Updates from June, 2020 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 7:30 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Handful Of Stars, , , The 5th Dimension, The Age of Aquarius, The Starlit Hour, The Stars Will Remember, Vera Lynn, vocalists,   

    LEFTOVER STARS 

    A lot of stars have flown over the bridge since my last stars turn (June 8), which I abandoned mid-post, and which was to be continued when browsers no longer go on the blink and Jupiter aligns with Mars — like, maybe after the dawning of the….

    With so much happening in our wayward world, you’re forgiven if you’ve forgotten my intention to follow up. But that doesn’t mean you’re spared these leftovers — because it dawned on me even back then that….

    Speaking of remembering, I’d like to note the passing eight days ago of Vera Lynn at age 103. I know of no more popular English female vocalist, especially during WW II when she toured Egypt, India, and Burma entertaining British troops, who named her their favorite musical artist. A brilliant new star shines in the heavens this month.

    You may have gathered by now, friends, that the Firefox fix is finally in. Actually (and unbelievably), as I was preparing this post yesterday, I stumbled upon a way to copy music videos to my blog — so, between today’s fix and yesterday’s good fortune (my technological ignorance notwithstanding), I’m feeling so sky high, I could reach up and grab….

    With a shout out of appreciation to those readers who offered possible solutions to my tech problems, I’ll close out this series of star songs with THE star female vocalist of the 20th century:

     
    • Rivergirl 7:40 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Glad it’s finally fixed on your end. Sadly two of the three videos were unavailable to me. Computers are a strange thing…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:56 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Rg. Actually, I posted four videos: AGE OF AQUARIUS, THE STARS WILL REMEMBER, A HANDFUL OF STARS, and THE STARLIT HOUR. Hopefully, the unavailable (to you) videos will appear when my daughter completes her “fix” later today.

        Liked by 1 person

      • calmkate 8:28 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        all four worked fine for me, they took a while to start but all good!

        Fancy making it to 103, what a legend ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:51 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for advising me that all four worked for you — it’s a relief to know that the ‘no-shows’ aren’t no-shows universally!

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:41 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          no occasionally I’m block from videos on d’Verse poetry site but yours always seem to work fine!

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 8:24 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      oh joy of joy, you sound like the MrM I know … all done and dusted!

      You’ve not only conquered the technology challenges you’ve also brought back some lovely memories with this collection 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:33 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry to temper your joy, Kate, but any “high” I’m on now is strictly short term as long as Trump is Pres..When he goes, we can all thank our lucky stars!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:44 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          we don’t even live there but will feel the same relief … if he stays we will all be trembling in fear!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:25 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Firefox to the rescue!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:44 am on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I managed to solve my video clip issue yesterday, but that was only one of my problems. Hopefully the Firefox installation today will “rescue” me from the rest of them.

        Liked by 2 people

    • magickmermaid 1:44 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      All the videos worked for me! My grandmother’s favourite stars were Tony Martin and Tyrone Power. 🙂
      I’m wishing on a star that all your internet troubles will be gone today! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:08 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks, mm. I haven’t forgotten your 6/21 comment regarding my “Like” problem, which I said I’d pass on to my daughter when she came to install Foxfire. She’s working on something else at present, but I’ll show it to her later to see if it can help me. Hopefully, by the end of the day, my internet troubles will indeed be gone! .

        Liked by 1 person

        • magickmermaid 4:47 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          The “like” problem was happening to me until I worked out what the problem was.
          Soon you can be over the moon that all your stars are aligned. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:36 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink

          The “fix” is in, and so far, so good — “Like” is working on replies to my comments on various blogs. My daughter said your 6/21 suggestions are incorporated in Firefox, so she didn’t need to do anything extra. It’s all Greek to me, so I’ll take her word for it!

          Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:15 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So happy that you’re back among the stars once again! I was happily able to listen to all four of your video clips. Nostalgia of my father who had records of your featured singers in his large musical collection.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:16 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate that, Rosaliene. I too once had a large musical collection including thousands of 78s, but had to sell that part of it and am left with hundreds of LPs. No doubt your father and I would’ve had a ball if we could have checked out each other’s collections!

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 5:02 pm on June 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      All four played, no problems. Hope the Firefox fix sticks.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 10:06 am on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So how is it that Firefox is your friend and not mine? Can you tell me how you grabbed those videos bc I now can’t do it with the sly singed one.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:12 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        The easiestt way is still the way I “stumbled” upon (as mentioned in my post) the day BEFORE Firefox was installed, which is to bring up the Youtube video you want to use, go to the URL in the address bar at the very top, then copy and paste as you would anything else you want to copy and paste. It’s so simple that I can’t believe I didn’t think of it before!

        I hope this works for you as well as it works for me.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 11:13 am on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Believe it or not, my son and I were talking about Vera Lynn just last night. We were watching Pink Floyd’s The Wall. We both know a lot of her music and about her life.

      Synchronicity…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:02 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for your comment. Although I’ve long liked Vera Lynn’s voice, i didn’t know much about her until I was putting this post together and learned of her recent death….which led me to Wikipedia to learn more. I think she was under-appreciated in the U.S., despite her popularity in England.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 1:58 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t want to take up more of your time with this browser stuff, but that was and is precisely what I do with Safari, but freakin’FF won’t comply. So I guess I shall have to remain bibrowsual. No need to respond; there are worse things in life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:54 pm on June 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t mind responding again, Annie. If anyone knows it often takes two or more times to ‘get the job done,’ it’s me!

        In any case, here’s how my daughter told me to do it on Firefox: Bring up the music video you want to copy and, after starting to play it, right-click on the right hand side of the clip, which brings up a menu. Left-click the 4th item down, which is “Copy embedded code,” and you’re ready to paste the clip unto your post. I tried it once and it worked, so now I have my choice of two ways to post videos.

        Like

    • dunnasead.co 10:10 am on June 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sometimes you hear such a beauty of voice you just want to listen, irregardless of what the orchestra, arrangements, tap dancers etc are doing. you are focused. this is focus music. thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:00 am on June 29, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Well said. No doubt the orchestral accompaniments to the Vera Lynn and Tony Martin vocals sound hoary to modern ears, but the “beauty of voice” is timeless.

        Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 12:24 am on June 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello Mistermuse, video does not sow. Vera Lynn has the same occupation simultaneously, as did Edith Piaf!. Cheers and well wishes for a great Summer!💕☕️☕️

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:56 am on June 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry about the video not showing, AOC. Most of the previous commenters have reported being able to see all four videos, so the problem is apparently at your end. Hope you were able to view the other three.

      Like

  • mistermuse 8:12 pm on June 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , bigotry, , , the Constitution, woman's intuition   

    IT’S ALL IN THE (HUMAN) FAMILY 

    Surprise, surprise. I’m back before Father’s Day — not because my browser problem has magically been resolved (or resolved itself), but because what I want to share in this post doesn’t require video clips unavailable to me until the “Father’s Day fix” previously delineated.

    Those of you old enough to remember the 1970’s TV sitcom ALL IN THE FAMILY will undoubtedly recall the name Carroll O’Connor, who played the role of bigoted Archie Bunker in that top-rated series:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carroll_O%27Connor

    Ironically, as I began this post this afternoon, I didn’t realize that O’Connor died 19 years ago on June 21, which happens to be Father’s Day (the day I wrongly thought I’d resume blogging). Earlier today, again by happenstance, I’d started reading his autobiography (titled I THINK I’M OUTTA HERE, which I’ve owned for some time), and realized that this was an articulate man who had much to say and said it well. So, to make a wrong story short, some of what he had to say is what I want to share, because it’s even more relevant today :

    “Ruminating in later years on how nations have come under the control of haters and fools, I began to understand that it was only the brilliant foresight of the men who made the Constitution — that insistent clutch of intellectuals, not the ordinary mob of “good” people we praise so fulsomely — [who] prevented the most evil traditions of Europe from flourishing three centuries ago on these helpless shores, already defiled by slavery. And yet even so, the ordinary good people have retained their private benighted beliefs [which] have sickened the life of the country.”

    “I take women very seriously, far more seriously than most men take them, or than I take most men. If a woman disapproves of what I’m doing, I worry, regardless of whether or not her reason makes complete sense to me. Woman’s intuition may be an ancient cliché, but I believe in it, respect it, and sometimes panic in the face of it.”

    “My grandfather, being rich, shared the view of the rich that if private enterprise thrives, so will its dependents, the ordinary people and the poor, except a segment of the poor known as the chronic poor. “Ah, the chronic poor!” exclaimed my father in mock lament. “The rich man looks at the chronic poor and recalls the words of the Lord that they will always be with us, which the rich man understands to mean that he needn’t worry about them.”

    The above quotes come from the book’s first 33 pages, which is as far as I’ve gotten so far.  On that basis alone, I recommend I THINK I’M OUTTA HERE….which, as it happens, is what I am.

     

     
    • D. Wallace Peach 9:13 pm on June 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So interesting. He was a smart guy and ahead of his time compared to many Americans who still struggle with basic brain-function. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 9:15 pm on June 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh Jeez…
      Very odd how a very liberal man portrayed such a bigoted conservative so well.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:55 pm on June 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I confess I didn’t know much about Carroll O’Connor before, but I must have heard that he wasn’t anything like the guy he portrayed on TV, or I wouldn’t have bought the book a few years ago. Now that I’ve started reading it, I’m glad I did.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Totsymae 12:14 pm on June 14, 2020 Permalink

          Yes, I’d heard that he was a very nice guy and nothing like the Archie character. You have to think that during that time, there were so many informal ways to learn to be such a character as Archie since so many held those beliefs. If he were to play that same character today, he’d still have an accurate or similar portrayal, looking at the social climate now. He was such a natural, it didn’t seem rehearsed.

          Like

        • mistermuse 8:53 pm on June 14, 2020 Permalink

          For some reason, Totsymae, I’m unable to “Like” your comment even though I like it (I’m sure that makes no sense to you, but take my word — regular readers of my blog know what I mean). In any case, I appreciate the comment.

          Like

    • calmkate 2:00 am on June 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      well that gives testemony to his acting ability!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 7:56 am on June 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      He will be forever associated with a bigot from Queens, but in reality was far from it.
      As for the quotes, all you men should panic in the face of our intuition.
      😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • annieasksyou 4:32 pm on June 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I like this a lot, mistermuse. I do recall Archie Bunker’s arguments with his son-in-law, the liberal Meathead, played by Rob Reiner. They were all brilliant, especially Norman Lear, their creator, and I recall being encouraged by the program’s directness in addressing the prejudices that weren’t talked about then.
      Ok: here’s one for you. A few hours before reading this post. I released mine, in which I quoted a COVID-19 sniffing dog in an airport telling a traveler: “You’re outta here!” What are the odds…?

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 6:24 pm on June 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Annie. Rob Reiner, as you no doubt know, is the son of Carl Reiner, who along with Sid Caesar was one of the stars of YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS and CAESAR’S HOUR, two of my favorite shows back in TV’s early years. I mention this because Sid (in his autobiography CAESAR’S HOURS) relates that “Carl would often bring his young son, Rob, to watch the show”….as if I needed a reminder that I am even older than Rob!

        I read your very interesting and informative post and left a Like but not a comment, which I hope you’ll forgive, as I didn’t feel as if I had anything interesting or informative to add (I haven’t owned a dog since boyhood, haven’t been in an airport since a trip to Ireland in 1984, and haven’t crossed a border since driving through western Canada to Alaska in 2001). In other words, I felt “outta the loop” relevant to your subject matter!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 8:48 pm on June 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I had no idea that he was this sort of a man. I am sorry that I so easily confused the actor with the character he portrayed. Thanks for setting me straight.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:28 pm on June 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Some actors (like John Wayne) basically played themselves no matter what character they portrayed. Other actors (like Fredric March) were so good that they were completely believable as the character they played, no matter how different (if you saw him in INHERIT THE WIND and THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES, for example, you wouldn’t think it’s the same actor). Outside of ALL IN THE FAMILY, I haven’t seen enough of O’Connor to categorize him definitively, but obviously he didn’t play himself in that show….but, like you, I didn’t know that at the time.

        Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 9:32 am on June 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Only a very good actor could play Archie Bunker and still be likeable enough for people to watch. Same with Jean Stapleton. They made it look easy.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:49 am on June 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m further along in O’Connor’s autobiography, but still haven’t gotten to the Archie Bunker part, which should be very interesting (including what he has to say about Jean).

      Liked by 2 people

    • annieasksyou 12:32 pm on June 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse: of course I forgive you for not leaving a comment, and I appreciated the “like.” But Doggone it, there was some bad punning going on, and I wished you had pawsed long enough to add your two scents!

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 3:03 pm on June 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I shouldn’t have said I haven’t owned a dog since boyhood, as I still own two….but in this hot weather, they stink so much when I take my shoes off that my wife has to put a clothespin on her nose and rub copious amounts of hand sanitizer on my feet. Now my love life has gone to the dogs and the rest of me is in the doghouse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 3:51 pm on June 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      TMI😉

      Liked by 2 people

    • annieasksyou 6:56 pm on June 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Seismically, I’m sure!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , I've Told Every Little Star, , , Old King Cole, , stars   

    A CONTINUATION OF STARS 

    “How far away the stars seem, how far our first kiss, and ah, how old my heart.” –William Butler Yeats

    *        *                  *            *            *            *     *         *             *              *          *                    *             *
    *         *            *         *        *                 *            *                *                 *                  *               *                *          *             *               *               *         *       *          *          *                        *                *               *
    *      *        *               *          *               *              *              *        *         *                *           *       *                *
    *            *       *               *            *                *             *                     *               *              *                   *

    Since my last post (A CONSOLATION OF STARS), it occurred to me that the realm of the Golden Age of Popular Music begot a ‘title wave’ of Star songs — so why not give it its just due and do another post along similar lines? Then along comes the birthday (June 9, 1892) of fabled old king Cole Porter, and it further occurred to me that such a prolific composer must have written at least one serenade to the stars…..but none came to my mind. So I searched the night sky and found that he did indeed compose one — and only one — such song:

    I’m not so starry-eyed as to contend that the above song is Porter’s best love song — far from it — but it does serve to set the tableau, if you’ll pardon my French. So let us now turn to a song higher in the pantheon of great romantic songs, composed by the great team of Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II:

    https://secondhandsongs.com/performance/128759

    I hadn’t intended to stop here, but I’ve come to a point where my outdated browser is causing problems beyond what my old head can handle (until my daughter does a Father’s Day fix). Looking back, a suspension of posting (pending a fix) was as inevitable as night follows day….or should I say: It Was Written In The Stars.

    “CONTINUATION” TO BE CONTINUED*

    *after the “fix” I’m in is fixed

     

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:57 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      hey that’s two posts I didn’t expect 🙂

      and you are not able to click ‘like’ … I had noticed!

      So huge progress … we will expect masterpiece posts after Father’s Day 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:08 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Huge progress in one area, huge regress in another, Kate. I started writing this post several days ago and was able to copy the “It Was Written In The Stars” video. Over the next few days, I tried unsuccessfully to copy additional “Stars” song clips, and each time my old browser wouldn’t let me — that’s why I couldn’t complete this post. My daughter assures me that the new browser she will install will solve the problem. If not, I’ll be (star) crossed as hell!

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 7:12 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink

          lol you will get there slowly but surely … no point in rushing these things MrM 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 1:27 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I hope that your fix gets fixed. I’d be in a fix without you. Love the starry theme.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:19 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Lorraine. The stars at the top was a last-minute idea to ‘complete the picture’ which I probably wouldn’t have thought of if I’d been able to ‘complete the post’ as I’d intended, Glad you like/love it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • blindzanygirl 7:51 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink

          I have a penchant for stars as may be obvious in some of my postings lol. Xx

          Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 7:47 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I LOVE Porter, but the first song that came to mind is Hogie’s Stardust.
      We all feel your pain when it comes to computer issues. Hang in.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:24 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I had Louis Armstrong’s rendition of STARDUST in my previous post. Of course, Hoagie wrote it (as well as recorded it), but Satchmo does it better than anyone, in my opinion.

        As for my computer issues, I’m counting on a new browser to resolve most of them. If it doesn’t, even my techie daughter may be stumped, leaving me up a tree.

        Like

    • masercot 8:46 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Dream a Little Dream of Me

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:54 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I know the song, which has “Stars” in the lyrics, but my continuation of this post after Father’s Day will stick to songs with Star(s) in the title, as there are many to choose from. Nevertheless, your comment leads me to think of doing a “Dream(s)” song post post-Stars, so, though I may not dream a little dream of you, I’ll probably include a little clip of it in a future post.

        Like

    • tubularsock 11:50 am on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ahhh, simpler times yet love was still complex. “And why haven’t I told you?”
      Most interesting to hear THAT sound again. Tubularsock is going to work on making a rap song out of it.
      (relax, just kidding!)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:38 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I used to think love was complex until computers and the Internet came along. Now I think love is simple — it’s people and computers that are complex (which, I suppose, is why I’ll never understand why they do some of the things they do)..

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:30 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “Are the stars out tonight? I can’t tell if it’s cloudy or bright. Cause I only have eyes for you dear.” One of my dad’s favorites.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:51 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Elizabeth, I Remember It Well (which, as you may know, is the title of a song from GIGI).

        Like

    • magickmermaid 6:40 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You’re a star, Mister Muse! I wasn’t familiar with either of these songs. I like the second one the best. My house was built in 1928 so whenever I play one of the tunes you feature, I can just imagine the original owners dancing in the parlour. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:17 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, mm, but I’m more like a dwarf star when it comes to technology. Assuming my daughter can get me back in the loop, I’ll be back SWINGING ON A STAR before you can say “Bing Crosby” (who sang that Academy Award winning song in the 1944 film GOING MY WAY).

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 8:00 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Not sure how, but I wound up with a Bury Bacharach/Dionne Warwick multiplicities of pleasure, including What the World Needs Now (Is Love Sweet Love), which couldn’t be more true. So a serendipitous thank you for that! Best of luck with your new browser. Hope your experience is better than my switch, which doesn’t always let me pick up photos and videos. Anyway, you set a lovely tableau, mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

      • annieasksyou 8:00 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Obviously, Burt; sorry for graveyard typo.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:51 pm on June 9, 2020 Permalink

          Annie, your typo reminds me of what Mark Twain said when his obituary was mistakenly published: THE REPORTS OF MY DEATH ARE GREATLY EXAGGERATED. So I’m sure that any distress the typo may have caused Burt is greatly mitigated by virtue of now joining such esteemed company in premature burial. 😉

          Like

    • Silver Screenings 3:15 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve been listening to the music you’ve posted while catching up on blog reading. Your choices are a fabulous soundtrack for a Sunday.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:36 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        One of the few advantages of growing old is that I know so many old songs, SS. The disadvantage of being old is that it’s getting harder to remember them all. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: blogosphere, food for thought, , , irrationality, , power, rationality, reason, , SNAFU, The Enlightenment,   

    A HELLUVA WAY TO RUN A WORLD 

    “This is a helluva way to run a railroad.” –from a 1906 speech by Leonor F. Loree, railroad executive, to a committee of creditors who asked him to take charge of the Kansas City Southern Railroad, which was described as two streaks of rust; its engines lost steam; the men were disheartened; and the stations were shacks.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Since first said in 1906, the above quote has famously become a catchphrase for the high-and-mighty mentality of any commercial, governmental, military, or other top-down entity operating in a fashion oblivious to SNAFU (Situation Normal, All Fucked Up). I (and maybe you too) have had occasion to view SNAFU close-up and personal, having served as a draftee in the military and as a 30-year “soldier” in the corporate milieu before retiring to savor domestic life anew (and rue honey-do). But at least I’m the boss of my own blog (though still at the mercy of invisible forces somewhere out there in the blogosphere).

    Anyway, being of a philosophical bent, this got me to thinking about helluva railroads and SNAFU, writ LARGE –as in, dude: how did this whole woebegone world come to be so SNAFUed? Do we have a clue? Perhaps a few of us do.

    It’s a story we can’t stop telling ourselves. Once, humans were benighted by superstition and irrationality, but then the Greeks invented reason. Later, the Enlightenment enshrined rationality as the supreme value. Discovering that reason is the defining feature of out species, we named ourselves the “rational animal.” But is this flattering story rational? From sex and music to religion and war, irrationality makes up the greater part of human life and history. –from a reference to IRRATIONALITY (subtitled A HISTORY OF THE DARK SIDE OF REASON), a book by Justin E. H. Smith, a professor of history and the philosophy of science.

    Well, if that isn’t food for thought, I don’t know what is. The problem, of course, is what it has always been: those most in need of reflecting on and applying such appraisal to oneself wouldn’t be caught dead doing so. It’s Greek to them. The Trumps of the world live in their own little world where big money talks….and it speaks power.

    Oh well. So much for funny money.

     

     
    • obbverse 12:28 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The world is mad. I tell ya- mad, its mad mad mad. Powerful mad.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 12:47 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      we spell SNAFU differently here down under, it’s spelt STUFFED …

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:18 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s post-modernism in its grossest form…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:40 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        My post makes no apologies (except for subjecting readers to the inclusion of His Grossness near the end).

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 9:13 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          Remember when the right-wing accused their opponents of trying to make reality flexible? Little did we know that they’d actually be the ones doing that…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 9:28 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          “Flexible” is a very charitable word for the right-wing’s appropriation of reality.

          Liked by 3 people

    • Rivergirl 8:14 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      SNAFU times 2!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:52 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        ….as in Doublemint gum on one’s shoes (sorry about that — I searched my sole, but was stuck for a better reply).

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rivergirl 8:54 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink

          I’d insult your reply, but that would make me a heel. A sticky situation at best…

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:30 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      😉

      Like

    • magickmermaid 11:03 am on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hell in a hand basket to be sure! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 5:50 pm on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

    • mistermuse 6:16 pm on April 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I see that I commented on that January post, Ricardo, but unfortunately no space alien has subsequently come to take Trump back to his home planet for experiments, as I hoped (probably scared off by the coronavirus outbreak, which Trump was ignoring at the time).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:49 pm on April 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I suppose those are the stimulus checks floating down to appease us and distract from the insanity.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:39 pm on April 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Everything Trump says or “floats” is either about him, or is something he does to turn things to his advantage. I have no doubt he will tout the stimulus checks accordingly.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 4:49 pm on April 9, 2020 Permalink

          He will probably sign them himself.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:33 pm on April 9, 2020 Permalink

          ….and the checks will probably have his face imprinted on them (giving BAD checks a whole new meaning!).

          Like

    • GP Cox 6:58 am on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      People keep saying they admire the Greatest Generation, in this world-wide predicament, they can try to emulate them, rather than sit back and find things to complain about.
      They can’t make movies like ‘It’s a Mad, mad, Mad World’ – the actors would want too much money, plus a percentage of the profits.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:51 am on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It seems to be mostly young people (teens & 20s) and evangelicals who are disregarding the “rules” and doing their own thing. Young people have always thought they’re invincible, but evangelicals should know better….actually, deep down they probably do, but under the spell of the Falwells and Rick Warrens of the world, they suspend belief in everything but what they’re misled to believe.

        As for “Mad World,” no doubt you’re right. It probably had more stars than any other film in movie history (most of them in cameo appearances), including Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney, Ethel Merman, Sid Caesar, etc. — many of them all but forgotten today.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 12:10 pm on April 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 5:04 pm on April 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I always forget how many big stars were in this film. It was a truly ambitious undertaking in so many ways.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:23 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        It’s a pretty good film, but I think it should’ve been better. It was director Stanley Kramer’s first attempt at comedy, and despite some good scenes, the unevenness shows. I’d rate it about a 7 out of 10.

        Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 3:28 am on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And the world gets madder and madder each day!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:35 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I couldn’t agree more, Lorraine….especially when you think how much better it could be if more countries had better leaders. Trump has been an absolute disaster for the US, and no doubt your country is hurting for lack of competent, humane leadership, as well….while the rest of us pay the price for their arrogance and bungling.

        Sorry this reply is such a downer. Hopefully we’ll survive this epidemic and live to elect leaders worthy of their calling.

        Liked by 1 person

        • blindzanygirl 3:05 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink

          Don’t worry about it being a downer Mistermuse. We have to say it as it is. I’m all for that. I don’t know how any of us are going to get out of this mess but I bet once we have, there will be another one waiting around the corner. How are all our Leaders going to deal with the Recession that we are going to get? Hmmm.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:20 pm on April 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Good attitude, Lorraine. As for handling the recession-to-come, I don’t know about your country, but I have no confidence whatsoever in Trump. It would be hard enough for a competent, caring President, much less an incompetent, self-serving narcissist like Trump.

      Like

    • Carol A. Hand 6:21 pm on April 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a mad world, indeed, Mister Muse. Thought you might appreciate a bit of musical humor about these times, created by Don Caron from the Parody Project:

      Battle Hymn of the Republic – Revised for Relevance (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eR0ckpJ3bk);

      The Ballad of New Orleans (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB11scadABg)

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , L:ove Song, , , Mack The Knife, , , The Three Penny Opera   

    A SINGULAR COMPOSER, A TWO-TIMING WIFE, AND A THREE PENNY OPERA 

    “THE ROMANCE of Kurt Weill, the Jewish cantor’s son, and Lotte Lenya, the Viennese coachman’s daughter, changed the history of Western music. Their work on The Three Penny Opera provides a knowing insight into their relationship: Weill was the creator whose work was backstage, unseen. Lenya was the performer who put the work into view. They heard the same unique music, but he gave it form while she gave it life.”
    –from the cover flap of LOVE SONG, by Ethan Mordden

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    If you like a bargain and biographies, I’ve just read a book I’m about to tell you about, titled LOVE SONG. The “bargain” is hinted at in the subtitle: THE LIVES OF KURT WEILL AND LOTTE LENYA — a double biography, two lives for the price of one. If you’re acquainted with the music of Kurt Weill and the mystique of Lotte Lenya, an individual biography of either would be a bargain at twice  – nay, thrice — the price.

    Kurt Weill was born in Germany in March 1900. As a young man (according to Mordden), “Music was his only interest, in total immersion.” He later fled the Nazi takeover and came to New York, U.S.A., in September, 1935. That month is notable for its namesake song, which may be the most unforgettable of his many memorable compositions:

    Lotte Lenya, twice-married to Weill and many times in bed with other men, was born in Vienna in 1898 and outlived her husband by 31 years. Quoting from the book, “Lenya was quick to adapt to her audience: a performer, but a warm and giving one, quickly intimate with anyone she liked….she could play everything from the merrily heartless Jenny of The Threepenny Opera to the helplessly coquettish Frau Schneider of Cabaret.” Here she sings one of my favorite Weill songs:

    I wish I could give you a front row seat at the real-life opera that is the LOVE SONG of Kurt Weill and Lotte Lenya, for it is not only a love story, but an adventure and a 20th century history ranging from early success in Weimar Germany, escape from war-torn Europe, and finding the fulfillment in America which was cut short in their native land….but I could not begin to get you as caught up in their story as this “meticulously researched and detailed” book does. If you love the music of Kurt Weill, you will love this biography.

    I would love to post clips of such Weill classics as Speak Low, This Is New, and To Love You And To Lose You, but that would perhaps be too much of a good thing….so I’ll bring down the curtain with this Bobby Darin hit from The Three Penny Opera which my fellow seniors will well remember (assuming your memory is sharp):

     

     

     
    • obbverse 12:13 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Era defining, Mack the Knife. Not bad for a song written thirty years and a Second World War earlier. In the parlance of the day- killer track.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:25 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Not bad, indeed….and I dig your “killer track” juxtaposition with regard to MACK THE KNIFE.

        Like

    • calmkate 1:06 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sorry I must be too young … or the memory is shot, don’t remember any of this!
      But totally love Mack the knife 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 7:06 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Weill I have heard of, but not Lotte Lenya, and I do know the songs and of course Bobby Darin. Great post. I’m sure you could write more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:48 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. I try to hold my posts to a reasonable length despite the temptation to keep going, as I realize that most of my followers probably have many blogs to follow, but only limited time….and if I go overboard, they may lose interest.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:17 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, Bobby Darin. Lost too soon..

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Lost too soon….and forgotten too fast (but not by those who appreciated what a great talent he was).

        Like

    • equipsblog 10:36 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I not only remember the song, I saw Sting play Mac the Knife in Three Penny Opera at (I think) the National Theater in Washington, DC.

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:56 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      For some reason I know the September song. My parents liked Bobby Darin so I know Mack the Knife and Beyond the Sea.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 2:19 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I remember a Lenya vinyl album that my parents had. If I recall it correctly, she’s on the cover in a provocative pose, possibly with a cigarette in hand.

      Hello there. Bye till next time.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:01 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        She lived to age 83 despite smoking and sexual promiscuity, so she must have had good Genes…and probably a lot of Toms, Dicks and Harrys, too.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 2:55 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Bobby Darin was a little before my time but I always like to hear music from that era. Hope things are well with you, mistermuse. Our province has declared an Emergency today and we are now limited to groups of five people; essential businesses/stores open but keeping the 6 ft. Distance in place. So far, we’ve not had a problem with self-isolation as we have lots of projects on the go! I’ll tell ya, watching the grandchildren cavort out on the lawn is preferable to cleaning up inside after they leave!
      And of course one can always listen to all sorts of hits from lovely blogs. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:18 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, Carmen — long time, no see. Good to hear from you again, and glad that you’re dealing well with the pandemic. I’m doing the same, but there’s no avoiding having to go to the store and/or pharmacy occasionally. Using hand sanitizer or wearing vinyl gloves while shopping helps, but social distancing is impossible in a crowded store, and lately it’s been crowded even at 7 a.m. (I’d go earlier, but I’d have to break in, since they don’t open until 7). 😉

        Like

    • annieasksyou 2:59 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a nostalgia trip this was! Haven’t thought about Bobby Darin for a while, but this was a welcome reminder.

      And for the first time, I was struck by the reference to “Miss Lotte Lenya” in Mack the Knife. That was like finding a jigsaw puzzle piece and placing it in its intended home.

      Thank you, mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:39 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m pleased that you enjoyed the post, Annie. Bobby Darin was one of my favorites back in the day, but Lotte Lenya was little more than a name to me until I read the book LOVE SONG and listened to her sing. I highly recommend the book if you’re interested.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 8:42 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Many years ago I found a 4 LP set of the original Berlin production of 3 Penny with Miss Lotta in German. And huge program booklet with the English translation and pictures describing the production and the times. What a treasure.
      Weill was a musical genius. His work here in America is some of the best to ever appear on stage. September Song etc..
      Lotta never got as big here as in Germany, but she never got to be one of the most memorable James Bond villians.
      I will have to look the book up.
      PS: As much as I liked the Darin rendition of Mack, my favorite is the Louis Armstrong’s.
      Stay Healthy

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:29 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      There is a discography at the end of the book LOVE SONG which lists a 1930 Ultraphon 78 rpm set of Die Dreigroschenoper (The Three Penny Opera) wherein “Lenya sings not only her opening-night role of Jenny but also Polly and Lucy and even gets a crack at the Moritat. Most listeners learned these readings from reissues by Telefunken on 78 and LP” — which is apparently what you are fortunate enough to have.

      Weill was indeed a musical genius. I hope you can find the book (published in 2012 by St. Martin’s Press), because I’m sure you would find it immensely interesting.

      Thanks for the comment, and you stay healthy as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 10:31 am on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for sharing

      Take care of yourself

      Love, light and glitter

      Like

    • Elizabeth 4:32 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My grandson learned “Mack the Knife” from me when he was about two. He sang it joyfully.”Look out old Mack is back.” My daughter finally heard the words and was duly appalled that I had taught him such a gory song.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:38 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        How times have changed, Elizabeth — nowadays, that song wouldn’t appall anyone, except maybe the younger generation who would be appalled at how “outdated” it is.

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 8:01 am on March 24, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for some lovely old songs, and info on the writers/performers that I did not know. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:03 pm on April 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for 2 things:
      1) for the book recommendation, a subject I’ve been long curious about but have made no effort to research; and
      2) for posting Mack the Knife.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:06 pm on April 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m pleased to recommend the book because, although I was fairly familiar with Kurt Weill and his work, I too was curious was about Lotte Lenya and the relationship between them. It’s a fascinating story. As for Mack the Knife, Bobby Darin’s version is my favorite, and I’m glad you enjoyed it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:15 am on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent review and show!

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 7:09 pm on April 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Kurt Weill is one of my very favorite composers – along with Brecht…geniuses. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:10 pm on April 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Weill and Brecht were indeed musical geniuses, but their relationship hit some sour notes, mainly because of Brecht (according to LOVE SONG, the book mentioned in my post). Nonetheless, they made beautiful music together.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:17 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: At The Circus, Barnum & Bailey, , , , , , Ringling Bros., The Big Top, the Circus, ,   

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH 

    Does this melody ring a bell?

    Does the name Ringling Bros. ring a bell?

    If it does, the connection between the two should be clear as a bell, because that melody was used for decades on Hollywood soundtracks to accompany circus footage. The most famous circus of them all was Ringling Bros., which was founded on April 10, 1871, merged with Barnum & Bailey’s Greatest Show on Earth in 1919, and closed on May 22 2017.

    I recall seeing a circus as a young boy (regrettably, I don’t recall if it was Ringling Bros.)…. but this post’s focus is on circus movies, two of which I’ve seen several times since I was a teenage boy: Charlie Chaplin’s THE CIRCUS, and {The Marx Brothers) AT THE CIRCUS.

    THE CIRCUS (1928) is not as well known as such Chaplin masterpieces as THE GOLD RUSH, CITY LIGHTS, and MODERN TIMES, but it is still a great show. Here is the trailer, followed by the closing scene when the circus leaves town with the circus girl he loves:

    AT THE CIRCUS (1939) isn’t one of the Marx Brothers’ best films, but it has one of Groucho’s most famous scenes:

    How this song came to be written is a story in itself, but the history of Lydia actually pre-dates the song. In Germany in the 1920s, an entertainer named Wilhelm Bendow had a stand-up act as Lydia Smith, the tattooed lady, in which he wore a body cast and performed a satirical sketch. It is no stretch to assume that American lyricist Yip Harburg had heard of that act when he and composer Harold Arlen wrote the song in 1939 (yes, it’s the same Harburg and Arlen who earlier in 1939 wrote OVER THE RAINBOW and the other great songs in WIZARD OF OZ).

    As for the song’s lyrics, Harburg was a friend of Groucho, and both were fans of Gilbert and Sullivan. One evening (as AT THE CIRCUS was being developed) at a gathering at Groucho’s house, they were playing G & S records and singing along. Harburg was inspired to show his G & S-like inventiveness with rhyme scheme and verbal dexterity by writing a song for Groucho for the film, and the result was Lydia, The Tattooed Lady.

    But the song ran into trouble with the Breen office censors. Quoting Harburg: “That song was thought to be risqué, and we had a hell of a lot of trouble with it. This was 1939 and censorship was at its full height. We were told we would have to cut it out of the picture. Harold and I were mad. Finally, we got an idea of how to save the song. We put in a final verse to legitimize [it]”:

    She once swept an admiral off of his feet
    The ships on her hips made his heart skip a beat
    And now the old boy is in charge of the fleet
    For he went and married Lydia.

    There have been other circus movies (including the 1952 opus with the same title as this post, starring Jimmy Stewart as a circus clown), but that would make a three-ring circus of this post, and two is enough for this old boy.

    The Big Top stops here.

     

     

     

     

     
    • D. Wallace Peach 6:16 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      How fun to listen to that song. I went to the circus a couple of times as a kid and took my daughter decades ago. Now, with greater awareness of the impact on the animals, the circus has lost its luster, but sad too that it’s gone.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:33 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You ain’t lion, Diana. We still have zoos, but some people would like to do away with them too. I don’t agree, because I suspect that zoos are the last best hope of saving some on-the-verge-of-extinction animals (and zoo animals are no doubt, on the whole, better treated than circus animals were).

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 7:46 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink

          Yes, I agree about the zoos, especially since humans seem committed to destroying their natural habitats or just killing them for fun. Like the Trump boys.

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 6:49 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      oh that first tune brought back many fond memories … second video was not available.

      Would love cc’s Circus, think I’ll look for it 🙂
      Lydia packs a punch, the song and it’s fascinating history, thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:34 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You should be able to find viewable clips of Charlie Chaplin’s THE CIRCUS fairly easily, Kate. When I Googled it, I saw various scenes, and even the whole movie, available on Youtube.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 7:52 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Of course I know that melody! It’s one of the background songs of the circus that is my life 🙂 La la la la!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 8, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Now you’re talking my La la la la language, mm! It’s one of those songs that, once you hear it, you won’t forget it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:46 am on March 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I learned a lot from Lydia…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:59 pm on March 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I wonder if Trump learned anything from Lydia? Even if he did, he wouldn’t give her credit, so kudos to you. 😉

        Like

    • Rivergirl 8:40 am on March 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I spent my childhood at Madison Square Garden with Ringling Brothers Greatest Show on Earth. As a kid? It was 3 rings of pure magic…

      Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 5:08 pm on March 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Barnum came from Bridgeport Connecticut, so he is well known around here. My grandfather introduced us to “Lydia” in 1957, much to the consternation of my grandmother! He always liked innuendo.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on March 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Sounds like Lydia meant SINnuendo to your grandmother, Elizabeth. Bless her heart, I shudder to think how she would feel about today’s culture.

        Liked by 1 person

    • The Diary of a Country Bumpkin 5:18 pm on March 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Love the Marx brothers, brilliant!

      Liked by 1 person

    • kutukamus 2:01 am on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never knew the title of that song before. Thanks! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:49 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m another one who didn’t know the title of that famous circus song.

      As for Charlie Chaplin, I have not yet seen his film, The Circus, and the trailer you posted makes me want to see it immediately. Thanks for putting it on my radar. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:43 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I must confess that I didn’t know the title either….or rather, I knew it at one time but had forgotten it (courtesy of old age having crept up on me). As for The Circus, you shouldn’t have any trouble finding it on Youtube.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:55 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , United Nations, whistleblower   

    PREACHING TO THE LIAR 

    Mr. President:

    Why did you lie when you said….

    in September 2018 (addressing the United Nations), “My administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country”….adding, “So true” as laughter broke out among the foreign dignitaries.

    in October 2018 (when there were still about 1,000 troops in Syria) , “Look, we have no soldiers in Syria. We’ve won.”

    in February 2019, “And when I look at what’s happened in California with the votes — as you know, there was just a case where they found a million fraudulent votes.”

    in April 2019, “If you  have a windmill near your house, congratulations, your house just went down 75% in value. And they say the noise causes cancer.”

    in May 2019 (about Veteran’s Choice, a bill co-authored by John McCain which President Obama signed into law in 2014), “I disagree with John McCain on the way he handled the vets, because I said you got to get Choice. He was never able to get Choice. I got Choice.”

    in October 2019, “They heard a whistleblower who came out with a false story. What the whistleblower said bore no relationship to what the call was.” (The whistleblower’s primary allegations were proven correct, including by the rough transcript Trump himself released.)

    Etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., ad infinitum….

    Why, Mr. President — WHY, WHY, WHY, WHY, WHY?

     

     
    • pendantry 1:59 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And they say the noise causes cancer.

      p a u s e …

      BWAHAHAHAhahahaha

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 3:06 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t keep up with his lies. I just assume every time he opens his mouth it will be a whopper.

      Liked by 5 people

    • obbverse 3:26 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Well, he does suffer from a congenital disease; BlindWillfull TrumpRightism. Symptoms are obvious- no conscience, no basic core of truth, an inability to see beyond the bounds of ones own ego. No treatment,no cure.

      Liked by 6 people

      • mistermuse 3:59 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        And sad to say, the disease has spread to 40% or more of the population….but the cure will become available November 3, 2020.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Paulie 4:04 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe more to the point is why do people swallow these lies?

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 4:36 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Repeat a lie often enough and it becomes the truth.” –attributed to Nazi Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels….and who repeats lies more than Donald Trump?

        Liked by 4 people

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 4:22 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Why? Those among us who accept him as their Messiah are comforted by his alternate reality.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 4:41 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thinking of Trump’s presidency as a kind of cult goes a long way toward answering that question.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Ashley 4:49 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Yeh! Just like there’s an alternative to baldness or old age!

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:12 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink

          Well, we once had the Whig Party, but you’ve got me on the “old age” part. Anyway, thankfully, there’s an alternative to Trump….but we must wait until Nov 3 to choose it.

          Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 5:38 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Come NOvember will our choices be a Socialist vs. Narciscist ?

      Liked by 3 people

    • calmkate 6:47 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      psychopaths have no conscious, pathological liars, grandiose self view, etc … read the 20 traits and tell me he aint!

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 8:59 pm on March 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      You’ll get no argument from me, Kate!

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 11:30 am on March 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I blame post-modernism…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:47 am on March 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’d agree, but the term “post-modernism” strikes me as akin to “tomorrow” — it never comes. In any case, I ain’t there yet.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:28 pm on March 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Because he is a liar. Plain and simple. Liars lie.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:38 pm on March 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m no scientist, but I believe liars who lie because “that’s what they do” are called pathological liars. In other words, the man is sick.

        Liked by 2 people

    • JosieHolford 10:44 am on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      The lying liar lies lyingly.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 9:12 pm on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Best title of the year, Sr. Muse

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:58 pm on March 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Gracias, Ricardo. but the year is still young, and Trump is such an inspiration that the honor may be short-lived.

        Like

    • Carol A. Hand 1:23 pm on March 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What can what say? In his own language, he’s just “nasty!”

      Liked by 2 people

    • barkinginthedark 6:34 pm on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      MM, my next post is on “Trumpspeak.” Enjoy, continue…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:06 pm on March 13, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Read your March 13 post earlier today and thought you were too hard on Trump (just kidding — if anyone deserves it, he does). Will look forward to your next one.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 10:32 am on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know… but maybe coz power is more than honesty to some. Though I know you weren’t asking for an answer.

      Love, light, and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:34 am on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That reminds me of a scene in a Mae West (“queen” of sexual innuendo) movie in which she replied “Goodness had nothing to do with it, honey” to a gal who remarked “Goodness!”
        When it comes to gaining and retaining power, it’s usually the case that HONESTY HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH IT.

        Like

        • Eliza 12:15 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink

          That makes me sad. I still like to believe in the goodness and beauty of everyone…
          Love, light, and glitter

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:30 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink

          Sorry, Eliza — I didn’t mean to rain on your parade. There’s a lot of goodness and beauty in the world, but badness and ugliness stand out like sore thumbs because they are aberrations (though the aberrations are numerous). And it doesn’t help that the power-driven (as opposed to the “better angels”-driven) are often the ones who gain power.

          Like

    • equipsblog 5:37 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At this point in March l agree and feel more hopeful.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bernice Petkere, , , , , , , , , On the Sunny Side of the Street, Starlight,   

    TWO TO GO 

    As 2019 goes into the history books, we close out the year and our series of 1920s-30s female songwriters with two of the best: BERNICE PETKERE and DOROTHY FIELDS.

    PETKERE, the longest lived (1901-2000) but perhaps least remembered of the women in this series, had her greatest success as a composer in the 1930s. This hit (with lyrics by Joe Young) was recorded in early 1932 by a rising star by the name of Bing Crosby:

    Petkere, primarily a composer, also wrote the lyrics to a few of her songs, including….

    Saving the class of the field for last, we turn to the most prolific lady lyricist of the era (and the first woman to be elected to the Songwriters Hall of Fame), DOROTHY FIELDS, “the only female songwriter of the golden age whose name has not sunk into oblivion with time.” –Deborah Grace Winer, author of ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET, subtitled THE LIFE AND TIMES OF DOROTHY FIELDS

    Named after Dorothy of Wizard of Oz fame, she teamed with composer Jimmy McHugh in 1927 to write many hits over the next eight years, including this all-time standard in 1930:

    Fields went on to write many songs with other composers until her death in 1974….but as much as I’d like to post links to more of Fields work, I’m going to resist temptation (you know what they say about too much of a good thing), Take It Easy*, and call it a Fields day

    ….except to say, Happy New Year!

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    *the title, it so happens, of a Fields song I resisted linking to (recorded by Fats Waller)

     

     
    • calmkate 3:22 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      wow I actually know most of Dorothy’s songs … that’s a huge achievement! I had often wondered who had written some of them … but not enough to look her up 🙂

      great way to welcome in the new decade, doubt I’ll see the next 😎

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:30 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. What better way to ring out the old and “welcome in the new decade” than with songs that stand the test of time, and know that if we are still around “in the next decade,” these great songs will still be around too.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 7:28 pm on December 31, 2019 Permalink

          these songs will be around for all time, they are so memorable … not sure I am that memorable!

          Like

        • mistermuse 1:30 am on January 1, 2020 Permalink

          Neither am I, Kate, but if it’s any consolation, it’s far better not to be remembered, than to be remembered like the likes of Donald Trump will be.

          Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 8:09 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve enjoyed your entertaining posts and movie/song clips this year, and look forward to more next year. 😀
      Happy New Year to you and all the best for 2020. 🙂

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:23 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I appreciate that, scifi — best New Year’s wishes to you as well.

      Like

    • GP Cox 9:53 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 10:02 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great post this! And thanks for the introduction to Pamela Rose! Born in the 50’s I’m not sure where I’ve heard so many of these songs before! Also thanks for the introduction to Diana Krall, great voice, just my sort of music and that piano! Couldn’t make out the make but the old well worn sound was wonderful.
      Have a happy healthy and peaceful New Year!

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:17 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Ashley, have I ever told you that you have great taste in music?
        But seriously, I’m seriously pleased that you dig this post. As for Diana Krall, I couldn’t agree more — I think she’s the finest jazz vocalist since Mel Tormé, and yet virtually unknown outside of jazz circles. Such a pity that great jazz singers have almost no place in recent popular music culture.

        Like

    • smbabbitt 3:57 pm on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great selection of songs!

      Like

    • America On Coffee 1:49 am on January 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Classics live on! A great selection! 💕☕️☕️

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:03 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Bob Crosby, Cozy Cole, , , Johnny Hodges, Jonah Jones, , , Tot Seymour, Vee Lawnhurst   

    WHAT VEE/TOT BEGOT, BE WHAT WE GOT (AND THEN SOME) 

    In a comment to my last post (on composer Kay Swift), a certain mister mused that more posts should follow devoted to women songwriters of the 1920s-30s, of whom there were too few. I’ve since found that two of those few got together to form what was the era’s only successful female songwriting partnership: VEE LAWNHURST (composer) and TOT SEYMOUR (lyricist). We shall proceed accordingly forthwith….or forthwith accordingly. Whatever.

    Let’s start with their biggest hit, a #1 bestseller for 11 weeks in 1935, AND THEN SOME:

    VEE LAWNHURST (1905-92), born in NYC, was a pianist, singer, teacher, and a pioneer in radio broadcasting. She worked with several lyricists before teaming with Tot to write a lot of hits in the mid to late 1930s, including the title song from the 1935 film ACCENT ON YOUTH, played here by the DUKE ELLINGTON Orchestra (Johnny Hodges on alto sax):

    TOT SEYMOUR (1889-1966), also born in NYC, was a multi-talented writer, including special material for such stars of the day as Fannie Brice and Mae West, then turning to popular song writing in 1930, working with various composers until teaming with Vee Lawnhurst. Among their many fine songs is this 1937 Billie Holiday classic featuring such jazz greats as Jonah Jones, Ben Webster, Teddy Wilson and Cozy Cole:

    Apparently Vee and Tot wrote no Christmas songs, which is just as well because you’ve probably already had more than your fill. So I’ll just close by wishing you a Happy Humbug….and then some.

     

     
    • obbverse 1:52 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      So over the bellowing carols and mindless Merry Christmases, roll on blessed silence and boxing day sales!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:02 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and then some!

        Thanks for the comment, o.b., and may I be the last to wish you a mindless Merry Christmas..

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 4:01 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      do enjoy your posts … is it my hearing, I didn’t catch any words in #2?

      Happy Humbug keep on toe tappin 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:19 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Your hearing isn’t failing you, Kate. I posted the Ellington instrumental version because I dig Duke and Johnny Hodges’ gorgeous alto sax solo late in the recording. But never fear –you can hear the words here, in this non-jazz record:

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 5:23 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink

          who doesn’t love the Duke, but as you were talking about her song writing … appreciate the link!

          Like

      • mistermuse 8:19 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Kate, I placed the Duke Ellington instrumental to go with the Vee Lawnhurst paragraph because she wasn’t the lyricist half of the team It fit there better there because the other two links had vocals.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 11:04 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink

          lol no need to defend yourself, your post!
          But I had expected lyrics so probably didn’t absorb the magic music as much as I should have, my fault entirely 🙂

          Like

    • Elizabeth 6:35 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love their ambiguous first names which may have allowed them more success.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:44 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s possible, Elizabeth, but I’d like to think that their intelligence and talent had more to do with it. For example, there’s the common name of Dorothy Parker, the famed wit and writer in the 1920s & 30s (who, btw, also wrote the lyrics to a few good songs, such as I WISHED ON THE MOON) .

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 3:01 pm on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had never heard of Bob Crosby and when I looked him up I see that he had many children one of them called Harry, better known as Bing. (Wow! When I was first reading your post my dear wife was looking over my shoulder and later said something like “that looks very like a young Bing Crosby!” You see we work as a team and usually sort most things out). Have a wonderful Yuletide yourself.

      Like

      • mistermuse 4:31 pm on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Ashley, the Bob Crosby in my first clip was actually Bing’s younger brother. There may have been another Bob somewhere in the Crosby family tree, but this Bob was born in 1913 and looked and sounded somewhat like his older brother. In 1935, he became the front man and vocalist for the band which recorded AND THEN SOME, and which went on to become one the best big bands in the business until 1942, when it disbanded, and Bob served in the military in WW II

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:22 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always loved 20s and 30s tunes! And old films!

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:24 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, mm….and speaking of 1930s tunes, here’s a Christmas tune from 1934. Enjoy!

        Like

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