on my unworldly-wise perception of the world. If you haven’t read the book, this summary will at least give you the bare bones:

    Several films have been made based on the novel; here is the trailer for the version I remember seeing (the book was what made me think; the movie served as entertaining afterthought):

    JONATHAN SWIFT, born this day (Nov. 30) in 1667 in Dublin, led a multi-faceted life between Ireland and England (his place of residence often depended on events beyond his control). For the meaty details of  his life, you might consider taking time to go Googling; here, I offer a dozen of his quotes, the first two of which are from Gulliver’s Travels:

    Based on Gulliver’s descriptions of their behavior, the King describes Europeans as “the most pernicious race of little odious vermin that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.

    The tiny Lilliputians surmise that Gulliver’s watch may be his God, because it is that which, he admits, he seldom does anything without consulting.

    When the world has once begun to use us ill, it afterwards continues to use the same treatment with less scruple or ceremony, as men do to a whore.

    I never wonder to see men wicked, but I often wonder to see them not ashamed.

    Words are the clothing of our thoughts.

    Falsehood flies, and truth comes limping after it, so that when men come to be undeceived, it is too late; the jest is over, and the tale hath had its effect: like a man who hath thought of a good repartee when the company departed.

    Happiness is the perpetual possession of being well deceived.

    We of this age have discovered a shorter, and more prudent method to become scholars and wits, without the fatigue of reading or of thinking.

    We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.

    I wonder what fool it was that first invented kissing.

    It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

    Nothing is so hard for those who  abound in riches as to conceive how others can be in want.

    Almost 300 years have passed since Swift completed Gulliver’s Travels, and the world still doesn’t seem to have gotten the word. Too bad.

     
    • calmkate 1:00 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      yes I always thought he was profound beyond measure … these quotes perfectly demonstrate that!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:56 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Among other things, he was a clergyman, but wasn’t above criticizing religion (as shown by one of the quotes). Now there’s a man you can have faith in!

        Liked by 3 people

    • obbverse 2:52 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      ‘Words are the clothing of our thoughts’, that’s a wonderful quote.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:33 am on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree — but I think we should take it cautiously, in the sense that judging someone by how they dress would require a perfect judge, and none of us are that (except me — ha ha).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 4:12 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Sadly, there are some lessons we never learn….

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:54 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It must be something in the air. If we’d all stop breathing, maybe people would stop killing and doing other bad things to each other.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 6:05 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The essay by Swift that always got to my students was “A Modest Proposal.” It is pretty timely again too, given the attitude towards struggling refugees world wide at the moment.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:18 am on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’m against eating poor children, as modestly (and satirically) proposed by Swift, but I’m not opposed to eating the likes of Donald Trump by anyone who has the stomach for it.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Silver Screenings 6:26 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wow – three hundred years old! And as timely as ever.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 8:53 am on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Haha! I nearly spewed my morning cup o’ tea on the keyboard when I read your reply.

      Liked by 2 people

    • JosieHolford 5:16 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a brilliant skewering of all our pretensions and hypocrisies.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:14 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed it is….and after thousands of years of human history, my guess is that if we haven’t shed our pretensions and hypocrises by now, we never will.

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 6:07 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Seems like there are quite a few descendants of the Yahoos in today’s world 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Richard A Cahill 9:01 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Everyone was required to read Gulliver’s Travels in my high school days, and they should be again Sr. Muse. That’s a modest proposal.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:07 pm on December 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Ricardo — or at least watch the movie, for those who have made it to high school unable to read.

        Liked by 1 person

    • willedare 7:36 am on October 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotations! These two in particular jumped out at me. “We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another…” and “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into…” I guess it is slightly reassuring to be reminded that human beings have been behaving poorly for centuries! Thank you for this post.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:36 am on October 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I never thought of it as even “slightly reassuring,” but now that you mention it, it is reassuring to realize that human beings of old didn’t have the weapons of mass obliteration of the past 80 years, or our ancestors might have been obliterated and we wouldn’t have been born.

        On a more agreeable note (speaking of great quotes), two days ago I published a post on another Dublin-born writer, Oscar Wilde. A few of the quotes in that post seem very Swift-like. I guess great minds really do think alike.

        Thank you for your comment.

        Like

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