Tagged: Charlie Chan Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:09 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Charlie Chan, , Edward Everett Horton, , , , , , Mantan Moreland, , , S. Z. Sakall, Way Out West,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: WHAT A CHARACTER (ACTOR)! 

    “Nobody needs a mink coat but the mink.” –S. Z. “Cuddles” Sakall, character actor (Feb. 2, 1883-Feb. 12, 1955)

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    There have been so many great male character actors in Hollywood Golden Age history that, for this post, I’m going to narrow the field to comedic character actors….and even then, I’ll probably leave out some of your favorites. Of course, if you don’t have any old comedy film favorites, you’re probably not an old comedy film fan, so you’re excused (even though that’s no excuse….actually, you should be ashamed of yourself).

    Leaving that aside, let’s move on, starting with the author of the above quote….a quote which probably didn’t go over too well with most of the Hollywood glamour girls he knew — speaking of which, did you know that Sakall was born in, and is strictly from, Hungary (btw, he was also in Casablanca). Here’s more scuttlebutt about Cuddles but…it’s not a lot:

    Next, Laurel & Hardy fans will remember the trademark ‘double-take’ look of this gent, who appeared in many of their films, including here in one of their best, WAY OUT WEST:

    Remember double features (two films for the price of one in movie houses of the 1930s-50s)? Here’s a double feature of two great comedic actors for the price of one in a scene from SHALL WE DANCE, one of three Astaire-Rogers movies in which they appeared together:

    If you’re a fan of Charlie Chan movies, you may recall the pop-eyed comic who played Chan’s chauffeur in over a dozen films, as well as parts in Preston Sturges’ THE PALM BEACH STORY (1942), CABIN IN THE SKY (1943), CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK (1944), and many others. Here he is in a scene from THE SCARLET CLUE (1945):

    In closing, I’ll mention several other great comedic character actors I could’ve/should’ve profiled here, but I have to stop somewhere: William Demarest, Edgar Kennedy, Frank Morgan, Franklin Pangborn, Erik Rhodes, Victor Moore, and many more. Thank you, one and all, for bringing character to comedy.

     
    • masercot 4:38 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Fine examples! Might I add Tom Kennedy?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:50 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely! I remember the name but couldn’t place the face until I checked — how could I have forgotten? I saw him in many a Marx Brothers, W.C. Fields, Laurel & Hardy and Three Stooges movie. My bad!

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 8:59 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink

          It was a time when any big Irishman could find work in the movies… My favorite line of his? “I feel a poem coming on”

          Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:28 pm on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I never knew the names of any of these actors, though I remember all of their appearances. I loved the banter in the last clip. That comedic timing is priceless.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:00 pm on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I believe that that banter came straight out of an old vaudeville skit which Mantan Moreland probably performed many times previously. An oldie but goody!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 11:37 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These posts are treats. Thanks for curating these lists and choosing such fab videos to share with us.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:20 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for your comments, SS. I very much enjoyed doing this series of posts, time-consuming though it was to do the work of putting them together.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Silver Screenings 10:29 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink

          Oh yes, I can imagine the hours spent in this series. The end result is fabulous: A tour through classic Hollywood.

          Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 11:18 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Memorable picks! Love them all!!💕❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: black cat, Charlie Chan, , , , , ,   

    CONFUCIUS SAY HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW 

    Today is birthday of Chinese philosopher Confucius, born September 28, 551 BC (not to be Confucius-ed with Chinese philosopher who long Ago Too Young die like fool, choking on egg). Confucius, of course, left us even more wise old sayings than the inscrutable Charlie Chan, which was pen name of writer called None the Wiser (not to be Confucius-ed with his agent — a gent named Ah So).

    In any case, in the interest of being fair and balanced and sly as a Fox, we herewith present selection of Confucius sayings to go along with those in CHARLIE CHAN post of Sept. 15. No matter which you prefer, may you benefit from their wisdom, and may all your male children be wise guys.

    I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

    The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

    Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance.

    Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.

    He who knows all the answers has not been asked all the questions.

    The funniest people are the saddest ones.

    Sad to say, my work here is dumb….make that done. On second thought, maybe right first time.

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:56 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mistermuse you have outdone yourself in the humor category….I laughed so loudly!!😂😂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Richard Cahill 9:33 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      In the spirit of your previous blog, I’ll be sure to raise a stein to the memory of Confucius this weekend, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:55 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        And in spirit of comment to previous blog post, Sr. Muse happily return Salud to you, Ricardo.

        Like

    • Forestwoodfolk 7:25 pm on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great minds think alike. Thanks for visiting me and commenting on my blog post about quotes and their meanings. Funny that we should do Confucius at the same time
      And it was his birthday!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:25 pm on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I used to visit your blog fairly often but somehow got off track, which was my loss. Now that I’ve come across your blog again, I’ll try to keep up more regularly.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 4:21 pm on September 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice Muse but I’m beginning to think that Confucius might be like Yogi in that he might not have said all the things he said.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:37 pm on September 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I got the same feeling when I read the “black cat” quote, Don. That one in particular seems suspect, in my opinion.

        Like

    • markscheel1 4:56 pm on September 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      My favorite is “Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.” But it left me with the question, how do we tell the difference?

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:56 pm on September 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Good question, Mark. I’d say the answer is BY COMPARISON: Confucius with Trump, for example (though Trump does seem to have made some “cosmetic” changes over the years).

        Like

  • mistermuse 8:25 pm on September 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Charlie Chan, , , , , ,   

    LIKE WISE 

    Noble goal like chasing rainbow — beautiful while it lasts.

    If the above quote sounds familiar, you have the memory of an elephant. It — the quote, not you or the elephant — appeared in my previous post as a Charlie Chanism which I made up after a trip to the latest local library book sale where my returns are becoming re-nowned and their books are becoming re-owned….and one of my new buys was titled CHARLIE CHAN — The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang.

    If you’re an old movie buff like me, you’ve probably seen a number of 1930s-40s Charlie Chan films (based on the 1920-3os novels by Earl Derr Biggers) in which Charlie chanted such gems of wisdom as these:

    Hasty deduction, like ancient egg, look good from outside.
    Mind, like parachute, only function when open.
    Trouble, like first love, teach many lessons.
    Facts like photographic film — must be exposed before developing.
    Advice after mistake like medicine after funeral.

    You will find these, and many more, Chanisms in Appendix I of the book. But that’s just a bonus — the real story of this book is “The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective”…. a story I can’t tell you because either I would have to kill you (leaving no clues), or it would spoil the story and leave you without a motive to buy the book. But I will tell you that the fictional Honolulu detective Charlie Chan was based on real-life Honolulu detective Chang Apana, who was a character in his own right and whose career included jobs ranging from gardener to gumshoe. So get the book, plant yourself in your favorite chair, and enjoy the read.

    Speaking of flowery characters, Earl Derr Biggers was no shrinking violet. Before turning novelist, Biggers (a Harvard grad)) was an outspoken newspaper columnist and drama critic. In one of his columns, he wrote of “a citizen of Mingo, Okla., [who] whipped out his trusty six-shooter the other day and shot the mustache off another citizen. We sincerely hope that the gentleman who lost the mustache appreciated the fact that he had a mighty close shave.” Shades of such baldfaced punsters as Dorothy Parker, Oscar Wilde and mistermuse! (The latter includes himself in such company on the grounds that the dead can’t object.)

    But enough about me. Here’s Charlie!

     

     
    • linnetmoss 8:26 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hahaha! Is that Tim Conway?
      What cracks me up about the Biggers story is the name “Mingo, Okla.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:17 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, that is Tim Conway, and that clip is like a scrambled egg — it breaks me up. 😦

      “Mingo” reminds me on “Mongo” in BLAZING SADDLES — which also breaks me up. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 10:32 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      One of the Facebooks groups I belong to has the parachute quote on its home page, Sr. Muse, only they attribute it to Frank Zappa. Since Chan preceded Zappa in the popular canon, it’s probably a misattribution. However, let’s face it–the fictional Chan never thought of it, either. It sprang from the brain of a now-forgotten writer. Such is the eventual fate of all we scribblers.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:21 pm on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Maybe I should have that “Noble goal like chasing rainbow” quote etched on my gravestone, Ricardo, so at least one of my scribblings survives long after I’m gone.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:36 am on September 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I went looking for a Charlie Chan saying for this case. “Blond hair can be obtained from a bottle – or wig maker.”

      I also semi-remembered something about Number 1 son. Looked that up too. He was played ,many times by Keye Luke who went onto to be in a ton of movies. He might best be remembered by TV fans as the old master in Kung Fu the TV show..

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:37 am on September 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, here’s a bit of trivia for you. As you know, the best Marx Brothers movie is generally considered to be A NIGHT AT THE OPERA (1935). The best Charlie Chan movie (according to film critic Leonard Maltin) appeared a year later: CHARLIE CHAN AT THE OPERA (1936).
      Coincidence?

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 4:37 am on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love the wisdoms in Chan, so concisely put. 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 8:49 pm on September 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never seen a Charlie Chan movie, I hate to admit! I’ll have to check it out sometime.

      Funny Carol Burnett sketch!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:08 am on September 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Charlie Chan movies were fun when I was young, but I must admit that most of them don’t age well. Of the few that do, I’d recommend CHARLIE CHAN AT THE OPERA.

        Liked by 1 person

    • eliza rudolf 1:15 am on September 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice post❤💖❤💖

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Borscht Belt, , Carl Reiner, Charlie Chan, , Dancing In The Dark, , Howard Dietz, , Imogene Coca, Isaac Newton, , , , Sid Caesar, television, , , Your Show of Shows   

    A LAUGH AND A SONG AND DANCE 

    If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants. –Sir Isaac Newton

    Comedian Sid Caesar, in his autobiography, CAESAR’S HOURS, quotes the above and adds, “I too stand on the shoulders of giants. Nobody does anything alone.”

    To me, to call Sid Caesar (born 9/8/22) a comedian is akin to calling Newton a physicist — accurate, yes, but hardly adequate. In a down-to-earth way, I might even say that what Newton was to gravity in the 1680s, Caesar was to levity in the 1950s. The bottom line is, I was in my teens then (the 1950s, not the 1680s), and still reasonably sentient at the time; thus I can bear witness to the comic genius that I, as a geezer, still see in Caesar.

    And just who were those giants on whose shoulders Caesar stood? He tells us in his book: “I always wanted to be Charlie Chaplin. He was one of my earliest comedic heroes, along with Buster Keaton, Laurel and Hardy, and W.C. Fields. Most of their comedy came from their character. They each believed in what they did, and I believed them.”

    Caesar was an up-and-coming comic performing mainly in the so-called Borscht Belt in New York’s Catskill Mountains when this opportunity arose in the infancy of network TV:

    It was called YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS, and what an innovative show it was. It premiered live on 2/25/50 with writers like Mel Brooks, Max Liebman (who also produced) and (later) Woody Allen. Said Caesar: “For nine years, I presided over what was arguably the best collection of comedy writers ever assembled in the history of television, and possibly in the history of the written word — unless you think the U.S. Constitution is funny.”

    Add co-stars Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris, and the show was both a commercial and artistic success from Hour One. Here, they show you why:

    Again quoting Caesar: “Until that time, the only big things on television were bowling, wrestling and Charlie Chan. [Max Liebman] wasn’t interested in the American public’s lowest common denominator. He wasn’t going to dumb down. His goal was that the quality of the show would drive its popularity and ultimately elevate taste.”

    As Charlie Chan might say: Noble goal like chasing rainbow — beautiful while it lasts.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Originally, I came to this post with the idea of making it a birthday (9/8/1896) tribute to Howard Dietz, one of my favorite lyricists, whose autobiography (titled DANCING IN THE DARK) I also commend. Then I learned that Sept. 8 is the birthday of Sid Caesar as well as Howard Dietz, and I thought I GUESS I’LL HAVE TO CHANGE MY PLAN.

    Hold on — it wouldn’t be right not to dance with the dude what brung me, so rather than ditch Dietz, I’ll sing his praises here too….starting with his first big hit (above), then an excerpt from early in the book, closing with a realization of the song which titles his story.

    The following is quoted from the book’s forward by Alan Jay Lerner: As for that quality of life known as charm, I can only shrug sadly and chalk it up as another victim of that creeping nastiness called modern civilization. I think about the man whose reminiscences are contained in this book. They come to mind because of that special gift of charm that is so characteristic of his lyrics. Howard [Dietz]  is the Fred Astaire, the Chevalier, the Molnar, the Lubitsch of lyric writers.

    Dancing in the dark
    Till the tune ends
    We’re dancing in the dark
    And it soon ends
    We’re waltzing in the wonder
    Of why we’re here
    Time hurries by we’re here
    And gone

     
    • scifihammy 2:41 am on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know Sid Caesar too well but I have seen that hilarious clock clip. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ricardo 9:44 am on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Your talent for bringing back things I barely remember from childhood continues unabated, Sr. Muse. My dad was a big fan of “Show of Shows.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:31 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I can still remember seeing that Bavarian Clock piece when they first did it in the early 1950s. It made such an impression on me that I still think it ranks as one of the most original and funniest skits ever done on TV….especially when you consider how ‘primitive’ television was back then.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jay 12:17 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hardly adequate: you’ve got that right.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 4:39 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That makes it absolutely certain, because two rights can’t make a wrong. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 8:40 am on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I was a little too young for that show and then it didn’t get syndicated, or at least we didn’t see it where I lived. I only heard about Sid Caesar later, but of course I knew of Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner. Speaking of Mel Brooks, I just watched “Young Frankenstein” last night and could not stop laughing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:19 am on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        In his autobiography, Sid Caesar has some very interesting and funny things to say about Mel Brooks when Brooks was a 20-something year old CHARACTER (that’s character with a capital CHARACTER) working for YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS. I have a feeling you would enjoy the autobio (CAESAR’S HOURS) tremendously if you have time to read it (Amazon has it in both hardcover and paperback).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 10:05 pm on September 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Wow! That takes me back all right. You’ve got a great talent for bringing back the blast from the past! Thanks for the memories.

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 5:17 pm on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse most people are familiar with Sinatra’s upbeat version of Dancing in the Dark but he also sang it like this from time to time a little slower and more poignant.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:40 pm on September 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don — I hadn’t heard this version before, and must say I prefer it to the upbeat version. I usually prefer Frank’s older & more mature voice, but in this case, I think he’s more in tune with the way the song should be sung and no doubt the way the songwriters (Dietz and Arthur Schwartz) envisioned it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jadi Campbell 3:02 am on September 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for a grreat post! I had the incredible good luck to see Sid Cesar and Imogene Coca together on stage. They did a piece without any words and it was amazing. I knew I was watching legends at the height of their gifts. Still shake my head at the memory, all these years later.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:31 am on September 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        That was indeed incredible good luck, Jadi — and it was an incredible pleasure to do this post, bringing back such recollections as the “Bavarian Clock” sketch which I hadn’t seen in decades.

        Thank you for sharing your memories.

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 4:38 am on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      LOVE a song and dance man 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:28 am on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Song and dance men don’t come any better than Fred Astaire!
        I especially love the DANCING IN THE DARK dance with Cyd Charisse — so sensual, so effortless, so perfect.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 11:43 am on September 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 7:09 pm on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Chanson D'Amour, Charlie Chan, , Manhattan Transfer, murder mysteries, , Sidney Toler, Warner Oland   

    CHAN SONG D’AMOUR 

    It occurs to me that the subject of my last post, Charlie Chan, may be a mystery to those of you to whom such things are a mystery (things such as antique detective stories). Charlie Chan is a fictional Chinese detective (created by Earl Derr Biggers in a 1925 novel), played in movies by various actors, most famously and memorably by Warner Oland (16 films) from 1931 to 1937 and Sidney Toler (22 films) from 1937 to 1947.

    I loved those movies when I was young and still enjoy watching the better ones now and then. As for the title of this post, it’s a play on the closest song title I could come up with to express that affection:

    That title (being French) leads seamlessly — or should I say shamelessly — to this clip from Charlie Chan In Paris (1935):

    1935 was also the year the Marx Brothers made A Night At The Opera, which has nothing to do with Charlie Chan, but serves to lead us equally shamelessly to Charlie Chan At The Opera (1936), one of the best films in the series. This movie also starred Boris Karloff and featured a “mock opera” composed by Oscar Levant, the pianist, actor and wit who was a close friend of George Gershwin. Here is the entire film:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeV5YBDs2tc

    Of course, no Charlie Chan piece would be complete without citing some of his famous aphorisms:

    Owner of face cannot always see nose.

    Bad alibi like dead fish — cannot stand test of time.

    Detective without curiousity is like glass eye at keyhole — no use.

    Grain of sand in eye may hide mountain.

    It takes very rainy day to drown duck.

    Smart rat know when to leave sinking ship.

    Bye now.

     
    • ladysighs 7:31 pm on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I love Charlie Chan. Thanks for posting his famous words. 🙂 And enjoyed both videos.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:03 pm on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know if Charlie Chan ever said it, but “The pleasure is all mine.”

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:47 am on November 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Never been a Chan fan, but thanks for taking note of the Manhattan Transfer. “Birdland” one of my favorite numbers ever.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:26 pm on November 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      At first I thought you were referring to “Lullaby of Birdland” (one of my favorite jazz numbers), but they’re not the same. However, I do dig Manhattan Transfer, though I’m much more “expert” about the music of earlier decades. Someone once said there’s no such thing as “old” music – there’s only “good” music and “bad” music….which is probably true, though that makes all music merely A MATTER OF TASTE (which, as someone else said, there’s no accounting for).

      Like

    • Don Frankel 4:04 pm on November 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’m listening to this and I’m thinking Edith Piaf. But then I’m saying no her famous song was La Vie En Rose. But then I’m saying no I hear Edith Piaf. Thank God for youtube and that I still have some memory cells left.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:13 pm on November 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I think you’re right – when you listen to one clip right after the other, the Manhattan Transfer rendition certainly sounds like Edith Piaf. I thought the M.T. sounded familiar, but unlike you, I couldn’t connect the two and they did the lip sync so well, I didn’t even try to jog my memory cells. Good work!

      Like

  • mistermuse 9:48 pm on November 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Charlie Chan, ,   

    HONORABLE GUILTY PLEASURES 

    Sayings of Charlie Chan
    Like watching girls on beach —
    May not get to bottom of case,
    But can’t help scrutinizing each.

     
    • ladysighs 9:54 am on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      🙂

      Like

    • arekhill1 9:54 am on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Where is the nearest beach to you, Sr. Muse?

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:29 am on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Actually, The Beach is just up the road across from King’s Island. OK, it’s just a waterpark,and it ain’t open this time of year, but I’m not a beach person anyway….which isn’t a problem as long as you keep posting those Kate Upton pix for me to ogle on your blog.

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:49 am on November 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’m thinking of changing my blog motto to “The Blog that Believes that Kate Upton Zero-G is the Most Important Film Ever Made.” It’s not really wordier than my current motto, and will certainly get me more attention from Google.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:00 pm on November 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Likewise, I should put “Kate Upton” in the Tags of my every post, but that would be stealing your idea (unless I call it “borrowing”) just to attract more followers. On second thought, after a few such posts with nothing on Kate Upton with nothing on, I’d probably lose more followers than I’d gain.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 3:54 pm on November 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      This was written before Kim Kardashian’s layout in Paper Magazine. Butt it should not go unmentioned.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:20 pm on November 18, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thank goodness you & Ricardo keep me up to date on that stuff, otherwise I’d miss out on the really important world news.

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 2:46 am on November 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I wold like you to visit some of the Florida’s infamous “girlie” clubs down here. But I think your wife would not like the idea. Maybe you could think about it … when you are freed from the icy chains of the miserable ” polar inversion.” Right now everyone is jealous of the weather in Florida.

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:41 am on November 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Florida is a beach too far for me nowadays, Michaeline, but I can picture Chan there:

      Sayings of Charlie Chan
      Like watching girls on South Beach –
      May not get to bottom of case,
      But can’t help scrutinizing each.

      Like

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