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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bobby Darin, , L:ove Song, , , Mack The Knife, , , The Three Penny Opera   

    A SINGULAR COMPOSER, A TWO-TIMING WIFE, AND A THREE PENNY OPERA 

    “THE ROMANCE of Kurt Weill, the Jewish cantor’s son, and Lotte Lenya, the Viennese coachman’s daughter, changed the history of Western music. Their work on The Three Penny Opera provides a knowing insight into their relationship: Weill was the creator whose work was backstage, unseen. Lenya was the performer who put the work into view. They heard the same unique music, but he gave it form while she gave it life.”
    –from the cover flap of LOVE SONG, by Ethan Mordden

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    If you like a bargain and biographies, I’ve just read a book I’m about to tell you about, titled LOVE SONG. The “bargain” is hinted at in the subtitle: THE LIVES OF KURT WEILL AND LOTTE LENYA — a double biography, two lives for the price of one. If you’re acquainted with the music of Kurt Weill and the mystique of Lotte Lenya, an individual biography of either would be a bargain at twice  – nay, thrice — the price.

    Kurt Weill was born in Germany in March 1900. As a young man (according to Mordden), “Music was his only interest, in total immersion.” He later fled the Nazi takeover and came to New York, U.S.A., in September, 1935. That month is notable for its namesake song, which may be the most unforgettable of his many memorable compositions:

    Lotte Lenya, twice-married to Weill and many times in bed with other men, was born in Vienna in 1898 and outlived her husband by 31 years. Quoting from the book, “Lenya was quick to adapt to her audience: a performer, but a warm and giving one, quickly intimate with anyone she liked….she could play everything from the merrily heartless Jenny of The Threepenny Opera to the helplessly coquettish Frau Schneider of Cabaret.” Here she sings one of my favorite Weill songs:

    I wish I could give you a front row seat at the real-life opera that is the LOVE SONG of Kurt Weill and Lotte Lenya, for it is not only a love story, but an adventure and a 20th century history ranging from early success in Weimar Germany, escape from war-torn Europe, and finding the fulfillment in America which was cut short in their native land….but I could not begin to get you as caught up in their story as this “meticulously researched and detailed” book does. If you love the music of Kurt Weill, you will love this biography.

    I would love to post clips of such Weill classics as Speak Low, This Is New, and To Love You And To Lose You, but that would perhaps be too much of a good thing….so I’ll bring down the curtain with this Bobby Darin hit from The Three Penny Opera which my fellow seniors will well remember (assuming your memory is sharp):

     

     

     
    • obbverse 12:13 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Era defining, Mack the Knife. Not bad for a song written thirty years and a Second World War earlier. In the parlance of the day- killer track.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:25 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Not bad, indeed….and I dig your “killer track” juxtaposition with regard to MACK THE KNIFE.

        Like

    • calmkate 1:06 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      sorry I must be too young … or the memory is shot, don’t remember any of this!
      But totally love Mack the knife 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 7:06 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Weill I have heard of, but not Lotte Lenya, and I do know the songs and of course Bobby Darin. Great post. I’m sure you could write more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:48 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. I try to hold my posts to a reasonable length despite the temptation to keep going, as I realize that most of my followers probably have many blogs to follow, but only limited time….and if I go overboard, they may lose interest.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:17 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, Bobby Darin. Lost too soon..

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Lost too soon….and forgotten too fast (but not by those who appreciated what a great talent he was).

        Like

    • equipsblog 10:36 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I not only remember the song, I saw Sting play Mac the Knife in Three Penny Opera at (I think) the National Theater in Washington, DC.

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:56 am on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      For some reason I know the September song. My parents liked Bobby Darin so I know Mack the Knife and Beyond the Sea.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 2:19 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I remember a Lenya vinyl album that my parents had. If I recall it correctly, she’s on the cover in a provocative pose, possibly with a cigarette in hand.

      Hello there. Bye till next time.

      Neil S.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:01 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        She lived to age 83 despite smoking and sexual promiscuity, so she must have had good Genes…and probably a lot of Toms, Dicks and Harrys, too.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 2:55 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Bobby Darin was a little before my time but I always like to hear music from that era. Hope things are well with you, mistermuse. Our province has declared an Emergency today and we are now limited to groups of five people; essential businesses/stores open but keeping the 6 ft. Distance in place. So far, we’ve not had a problem with self-isolation as we have lots of projects on the go! I’ll tell ya, watching the grandchildren cavort out on the lawn is preferable to cleaning up inside after they leave!
      And of course one can always listen to all sorts of hits from lovely blogs. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:18 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Hi, Carmen — long time, no see. Good to hear from you again, and glad that you’re dealing well with the pandemic. I’m doing the same, but there’s no avoiding having to go to the store and/or pharmacy occasionally. Using hand sanitizer or wearing vinyl gloves while shopping helps, but social distancing is impossible in a crowded store, and lately it’s been crowded even at 7 a.m. (I’d go earlier, but I’d have to break in, since they don’t open until 7). 😉

        Like

    • annieasksyou 2:59 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a nostalgia trip this was! Haven’t thought about Bobby Darin for a while, but this was a welcome reminder.

      And for the first time, I was struck by the reference to “Miss Lotte Lenya” in Mack the Knife. That was like finding a jigsaw puzzle piece and placing it in its intended home.

      Thank you, mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:39 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m pleased that you enjoyed the post, Annie. Bobby Darin was one of my favorites back in the day, but Lotte Lenya was little more than a name to me until I read the book LOVE SONG and listened to her sing. I highly recommend the book if you’re interested.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 8:42 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Many years ago I found a 4 LP set of the original Berlin production of 3 Penny with Miss Lotta in German. And huge program booklet with the English translation and pictures describing the production and the times. What a treasure.
      Weill was a musical genius. His work here in America is some of the best to ever appear on stage. September Song etc..
      Lotta never got as big here as in Germany, but she never got to be one of the most memorable James Bond villians.
      I will have to look the book up.
      PS: As much as I liked the Darin rendition of Mack, my favorite is the Louis Armstrong’s.
      Stay Healthy

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:29 pm on March 22, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      There is a discography at the end of the book LOVE SONG which lists a 1930 Ultraphon 78 rpm set of Die Dreigroschenoper (The Three Penny Opera) wherein “Lenya sings not only her opening-night role of Jenny but also Polly and Lucy and even gets a crack at the Moritat. Most listeners learned these readings from reissues by Telefunken on 78 and LP” — which is apparently what you are fortunate enough to have.

      Weill was indeed a musical genius. I hope you can find the book (published in 2012 by St. Martin’s Press), because I’m sure you would find it immensely interesting.

      Thanks for the comment, and you stay healthy as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 10:31 am on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for sharing

      Take care of yourself

      Love, light and glitter

      Like

    • Elizabeth 4:32 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My grandson learned “Mack the Knife” from me when he was about two. He sang it joyfully.”Look out old Mack is back.” My daughter finally heard the words and was duly appalled that I had taught him such a gory song.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:38 pm on March 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        How times have changed, Elizabeth — nowadays, that song wouldn’t appall anyone, except maybe the younger generation who would be appalled at how “outdated” it is.

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 8:01 am on March 24, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for some lovely old songs, and info on the writers/performers that I did not know. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 7:03 pm on April 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for 2 things:
      1) for the book recommendation, a subject I’ve been long curious about but have made no effort to research; and
      2) for posting Mack the Knife.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:06 pm on April 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m pleased to recommend the book because, although I was fairly familiar with Kurt Weill and his work, I too was curious was about Lotte Lenya and the relationship between them. It’s a fascinating story. As for Mack the Knife, Bobby Darin’s version is my favorite, and I’m glad you enjoyed it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:15 am on April 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent review and show!

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 7:09 pm on April 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Kurt Weill is one of my very favorite composers – along with Brecht…geniuses. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:10 pm on April 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Weill and Brecht were indeed musical geniuses, but their relationship hit some sour notes, mainly because of Brecht (according to LOVE SONG, the book mentioned in my post). Nonetheless, they made beautiful music together.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bobby Darin, Give Me That Old Time Religion, , , , It Ain't Necessarily So, longevity, , , oldest living man, , , , ,   

    SENIOR MUSE SOUNDS OFF FOR OLD TIMERS SAKE 

    In 1984, members of the Oxford Library Club for Retired Professional People were especially looking forward to hearing a guest speaker on “Old Age, Absent-Mindedness, and Keeping Fit.” Unfortunately, the speaker forgot to show up. –excerpted from the book 1,000 UNFORGETTABLE SENIOR MOMENTS

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    MAY being OLDER AMERICANS MONTH, and ME being an older American, I’ve decided to post a post predicated on passing on — make that on passing along — hoary words of wisdom concerning a subject I’m surpassingly qualified to write about, namely …. ….hmmm….uh….ah…. longevity (ha ha — you thought I forgot what I was going to write about, didn’t you?).

    Actually, I must admit to being a bit of a senior citizen-slouch when it comes to longevity — at least, compared to this guy:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/worlds-oldest-man-146-birthday-long-life-location-country-name-celebrates-old-age-a7505401.html

    And of course, that there this guy is himself a slouch compared to this here this guy:

    Methuselah, as all my bible-believing brethr’n and sistern know, was said to have lived 969 years (Genesis 5:27), so you might think this song is my inspiration to keep marching on:

    But (and I quote) “Who calls that livin’ when no gal’s gonna give in to no man what’s 900 years?”

    So there you have it from Bobby Darin singing the lyrics of Ira Gershwin. Or you can take it from Senior Muse quoting the words of Oscar Wilde: “The tragedy of old age is not that one is old, but that one is not young.”

     

     

     

     
    • mlrover 8:03 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It Ain’t Necessarily So is one of my favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 9:18 am on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      love it .. our resident ‘expert’ on longevity ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • equipsblog 2:08 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You must have read my mind. I think that at least a dozen times a day (or is I think it for the first time, a dozen times a day?)

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Well, there’s being “only as old as you feel” — and then there’s this:

        Like

    • Eliza 4:15 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Imagine being young for eternity??

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:11 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Being old, I find it hard to imagine. But innocence is for the young, and who am I to throw a sour note into their song?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:29 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’d like to live to 969 years old… if only to piss off the Social Security office.
      😈

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:34 pm on May 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        If the extreme right wing ever gains control of all branches of government, it may not matter how long you live — there probably won’t be a Social Security office (but not to worry; charity will take care of you).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Richard A Cahill 12:22 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always thought the world’s oldest man (or woman) to be the ultimate temp job, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:00 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I have laughed about a song that promises “I will love you until you’re 70.” Then what? Thanks for the opening laugh.

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:19 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Incredible!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 9:20 pm on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video not available.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:55 pm on May 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know which video you mean. The first is METHUSELAH, the second is GIVE ME THAT OLD TIME RELIGION, and the third is IT AIN’T NECESSARILY SO. If you can’t get the latter two, there are many other versions. If you can’t get METHUSELAH, the name is really all you need to know, so it ain’t necessarily worth the trouble of trying to find a substitute.

        Like

        • America On Coffee 1:38 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink

          Bobby Darin and Methuselah. I found Methuselah and its a great video as well as the old time religion which the world and I really need. Thank you mistermuse for all of your inspirings. Have a great week!

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:58 am on May 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The OLD TIME RELIGION clip is a scene from the 1960 movie INHERIT THE WIND based on the notorious 1925 “Scopes Monkey Trial” of a Tennessee schoolteacher for teaching evolution. It’s a great film (starring Spencer Tracy) and I highly recommend it.

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 4:49 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      146 years! Good grief!

      Also, I love a post that includes “Inherit the Wind” and Bobby Darin. Nicely done.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:53 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        INHERIT THE WIND was on TCM again last night. Since I hadn’t seen it in several years, I watched it again and enjoyed it as much as ever (though I think Gene Kelly is a bit miscast as the reporter).

        Like

        • Silver Screenings 1:00 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Agreed. I want to like Gene Kelly in that role, but I never quite buy it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:24 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink

          Fortunately, Spencer Tracy, Fredric March and the rest of the cast are so spot-on that Kelly’s off-key performance can be given a pass (though not by much).

          Like

      • mistermuse 3:33 pm on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Bobby Darin is all but forgotten today but was one of the great singers of his tragically short time in the spotlight.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 1:36 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Getting old ain’t for wimps, but a sense of humor goes a long way.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:32 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, Diana. If I didn’t have a sense of humor, I probably wouldn’t have any sense at all!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 1:32 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Growing old is better than the alternative – not growing old any longer.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:05 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I said that to an old relative in a nursing home years ago, and she said “How do you know — we don’t know what the alternative is.” Now that I’m old myself, I must admit there’s a sense in which she was right. Nonetheless, I plan on living to reach 100 if it kills me.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bobby Darin, , Henry James, , old song, , ,   

    A QUOTER OF NINE 

    One must never miss an opportunity of quoting things by others which are always more interesting than those one thinks up oneself. –Marcel Proust

    The idea for this post was born of the mating of the above quote (which came from a book I’m reading about Marcel Proust) with a play on words from the title of this old song:

    The next step was to come up with nine quotes based on the above premise. Almost by default, I chose quotes about quotes. I hope the result isn’t born stillborn — if so, de fault is yours (or mine, if you want to be petty about it). Let’s begin and see how it works out:

    Those who never quote, in return are never quoted. –Isaac D’Israeli

    Pretty things that are well said — it’s nice to have them in your head. –Robert Frost

    I have made it a rule that whenever I say something stupid, I immediately attribute it to Dr. Johnson, Marcus Aurelius or Dorothy Parker. –George Mikes

    Asked to describe his most recent play, a playwright (who Dorothy Parker felt had been copying her) said, “It’s hard to say — except that it’s a play against all isms.” She replied, “Except plagiarism.

    I always have a quotation for everything — it saves original thinking. –Dorothy L. Sayers

    To be amused at what you read — that is the great spring of quotation. –Charles Edward Montague

    While reading writers of great formulatory power — Henry James, Santayana, Proust — I find I can scarcely get through a page without having to stop to record some lapidary sentence. Reading Henry James, for example, I have muttered to myself, “C’mon, Henry, turn down the brilliance a notch, so I can get some reading done.” –Joseph Epstein

    If you want to be quoted, say something you shouldn’t say. –Evan Esar

    I really didn’t say everything I said. –Yogi Berra

    So that makes me a quoter of nine, unless one counts the opening Marcel Proust quote, which doesn’t count as ten unless you’re keeping count, in which case, count it instead as a bonus which would only count if you don’t count Yogi, who said he didn’t say what he said if he didn’t say it (but don’t quote me on that).

     

     

     
    • K. A. Bryce 12:07 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Very nice, though I was disappointed you didn’t have something by Wilde. Nothing comes to mind offhand and my own book of quotes is in no way organized, but I would have guessed he’d be one of your first. I’m sure he said something scathing about quotes, or at least one would hope so. Smiles>KB

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:08 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I own a book titled THE WIT AND HUMOR OF OSCAR WILDE which contains many Wilde quotes, but nothing “scathing about quotes.” However, Paul Sunstone came up with a Wilde quotation quote in his comment which follows….and then there’s this from my book, which isn’t too far off course: “I like to do all the talking myself. It saves time and prevents arguments.”

        Liked by 4 people

    • Paul Sunstone 12:14 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.” — Oscar Wilde

      Liked by 6 people

    • Richard A Cahill 1:31 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Any post that mentions the immortal Ms. Parker twice gets a star on my refrigerator, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mistermuse 8:25 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        One of my favorite wits as well, Ricardo. When I’m at wit’s end, I can always count on her to restore my faith in humility (as in ‘humiliating putdowns’).

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:20 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Quote, unquote and quote”

      “How many quotes is that, Jameson?”

      “Three, sir”

      “Three? Add another quote and make it a gallon”

      Groucho Marx – Animal Crackers

      Liked by 5 people

      • mistermuse 8:39 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Groucho was such a wise cracker that one would think he would be the Marx Brother at the famous Algonquin Round Table (where Dorothy Parker was ‘queen’), but instead it was Harpo.

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 8:45 am on September 5, 2018 Permalink

          I’ve heard that Harpo could be pretty funny. Actually, I heard the same thing about Zeppo. Some biographer talked about how ungodly slow Zeppo Marx drove and the author of the book just got lulled and FELL OUT OF THE CAR. It was probably going about twenty miles an hour at the time…

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 6:30 pm on September 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      lol gave me a smile, nice to see a post other than about him … 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • restlessjo 3:22 am on September 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I love it! I even remember the song 🙂 🙂 Original thinking is pretty hard, and I may have to spend the rest of my life quoting George Mikes.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:34 am on September 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Jo. That song was actually made popular by Al Jolson several decades before the Bobby Darin rendition, but I chose the Darin clip because he was one of my favorite singers. As you may know, he died tragically young, otherwise he may have given Sinatra a run for his money.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:15 pm on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Fabulous quotes, and am very glad to see Dorothy Parker honoured here.

      Also: Bobby Darin was the ultimate in Cool.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Did you know that Dorothy Parker was also a song writer? If you’ll click on “Dorothy Parker” under “Tags” (right hand column near the top) and scroll down to my June 7 post EXCUSE MY DUST, you’ll come to a clip of I WISHED ON THE MOON, to which she wrote the lyrics.

        Liked by 2 people

    • markscheel1 3:37 pm on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Dare I disclose the following? A story of mine, I’ve just been informed, is a finalist in a Dorothy Parker writing contest where entrants are required to take the first line and last line of her “A Telephone Call” story and write their own story seamlessly in between. Furthermore, a little bird landed on my window recently and tweeted that you (and yours) are due for congratulations–and you know what for. So, by golly, congrats!!!!! And many more. 🙂

      Mark

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:14 pm on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Congrats on being a Dorothy Parker writing contest finalist, Mark — here’s hoping that your story wins (and, if so, that you post it). Also, thanks for the “you know what” congrats; I’m glad the tweet came from a little bird, not from you know who. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • rivergirl1211 4:59 pm on September 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said, or quoted as the case may be.

      “I often quote myself. It adds spice to my conversation.”
      George Bernard Shaw

      Liked by 3 people

    • barkinginthedark 6:20 pm on September 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      tonite, the stars’ll twinkle and shine, this evening…about a quoter of nine. continue…

      Liked by 3 people

    • barkinginthedark 6:22 pm on September 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      actually i wrote that before i even knew what the Darin clip was. great minds. continue…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:54 pm on September 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        In a way, that’s similar to Trump — he writes tweets before he knows what he’s talking about.

        (Just kidding — that comparison was a terrible one to make!)

        Liked by 1 person

    • smbabbitt 10:53 pm on September 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Just ran across this (from LOVE’S LABOURS LOST) in an old advertisement for a new book of quotations:
      Moth. [Aside to COSTARD.] They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps.
      Costard. O! they have lived long on the almsbasket of words. I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word; for thou art not so long by the head as honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier swallowed than a flap-dragon.

      Liked by 3 people

    • smbabbitt 10:56 pm on September 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry, should have been LABOUR’S

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:45 pm on September 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

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