Updates from June, 2018 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , David McCullough, , flight, , , , , , , , Orville Wright, , , rhymes, , Wilbur Wright, William Howard Taft   

    LET US TURN BACK TO THE WRIGHT, BROTHERS AND SISTERS 

    PROLOGUE:
    We had to go ahead and discover everything for ourselves.
    –Orville Wright, 1901

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Friends, Readers, Countrymen —

    If you have spent many a sleepless night
    tossing and turning ’til dawn’s early light,
    wondering if I’d e’er host another post,
    take such worries off thy plate — they’re toast.

    Yes, Brothers and Sisters, thy long wait is o’er.
    I’m back, and who of you could ask for more
    although I must confess
    that most may ask for less. 😦

    Never-the-less, Brothers and Sisters,
    it is written in the stars that I must return to the scene of my rhymes and other crimes. It’s Kismet.

    Notwithstanding the never-the-less, Brothers and Sisters, I digress.
    I come here not to berhyme the Wrights, but to praise them.

    Thus this follow-up to my May 17 post, THE DAY THE WRIGHTS DONE ME WRONG, because, by ancient axiom, it’s the Wright thing to do (If at first you don’t succeed, fly, fly again). And if this discourse has the unintended consequence of being the sleep-aid you need to catch up on those zzzzz, the added benefit comes at no extra charge.

    But I doubt that will be the case with THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, which, it so happens, is the title of a book I just finished reading (by my favorite historian, David McCullough). It’s no less than you’d expect from a Pulitzer Prize winning author: a masterful biography which (quoting from the dust cover) “draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including personal diaries, notebooks, and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence, to tell the human side of a profoundly American story.”

    The Wrights spent years of trial and air working to construct the world’s first ‘aeroplane,’ but as reader Don Frankel noted on May 17, America paid scant attention even after their successful first flight Dec. 17, 1903 at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina (and Don wasn’t just whistling Dixie in his comment). Finally, in 1906, after numerous improvements (including a more powerful engine) and many test flights, “much of the scientific world and the press [began] to change their perspective on the brothers”, and they started to attract commercial and government–especially French, not American– interest.

    To the latter point, President (and fellow Ohioan) Wm. Howard Taft spoke as follows in presenting the two brothers with Gold Medals on June 10, 1909, in Washington D.C.:

    I esteem it a great honor and an opportunity to present these medals to you as an evidence of what you have done. I am so glad–perhaps at a delayed hour–to show that in America it is not true that “a prophet is not without honor save in his own country.” It is especially gratifying thus to note a great step in human discovery by paying honor to men who bear it so modestly. You made this discovery by a course that we of America like to feel is distinctly American–by keeping your noses right at the job until you had accomplished what you had determined to do.

    There are many stories within the story of THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, many twists and turns and mishaps along the way. The Wrights weren’t ‘stick’ figures with no interests and little to commend beyond their mechanical genius. Wilbur, for example, wrote home from France in 1906 of long walks and “the great buildings and art treasures of Paris, revealing as he never had–or had call to–the extent of his interest in architecture and painting.”

    Read this bio and you will surely be taken along for the ride, as was I, by “the human side of a profoundly American story” of two men most of us know only from dry history books.

    So fasten your life jackets and come fly with me.

    EPILOGUE:
    We dared to hope we had invented something that would bring lasting peace to the Earth. But we were wrong. We underestimated man’s capacity to hate and to corrupt good means for an evil end. –Orville Wright, 1943 (during WWII)

     

     
    • Carmen 12:50 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      A timely subject, Mr. Muse. . I’m flying from Melbourne, Australia to Halifax, Nova Scotia on Friday. :). Those Wright Brothers started somethin’, eh?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:15 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        It certainly sounds Wright that from Down Under, there’s hardly anywhere to go but up…so have a safe flight home, Carmen. I’ll look forward to reading all about your trip if you post it on your blog.

        Like

    • calmkate 4:31 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      lol love your opening poem and your review sounds interesting but … 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:53 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        No buts about it, Kate — my reviews are always interesting (except when they’re not). 😦

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 7:26 pm on June 13, 2018 Permalink

          except the topic holds no interest for me .. but as you wrote it I still read it 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 10:12 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Re: Orville Wright’s 1943 quote – ain’t it the truth! As I read your last post on the Wright Bros., I thought, “In a few short years, folks would be arming this marvellous invention in an effort to kill more people.”

      The biography sounds fascinating. Thanks for the recommendation!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:28 pm on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You’re more than welcome, SS. As for the quote, “ain’t it the truth” indeed.What an ugly and beautiful mixed bag of a world this is!

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:02 am on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Isn’t that last quote the truth? And the brothers Wright never even heard of Facebook.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Don Frankel 8:49 am on June 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That’s a great book Muse. I was amazed at all the things they had to develop in order to figure how to take flight. It is an amazing story. But I still can’t get over how they are flying just about everyday in Dayton and the only person who wrote about it was a traveling bee salesman in his little magazine which would be a the equivalent of a blog today.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:29 am on June 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I’m glad you mentioned the bee magazine, Don — it’s the perfect example of how under-appreciated and almost ignored the Wrights were when you consider the game-changing nature of their accomplishment. The failure to recognize what seems so obvious reminds me of the old saying, IF IT WAS A SNAKE, IT WOULD HAVE BIT YOU.

        Liked by 1 person

    • chattykerry 9:21 am on June 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I am going to work at the airport today and I will consider the amazing achievements of the Wright brothers as I attempt to deal airlines and passengers who think they are riding a Greyhound bus…😁😁

      Liked by 3 people

    • barkinginthedark 6:51 pm on August 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Orville’s regret is too sad…to see your marvelous invention being employed to kill…too sad. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:08 pm on August 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “We underestimated man’s capacity to hate and to corrupt good means for an evil end.” Today, Orville’s 1943 quote has an even wider application than airplanes, as (courtesy of Donald Trump) democracy itself is being corrupted for an evil end.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:26 am on January 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Chaz Bono, gender issues, , Nero, , , , Sonny and Cher, transgender, transsexual,   

    THIS POST IS A DRAG 

    Having been a ‘square’ since round one of my life, I’ve never been too interested in the affairs of those of various and sundry sexual orientations. There are lots of ‘different’ people who aren’t on the same wavelength and/or don’t meet with other people’s approval, but I can’t help that — I’ve got my own problems. My mantra has been: To each his own. Live and let live. Whatever rattles your cage. Etc.

    You may think the reason I’m writing this is because I have just experienced a sudden conversion and intend to become a zealot for the causes of the transsexual, transvestite, transgendered….etc. Not so. I’m still an old-fashioned, “You go your way, I’ll go mine” kind of gay — er, guy. But issues surrounding the foregoing have come increasingly to the fore in recent years, so I’m finally taking the trouble to educate myself a bit. How much time can it take to see if you can put yourself in the other guy’s/gal’s/gay’s shoes for a moment? They may not fit, but food for thought won’t make you fat.

    http://www.medicaldaily.com/what-difference-between-transsexual-and-transgender-facebooks-new-version-its-complicated-271389

    Then there is the biblical story of the prodi-gal son (forgive me, Father, for I have punned) as a reminder that sexual duality is nothing new. It’s been around since long before Commodus was commodious and Nero fiddled around. Would they have not been tyrants if they had been straight arrows? Isn’t that like saying a magician would not be an illusionist if he had one less rabbit in his bag of tricks? (I just pulled that one out of the hat — no doubt you can come up with a better analogy.)

    And on that venture into the androgynous zone, I will close with this:

    There’s a gender in your brain and a gender in your body. For 99 percent of people, those things are in alignment. For transgender people, they’re mismatched. That’s all it is. It’s not complicated, it’s not a neurosis. It’s a mix-up. It’s a birth defect, like a cleft palate.” — Chaz Bono

    Who is Chaz Bono? Click on this 2009 video clip, then click where it says Watch on YouTube:

     

     
    • Don Frankel 12:58 pm on January 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse this I learned from being married to a Doctor, in medicine they study everything from hang nails to heart attacks. So somewhere are actual studies on the subject with real information not the stuff bandied about in the media. The other thing I know is everything about us is in our jeans, no wait, genes.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:39 pm on January 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, that’s one reason why I never ‘invested’ time in forming hard and fast opinions on this subject: you don’t know who to believe (not unlike politics, come to think of it). Nonetheless, I think the Chaz Bono quote deserves to be taken seriously because it comes from a serious, intelligent person speaking from personal experience, not from someone wearing ideological jeans, or genes (notice that I liked your wordplay so much, I re-used it).

        Like

    • arekhill1 6:25 pm on January 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Live and let live indeed, Sr. Muse. Also, pee and let pee, wherever you think you should.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 8:07 am on January 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse I’m flattered that you re-used it. And the patient”s thoughts and perceptions are very important. We call that patient history. Ooops I’m not really a Doctor. I only play one on nyuge.com. But a whole lot of people will weigh in on this and a whole lot of other subjects without a clue. The irony of it, is all you have to do is use a search engine and you can get real knowledge. But maybe that would ruin all the fun of screaming and gnashing of teeth.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:52 am on January 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said, Don.

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:01 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Donald O'Connor, Easy come easy go, , Fit as a fiddle, , , , If it looks like a duck, , , , , , , , Tweety Bird,   

    DUBIOUS PROPOSITIONS 

    I’m a big fan of old sayings, but even I concede that some sayings could no more pass the proverbial smell test than a rodent could pass a spell(ing) test. They may seem innoscent enough, but smellegant isn’t the same as elegant, and you must admit that a proverb like A turd in the hand is worth two in the tush is less than elegant. Really, close encounters of the turd kind could leave you holding your nose….if not checking your rear-view mirror.

    That said, are such askew old sayings any less farcical than the twisted tweets America’s Tweeter-in-Chief oft twitters? “Fake news!”…”fake news!”…”fake news!” And if ANYONE can smell (like) a rat when it comes to fake news, it is obviously President Tweety Turd.

    Leaving the President’s behind for a moment, here are some classic old sayings. Can you make out the fakeout — aka smell the rat — in these venerable gems?

    If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and mocks like a mocking bird, duck — it’s The Donald.

    A watched pot never boils….but it may get a bit peeved.

    A rolling stone gathers no animosity.

    A fool and his honey are soon parted.

    Faint heart ne’er won bare lady.

    Oil and water don’t mix — got that, Slick?

    You can’t get blood out of a turnip, but you can get honey out of two-lips.

    Monkey pee pee, monkey do do (easy come, easy go).

    Dead men tell no tales, but some may leave a will which does.

    Friends and would-be heirs, some of the above were almost enough to make me gag, but I can assure your butt that not every old phrase strays in dubious ways. For example:

    ….and this:

    ….and this:

    Oh….and I almost forgot this old saying: HAPPY NEW YEAR!

     

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 6:30 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year Mistermuse! Love your “old” sayings🤗

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:27 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. Here’s an “old” saying that’s so bad, it goes without saying: A GARFIELD HUG AROUND THE TUSH IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH. Sorry about that — especially if you mind Garfield hugging you around the tush. 🙂

        Like

    • Carmen 7:41 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As hubby’s grandmother used to say (referring to the first video), “Those fellas are SOUP-le”. 🙂
      Great videos as usual, mistermuse! (Although the second one wasn’t available -in my country, I assume)
      Meanwhile, here in the Maritimes, we are bringing in the brass monkey at night. Brrrrr. . Happy New Year, eh? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:44 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        “SOUP-le” sounds like French for “supple.” I’d supple-ment that with something witty, but it’s not supple-meant to be.

        The second video is a 1939 song titled SNUG AS A BUG IN A RUG, which I hope you and your hubby are staying in this “Brrrrr” weather.

        Warmest wishes for the New Year.

        Like

        • Carmen 9:57 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink

          That was the joke. She meant to say ‘supple’, as in ‘can bend easily’ but it came out mispronounced. It was one of those endearing things she said which no one ever corrected – she was a character! 🙂
          We’ve got fires in both the furnace and the kitchen wood range. . . we’re managing! Even took the kids on a not-exactly-sleigh-ride yesterday (it was a balmy minus 8 C) — a trailer hooked to an old tractor, complete with straw bales and blankets. Seventeen children, eight on down to eight months, thought it was a great time!

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:01 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That “sleigh ride” sounds like a blast (of cold air), but who cares about the cold when you’re “eight on down.” It’s a different story when you’re eighty on up….but it beats the alternative of being six feet under. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

    • manoloprofe 1:16 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year & thanks a lot for being in the observation post…! 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:33 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        It has been my pleasure. Hopefully 2018 will be another good year of observation and posting for both of us.

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 2:27 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Still in love with Gene Kelly after all these years…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:37 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        And well you should….after all, Gene Kelly danced almost as well as I (in my dreams). 🙂

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:52 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year Muse!

      Remember ‘Actions Speak Louder Than Words’.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:25 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        B.B. King must’ve thought he was indeed a king, singing “You don’t do as I tell you, baby” in that song — apparently her INaction spoke louder than words, as far as he was concerned. The nerve of the woman, not doing as he told her!

        Don, if you’re heading for Times Square tomorrow night to ring in the New Year, stay warm and sober (or at least warm). 🙂

        Like

        • Don Frankel 9:28 am on December 31, 2017 Permalink

          Muse I’m just going to post last year’s picture from last year. I’m not going out of the house today.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Superduque777 8:05 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 4:47 pm on January 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year! Love your blog ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • lexborgia 11:32 pm on January 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      You can’t get blood out of a turnip…..leave a will which does.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: black cat, , , , , , ,   

    CONFUCIUS SAY HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW 

    Today is birthday of Chinese philosopher Confucius, born September 28, 551 BC (not to be Confucius-ed with Chinese philosopher who long Ago Too Young die like fool, choking on egg). Confucius, of course, left us even more wise old sayings than the inscrutable Charlie Chan, which was pen name of writer called None the Wiser (not to be Confucius-ed with his agent — a gent named Ah So).

    In any case, in the interest of being fair and balanced and sly as a Fox, we herewith present selection of Confucius sayings to go along with those in CHARLIE CHAN post of Sept. 15. No matter which you prefer, may you benefit from their wisdom, and may all your male children be wise guys.

    I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

    The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

    Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance.

    Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.

    He who knows all the answers has not been asked all the questions.

    The funniest people are the saddest ones.

    Sad to say, my work here is dumb….make that done. On second thought, maybe right first time.

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:56 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mistermuse you have outdone yourself in the humor category….I laughed so loudly!!😂😂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Richard Cahill 9:33 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      In the spirit of your previous blog, I’ll be sure to raise a stein to the memory of Confucius this weekend, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:55 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        And in spirit of comment to previous blog post, Sr. Muse happily return Salud to you, Ricardo.

        Like

    • Forestwoodfolk 7:25 pm on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great minds think alike. Thanks for visiting me and commenting on my blog post about quotes and their meanings. Funny that we should do Confucius at the same time
      And it was his birthday!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:25 pm on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I used to visit your blog fairly often but somehow got off track, which was my loss. Now that I’ve come across your blog again, I’ll try to keep up more regularly.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 4:21 pm on September 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice Muse but I’m beginning to think that Confucius might be like Yogi in that he might not have said all the things he said.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:37 pm on September 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I got the same feeling when I read the “black cat” quote, Don. That one in particular seems suspect, in my opinion.

        Like

    • markscheel1 4:56 pm on September 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      My favorite is “Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.” But it left me with the question, how do we tell the difference?

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 pm on September 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Good question, Mark. I’d say the answer is BY COMPARISON: Confucius with Trump, for example (though Trump does seem to have made some “cosmetic” changes over the years).

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Chinese proverbs, , , , , , , , USA! USA! USA!,   

    CONFUCIUS, PRO AND CON 

    Yesterday, Sept. 29, was CONFUCIUS DAY. Confucius say: Mistermuse perfect pundit to write Sept. 30 CONFUCIUS DAY post because he always a day late and a yuan* short. Mistermuse say: I not a day late, Confucius Day a day too soon — besides, everyone know yuan is actually Spanish/Latino name (as in Don Juan), not Chinese. Latinos say: Whatever. Just don’t Confuci-us with the Japanese, who have the yen. Anyway, before yuan thing lead to another, what counts is the way we Americans say it: “A day late and a dollar short.”  USA! USA! USA!

    *Chinese currency

    Now that we’ve cleared that up, let us get down to the business at hand, which happens to be a selection of profound proverbs by Confucius, followed by an equal proportion of proverbial conclusions by Contrarius (which happens to be the pun name of Anonymous).

    Choose a job that you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
    Learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is perilous.
    To see and listen to the wicked is already the beginning of wickedness.
    He who speaks without modesty will find it difficult to make words good.
    Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.
    The superior man understands what is right; the inferior man understands what will sell.

    Man who stand on toilet may be high on pot.
    Wife who put husband in doghouse soon find him in cat house.
    Passionate kiss like spider web: leads to undoing of fly.
    People who eat too many prunes get good run for money.
    War does not determine who is right, war determine who is left.
    Man who jump off cliff jump to conclusion.

    THE END (and not a moment too soon)

     

     

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 12:07 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Man who fly airplane upside down have crack up.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:26 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Man who walk through airport turnstile sideways going to Bangkok. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

        • Michaeline 9:14 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink

          Woman with dress on walking though airport doing handstands reveals cock pit.

          Bunnies making love in bushes can be seen by their cotton balls.

          OLDER WOMEN ALLOWED TO SAY NAUGHTY JOKES, IF THEY CAN REMEMBER THEM.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Cynthia Jobin 10:40 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink

          As the youngsters say: LOL! I heard a lot of those from my Dad. We used to watch old Charlie Chan movies….

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:30 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      But younger women have no such excuse, Michaeline, so your husband should wash your mouth out with soap. 🙂

      Like

    • arekhill1 11:18 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      This post gave me a bad case of deja moo, Sr. Muse. I’ve heard this bull before.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:31 am on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry about that, Ricardo (and, according to your latest post, you’re not even a Taurus!).

        Like

    • Carmen 6:19 am on October 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I see you are being your a-MUSE-ing self. . . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:24 am on October 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Carmen, but one thing in my post confuses, as much as it amuses, me: what do the Japanese have a yen for (of course, I could guess, but I don’t yuan-na).

      Like

    • Don Frankel 2:51 pm on October 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great, wise and funny stuff here Muse. But I must take umbrage with the one about not listening to wicked people. I mean if I had done that in life, I wouldn’t have any friends.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:21 pm on October 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, you’d still have me for a friend, Don (unless you count me among the wicked). 🙂

        As for the wise and funny stuff, I think perhaps the wisest proverb is actually one that’s listed with the funny ones: “War does not determine who is right, war determine who is left.” How true that is!

        Like

    • Don Frankel 1:27 pm on October 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Think Winston Churchill got there first. “History is written by the victors.” Has a slight different bent but it’s the same thought.

      Like

    • mistermuse 3:19 pm on October 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I think “war determine who is left” could also be taken in ‘the last man standing’ sense, regardless of the naïve belief that ‘the good guys are bound to win because they’re ‘right.’ But you’re probably right that it’s just a different take on the same thought.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 2:22 pm on October 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Man who jump off cliff jump to conclusion.

      Hope you don’t do that with Trump.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:11 pm on October 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry, but I’ve already jumped to the conclusion that Trump is the worst excuse for a Presidential candidate in my lifetime. I’d go back before that, but that would be jumping to another conclusion. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Forestwoodfolkart 7:18 am on November 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I do like the Confucian sayings. They contain such wisdoms.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:40 am on November 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely! And to think that he said them 2,500 years ago! If most people haven’t taken them to heart by this time, will they ever?

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: garbage, gays, , outhouse, , rubbish, , trash, trash talk, , waste not want not   

    GARBAGE IN — GARBAGE OUT? 

    I consider myself reasonably wise in the ways of the world, but the more I think about it, the more I realize there’s been a lot of stuff going on that I’m not aware of. For example, every man-of-the-house knows that he’s the one who takes out the garbage (as my wife is sure to remind me if I forget) — but how does that work when two gays live together?

                                                         Garbage out

    Then there’s the question of taking out the garbage in a high rise apartment building. I’ve never lived in one, so it never occurred to me to wonder how that works. Let’s say I rent a 30th floor apartment and, by the by, my cache of trash reaches a truly disgusting level of odoriferousness — do I open a window, look down to make sure ground zero is relatively clear, and submit to the gravity of the situation? What if the windows don’t open — do I look for a laundry chute? Do buildings even have laundry chutes anymore? Oh, for the good old days when you fed garbage to the hogs and buried what they did not eat behind the outhouse. (Don’t ask why they did not eat behind the outhouse — you’d think if they’d already made pigs of themselves, what goes in must come out, and what better place to be near than an outhouse? It just reeks of convenience!)

    Anyway, the nice thing about writing a post on this subject is that it may be a bunch of garbage, but it’s not like it stinks….and even if it does, what did you expect? It’s not every day that I get to talk trash with imp.u.nity. And who knows what I could win if the awarders of the P.U.litzer Prize get wind of it? It’s clearly a wind-win situation.

    So much for my take on trash. Now let’s see what rubbish others have put out there:

    If you ever wonder whether or not someone is too good for you, I’d advise going through their trash. Really. No one looks superior after that. –Ally Carter

    A simple pecking order has always characterized mankind’s relationship to waste: The wealthy throw out what they do not want, the poor scavenge what they can, and whatever remains is left to rot. –Dan Fagin

    Waste not, want not. –John Wesley

    Here’s a no-brainer that religious extremists/certain politicians can’t seem to wrap their heads around:
    A mind is a terrible thing to waste. –Arthur Fletcher (Ya think?)

    I’m surprised when I walk right into yet another abandoned hunters’ camp. Tattered plastic sheeting still hangs askew here and there. Blackened aerosol cans of Cheez Whiz sit in the fire pit, which sits in the middle of the trail. Assorted Styro-ware…. Where are these people? –Rick Bass

    And with that, my gun — I mean, gum — is losing its flavor, so it’s time to stick it under my chair and call it a day. Lady-of-the-house, where are my nightcap and trail mix?

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 12:25 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Garbage in high rise apartment buildings is either sent down a chute—on each floor– to a compactor or incinerator in the basement, or there’s a room with garbage cans on each floor and a maintenance person lugs it to the elevator and to the basement. Then it is put out on trash collection day.

      Your chewing gum reminds me of an old camp song: ” Does the chewing gum lose its flavor on the bedpost overnight?” Apparently the song actually goes back to 1924, when instead of “chewing gum” the song specified “spearmint.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • Michaeline Montezinos 1:15 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        mister muse this is a very funny post! I needed some humor in my life and I thank you. And I used to roll out the trash when my husband worked full time. Now my husband walks to the trash compacter. It is usually overflowing. Glad I retired from that chore.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:38 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, Cynthia, like they say, you learn something new every day — who knew you could “chute” garbage to get rid of it? But then, people do the same to other people every day, so what’s the big deal.

        Love the song. It reminds me of another oldie that I remember from my boyhood:

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:54 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Michaeline. I’d rather humor you more than humor the gloom or, at least, that’s the rumor.

      Like

    • Midwestern Plant Girl 10:46 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I remember Sonny & Cher singing that song on their skit show! These quotes were hilarious!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:55 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Sonny & Cher — ah, those were the days, my friend. Nowadays most of the music stinks, if you ask me (not that anyone would). 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:57 am on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      As a former high-rise dweller, I can attest to the existence of trash chutes as well. Laundry chutes, however, are exceedingly rare. Coincidentally, it is trash day here and it will be my duty to trundle the bins to the curb, as you have noted, Sr. Muse. That the male of the pair is the trash handler among our species is as inexorable a law of nature as the rule that the male seahorse is tasked with child-rearing. We have it good compared to them.

      Like

      • mistermuse 1:19 pm on August 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        As I recall, a laundry chute played a significant role in the trial outcome in the 1959 Jimmy Stewart film ANATOMY OF A MURDER, as well as in a few even older films. As for the male seahorse doing the child-rearing, it seems only fair that Mrs. Seahorse should be tasked with taking out the garbage, but he probably gets saddled with that as well, while she gets to unwind drinking beer, smoking soggy cigars, and watching football games and seahorse races. We men do indeed have it good compared to our seahorse counterparts.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 9:20 am on August 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You know. I never once wondered how trash is handled in highrise apartment buildings. I looked it up (I had to). “High-rise buildings typically have built-in vertical trash chutes. Residents dump their waste into a chute on their floor, where it falls into a container at the bottom The chute containers are then periodically taken to the load-out dock where they are emptied into the building’s trash compactor.” There you go. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:54 am on August 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for going to that trouble, Diana. I would’ve done so when I got the idea for this post, but I thought if I remained ignorant on the subject, I could better get my points across (after all, that kind of reasoning worked for The Donald to get the GOP nomination for Pres….although such logic seems to going down the tubes — make that the chute — lately). 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 10:56 am on August 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I can attest to the trash chute in a high rise since I live in one. Unfortunately someone will drop an empty Pizza box down the chute and it will get caught sideways and block anything else coming down. At that point we could use some hogs.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:06 am on August 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, if there are no hogs handy, you could try dropping a bowling ball down to dislodge the box (hopefully, no one in the apartment below you will be sticking his/her head in the chute to see what the problem is).

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 12:31 am on August 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No wonder some folks think gay marriage can’t work — who could figure out how to take out the trash?

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:51 am on August 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’m no expert on gay relationships, but perhaps taking turns would do the trick.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 8:29 am on August 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, excellent idea. Next time Maintenance complains about it I’ll suggest the bowling ball. It might wreck the compactor that the garbage goes into but well if you want to make an omelette you have to break a few eggs.

      Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 5:33 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I see people have beat me to it, but I lived in a Manhattan high rise and getting ride of garbage was easy as pie. There were always those, though, who couldn’t seem to manage getting their bags in all the way, or thought it was enough to take it to the room – as if some elf would open the chute and drop it down. Garbage day in Manhattan can be a scene, especially in the evening on a street with restaurants – and rabbit-size rats.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , inspiration & perspiration, , , , song titles,   

    SAY WHAT AGAIN? 

    The use of wordplay in the titles of my last two posts (ROMANCE WASN’T BUILT IN A DAY and ALL’S FARE IN LOVE AND FOUR) doesn’t cancel the reservations I expressed in my 6/1/15 post (SAY WHAT?); i.e., it’s chancy to ‘pun’ old sayings because most people today don’t know them….and if they don’t know the sayings, they won’t get the wordplay.

    Now, granted that some party-poopers may have known the actual sayings (ROME WASN’T BUILT IN A DAY and ALL’S FAIR IN LOVE AND WAR) behind those titles, but pooh-poohed the wordplay as hardly worth the strain my brain went through to get the end result. Be that as it may, my purpose here is to be ‘test assured’ that my readers are more familiar with once-familiar old sayings than “most people” in the first place — so, if you’re game, here’s a list of 4 old sayings, 4 song titles, and 4 made-up idioms. If you can pick — out of the dozen — 3 of the 4 old sayings, consider yourself a genius. If you get all four right, I will consider you a genius.

    1.  FAINT HEART NE’ER WON FAIR LADY

    2.  A PRETTY GIRL IS LIKE A MELODY

    3.  DISCRETION IS THE BETTER PART OF VALOR

    4.  ANY PLACE I HANG MY HAT IS HOME

    5.  GOOD FECES MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS

    6.  FISH AND VISITORS STINK AFTER THREE DAYS

    7.  ANY TIME’S THE TIME TO FALL IN LOVE

    8.  DON’T CHANGE CORPSES IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREAM

    9.  DON’T THROW COLD WATER ON THE FLAME OF LOVE

    10. GO TO BED WITH THE CHICKENS, WAKE UP WITH THE ROOSTERS

    11. WHILE THE CAT’S AWAY, THE MICE WILL PRAY*

    12. GENIUS IS ONE PERCENT INSPIRATION AND 99 PERCENT PERSPIRATION

    *Apparently they’re church mice.

    So, how do you think you did? If you can’t stand the suspense, hold on to your pants, because I will keep you in suspenders no longer — the old sayings are #1, #3, #6 and #12. Speaking of #12, if you weren’t right at least 3 times of 4, obviously you don’t perspire enough to be a genius.

    As for the other two categories, I made up #5 (“feces” for “fences”), #8 (“corpses” replaces “horses”), #10 and #11 (“pray” is a play on “play”), and the song titles are #2, #4, #7 and #9. What’s that you say — #9 sounds like something I made up, not a song? Well, I hate to throw cold water on your hot tamales, but the proof is in the pudding:

    In  closing, take pride, ye geniuses who passed the test and could dig the rest; let the record show, The wordplay’s the thing.

     

     

     

     
    • renxkyoko 12:18 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Good ” feces” and don’t change corpses ….. I was sure they were mistakes. lol

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 3:40 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I admit they’re not old sayings, but I still think they’re good advice. 🙂

      Like

    • linnetmoss 7:44 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got the four old sayings! The fish and visitors is a rule to live by, and I do. I believe it has been attributed to Ben Franklin. The first two sayings have a Shakespearean ring. As for the songs, I recognized a couple. Especially A Pretty Girl is Like a Melody, from the Ziegfeld Follies. And now… once more unto the beach.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:34 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        True to my word, I hereby recognize you as A Pretty Girl — I mean, a genius….well, both actually.
        The first saying definitely has a Shakespearean ring, which is probably why I remember it as I posted it — although when I Googled it that way, all the sites came up FAINT HEART NEVER instead of FAINT HEART NE’ER….but, since I’m a helluva lot older than Google, I decided to take my word for it rather than Google’s.

        Liked by 1 person

        • linnetmoss 6:46 am on August 16, 2016 Permalink

          And the “discretion” one comes from Falstaff, though in slightly different form. Maybe it was already a proverb in the Bard’s day.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:23 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got all the old sayings as well I’m old. Missed one or two of the songs, especially don’t throw cold water on the flame of love. But I got all the word play because that is where we catch the conscious of The Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:44 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’m delighted to crown another genius, Don — if this keeps up, that should prove I have the most literate followers this side of F. Scott Fitzgerald.
        As for the song you missed, that was a tough one (which is why I included the “proof is in the pudding” link).

        Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 10:33 am on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, MisterMuse, I’m guessing it’s being old that allows me to identify those sayings, because I already know I am not a genius. I remember “Faint heart ne’er won fair lady..” from Gilbert and Sullivan’s IOLANTHE, though I doubt it originated there. And “Discretion…etc.” was spoken by Shakespeare’s Fallstaff in HENRY IV. “Inspiration…perspiration” is definitely Thomas Edison, and I always heard that business about fish and visitors came from Ben Franklin.

      The songs are all familiar, too…except for the last one, which you were kind enough to provide a video of…

      I wonder what Robert Frost would say about your removing the letter “n” from his famous line? Maybe that would make a good sign posted near a dog park as a reminder to pooper scoopers.

      And last, but not least, though I realize it has become accepted in popular parlance, I still scream at the TV every time I hear “the proof is in the pudding”…no, no no! It’s “The proof of the pudding is in the eating.”

      This was a lot of fun!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:37 pm on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        As it happens, I own a 1941 book edited by Deems Taylor, titled A TREASURY OF GILBERT & SULLIVAN, which includes the music of IOLANTHE. In that book, I find that G & S titled the song FAINT HEART NEVER WON FAIR LADY, so if my memory of NE’ER (rather than NEVER) is correct, it must indeed have originated earlier, as you suggest. Otherwise, my memory is going the way of all flesh, ne’er to be trusted again. 🙂

        As for “the proof is in the pudding,” I suspect that’s W. C. Fields’ take on the saying, though whether he spiked the pudding with 100 proof, or whatever, probably depended on what was available. Quoting him: “I cook with wine; sometimes I even add it to the food.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • Cynthia Jobin 3:30 pm on August 15, 2016 Permalink

          Well, if that’s the kind of “proof” we’re talking about, I have to say I finally understand “the proof is in the pudding.” Thanks for the enlightenment. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:40 pm on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      1,3,6 and 12. Didn’t cheat

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:46 pm on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Calling again on W. C. Fields, one of his films was titled YOU CAN’T CHEAT AN HONEST MAN. I assume that includes not being able to cheat oneself — which, of course, makes you an honest man….which, of course, I already knew. Honest!

        Like

    • eths 8:33 pm on August 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Fun!

      Liked by 1 person

    • GP Cox 1:53 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ll pick 3, 4, 7 & 12 as the old sayings.
      [okay – how stupid am I ?]

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 3:50 pm on August 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      FYI, here are the one’s I’m familiar with — including those wordplayed:

      3. DISCRETION IS THE BETTER PART OF VALOR

      5. GOOD FECES MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS

      6. FISH AND VISITORS STINK AFTER THREE DAYS

      8. DON’T CHANGE CORPSES IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREAM

      11. WHILE THE CAT’S AWAY, THE MICE WILL PRAY*

      12. GENIUS IS ONE PERCENT INSPIRATION AND 99 PERCENT PERSPIRATION

      I’m still wondering at 3, 8, 11.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:06 pm on August 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Not knowing quite what to say about your comment, I’ll “go” with #3. 🙂

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , lazy, , , , , summer songs   

    SUMMERTIME, AND THE LIVIN’ IS EASY 

    In summer, the song sings itself. –William Carlos Williams
    Deep summer is when laziness finds respectability. –Sam Keen

    June 20 being the first day of summer, and thus the ‘official’ start of those lazy hazy days of summer, what better time to rest on my laurels — such as they are — and take it easy. The less said (and the more summer songs I can summon to save me the amount of work that went into my last post), the less strain on my brain to compose today’s post (if that rationale sounds like a reprise of a vaguely familiar theme, I did a celebration of spring songs on March 20 — the first day of spring — titled IT MIGHT AS WELL BE SPRING).

    Excuse thus established, on with the show. Enjoy!

    And with that, my very fine feted friends (notice I didn’t say fine fetid friends), I declare that….

     
    • scifihammy 2:53 am on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Lovely post. I like the cat rescuing the fish! 🙂
      Enjoy your summer. – At the other end of the world, we are mid-winter!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:31 am on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. I’ve heard of rescue dogs, but rescue cats? Sounds fishy to me — I’m thinkin’ maybe the cat was contemplating a snack but was so well fed that the fish swam away while the feline was still thinking about it! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 8:34 am on June 20, 2016 Permalink

          I don’t know what goes on in a cat’s head! Maybe it just thought it didn’t look right, so fixed it. 🙂 Also, I thought it was a clockwork fish! 😀

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:35 am on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’m in La Paz, where it’s summer until about December and some years longer. Suits me perfectly.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:51 am on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Scifihammy, I must confess I’ve never heard of a clockwork fish, but I am familiar with A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (both the movie and the fruit). I recommend you get only the juice of the latter (like MINUTE Maid), otherwise you may have a hard time digesting the clockwork. 🙂

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 9:31 pm on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I especially like that one-man barbershop quartet. I always enjoyed singing in an a cappella quartet, and now I think that if I were still young (and technology savvy) I would definitely want to try to pull-off something like that. I don’t know if I could do four voices, but three would certainly be possible. I could be a one-woman Andrews Sisters!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:27 pm on June 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        As good as the Andrews Sisters were, I prefer their ‘jazzier’ predecessors The Boswell Sisters, who were from New Orleans & disbanded in 1935. Here they are in a scene from a 1934 film singing a song titled ROCK & ROLL before there was such a thing as rock & roll!

        As for barbershop quartets — here’s a great scene from the 1949 Judy Garland film MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS:

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 5:13 pm on June 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Always a sucker for a cat video, I like to imagine he was indeed rescuing the poor thing rather than thinking about dinner.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:41 pm on June 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d like to think so too, RMW….or, if not rescuing, just too well fed and/or lazy to pursue the matter fur-ther.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , James Jones, John Steinbeck, , , , , , , Willa Cather, ,   

    TELLTALE TITLES 

    How much time and thought do you devote to coming up with just-the-right title for your story, poem or article? If you take writing seriously, the answer is probably: as long as it takes to nail it — which could be almost no time at all, if it comes to you in a flash — or, more time than a less intense writer is willing to allot.

    Ernest Hemingway, for one, evidently wasn’t the latter type. Case in point: in writing his definitive Spanish Civil War novel, he didn’t settle for less than a killer title that would encapsulate ‘the moral of the story,’ eventually finding it in this passage from a 1624 work by the poet John Donne: “Any man’s death diminishes me because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”

    As a writer of (mostly) humorous poems and posts, I’m inclined to go for witty and/or wordplay titles. Many times, the title to a particular piece all but suggests itself, but more often, no such luck, and I’m stuck — until eventually (as with the title of this post) a eureka moment rewards my resolve….or a poem resists my labeling efforts, and I just settle for:

    UNTITLED

    This poem’s title is Untitled —
    Not because it is untitled,
    But because I am entitled
    To entitle it Untitled.

    If I’d not titled it Untitled,
    It would truly be untitled….
    Which would make it unentitled
    To the title of Untitled.

    So it is vital, if untitled,
    Not to title it Untitled,
    And to leave that title idled,
    As a title is entitled.

    Moving on, suppose we try a title quiz based on the Papa Hemingway model (sorry, those of you who’d prefer the mistermuse model). Here are five passages from classic original works from which later authors lifted titles for their novels. Can you name the five later works and pin each tale on its author (ten answers total)? If you name all ten correctly, you win the title (with apologies to Cervantes) of Donkeyote Of All You Survey.

    PASSAGES FROM ORIGINAL WORKS:

    Gentlemen-rankers out on the spree/Damned from here to Eternity/God ha’ mercy on such as we/Ba! Yah! Bah! –Rudyard Kipling

    The best laid schemes o’ mice an’ men/Gang aft a-gley/An’ lea’e us naught but grief an’ pain/For promised joy! –Robert Burns

    By the pricking of my thumbs,/Something wicked this way comes. –Wm. Shakespeare

    Come my tan-faced children/Follow well in order, get your weapons ready/Have you your pistols? Have you your sharp-edged axes?/Pioneers! O pioneers! –Walt Whitman

    No Place so Sacred from such Fops is barr’d,/Nor is Paul’s Church more safe than Paul’s Churchyard./Nay, fly to altars; there they’ll talk you dead/For Fools rush in where Angels fear to tread. –Alexander Pope

    TITLES (WITH AUTHORS) FROM  ABOVE PREVIOUS WORKS:

    FROM HERE TO ETERNITY –James Jones
    OF MICE AND MEN –John Steinbeck
    SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES –Ray Bradbury
    O PIONEERS! –Willa Cather
    WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD –E.M. Forster

    How many of the ten titles/authors did you get? That last title, parenthetically, became part of Johnny Mercer’s lyrics to this 1940 hit song composed by Rube Bloom:

    And now I fear I must tread on out….before something wicked this way comes.

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 10:29 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      If there were an award entitled “The Best Poem about Title-ing An Untitled Poem” you certainly would be entitled to it. I recall a creative writing teacher who was a stickler about titles; she said leaving a poem untitled was lazy and a refusal to finish your poem properly. In the history of Literature it seems even the use of Numbers—Sonnet 24—has been acceptable, and often the first line or phrase of a poem is used as its title—-“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night….”.

      I liked the quiz. Pour moi it was a piece of cake. Just this past month I used a line from a Shakespeare sonnet for one of my titles: “Love’s Not Time’s Fool.” Thanks for an enjoyable post!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:21 am on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cynthia. I believe the exception to the ‘poems must be titled rule’ is the limerick, which should never be titled (if one were to follow the rules, which apparently exist to curtail my fun, so I have occasionally titled a few of mine).

        Congrats on getting 100% on the quiz. I hereby award you the title (in deference to your gender) of DONNA-KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:14 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got all the titles but sad to say did not know the last three authors off the top of my head. I guess I get a 70. But of course I knew the song.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:05 pm on June 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, you know how much I dig great old songs, so I’m giving you 30 bonus points for knowing FOOLS RUSH IN (WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD). That brings your score up to 100, which wins you the DON(FRANKEL)KEYOTE OF ALL YOU SURVEY AWARD….and well deserved, I might add!

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:32 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      AUTO REPLY: I’m on vacation. Any quizzes will be taken when I get back to my office.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:07 am on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I auto wish you a great vacation, but no doubt you’re having one anyway. Safe trip home.

      Like

    • inesephoto 5:55 pm on June 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Love your poem 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:20 pm on June 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I got the titles but didn’t know all the authors. This was really interesting. Your poem made me laugh. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Victor Hugo   

    SENIOR MUSE 

    May is Older Americans Month (fka Senior Citizens Month). Back in 1963, when the month was established, I was “a young man full of idealism and vigor” (as Barack Obama joked recently at the White House in a different context), a year out of the army with the rest of my life ahead of me. Now here it is 2016, some 53 years later, and I still have the rest of my life ahead of me. Amazing.

    So much for the glass-half-full outlook. In the other hand, the glass is half-empty:

    COME TO THINK OF IT

    Old age is a sad estate.
    With it comes wisdom,
    But it comes so late.

    Now recall innocent youth.
    Ignorance was bliss,
    But less than truth.

    Why can’t life be in reverse:
    Born knowing the score,
    Blameless in the hearse?

    The old joke about old age is that there’s not much future in it. Maybe so, but I like to think ‘outside the box.’ One thing for sure: Old age is no place for sissies. –Bette Davis

    Well, never let it be said that this blog is no place for good quotes. Most of the following goodies aren’t funny, but then, old age isn’t exactly a barrel of laughs either. So, until further adieu:

    Old age isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative. –Maurice Chevalier

    Old age is the most unexpected of all the things that can happen to a man. –James Thurber

    A stockbroker urged me to buy a stock that would triple its value every year. I told him, “At my age, I don’t even buy green bananas.” –Claude Pepper

    Life’s tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late. –Benjamin Franklin

    Forty is the old age of youth; fifty the youth of old age. –Victor Hugo

    There’s no such thing as old age; there is only sorrow. –Fay Weldon

    Whatever poet, orator or sage may say of it, old age is still old age. –Sinclair Lewis

    A truly great book should be read in youth, again in maturity, and once more in old age, as a fine building should be seen by morning light, at noon and by moonlight. –Robertson Davies

    Not even old age knows how to love death. –Sophocles

    By the time you’re 80 years old you’ve learned everything. You only have to remember it. –George Burns (who, in case you forgot, lived to age 100)

    And now for the BIG (double) FINISH:

     

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 12:34 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoyed listening to both renditions of the Farewell Blues.

      I like Mark Twain’s take on the fear of death: — ‘I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience…’

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:33 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cynthia. I hadn’t read that Mark Twain quote before (or, if I did, I forgot it in my old age). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • eths 1:45 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Losing a son last year made me look at my life differently. I feel really lucky to be 81 and in good health and to look forward to each day, particularly now that I’ve found the blogging world.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:48 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I can empathize, as I lost my only sister this year. As for your blog, I read it (ir)religiously and I look forward to it each day — or at least each year (just kidding – I wholly recommend it). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • eths 5:46 pm on May 5, 2016 Permalink

          I am sorry about your sister. I hope you are doing well.

          Liked by 1 person

    • ladysighs 7:43 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for informing me that May is Old Age Month. I think. 😦
      One of those things I’d rather not think about, but now that I know about it I can’t stop thinking about it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:10 am on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Ladysighs, I’d apologize, but I’d like to think this post inspired your excellent blog post today along the same lines (I’m sure you wrote yours before you saw mine, but that’s just a minor detail). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 2:47 pm on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Old or young, keep in mind the words of the philosopher–“Nobody gets out of life alive.”

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on May 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Some people are lucky to get INTO it alive….which seems ironic, when you consider that none of us asked to be conceived, much less born. To paraphrase Rick (Humphrey Bogart) in Casablanca: It seems that fate takes a hand.

        Like

    • Carmen 6:56 am on May 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mister use-
      I get that comment from a few of my students when they realize I’m the same age as their grandmothers. They’ll blurt out, “You’re OLD!!” I always come back with, “Compared to whom?”
      It’s all relative. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:10 am on May 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It’s all relative until we kick the bucket….and then it’s all relatives (at the funeral). 🙂

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:29 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I swore I commented on this but then maybe I just came into the room where I have the computer and stared at the screen and forgot why I went into this room. What’s this post about again?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:34 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Welcome to the club, Don. It’s the only club I know of where, once you’re in, there’s only one way out. 😦

        Like

        • Carmen 8:49 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink

          Methinks you two exaggerate. . .there’s lots of mustard left to cut with the pair of you! 😉

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:20 am on May 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Carmen, your comment cuts the mustard, whether we exaggerate or not. 🙂

      Like

    • blindzanygirl 12:17 am on May 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love those quotes mistermuse. Looks like I have dug right back into your blog. But it was worth it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:48 am on May 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        To think that when I wrote this post, Trump wasn’t even the Republican nominee for U.S. President yet. They say time flies when you’re having fun, but judging by the past 3 1/2 years, time flies even when you’re not having fun.

        Liked by 1 person

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