Tagged: old age Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Give Me That Old Time Religion, , , , It Ain't Necessarily So, longevity, , old age, oldest living man, , , , ,   

    SENIOR MUSE SOUNDS OFF FOR OLD TIMERS SAKE 

    In 1984, members of the Oxford Library Club for Retired Professional People were especially looking forward to hearing a guest speaker on “Old Age, Absent-Mindedness, and Keeping Fit.” Unfortunately, the speaker forgot to show up. –excerpted from the book 1,000 UNFORGETTABLE SENIOR MOMENTS

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    MAY being OLDER AMERICANS MONTH, and ME being an older American, I’ve decided to post a post predicated on passing on — make that on passing along — hoary words of wisdom concerning a subject I’m surpassingly qualified to write about, namely …. ….hmmm….uh….ah…. longevity (ha ha — you thought I forgot what I was going to write about, didn’t you?).

    Actually, I must admit to being a bit of a senior citizen-slouch when it comes to longevity — at least, compared to this guy:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/worlds-oldest-man-146-birthday-long-life-location-country-name-celebrates-old-age-a7505401.html

    And of course, that there this guy is himself a slouch compared to this here this guy:

    Methuselah, as all my bible-believing brethr’n and sistern know, was said to have lived 969 years (Genesis 5:27), so you might think this song is my inspiration to keep marching on:

    But (and I quote) “Who calls that livin’ when no gal’s gonna give in to no man what’s 900 years?”

    So there you have it from Bobby Darin singing the lyrics of Ira Gershwin. Or you can take it from Senior Muse quoting the words of Oscar Wilde: “The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is not young.”

     

     

     

     
    • mlrover 8:03 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It Ain’t Necessarily So is one of my favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 9:18 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      love it .. our resident ‘expert’ on longevity ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 2:08 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You must have read my mind. I think that at least a dozen times a day (or is I think it for the first time, a dozen times a day?)

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Well, there’s being “only as old as you feel” — and then there’s this:

        Like

    • Eliza 4:15 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Imagine being young for eternity??

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Being old, I find it hard to imagine. But innocence is for the young, and who am I to throw a sour note into their song?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:29 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d like to live to 969 years old… if only to piss off the Social Security office.
      😈

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:34 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If the extreme right wing ever gains control of all branches of government, it may not matter how long you live — there probably won’t be a Social Security office (but not to worry; charity will take care of you).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 12:22 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always thought the world’s oldest man (or woman) to be the ultimate temp job, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:00 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I have laughed about a song that promises “I will love you until you’re 70.” Then what? Thanks for the opening laugh.

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:19 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Incredible!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:20 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video not available.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:55 pm on May 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know which video you mean. The first is METHUSELAH, the second is GIVE ME THAT OLD TIME RELIGION, and the third is IT AIN’T NECESSARILY SO. If you can’t get the latter two, there are many other versions. If you can’t get METHUSELAH, the name is really all you need to know, so it ain’t necessarily worth the trouble of trying to find a substitute.

        Like

        • America On Coffee 1:38 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink

          Bobby Darin and Methuselah. I found Methuselah and its a great video as well as the old time religion which the world and I really need. Thank you mistermuse for all of your inspirings. Have a great week!

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:58 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The OLD TIME RELIGION clip is a scene from the 1960 movie INHERIT THE WIND based on the notorious 1925 “Scopes Monkey Trial” of a Tennessee schoolteacher for teaching evolution. It’s a great film (starring Spencer Tracy) and I highly recommend it.

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 4:49 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      146 years! Good grief!

      Also, I love a post that includes “Inherit the Wind” and Bobby Darin. Nicely done.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:53 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        INHERIT THE WIND was on TCM again last night. Since I hadn’t seen it in several years, I watched it again and enjoyed it as much as ever (though I think Gene Kelly is a bit miscast as the reporter).

        Like

        • Silver Screenings 1:00 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Agreed. I want to like Gene Kelly in that role, but I never quite buy it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:24 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Fortunately, Spencer Tracy, Fredric March and the rest of the cast are so spot-on that Kelly’s off-key performance can be given a pass (though not by much).

          Like

      • mistermuse 3:33 pm on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Bobby Darin is all but forgotten today but was one of the great singers of his tragically short time in the spotlight.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:36 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Getting old ain’t for wimps, but a sense of humor goes a long way.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:32 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, Diana. If I didn’t have a sense of humor, I probably wouldn’t have any sense at all!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 1:32 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Growing old is better than the alternative – not growing old any longer.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:05 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I said that to an old relative in a nursing home years ago, and she said “How do you know — we don’t know what the alternative is.” Now that I’m old myself, I must admit there’s a sense in which she was right. Nonetheless, I plan on living to reach 100 if it kills me.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bucket truck, feet, Footloose and Fancy Free, , kick the bucket, old age, one foot in the grave, , , , Richard Himber Orchestra (Stuart Allen vocal), , song,   

    ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOT TALK? 

    When I was young, I never thought about getting old (a stage of life known as having one foot in the grave — almost curtains). So, having two feet in the grave was the last thing on my mind. Now I’m a senior citizen, and I’m still not ready to kick the bucket, but my feet are killing me like I am about to kick bucket — or, with my luck it (this bucket) kicks me:

    Foot cramps, ingrown toenails, fungus among-us, smelly feet (you know this from my last post) — it’s like I got my feet at the Bad Feet Store. You name it, my feet are treating me like a heel. Don’t laugh — someday you may walk in my shoes, and then you’ll know the agony of de feet and be the sole of remorse for not seeing fit to empathize. But I guess you’ll cross that footbridge when you come to it.

    Having retired from a desk job, I didn’t spend most of my life upon my feet, so my tootsies aren’t letting me down because of being mistreated. Likewise, I’ve seldom, if ever, worn high heels (I may have BEEN a heel a time or two, but that’s a different story). I don’t know — maybe I’m finally footing the bill for writing such poems as this:

    All humans have more than one foot,
    Unless one has less than two.
    One can trust I count two on me —
    More or less, can one count on you?

    Groan. I guess my days of being this are over:

     

     

     
    • Paul Sunstone 1:35 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I was forced to forward your post to the proper authorities on the grounds it was exceeding the legal pun limit.

      Liked by 4 people

    • calmkate 7:17 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      how footuitous that you have both feet in the grave, are down in the heel and obviously in need of a swift shoe up the posterior IMHO 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:36 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Fortunately, I only have one foot in the grave, calmkate. When I have two feet in the grave, I won’t be replying to your comments (or anyone else’s, for that matter). 🙂

        BTW, “one foot in the grave” is an expression which dates back to the 17th century, which makes it almost as old as I am. It means ‘near death’ (like most of my puns).

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:47 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink

          had no idea the term or you were so prehistoric, nice chatting with a dinosaur 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 8:23 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “You need feet, to stand up straight with,
      You need feet, to kick your friends,
      You need feet, to keep your socks up,
      And stop your legs from, fraying at the ends.” – “You Need Feet” Edwin Carp

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Not to Carp, masercot, but did you have to come up with a poem that’s more better than mine in the post (not that difficult to do, I admit)? But I appreciate it, nonetheless. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • rivergirl1211 8:24 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My name is River… and I have bunions. Don’t get me started on feet! My issues started when I was 40 and that’s just not fair!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:51 am on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I wish I could tell you a cure, River, but when it comes to bunions, I don’t know my onions. I can only hope that these punions are so bad, they make you forget your bunions for a while.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 12:08 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s living in Ohio that’s hurting your wheels, Sr. Muse. Move to a warmer clime, like I’ve lived in most of my life, and liberate those tootsies from the confines of shoes at, least nights and on weekends. Flip-flops never gave anybody bunions.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 2:47 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Unfortunately, a move to a warmer clime isn’t in my foreseeable future, Ricardo, but if I can just hang around for another century or so, global warming will have moved to me, thereby saving me the trouble.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:03 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My sympathy. We have frequent user discounts at the podiatrist!

      Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 6:43 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A great post and a toe-tapper of a tune! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:43 pm on March 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad you liked both. The composer of the tune was Carmen Lombardo, brother of Guy Lombardo. He was the lead saxophonist in Guy’s orchestra, which you may remember because it was one of the most popular dance bands of all time for many years.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 9:49 am on March 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The song you posted, “Footloose and Fancy Free”, is a great start to the day. Thanks for that!

      And thanks for the Bucket Truck video – I mean it. It’s fascinating! Now I want to ride in one.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:48 pm on March 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad you enjoyed both the song and the Bucket Truck video, which I was lucky to stumble upon as a good fit for this post. Some amusement park should come up with a version of the Bucket Trucks for a kids’ ride (including us adult kids)!

        Liked by 1 person

    • equipsblog 5:51 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d hate to foot the bill for this entertaining post, because if we have to pay by the pun, it’s very expensive.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:06 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I see that the latest post on your blog is titled “ImPUNity” (my caps) — a pun so bad that I should probably pay you. But by recommending that my readers check out your blog, suppose we call it even. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:31 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Actually, “Its” is pronounced “Itz”….but it’s the pits in both cases, so I’ll call it a night before I get in any deeper. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ghosts of the past, Jean Negulesco, knowing yourself, memoir, , , , old age, , The Way We Were   

    THE WAY WE WEREN’T 

    The trouble with turning memories into memoirs is that when one is finished, a sneaky feeling comes along: “Things never were that way, anyway.” –Jean Negulesco (1900-93), Academy Award-winning movie director

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    I’ve just finished reading Jean Negulesco’s memoir (coincidentally, he died 25 years ago today) titled THINGS I DID AND THINGS I THINK I DID. The above quote is from that book–as is his reflection on having raised, with his wife, two adopted daughters from war-torn, post-WWII Germany:

    And so it starts, and so it ends. And we see ourselves in them. There is no sense in telling them, “When I was your age….” We never were their age. 

    “We never were their age.” And so it is with us. We’ve never been ‘inside’ them–even our own children. When all is said and done, we’re lucky if we know ourselves–now, then or in-between–which is not to say that, along the way, we were not open to wanting whatever knowledge romance promised….

    They say “You can’t go home again”–even if your old haunts still exist, your past and its ghosts stay with you, not with where you were….not so? So, where do we go?

    Now, I’m as nostalgic as the next old geezer, but as my past recedes further into the past, I look at old photos, see the images of faces and places I knew, and there’s no avoiding the sense that the road between THINGS I DID AND THINGS I WISH I DID leads to a place where the sun sets before we get there.

    Sooner or later, it’s all over but the doubting. It’s the place where (to paraphrase a phrase) OLD GHOSTS NEVER DIE, they….just….fade….a w a y

    Still….

     
    • Lisa R. Palmer 1:05 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Profound thoughts and deep reflection – a wellspring for the humor that is your trademark here at WordPress. For it is only that level of understanding and the wisdom that grows from it that can fuel a true sense of irony laced with compassion…

      Oh, and I’m taking this quote with me, as it moves me to ponder my own deep thoughts: “and there’s no avoiding the sense that the road between THINGS I DID AND THINGS I WISH I DID leads to a place where the sun sets before we get there.”

      Great stuff here, mistermuse!

      Liked by 7 people

      • mistermuse 1:33 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Lisa, for taking time to comment in such a thoughtful way. I wrote this post not expecting it to appeal to all tastes, but a man does not live by humor alone–if I did, my wife would kill me (just kidding–I brought home enough bacon before I retired to keep her fat and happily recumbent most of the time).

        Liked by 2 people

        • Lisa R. Palmer 2:45 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink

          The “happy” part is the only one that truly matters, so whatever you did, or do, to achieve and maintain that state is goodness in itself. Lol!

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 3:51 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Agree with Lisa’s comment but fortunately I have few regrets, I tended to do what I wanted when I wanted 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • Carmen 6:06 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That Annabelle – what a charmer! And only ten! Wow! Can definitely detect a great personality. Apple doesn’t fall very far from the tree, eh? 😉

      Speaking of such things, my husband was at a gathering one time to discuss the passing of a friend. Some comment was made about this guy having ‘climbed the ladder to a better place’. . . Or some such thing. Hubby said, “I figure where I’m going, the only thing I’ll need is a hand sled!” Ha, ha!

      Wherever it is, I’ll worry about it after I get there (although I don’t think there’ll be any ‘think’ left). 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 9:42 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Well, Carmen, at least your hubby thinks he’s going SOMEPLACE! 🙂

        As for me: I think–therefore I don’t know what to think. 😦

        As for Annabelle, talent like that needs and deserves to soar. Destination Broadway (I hope)….speaking of which, The Unsinkable Molly Brown was a Broadway show which was made into a movie starring Debbie Reynolds. Here is her “I Ain’t Down Yet” from the film:

        Like

    • Don Frankel 8:13 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “The past is always with us.” Or as I like to say we are the things we did. No getting around it.

      But I do think we experience life in the past, the present and with a slight anticipation of the future. It’s just the way our minds work.

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 5:09 pm on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Perhaps that’s generally true, Don–but I think with politicians, there’s more than a slight anticipation of the future. No sooner is one election over than they start calculating for the next one, even if it’s as much as six years away (in the case of U.S. senators).

        Like

        • Don Frankel 7:11 am on July 19, 2018 Permalink

          Muse, at the end of the rainbow is a pot of gold.

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 8:36 am on July 19, 2018 Permalink

          Don, I’ve already got the pot, and even if I get the gold at the end of the rainbow, I can’t take it with me where I’m going.

          On second thought, I’d better mend my ways so I can go to the other place — who wants to spend eternity roasting with the boasting Orange Man?

          Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 8:18 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Always there are two sides to every story. Sometimes there is no glory!! You shared it so well!!

      Liked by 3 people

    • scifihammy 11:05 am on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      A very thoughtful post – thank you. 🙂
      It doesn’t bother me if I’m not remembering something ‘correctly’ because the memory is what I have now. And I never go back to old places, preferring my memory of them as they were. 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • arekhill1 12:00 pm on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I always thought Hardy’s words meant your home has changed from the way you remember it, so it is never the home you left, but your interpretation works as well, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 12:51 pm on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I take “You can’t go home again” to mean that, though your old home may still be there, what you left of yourself there is gone forever….and one goes “home again” hoping in some amorphous way to recapture a piece of it. That may be ‘a bit much,’ but I prefer to think (without knowing) that it’s close(r) to what Hardy had in mind. In any case, I’m at home with your interpretation as well, Ricardo.

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 3:40 am on July 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I like that quote too., and I like you being thoughtful. Often when I write posts such as yesterdays I wonder if I’m being really truthful, if I’m giving the ‘right’ impression, and if indeed, I know what the ‘right’ impression is. This can go on and on, can’t it? I’ve often thought of writing Dad’s story but reporting it accurately worries me. And no, we can’t go back but I loved that film… 🙂 🙂
      Mam was a wise old bird and she used to say ‘can’t put an old head on young shoulders’.

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 9:42 am on July 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Jo, your post yesterday rang true to me and, I’m sure, to everyone who read it. I hope anyone who reads this will go to it and see for themselves.

        Thanks for quoting your mam’s wise words. It’s been a long time since I heard that quote, and it was good to hear it again.

        Like

    • katsobservations 1:54 pm on July 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Very powerful post. For me though, nostalgia represents not appreciating the past instead of wishing I did something differently. I guess nostalgia has a different meaning for each person.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:11 pm on July 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Well put, Kat. Perhaps one reason for a ‘different take’ on the past by another person would be if that person had one or more bitter experiences as a child that would make revisiting his or her childhood haunts a return to mixed memories. As you say, different meanings for different persons.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rachel McAlpine 5:58 pm on July 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      When those moments arise the best I can do is to tell myself I did the best I could with the me I was at the time. And don’t worry, your memoirs will be “corrected” by those who disagree. My friends write their own memoirs in revenge,

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 12:35 am on July 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Rachel, there is much wisdom in your first sentence. No one is the same person they were when they were young–or if they are the same, they haven’t matured–and therefore, you have to let go of the regret you feel that you would do something differently if you had it to do over again.

        Regarding memoirs, I don’t plan on writing any, so there won’t be any to correct….and as for my friends, I plan on outliving them. Good luck with that, right? 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 1:26 pm on July 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:14 pm on July 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Once again I am in your debt, sir. I shall REMEMBER you in my prayers (in lieu of in my will). 😦

        Like

        • moorezart 5:17 pm on July 24, 2018 Permalink

          Wonderful post sir, consider all debts cancelled in payment for being gifted by your lofty thoughts.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 11:11 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That girl, from the video you posted, is a true entertainer!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:42 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I just watched the video again, and she’s just as good as the last time I watched her! 🙂
        But seriously, that is one talented girl, and I hope she grows up to reach her full potential.

        Liked by 1 person

    • etiliyle 11:31 am on September 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      💞❤💞

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 1:13 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , old age, ,   

    TIME FLIES 

    It is said that “Time flies when you’re having fun.” As for me, time flies when you can’t believe a certain young woman and I will celebrate our 50th wedding anniversary this fall, and next year on June 23, the oldest of our two daughters (Big One and Little One) will celebrate(?) her 50th birthday. How is it possible that one day the young woman and I got married, and the next thing we know, our girls are older than my oldest clothes (though not by much). Time and fun fly when ‘hangers-on’ in the closet look the same as decades ago….but the reflection in the mirror looks like Methuselah’s grandfather. 😦

    The moral of the story?

    Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
    Old Time is still a-flying;
    And this same flower that smiles today
    Tomorrow will be dying.

    Then be not coy, but use your time
    And while ye may, go marry;
    For having lost but once your prime,
    You may forever tarry.

    –Robert Herrick (from his poem TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME, 1648)

    In other words, take the advice of legendary songwriter Irving Berlin (1888-1989) and….

    Oh….I almost forgot: Happy 49th Birthday, Big One!

     

     

     
    • arekhill1 2:05 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m the eldest of seven, Sr. Muse, and a honeymoon baby like Big One. My mother is continually startled by how old I am.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 4:03 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I lost my mother years ago, Ricardo, but I’m sure she would react the same as yours if she were still alive.

        Like

    • calmkate 3:34 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      lol wow 50 years is most impressive! Well done both of you, love the song …

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:07 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. The song is one of Irving Berlin’s lesser-known ones but, I think, one of his best, despite (or maybe because of) its simplicity.

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 8:17 am on June 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Time does fly!
      Happy Golden Anniversary for later this year. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Don Frankel 9:51 am on June 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Anniversary Mister and Mrs Muse. Guess it is safe to say…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:02 am on June 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I guess, having made it through the first 50 years, Mister and Mrs. Muse can make it through the next 50….and then we’ll be in better position to see if we can handle Everlasting.

        Like

    • pjlazos 6:46 am on June 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      So many milestones! Have fun!! Oh, and time is all happening at once so re-live it at your leisure. 😘

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:53 pm on June 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Time does fly, doesn’t it? I went to my grandson’s 5th birthday party yesterday. He’s starting school in the fall. How did that happen? He was just born last week. 🙂
      An early Happy Anniversary, and Happy Birthday to the Big One.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:39 pm on June 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        How lucky can you be, to have a grandchild of that age (or any age), Diana. Enjoy his childhood “while ye may,” because TIME FLIES! And thank you for the Anniversary and Birthday wishes.

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 12:50 am on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Fifty years of wedded bliss…. congrats…. that’s a lot of cat lifetimes. I actually had to use the calculator to figure out what year that was… 1968. For me, life is a lot better now.

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 1:20 am on July 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you MM for all the reading…I love this music and thanks for the follow. Barking in the Dark will always endeavor to inform, agitate and, above all, amuse. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kally 7:15 am on July 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Love this song. Advance congratulations to your anniversary and a loving wish for your elder one’s birthday.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:30 am on July 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kally. You remind me of the Dr. Pepper commercial on TV–you’re “the sweet one.” 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Kally 10:16 am on July 7, 2018 Permalink

          Awwww! I haven’t seen that commercial. We don’t have Dr. Pepper over here but I Guess I’ll YouTube to find out which one! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 1:26 pm on July 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Every day is a good day for Art Landry & Co., in my opinion.

      Hey, Congrats on your upcoming 50th Anniversay! Woohoo! That is a remarkable achievement.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:31 pm on July 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, S.S.

        Art Landry’s was one of many popular big bands back in the Roaring Twenties. I should probably devote a post or two to remembering some of them: Paul Whiteman, Fred Waring, Ben Selvin, Leo Reisman, George Olsen, etc.

        Liked by 1 person

    • franklparker 11:49 am on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Loved this. You may have beaten to 80 by a year three but I claim victory in the marriage duration stakes and having a child over 50. (55 and 53 respectively this September). Must follow you and read more of your poetry and politics.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:59 am on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Frank. I, too, must read more of your posts as time permits — as if it ever does….so I’ll just have to take time and like it (which shouldn’t be too difficult, based on what I’ve read so far).

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , John Glenn, , , old age, , , Truman Capote,   

    MAY IS OLDER AMERICANS MONTH (and don’t you forget it!) 

    May is OLDER AMERICANS MONTH. I’m pretty sure I qualify as an older American because, as George Washington told me, “The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be free men or slaves”….or maybe I’m thinkin’ of Lincoln (incidental details, like who said what, can get a bit hazy at my age). No matter — either way, it proves I’ve been around long enough to establish my bona feces.

    As long as I’m quoting bigwigs I have known or could have known (as the case may be), no doubt you will be interested in other memorable quotes that I remember, most of which admittedly weren’t said to me directly, but which I either overheard, or were whiskered to me in confidence by the quotees under their goatees (or beards, as the face may be):

    Old age is no place for sissies. –Bette Davis (whose facial hair at the time was confined to a mustache, as I recall)

    Life is a moderately good play with a badly written third act. –Truman Capote

    Inside every older person is a younger person wondering what happened. –Jennifer Yane

    If I’d known I was going to live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself. — variously attributed to  Eubie Blake, Adolph Zukor and Mae West, among others

    There is no cure for the common birthday. —John Glenn

    You’re only as old as the girl that you feel. –Groucho Marx

    Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional. –Chili Davis

    Time may be a great healer, but it’s a lousy beautician. –Anonymous

    Life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer you get to the end, the faster it goes. –Anonymous

    So there you have the story of my anonymous existence: just when I’m on a roll, I run flush out of time. C’est la vie. Take it on out, Pops (Louis) and Schnoz (Jimmy):

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • Carmen 1:26 am on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Speaking of toilet paper – I don’t know about you mistermuse, but I’m looking forward to forgetting all the stupid sh*t I’ve done. . . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:29 am on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t mean to spoil your hopes, Carmen, but may you have a long time to wait. 🙂

        Like

    • scifihammy 7:19 am on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      haha I like the quotes – and the fact that you knew George Washington! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:45 am on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I not only knew him — we were so close, he admitted to me that he didn’t chop down the cherry tree — it was a SLIPPERY ELM (which is why it took him so long to get a handle on it….not to mention that the handle was missing a blade).

        Liked by 1 person

    • GP Cox 8:15 am on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Forget what? (just kidding – I think). It’s about time us old folks got an honorable mention around Blogsville!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 12:27 pm on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      They give us a whole month? Some of us might not use all of it. But when it comes to time sometimes its the same…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:40 pm on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, this is for those who “might not use all of it”:

        Note: Billie is backed this time by (among others) jazz legends Lester Young on tenor sax, Roy Eldridge on trumpet, and Teddy Wilson on piano.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 8:08 pm on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Oh goodness. I’m among this crowd. At least the sense of humor remains intact! The quote from Chili Davis is my favorite because it’s 100% true! Keep up the laughter. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:43 pm on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana. I almost didn’t use the Chili Davis quote because initially, I couldn’t decide between it and a similar one by Ogden Nash (“You are only young once, but you can stay immature indefinitely.”). I finally chose the Davis quote because I couldn’t stay undecided indefinitely. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • eths 10:44 pm on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love the quotes!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 pm on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. I especially liked the Capote, Yane, Glenn and ‘t.p.’ quotes because they were new to me, whereas the others were familiar.

        Like

    • Silver Screenings 9:37 am on May 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never seen this clip with Louis Armstrong and Jimmy Durante. The both of them have SO MUCH CHARISMA!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:16 pm on May 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Louis was long past his trumpet-playing prime by the time of that clip, and Jimmy was even older (by 7 years), but they both still had ‘it,’ charisma-wise. Interestingly, Jimmy also started out as a jazzman, playing piano and (in 1916) organizing the Original New Orleans Jazz Band (in New York!).

        Like

    • restlessjo 12:58 pm on May 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      All of them true, alas 🙂 🙂 But I won’t let it spoil my weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:06 pm on May 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Do you know the definition of “weekend?” It’s the shortest distance between Friday and Monday — so enjoy it before it’s over! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 12:47 pm on May 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      A little late commenting but my excuse is I was in Brighton, England (my birthplace) celebrating my birthday on this very day. So, as it was a big number birthday this post was very appropriate. Although I’m getting older, life is getting better. I’ve been saving the best for last. However, I do agree with the toilet paper analogy.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Eleanor Powell, , Golda Meir, , , old age, , ,   

    AGE WISE 

    For the benefit of my fellow geezers out there who may not be aware of it, May is OLDER AMERICANS MONTH (not to be confused with NATIONAL SENIOR CENTER MONTH (September) or NATIONAL ACCORDION MONTH (June). Accordionly, May you and I bask in the recognition which is due us for living long enough to pass along our well-earned wisdom to those who don’t want to hear it.

    To be sure, there is also a slight  drawback about old age: there’s not much future in it….but otherwise, it’s not a bad time to be alive. At any rate, it beats the alternative — or so they say (as if “they” have experienced said alternative).  On the flip side, there are many timely quotes on the age-old subject of age, so let’s put on our reading glasses and see if we can make heads or tails of some of them:

    If  I’d known I was going to live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself. –Anonymous

    An archaeologist is the best husband any woman can have: the older she gets, the more interested he is in her. –Agatha Christie

    Age does not diminish the extreme disappointment of having a scoop of ice cream fall from the cone. –Jim Fiebig

    Millions long for immortality who don’t know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. –Susan Ertz

    Old age is like a plane flying through a storm. Once you’re aboard, there’s nothing you can do. –Golda Meir

    Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional. –Chili Davis

    You’re only as old as the girl that you feel. –Groucho Marx

    Time may be a great healer, but it’s a lousy beautician. –Anonymous

    If you worry, you die. If you don’t worry, you also die. So why worry? –Mike Horn

    I was going to use that last quote to close with the song DON’T WORRY, BE HAPPY, but on the occasion of the birthday (May 10, 1899) of the never-grows-old Fred Astaire, this song and dance make me happy to change my tune:

     

     

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:38 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hysterical first paragraph (even the pun), and I always love the quotes you feature. I heard the first quote, btw, with “my teeth” replacing “myself” – both are apt and only slightly funny once you get old enough to be considered a senior. 🙂

      Love-love-LOVE the tap number – rarely seen in today’s dance shows (unless you want to count the choreography of STOMP or a few contestants on So You Think You Can Dance, where it is rarely featured predominantly). Thank you for making me grin by posting.

      Crazy about Astaire, but must chime in again that it’s a shame that his partners never seem to have gotten the credit they deserve – rarely credited at all, actually, when Fred Astaire numbers are posted (even here). ::sigh::

      ANYWAY, Happy Older Americans Month! Let’s get up out of our rockers and rock the month!
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:57 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        And a Happy to you as well, Madelyn! 🙂

        I have to disagree (in part) about Fred’s partners not getting the credit they deserve. I think Ginger got a lot of credit — the whole world knows immediately that when you say Fred and Ginger, you’re referring to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. In my opinion, it was some of his other partners who didn’t receive enough credit, even though they were considered better dancers than Ginger (Eleanor Powell, Rita Hayworth, Cyd Charisse). Of course, Ginger made many more films with Fred than they, and built the sustained magic with Fred that wasn’t possible in one or two films with other partners. But there is magic nonetheless in such clips as his tap dance with Eleanor Powell!

        P.S. I didn’t think it necessary to mention Eleanor’s name in introducing the clip because her name appears in the clip photo itself….and, after all, it’s HIS birthday, not her’s!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:33 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink

          Great points. btw – this would be a great post to share on today’s Senior Salon – the little couch at the bottom of May’s Mental Health Calendar has a direct link.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:09 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink

          Thanks for the share suggestion, Madelyn, but I don’t think you appreciate what a dufus I am with regard to the internet. I don’t see “the little couch at the bottom of May’s Mental Health Calendar,” and even if I did, I probably wouldn’t know what to do with it to share this post. I ain’t an old geezer for nothing! 🙂

          Like

    • scifihammy 2:24 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the laugh! 😀 An hilarious post – plus the bonus of Fred Astaire! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Michaeline 5:29 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse, I liked your posts, and especially your quotes while I enjoy the warm, sunny coast of Florida. I think of most poets that you are the most congenial, better than an epidural by far, and I wish on a star that you stay as young as you are.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:25 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Not only am I better than an epidural, I’m better than an epidemic (though an epicurean might give me problems — it would be an epic contest). 😦

        Like

    • linnetmoss 6:38 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Haha! These were great. I have been watching my scoops of ice cream fall in slow motion for some time now, and I’ve decided that laughter is the only medicine. And a little Eleanor Powell (such a worthy partner for Fred) never hurts…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:15 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Unfortunately, those scoops of ice cream never fall in slow enough motion to catch them before they hit the ground (or your shoes) — leaving you standing there holding an empty cone and looking like an idiot (make that ME looking like an idiot — I’m sure you would look like you were just giving your dog a treat….or your dogs a treat, if the scoop hit your feet). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:00 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      How delightful lol … Fred and Ginger are my favourites, you got the wrong gal.
      I intend growing old disgracefully … any one care to join me?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:14 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks to all for your comments. Calmkate, I’m not sure there’s any such thing as “the wrong gal” when it came to dancing with Fred — even a non-dancer like Joan Fontaine looked pretty good dancing with Fred in DAMSEL IN DISTRESS. But I agree that Ginger was special.

        As for growing old disgracefully — you go, girl! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:18 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink

          “wrong girl” in that it wasn’t me … 😦
          Joan was a hero of mine but last I saw she should have retired .. her partner had to carry her around the stage … it was so sad

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:46 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      A wise man once said. “Don’t look back something may be gaining on you.” He also said. “Age is mind over matter. If you don’t mind it don’t matter.”

      If you believe that baseball is life as I do then another wise man put it best. “70% of baseball is mental. The rest of it is in your mind.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:31 am on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, for the benefit of the baseball uninitiated, the wise men you quoted were Satchel Paige and Yogi Berra. But there can’t be just two wise men — there must be three. So here’s a quote from Tommy Lasorda: “I love doubleheaders. That way I get to keep my uniform on longer.”

      Whatever happened to doubleheaders, anyway?

      Like

    • MC Clark 12:48 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m still wondering how the heck I got here…I was 25 just the other day. 🙁
      Thanks for the laughs!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 2:57 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      We grow old too early and wise too late, Sr. Muse. On the other hand, you can dispense with any effort to acquire wisdom at all, and take comfort in the assertion that there’s no fool like an old fool, and congratulate yourself for being on top of the fool chain.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:19 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Well, at least I’m not on top of the drool chain yet, Ricardo. Hopefully it will never come down to that.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:34 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      One good turn deserves another and we can’t leave this guy out on this subject. “The Yankees fired me because I turned 70. I’ll never let that happen again.” Casey Stengel.

      Then there was Warren Spahn who played for Casey before he managed the Yankees and later when Casey managed the Mets. “I worked for Casey before and after he was a genius.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Margarita 10:14 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As I said to a friend recently, I love being an old person! 😉 xoM

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:37 pm on May 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As Thoreau once said, “None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.” You obviously haven’t outlived yours, Margarita. 🙂

      Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 12:19 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love the humor in your intro and these quotes are great. Susan Ertz was my favorite, but the anonymous one about the lousy beautician made me laugh. Great post. Happy Belated Birthday!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:46 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, Diana….and I’m sure Fred Astaire, from that great ballroom in the sky, thanks you as well (for the Happy Birthday wishes). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Pat 3:04 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Synchronicity . . . love it. I just signed up for Silver Sneakers today and didn’t even know it was Older Americans Month. First time over here and enjoyed the quotes — not done yet in these golden years – just figuring that out. Forever young (Eleanor Powell and Fred Astaire) — fun to watch them again. Thank you for sharing. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • M. Talmage Moorehead 4:35 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t believe how much I enjoyed that dance. They must have practiced endlessly to remember all those details. Eleanor Powell blew me away. The guy was good, too. Hahaha

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:47 pm on May 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I had the same reaction as I watched it when selecting it for this post — and I had already seen it probably 5 or 6 times over the years.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 11:13 pm on May 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Pithy: “Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.” –Chili Davis

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bette A. Stevens 12:57 pm on May 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Fun and funny! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 2:47 am on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Magic! What a way to start my day 🙂 🙂 How does he manage such energy and elegance combined? Many thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:25 am on May 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        In a word, Astaire was a perfectionist. Such ease and elegance came from untold hours of practice and hard work (not to mention, natural talent)!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Zinni 1:40 pm on June 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      It’s never too late to cherish the disappointment of a scoop of ice cream falling from the cone

      Liked by 1 person

    • Zinni 1:40 pm on June 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      😍

      Liked by 1 person

    • kertsen 3:30 am on June 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Keep up the good work. Old age is very relaxing I have great difficulty getting out of my chair.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , October, old age, , ,   

    THE OLD MAN AND THE SEASON 

     

    In the unscheduled post which appeared here on my birthday (October 18th), my youngest daughter let the cat out of the bag — her old dog of a dad had just turned certifiably ancient, though I didn’t feel more than a day older than I did on October 17 as a young pup of 79. More’s the pity. Some say age is only a number….but it goes without saying that October is autumn. Yes, if you look at the calendar, September and November lay claim to autumn as well, but let’s be clear — nobody does autumn as well as October. So this will be a post of poems and quotes about aging and autumn, in that order (age before beauty).

    AGE DEPLORE(s) BEAUTY

    What passed for time
    Before time was invented?
    Before there was time,
    How was time prevented?

    If time had a beginning,
    When did time start?
    When it’s time that time end,
    How will time depart?

    Why are there times
    When time frustrates and vexes….
    And last, why must time
    Do its thing to the sexes?

    THE BIG FIX

    While passing through,
    I noticed that
    this world is too much.
    What big teeth it has.
    What big eyes you need.
    What big talk is heard.
    Speak to me.
    But not big.

    I OF THE BE OLDER

    If you think
    I take life
    too seriously you

    are either

    a night and
    day younger than
    I am or

    I do.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I am so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers. –L.M. Montgomery

    Listen! The wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves;
    we have had our summer evenings, now for October eves.
    –Humbert Wolfe

    Anyone who thinks fallen leaves are dead has never watched them dancing on a windy day. –Shira Tamir

    The tints of autumn … a mighty flower garden blossoming under the spell of the enchanter frost. –John Greenleaf Whittier

    For anyone who lives in the oak-and-maple area of New England, there is a perennial temptation to plunge into a purple sea of adjectives about October. –Hal Borland  

    Autumn is a second spring where every leaf is a flower. –Albert Camus

    Spring is too rainy and summer’s too hot;
    fall is soon over and winter is not.
    –Evan Esar

    Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns. –George Eliot

    Autumn sunsets exquisitely dying. –Langston Hughes

    Now Autumn’s fire burns slowly along the woods and day by day the dead leaves fall and melt. –William Allingham

    NOTE: There have been many recordings of AUTUMN LEAVES over the years; I chose the French chanteuse Edith Piaf’s version because it was originally a 1945 French song titled “Les Feuilles Mortes”  (“The Dead Leaves”), and because October (1963) is the month Edith Piaf died and drifted by the window.

     

     

     

     

     
    • painkills2 1:43 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I searched and searched the internet for just the right Happy Birthday video. Enjoy 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 8:38 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Birthday. Autumn is a wonderful time of year and life. 🙂 Enjoy.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 11:18 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      ‘Tis the season of big talk, Sr. Muse, so one of your efforts is well said and particularly well-timed.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:55 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t wait for the voters to turn the biggest talker into the biggest loser. But of course The Donald hates losers, so rather than admit he lost, he’ll claim (as he’s already doing) that the election was rigged. What a guy!

      Like

    • Don Frankel 10:05 am on October 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The Fix is in Muse. The Fix is in. Nothing we can do about it except squeeze every last drop out of it.
      BTW your daughter did a helluva job there.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:59 am on October 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        All the more “helluva job” when you take into consideration that she has Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, an incurable disease by which physical and/or mental exertion cause extreme fatigue and ‘knock her for a loop’ for several days.

        As for the “Fix is in,” The Donald’s antics would be laughable if they didn’t exacerbate an already over-polarized atmosphere in this country. The immediate aftermath of the election could be very interesting, to say the least.

        Like

    • Mél@nie 11:53 am on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mille merci for Edith Piaf… ❤ here's the most popular version performed by Yves Montand who first recites Jacques Prévert's famous poem:"les feuilles mortes…"

      Liked by 2 people

    • Cynthia Jobin 12:58 pm on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Prévert est un poète que j”aime bien…

      “…Et la vie sépare ceux qui s’aiment,
      Tout doucement, sans faire de bruit.
      Et la mer efface sur le sable,
      Les pas des amants désunis…”

      merci bien d”avoir présenter ce “video”….

      Like

    • Mark Scheel 7:31 pm on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,

      Wonderful tribute–and most educational–by your daughter. And you certainly outdid yourself with the punning poems. Well, that’s your forte. Oh, and yes, belatedly here’s a very happy birthday wish. 🙂

      Mark

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:23 pm on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks to all for your comments. May you all age as beautifully as the autumn leaves. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 6:33 pm on October 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy belated birthday! I am sure nothing changed two weeks later 🙂
      Love the song Autumn leaves.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:02 am on October 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Just as an aside, the English lyrics for AUTUMN LEAVES (originally a French song) were written by Johnny Mercer, who you no doubt know from his many hit songs such as MOON RIVER, DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES, and BLUES IN THE NIGHT (which gave me the idea for the title of my latest post, BOOS IN THE NIGHT).

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , old age, , , , , , Victor Hugo   

    SENIOR MUSE 

    May is Older Americans Month (fka Senior Citizens Month). Back in 1963, when the month was established, I was “a young man full of idealism and vigor” (as Barack Obama joked recently at the White House in a different context), a year out of the army with the rest of my life ahead of me. Now here it is 2016, some 53 years later, and I still have the rest of my life ahead of me. Amazing.

    So much for the glass-half-full outlook. In the other hand, the glass is half-empty:

    COME TO THINK OF IT

    Old age is a sad estate.
    With it comes wisdom,
    But it comes so late.

    Now recall innocent youth.
    Ignorance was bliss,
    But less than truth.

    Why can’t life be in reverse:
    Born knowing the score,
    Blameless in the hearse?

    The old joke about old age is that there’s not much future in it. Maybe so, but I like to think ‘outside the box.’ One thing for sure: Old age is no place for sissies. –Bette Davis

    Well, never let it be said that this blog is no place for good quotes. Most of the following goodies aren’t funny, but then, old age isn’t exactly a barrel of laughs either. So, until further adieu:

    Old age isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative. –Maurice Chevalier

    Old age is the most unexpected of all the things that can happen to a man. –James Thurber

    A stockbroker urged me to buy a stock that would triple its value every year. I told him, “At my age, I don’t even buy green bananas.” –Claude Pepper

    Life’s tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late. –Benjamin Franklin

    Forty is the old age of youth; fifty the youth of old age. –Victor Hugo

    There’s no such thing as old age; there is only sorrow. –Fay Weldon

    Whatever poet, orator or sage may say of it, old age is still old age. –Sinclair Lewis

    A truly great book should be read in youth, again in maturity, and once more in old age, as a fine building should be seen by morning light, at noon and by moonlight. –Robertson Davies

    Not even old age knows how to love death. –Sophocles

    By the time you’re 80 years old you’ve learned everything. You only have to remember it. –George Burns (who, in case you forgot, lived to age 100)

    And now for the BIG (double) FINISH:

     

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 12:34 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoyed listening to both renditions of the Farewell Blues.

      I like Mark Twain’s take on the fear of death: — ‘I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience…’

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:33 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cynthia. I hadn’t read that Mark Twain quote before (or, if I did, I forgot it in my old age). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • eths 1:45 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Losing a son last year made me look at my life differently. I feel really lucky to be 81 and in good health and to look forward to each day, particularly now that I’ve found the blogging world.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:48 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I can empathize, as I lost my only sister this year. As for your blog, I read it (ir)religiously and I look forward to it each day — or at least each year (just kidding – I wholly recommend it). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • eths 5:46 pm on May 5, 2016 Permalink

          I am sorry about your sister. I hope you are doing well.

          Liked by 1 person

    • ladysighs 7:43 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for informing me that May is Old Age Month. I think. 😦
      One of those things I’d rather not think about, but now that I know about it I can’t stop thinking about it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:10 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Ladysighs, I’d apologize, but I’d like to think this post inspired your excellent blog post today along the same lines (I’m sure you wrote yours before you saw mine, but that’s just a minor detail). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 2:47 pm on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Old or young, keep in mind the words of the philosopher–“Nobody gets out of life alive.”

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Some people are lucky to get INTO it alive….which seems ironic, when you consider that none of us asked to be conceived, much less born. To paraphrase Rick (Humphrey Bogart) in Casablanca: It seems that fate takes a hand.

        Like

    • Carmen 6:56 am on May 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mister use-
      I get that comment from a few of my students when they realize I’m the same age as their grandmothers. They’ll blurt out, “You’re OLD!!” I always come back with, “Compared to whom?”
      It’s all relative. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:10 am on May 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It’s all relative until we kick the bucket….and then it’s all relatives (at the funeral). 🙂

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:29 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I swore I commented on this but then maybe I just came into the room where I have the computer and stared at the screen and forgot why I went into this room. What’s this post about again?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:34 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Welcome to the club, Don. It’s the only club I know of where, once you’re in, there’s only one way out. 😦

        Like

        • Carmen 8:49 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink

          Methinks you two exaggerate. . .there’s lots of mustard left to cut with the pair of you! 😉

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:20 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Carmen, your comment cuts the mustard, whether we exaggerate or not. 🙂

      Like

    • blindzanygirl 12:17 am on May 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love those quotes mistermuse. Looks like I have dug right back into your blog. But it was worth it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:48 am on May 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        To think that when I wrote this post, Trump wasn’t even the Republican nominee for U.S. President yet. They say time flies when you’re having fun, but judging by the past 3 1/2 years, time flies even when you’re not having fun.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 11:13 am on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , old age, , regrets, ,   

    CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE 

    You can see them
    In once-upon-a-time spaces.

    You can hear them
    Regretting choices.

    You can see them
    In well-worn faces.

    You can hear them
    Remembering rejoices.

    You can see them
    In leftover traces.

    You can hear them
    Reflecting where time’s voice is.

    Circumstances alter places.
    Circumstances alter voices.

     
    • arekhill1 11:44 am on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Nicely said, Sr. Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:34 pm on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Ricardo.This is one of those poems I spent more time on than I should, never did get it as right as I wanted, and finally said to hell with it and clicked PUBLISH. Under the circumstances, I’ll take your comment as evidence I didn’t completely waste my time.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:13 pm on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for your testimony, Michaeline, but I think I’ll get back to funny business next time, as this poem gave me a “serious” case of the doubts!

      Like

    • Don Frankel 9:38 am on February 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Bleep happens. Then we try to make sense of it. Nice one Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:29 am on February 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      So I moved on to the next post, made funny, and got screwed anyway. Bleep!

      Like

  • mistermuse 10:35 am on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , conservatives, , , , old age, , ,   

    BY GEORGE 

    In my October 8th post CAN’T GO WRONG WITH WRIGHT, I mentioned several affinities I share with stand-up comedian Steven Wright….such as we both dig Woody Allen and the late George Carlin (1937-2008). I’ve done several posts featuring Woody and/or his films, but nothing by George. Time to stand up for George.

    CARLIN (a Mark Twain Prize winner for American Humor) was probably best known for his comedy routines about taboo subjects such as his famous “seven dirty words you can’t say on television,” but I prefer his political and counterculture satire. He was born in Manhattan of Irish-Catholic parents (an ancestry to which I can relate). When he was two months old, they separated due to his father’s alcoholism (did I mention he was Irish?). George was Catholic, as he said, “until I reached the age of reason.”

    I won’t delve further into his background, as his life and career can be easily checked out on Google if interested. There is also an official website: http://www.georgecarlin.com/
    So, without further ado, let’s get to the good stuff — his humor:

    A lot of times when they catch a guy who killed 27 people, they say, “He was a loner.”  Well, of course, he was a loner; he killed everyone he came in contact with.

    Ever notice that anyone going slower than you is an idiot, but anyone going faster is a maniac?

    Religion has convinced people there’s an invisible man living in the sky, who watches everything you do every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a list of ten specific things he doesn’t want you to do. And if you do any of these things, he will send you to a special place, of burning and fire and smoke and torture and anguish for you to live forever, and suffer and burn and scream until the end of time. But he loves you. He loves you and he needs money.

    Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.

    Environmentalists changed the word jungle to rain forest, because no one would give them money to save a jungle.

    I was surprised when I started getting old. I always thought it was one of those things that would happen to someone else.

    Have you ever wondered why Republicans are so interested in encouraging people to volunteer? It’s because volunteers work for no pay. Republicans have been trying to get people to work for no pay for a long time.

    Weather forecast for tonight: Dark. Continued dark overnight, with widely scattered light by morning.

    Once you leave the womb, conservatives don’t care about you until you reach military age. Then you’re just what they’re looking for.

    George Washington’s brother, Lawrence, was the Uncle of Our Country.

    Have you ever noticed that their stuff is shit and your shit is stuff?

    I put a dollar in a change machine. Nothing changed.

    SOS.

     
    • arekhill1 11:05 am on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, George! Always thought he was too mean to die, then he up and proved me wrong.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:08 pm on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Let’s hope he went up, and not down below. Too bad he was cremated – if he’d chosen burial, I bet he’d have come up with a great one-liner for his headstone.

        Like

    • ladysighs 11:21 am on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Truly my favorite comedienne! I can laugh at his words over and over again. Thanks for the post. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:22 pm on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Pardon my perverted sense of humor, but I never saw him in drag (comedienne?)! Anyway, I appreciate your comment, and I’ll try to be resist such a dig in the future. 🙂

      Like

    • mistermuse 2:34 pm on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      P.S. Click on ladysighs’ blog if you appreciate squirrels. Jan. 21 is their day, and I was considering doing an appropriate post before deciding nut to – make that NOT to….which worked out well because ladysighs went squirrely today and saved me the trouble.

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 7:09 pm on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I am reticent to make a comment, mistermuse, since you have already said Ladysighs “went squirely” today. Otherwise I agree that George Carlin was quite funny in his satire and one of my favorite comedians.

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:34 pm on January 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Unfortunately, I’m cursed with an aversion to making generic comments or replies. I admit that “customizing” runs a risk of seeming to try too hard to be funny, so maybe I should offer double my funny back to unsatisfied customers. Or I could just say I have the best, most understanding readers in the world, such as yourself, Michaeline (and ladysighs).

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:57 am on January 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I saw him in a nightclub once. Very, very funny man. First thing I thought of when I saw his name here was. “Tonight’s forecast dark…”

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:02 am on January 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      There are a lot of stand-up comedians out there, but in my opinion, few, if any, top Carlin and Steven Wright.

      Like

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