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  • mistermuse 9:40 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Hickory dickory dock, , , , quote, ,   

    THE ART OF BAD POETRY 

    Oscar Wilde quote: “All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling.” Maybe so, but you can’t blame a guy for trying.

    A few days ago, in pondering the possibility of posting a post of putrid poetry for BAD POETRY DAY (August 18th), I took the precaution of reviewing a decade (my blog began in 2009) of August posts to make sure I hadn’t previously perpetrated poetic perfidy on unsuspecting readers on this day. Unluckily for you , I found that I’ve never posted a post on Aug. 18, so we’re good to go….make that, I’m good to go. Or bad to go. You have to stay, because if you don’t, you’ll break my poor art — and that wouldn’t be polite.

    Perhaps you think that my calling bad poetry an art
    doesn’t pass the smell test, like calling passing gas a fart.

    Not to put you on the spot, but was that a bad-ass poem, or what?
    Granted, it has a perfect rhyme, but is that such a crime?
    As bad poetry, I still say it’s sublime….speaking of which, I’ll have you know there are actually high-class contests to determine how low a bad poem can get, such as:

    With that behind us, it’s time we get back to sum-more of my cool august poetry:

    CLOCKING OUT

    Hickory, dickory, dock,
    The doc ran up the rock.
    The rock was more slippery
    Than doc’s hickory dickory,
    So down he fell, which cleaned his clock.

    HAIR APPARENT

    A Whig party wig
    Is my saving grace —
    It diverts your gaze
    Away from my face.

    I WILL ONLY STOOP SO LOW

    I don’t do windows,
    I don’t do lawns —
    But when I doo-doo,
    I do do johns.

    And with that, I bid you a fond adieu-doo.

     

     
    • Carmen 10:20 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      • she chuckles *

      Of course you know I’ll have to offer my favourite poem (by Sheree Fitch, of Nova Scotia)

      TOES IN MY NOSE

      I stuck my toes in my nose and couldn’t get them out
      It looked a little strange and people began to shout
      “Why would you ever?”
      “My goodness I never!”
      They got in a terrible snit.

      “It’s simple” I said, as they put me to bed –
      “I just wanted to see if they FIT!”

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 10:45 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for that beautiful bad poem, Carmen. It calls to mind this golden oldie:

        You’re a poet
        though you don’t know it
        but your feet show it —
        they’re Longfellows.

        HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

        Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 11:29 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Your last poem is so bad it’s actually good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:46 am on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      To quote the late author and critic D.B. Wyndham Lewis, “There is bad Bad Verse and good Bad Verse.” Hopefully he would have agreed with you that my last poem fits the latter category.

      Like

    • Rivergirl 1:22 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      When it comes to bad… you’re very good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:48 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Chelsea Owens here on WP runs a weekly terrible poetry contest that is a total hoot. Much in line with the rhymes you posted. Lol. If you ever need a laugh in these dark days of Trump, there are plenty of bad poets willing to share their terribleness. 😀 Thanks for the clip about intolerable moo too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 7:20 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Only you could pull off bad poetry with such aplomb!

      Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 7:21 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Always a pleasure to read bad poetry- or so my proof reader tells me. Seriously, it is a pleasure to read. No doubt you’re aware of William McGonagle, the high/low mark of all bad poets He tried so hard to write well, in his so earnest po-faced way. That makes it all the more hilarious.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:12 pm on August 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. McGonagall had this in common with all bad poets: he was clueless that his poetry was bad. Still, I don’t mean that uncharitably — bad poets ‘gotta live too,’ and for all I know, maybe it keeps many of them out of trouble (although we all know a certain very bad tweeter who makes a lot of trouble for others).

        Like

    • America On Coffee 2:36 am on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I kind of like bad poetry. Composition charisma is what it has. 💕

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 12:04 pm on August 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hooray for bad poetry! Groaning 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 4:17 am on August 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      oy!
      oh boy!
      hoy hoy floy floy
      i may just be the hoi polloi
      but i really truly did enjoy.

      continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:06 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , quote, rain rain go away, , SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, , weather,   

    THE RAIN IN TWAIN FALLS MAINLY ON THE BRAIN 

    It is best to read the weather forecast before we pray for rain. –Mark Twain

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    It’s funny — April is NATIONAL HUMOR MONTH, but soddenly I don’t feel very humorous. It’s coming down in buckets out there, and some of what’s in the buckets is making its way into my basement. I hope whoever’s praying for rain is satisfied — now how about praying for it to stop? It’s bad enough that Mother Nature keeps raining on my head when I go outside — I don’t need her to greet my feet as a dweller in my cellar when I go down in the dungeon.

    ‘s no use. No letup in sight. Keeps rainin’ all the time….

    But am I going to let a reign of rain ruin what I’m doin’? No way! Others can be a Debbie Downer, despairing in the deluge. It’s in my Genes to be….

    P.S. The title of this post is word play on a song from a hit 1956 Broadway musical later made into a movie starring Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn. Can you name the song?

     

     
    • rivergirl1211 12:56 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Please go splash in your cellar puddles while imitating Gene Kelly…. we’ll wait.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:14 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, r.g.. I could dance up a storm if I weren’t feeling under the weather. I’ll let you know when I feel up to it (which will be about as long as it takes you to forget the whole thing). 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 1:12 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Singin’ in the Rain by Gene Kelly is one of my oldie’s favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 4:31 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe you could soak your feet in the basement!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Elizabeth 4:58 pm on April 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        No you have written about your feet, not your head. My husband was soaking his feet at the time I replied which probably influenced my response!

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:04 pm on April 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Elizabeth, I’m glad you didn’t tell me to go soak my head, because I would’ve had to take off my wig (instead of my shoes), which would be embarrassing because it’s glued on to my bald spot with Elmer’s Glue, and I’d have to get more glue from Elmer. 😦

        Like

    • calmkate 11:22 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      the rain in spain stays mainly in the plain ….

      Love your play of words and emotions here, great song picks!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 2:15 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Congrats for knowing the song in answer to my “P.S.” question, Kate! For those who don’t know, the song is from MY FAIR LADY, Lerner and Loewe’s great Broadway musical based on George Bernard Shaw’s PYGMALION.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 7:08 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink

          know it very well, my parents used to torture us as children with My Fair Lady and South Pacific!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 3:50 am on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Not true! I loved your post and laughed heartily, especially at your tweaked quotation! Good one Mistermuse and happy weekend ahead.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, G.H. — same to you, and give Garfield an extra big hug for me. 🙂

        Like

    • America On Coffee 10:38 pm on April 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wetheads are bad. Good that the seasons change. But then, there are the hotheads and airheads .😕

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:45 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and then there are the snotheads and the potheads, not to mention the roundheads and the squareheads, and the rumpheads and the Trumpheads (the last of whom has been known to dump heads, as in “You’re fired!”).

        Like

    • Marietta Rodgers 3:15 pm on April 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had no idea there were so many songs about rain. Sorry about all the rain, but you know what Longfellow says, “The best thing one can do when it’s raining, is to let it rain.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • awisewomansjourney 6:44 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This was a great play on a lot of words! Thank you for the songs I especially love that oldie but goodie Stormy Weather! ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 8:35 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for including Gene’s version of singing in the rain. I love, LOVE that scene and the way Gene dances in the rain.

      I hope the rain will end soon in your area and bring lovely spring flowers in its stead. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:59 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That scene is indeed a classic, as is the whole film (SINGING IN THE RAIN). Some consider it the best musical of all time. I wouldn’t go that far, but I’d include it AMONG the best musicals.

        As for the rain, we’ve had a reprieve the past several days, but tonight stars a new round which will test whether my hydraulic cement repairs hold. If not, maybe I’ll grow some aquatic plants in the basement rather than seek spring flowers. 🙂

        Like

    • moorezart 7:42 pm on April 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Irwin Shaw, , , , quote, silence, whispering   

    THE DEAD HAVE SPOKEN…. 

    There are too many books I haven’t read, too many places I haven’t seen, too many memories I haven’t kept long enough. –Irwin Shaw, playwright, screenwriter, novelist and author of Bury The Dead

    The dead have spoken….
    but the living have moved on.
    Hear their voices left in your mind,
    keep their memories in the images
    that are reborn in shared solitude.
    Who among us has not known the haunting fear,
    whispering we might not survive the silence?

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:18 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Good share Mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:37 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said Mr. Shaw.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:23 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The living have also spoken — thank you both.

      I started this post without the well-said Shaw quote, then decided it complemented my poem reasonably well, so I welcomed the ‘help’ — especially since I didn’t have to pay for it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • pendantry 2:39 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Who among us has not known the haunting fear,
      whispering we might not survive the silence?

      *shivers*

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:18 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        The warmth and reborn life of approaching spring offer the hope of an alternative to winter’s shivers. At least, that’s what I’d say if I were an optimist (and even sometimes as a poet).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Lisa R. Palmer 11:27 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Beautiful… compelling… and oddly comforting, knowing we are not alone in grief, sorrow, fear or healing.

      Bravo, mistermuse!! Bravo!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:08 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Lisa, they say a picture is worth a thousand words, but I say a bravo (or two) can be worth a thousand pictures. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 2:49 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
      No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
      And makes us rather bear those ills we have
      Than fly to others that we know not of?
      Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,”

      And you thought I’d send you this as the quintessential recording of In My Solitude.

      Ooops I guess I did.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:59 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Shakespeare couldn’t have said it better.

        I’m glad you sent the Billie Holiday recording of SOLITUDE, because I was torn between that one and Duke Ellington’s recording. I finally decided on Duke’s, mainly because he’s the composer.

        Like

    • tref 4:24 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Two great songs!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:19 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Tref. WHISPERING is a real oldie dating back to 1920, when Paul Whiteman’s recording became hugely popular and propelled him and his orchestra to fame. The Comedian Harmonists (a German vocal group) rendition is typical of their very appealing style. Unfortunately several members of the group were Jewish, and after Hitler came into power….well, I highly recommend a 1997 film which tells their story. Here’s an excerpt from the movie:

        Liked by 1 person

    • tref 5:38 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Moreover, I have just added the Comedians version to my playlist. Thanks, MM!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: First day of Spring, , , , , , quote, Robet Louis Stevenson, , , spring cleaning,   

    SPRING CLINGING 

    There’s something bad in everything good: when spring comes, can spring cleaning be far behind? — Evan Esar

    Spring has come, but in my sequestered domain, this doesn’t mean spring cleaning must follow. Though my closets be crammed and my drawers be loaded — make that cluttered — I’ll have no problem leaving spring cleaning far behind (even if others stink otherwise).

    Now, I’m not saying that spring cleaning doesn’t have its place. For example, it might be worth the bother if you’re young and in love:

    Speaking of “young love,” how old do you think the above song is? If you guessed it dates back to the ‘Golden Age’ of popular music (1920s, 30s, 40s), welcome to one of my happy places. If you’re thinking I’m clinging to the best of those romantic old songs out of naught but nostalgia, nothing could be further from the youth — my guileless youth that Father Time gradually re-placed. But suppose the mature me were unable to relate to the ever-young work of, say, Twain, Stevenson and Swift — it wouldn’t be that their writing has become outdated.  I would simply have lost the capacity to appreciate its timelessness.

    In like manner, whether it be seen as ‘gilding the lily’ of youth or burnishing the harmony of maturity, I still think of the oldies as younger than springtime….and on that note, I’ll tune out:

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 3:35 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My happy place too . What every happened to harmony — and words you could understand – and “girl singers” who sang without belting out most of the song – dressed, even? But don’t think its because I’m growing old. I’ve said the same thing since I was in my 30s.

      But I’m with you – and Quentin Quisp – on spring cleaning, “There is no need to do any housework at all. After four years the dirt doesn’t get any worse.”

      Another one from him (Naked Civil Servant):
      “Keeping up with the Joneses was a full-time job with my mother and father. It was not until many years later when I lived alone that I realized how much cheaper it was to drag the Joneses down to my level.”
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:53 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I like the quotes. As for “girl singers belting out most of the song” — that wasn’t unheard of (get it? — ha ha) in the ‘old days.’ Remember Ethel Merman, for example? She wasn’t one of my favs, but she was definitely loud (and dressed)! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 4:47 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink

          Good point. I guess I was thinking more of the singers who fronted the Big Bands. I never was sure if Merman was actually “singing” lol – but that voice was perfect for Broadway, and she could certainly sell a number like nobody else. And I do like some of the female performers today – just not as much as I loved the ones from the 30s-40s-50s (even as a teen in the 60s).
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:21 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink

          Merman may have been the loudest, but she wasn’t the earliest girl singer who belted out songs. One of the first (and probably most well known) pre-Merman belters was Sophie Tucker, heard here in in a 1926 recording of her most famous song:

          Like

    • Don Frankel 6:32 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Can I say The Girls From Mars, they send me? But Spring cleaning is in the same league as New Year’s Resolutions as it much talked about but seldom accomplished.

      Richard Rogers what a treasure.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:08 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I thought girls were supposed to be from Venus, men from Mars. But “supposed to be” is no longer in the stars — girls can be from wherever they want to be, and more power to them! And you’re right about Spring cleaning and New Year’s Resolutions.

        Richard Rodgers is indeed a treasure, and Oscar Hammerstein ain’t bad either (though I’m more partial to Rodgers’ original lyricist partner, Lorenz Hart).

        Like

    • Carmen 6:34 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great tunes, Mr. Muse! As soon as I started listening to the second one, I thought, “I’ve heard that guy before!” Sure enough, he does “Bring Him Home” (Les Mis)

      First day of spring here and – what do you know! – school is cancelled. (I think for the 13th day since December) Icy roads, apparently! Means I’m on my 3rd cup of coffee. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the heads up about Isaac Benelli. I couldn’t place him despite the fact he has such a beautiful voice that he must have been on Broadway. I need to start paying more attention to today’s (and not just yesterday’s) Broadway scene!

        Like

    • scifihammy 7:21 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You can’t beat these old well written and well sung songs. 🙂
      Enjoy your Springtime – the cleaning can wait! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:27 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. This must be the start of fall where you are in South Africa, so to return the favor, I’ll say Enjoy your autumn — the leaf raking can wait! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 11:04 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink

          Oh for sure the leaf raking can wait. And if I wait long enough, a good wind will blow it all away! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:22 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Living in the Golden State, as well as during my time in Hawaii, cleaning can be accomplished any time of year. When the filth and dreck of one’s home becomes too much to tolerate even when drunk, it is subject to scouring no matter the season.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carmen 11:33 am on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Geez, I’d love to see my husband THAT drunk. . . 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:55 pm on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Some might say your attitude lowers the standard in ‘standard of living,’ Ricardo, but as long as you can get to the beer in the fridge without undue difficulty, it seems like a workable concept to me.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:10 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m with you about leaving Spring cleaning in the dust! 🙂 Thanks for the tunes!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:27 am on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Diana. I like your “cleaning in the dust” pun so much that I can’t wipe the smile off my face! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 5:54 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Something beautiful to brighten my day is always available on your blog 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:15 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Any and all appreciation is always appreciated (and your blog will likewise have a brightening effect on any reader who wishes to check it out). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 9:33 pm on March 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Spring renewal! Yay!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Little Monster Girl 10:08 pm on March 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi mistermuse! Would you like to answer questions with me on my weekly Friendly Chat on my blog? I’m going to post it in a short while.I get the questions from Cee’s Share Your World and I share my answers every week with another blogger, and I’d like you to do it this week if you like! 😀 Here’s the questions for this week: https://ceenphotography.com/2017/03/20/share-your-world-march-20-2017/

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:28 am on March 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Many thanks for thinking of me, but due to very limited time (not to mention computer skills), I don’t feel I can commit to such an undertaking for the foreseeable future. Please accept my regrets and apologies.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , quote,   

    I’M BOOKED 

    It is easier to buy books than to read them, and easier to read them than to absorb them. –William Osler

    Well, I done done it again: done went traipsin’ off to another bargain book sale at the local library, and done ended up taking home more cheapo tomes than Trump takes ego trips. How many books do I own? I stopped counting around 720 (which, by the way, was a very good year, so I hear). Let’s just say that if all the books I’ve accumulated were people, they’d be so crammed together that they’d be begging for as much space, in relative terms, as tin-packed sardines have (not that I’d want space for relatives — my house ain’t no hostel for visiting bedlamites). My books, on the other hand, deserve more space because they’re doomed to wait longer than sardines for me to ‘digest’ them all — like until there’s peace on earth or Goodwill in store for my boatload of books after I sale off into the sunset.

    Anyway, the end result of all this trumpery is to take another ‘skip-a-post to read-the-most’ books I can — like the break I decided to take two months ago after I brought home my last used book bonanza. I’ll be back Feb. 15, more bleary-eyed but less behind (or, if you like, less in arrears) in books to read….Lord willin’ and the library don’t have another sale.

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:52 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You are a hoot! It’s a good thing we are not life-partners, however. We’d need another entire house for the books alone. I have NO more space to squeeze in even one more bookshelf, high, low or under — so I have to avoid those book-sale temptations I can never resist either.

      My writer-buds chant kindle-kindle-kindle, but I like the feel and the smell (and I’ve never been able to speed read online – which is fairly essential, given my habit and my schedule.) So if a book is out in paper, that’s ALWAYS a lure.

      Enjoy your time away – and Happy Valentines Day. (NOW – will that catchy tune stop playing in my head soon?) 🙂
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:02 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Owl have to agree with you about preferring paper books to Kindle. If God had intended humans to read on electronic devices, He’d have created Androids instead of trees.

        Happy Valentine’s Day to you as well! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • lexborgia 5:17 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoy. I started ‘Dancing In The Glory Of Monsters’ yesterday; it’s shaping up to be a treat.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:17 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        From what I’ve read about “Dancing In The Glory Of Monsters,’ it’s an excellent book — not for the squeamish, but then, the atrocities of monsters SHOULD cause revulsion in readers.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:05 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Book em Muse.

      BTW I have a book coming out soon. Can I send you a copy?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I’d be more than pleased to read it, Don (as long as it’s not a tribute to Trump!).

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 5:36 pm on February 10, 2017 Permalink

          I drafted a post that might help explain why folks don’t flock to wake up and dump his coffee, given all – and maybe even a cogent theory of “alternative facts.”

          [Why we hate to change our minds] posts Monday – shortly after midnight in New York, explaining cognitive dissonance and confirmation bias – briefly, and in language as “plain” as mine ever is. 🙂

          A direct link will be available from the right sidebar until it “ages off” – which gives it more than a month or so to continue to position itself farther down the page.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:05 pm on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoy your literary vacation, Sr. Muse. Me, I’ll be burning Trump again tomorrow to stay warm.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:01 pm on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Ricardo, I’m already burned up over practically everything our “so-called” President says (or at least the way he says it, like he’s a God-ass) and does. Nonetheless, I shall look forward to your continuing to give the devil his due.

        Liked by 1 person

    • milliethom 4:29 pm on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Love the post … love the humour … and love books! My house is bulging with them, too. Some have been read (and possibly digested) others, like many of yours, were cheapo buys or from charity shops, so not new to start with. I won’t comment on your trumpish jokes because I’m British! Haha. I’m keeping my nose out (if not my opinions) of politics right now – homegrown or otherwise.Thanks for the entertainment, Mr M.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 5:58 pm on February 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My pleasure, Ms. M. — and thank you for the kind words.

      I must admit to envying the British — you only have to deal with Brexit, not Trump (though Trump’s reign will effect, if not infect, the whole world soon enough). But let us read, drink, and lose ourselves in books while we may! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 7:54 am on February 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I have culled so many books from my shelves over the years that if I had kept them all, I’d have to buy an extra house to hold them. I often look for a book and then sadly realize that I gave it away ages ago… the digital experience just isn’t the same.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:39 am on February 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I know what you mean. The batch of books I bought at the previous library sale included two I forgot I already own because I hadn’t read them yet. That’s what happens when you accumulate too many books to read within a reasonable time, and most of them sit in the boxes you brought them home in for months, if not years. Oh, well, I could have a lot worse addictions!

        Liked by 2 people

    • BroadBlogs 7:59 pm on February 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Whenever I hear of Trumpery I start getting nervous.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:11 pm on February 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Trumpery (meaning “worthless nonsense”) is a word which long pre-dates Trump, but which in my opinion has never been more accurately personified than by him. It derives from the French “tromper,” meaning “to deceive” (again, a most accurate personification).

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 5:39 pm on February 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        A Brit I follow recently told me that his name has long been slang for fart in his circle. And now they have another reason to use it!
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:13 pm on February 10, 2017 Permalink

          That may be a clue as to why Trump favors unfettered gas development, with no concern for leaks.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 6:24 pm on February 10, 2017 Permalink

          He has no concern for *anything* other than his own life and issues: corporate capitalism.

          There is not enough time or room on *anybody’s* blog to list all his “no concerns,” but DeVoss, a vaccinated populace & torture – SERIOUSLY?

          His choices would be no different had he been SENT to destroy the planet and everybody on it.

          Almost makes me wonder if those nutty Scientologists are right. [Almost] 🙂
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:22 pm on February 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’ll look forward to your “after midnight in New York” Monday post, MGH (unless I change my mind). 🙂

      Like

    • mariasjostrand 6:47 am on February 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Definitely know the feeling… my dad still have some of my books because the room I rent now simply don’t have rooom for them all 🙂 And yet I wish for more…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:30 pm on February 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      At least wishes don’t take up space, and they don’t cost anything either (unless we indulge them, but hey, we only live once!).

      Like

    • Beauty Along the Road 10:13 pm on February 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I can very much relate to “needing” more books while there are still uncounted unread books on my shelves at home. Sigh. This has got to be the best line I’ve read in the last few days: “more cheapo tomes than Trump takes ego trips. ” 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:26 am on February 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You’re ahead of me in the sense that your unread books are on shelves. Many of my unread books were still in boxes, but I’ve taken advantage of the last nine days off between posts to make more shelf space. Now I’ve at least been able to empty the boxes, sort by subject and start reading.

      Thank you for commenting. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Beauty Along the Road 8:41 am on February 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        We’ve also implemented a new book ban for the entire year (that includes kindle downloads) – saves a lot of money and forces us to make use of what we’ve already got. Plus, there’s always the library….

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 2:02 pm on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      How funny! 🙂 🙂 I tend to recycle books rather than hang on to them. I buy them for 20-50p at charity book stalls and return them for resale when I’ve read them. Just occasionally I have to keep one 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:24 pm on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I recycle some, but keep a lot more — the ones I really like (the same thing I would do if I had a harem). 😦 🙂

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , quote, ,   

    SET IN STONE 

    I think, therefore I am. –René Descartes

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    You will (hopefully) recall that my last post, STONE COLD DEAD, featured some of my favorite epitaphs published 4 years ago on SWI (a blog due to bite the dust in November). Ah, but the best laid plans….  The SWI editor announced on 9/1 that he would now need to pull the plug first thing on Sept. 6; thus today becomes SWI’s last full day on this earth.

    This sudden passing prompts me to salvage another of my previously published posts from that body of work: a poem which poses a question I believe naturally arises out of STONE COLD DEAD. Unlike that post, it ain’t funny, but perhaps the poem’s saving grace is that what it lacks in humor, it makes up in brevity. It’s the least I can do on Labor Day.

    LUCKY STIFFS

    Are the faithful
    dead better positioned
    to be saved
    than those who
    lived with doubt?
    Even a God
    can’t help being
    what He thinks.

     

     

     
    • painkills2 12:13 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Saved from what? After you’re dead, no one can save you. But if this is about hell, then I don’t want to be saved — that’s where all the fun people go. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:44 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Think of this poem as if it were written by an agnostic. Then the question becomes: If there is a God and an afterlife, is He any more morally fit to judge you than you are to judge Him? If there is no afterlife, it’s irrelevant whether or not there is a God, because we will never know either way.

      I might add that the God(s) of religions and myth only muddy the waters of how to think about this whole business of a possible Creator. The word “God” itself seems to me to be an impediment to rational thinking about life and all that it may imply.

      Liked by 2 people

      • painkills2 1:09 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I suppose those who believe in a god also believe that this god is always right and shouldn’t be questioned. As for anyone — supernatural or not — who thinks they have the right to judge me, well, they’re wrong. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 7:12 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Nice one 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:26 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      They say it takes one to know one, so you’re a “nice one” too. 🙂

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 9:41 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “God is dead.” —Nietzsche, 1883

      “Nietzsche is dead.” —God, 1900

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:51 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “We’re all dead.” –Kismet, sooner or later 😦

      Liked by 3 people

    • arekhill1 11:42 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, death is the ultimate way of fitting in.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:32 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d call it forced integration God’s way….except for Christians, who make Book on to a different afterlife divide: heaven or hell.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:02 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      All things come to an end but nothing really dies on the internet. It just spins somewhere throughout the universe. And, since we’re doing some oldies I can’t help but recall once again my favorite Epitaph on a Tombstone in Tombstone.

      Here Lies Lester Moore
      4 slugs from a .44
      No Les
      No More

      Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 6:18 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I can never think about this topic (death) without this song running through my mind. I heard it for the first time when I was a teenager and it has stuck in my head ever since. Like this post, it’s remarkable for its brevity.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:14 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the song clip. When it comes to war and brevity, it took William Tecumseh Sherman only three words to tell it like it is: “War is hell.”

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:28 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know why God would punish our authenticity. Job is an interesting book to read on this topic.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:01 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, this subject would take an entire post to address in depth, including (for starters) whether or not one accepts the story of Job as having a basis in reality. For atheists and agnostics, it’s a non-starter to begin with, because if you disbelieve or doubt that God exists, Job is meaningless. Personally, as a deist who believes in a Creator but not the so-called “revealed God” of most religions, it is not my job to take Job seriously (pun intended).

      Like

      • Carmen 5:18 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Besides which, if you do read about poor old Job – and take the ‘lesson’ seriously-, you end up wondering why anyone would think Yahweh had any redeeming qualities.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Superduque777 7:49 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply


      CARPET DIEM

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:09 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You would never guess from that photo what the girl is actually saying to the pope: “Ubi possum potiri petasi similis isti?” (“Where can I get a hat like that?”)

      Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 10:12 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      . . .and he’s probably saying, “Go now and spin no more”. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:39 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No doubt Jim Beam had something to say about it too, but it looks like the pope is keeping it close to his vest-ments.

      Liked by 2 people

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