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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on August 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Battle of the sexes, , , , , , Oscar Wilde, , , , , , ,   

    ROMANCE WASN’T BUILT IN A DAY 

    To a romantic girl, all roads lead to Romeo. –Evan Esar

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    August is ROMANCE AWARENESS MONTH. I’m not sure why a month is needed to raise awareness of romance (a week, or even a day, seems more than sufficient to awaken all but the most world-weary of libidos)….however, if it must take a month, I suppose August will do as well as any other. But then who needs Valentine’s Day  — enough is enough!

    That may sound tantamount to telling Cupid to take a hike, but before you Romeos and Juliets go Roman off in a huff, be aware I have nothing against romance so long as it doesn’t get out of hand….which, as it happens, makes the title of my previous post (DON’T LOSE YOUR HEAD) appear as if I’d simultaneously had today’s post in mind. Alas, I am not that far-sighted, but as a killer of two birds with one stone, and as a preview of coming attractions, I must admit the title was prescient (and I assure you that the two birds killed weren’t lovebirds).

    Anyway, what can I say about romance that hasn’t already been intimated by many others? Not much, I’m happy to say, because it comports with my creative energy level in these dog days of August. Therefore, I shall turn to those others who have already waxed eloquent about puppy love and the like, and relieve myself of further arduous cogitation:

    Love is the emotion that a woman always feels for a poodle, and sometimes for a man. –George Jean Nathan

    Romance has been elegantly defined as the offspring of fiction and love. –Disraeli

    Marriage is a romance in which the heroine dies in the first chapter. –Cecelia Egan

    This guy goes to a psychiatrist and says, Doc, my brother’s crazy! He thinks he’s a chicken. The doc says, Well, why don’t you turn him in? And the guy says, I would but I need the eggs. I guess that’s how I feel about relationships. They’re totally irrational, crazy and absurd, but we keep going through it because we need the eggs. –Woody Allen

    Love is like an hourglass, with the heart filling up as the brain empties. –Jules Renard

    The realist always falls in love with a girl he has grown up with, the romanticist with a girl from “off somewhere.” –Robert Frost

    Fools rush in where bachelors fear to wed. –Evan Esar

    Men always want to be a woman’s first love. That is their clumsy vanity. Women have a more subtle instinct: what they like is to be a man’s last romance. –Oscar Wilde

    By the time you swear you’re his, shivering and sighing,
    And he vows his passion is infinite, undying —
    Lady, make a note of this: One of you is lying.

    –Dorothy Parker

    Nobody will ever win the battle of the sexes. There’s too much fraternizing with the enemy. –Henry Kissinger

    In as much as we began this romantic excursion with several punning allusions to Rome, it seems fitting to close with scenes from one of my favorite films, the Audrey Hepburn-Gregory Peck romantic comedy, ROMAN HOLIDAY (1953):

     
    • arekhill1 10:56 am on August 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “You can tell if you’re in love if all of your emotions can be described exactly by the lyrics of popular songs.”

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:54 am on August 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know who whose quote that is, but perhaps the last person you’d think it applies to was the acerbic satirist Dorothy Parker….and yet she wrote the lyrics to this love song sung by Billie Holiday, backed by the great Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra:

        Like

    • Don Frankel 6:47 pm on August 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes and a great clip of Roman Holiday. Love that Song too.

      Acerbic one minute dreaming the next, sounds like maybe somebody was in love.

      Like

      • mistermuse 8:39 pm on August 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. It sounds as if you’ve seen ROMAN HOLIDAY, but if not, I highly recommend it — it’s a great movie.
        Dorothy Parker was married to her second husband (Alan Campbell, a bisexual) from 1934 to 1947, so when she wrote I WISHED ON THE MOON in 1935, she may well have been in love, even though (according to Wikipedia) she said he was “queer as a billy goat” (or maybe she just had a fondness for goats).

        Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 8:44 am on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Love these, especially the Oscar Wilde quote 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jane 9:44 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always been a bit of an Audrey Hepburn fan (OK, maybe a big fan) and I’ve watched Roman Holiday many times. Gregory Peck is a favourite too. I can’t help being sad at the end of watching it though. Love, responsibility…it’s not easy. A lot in life is all about compromise. Romance is delightful. Real life gets tricky. I think the Dorothy Parker quote probably struck a chord with me most! Now that I’m approaching 50, I think I appreciate Joni Mitchell’s song, “Both Sides Now.” 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:57 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Jane, your well-observed comment deserves a more complete response than the rather hasty one I dashed off last night. I agree (although many politicians sadly think otherwise) that “A lot of life is all about compromise.” And I equally agree (my humorous/satirical post to the contrary) that “Romance is delightful” and there are few better movies that exemplify that than ROMAN HOLIDAY. Real life indeed gets tricky, as is so bittersweetly depicted in that film.

        And speaking of “delightful,” your thoughtful reply certainly qualifies. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jane 7:23 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink

          Thank you, Mistermuse, for the equally thoughtful and delightful responses. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:05 pm on August 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You can’t go wrong with a Dorothy Parker quote. I written about her and/or the Algonquin Round Table (of which she was a big part) several times, and may do so again before long (she has a birthday coming up on Aug. 22).

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 9:11 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great post, and I love the quotes and the video – Italian cinematography is exquisite.

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 9:22 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, half of my comment just got posted, but I haven’t finished yet 🙂 Audrey Hepburn is an exquisite actress, and she fits in Italian settings like no one other non-Italian actress. Still, my favorite romantic movies are Italian, and I love the music from these movies. Old timer I am 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:40 am on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Another romantic American film set in Italy that you might like is SUMMERTIME (1955), starring Katherine (rather than Audrey) Hepburn as an American on holiday in Venice, co-starring Rossano Brazzi. 🙂

      Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 10:16 pm on August 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Pretty funny. Who knew Kissinger was such a wit! Happy romancing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:37 am on August 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you. We’ve both spoken of Kissinger in the past tense (“WAS such a wit”), but he’s still alive at age 93. Let’s hope people don’t speak of us in the past tense when we’ve seen better days! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • D. Wallace Peach 8:27 am on August 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well, he was a wit when he said it. Didn’t mean to imply he was dead. Hopefully, he’s still just as sharp-witted today. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 9:35 pm on August 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It seems strange to need romance awareness month, and yet we do have February 14 as a day devoted to romance. And I always wished there were nicer weather for that day. I guess now there is — for a whole month!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:16 am on August 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Where I live, August is too much of a ‘nice weather’ thing (heat & humidity). I vote for May (meeting halfway between Feb. & August) to celebrate both Valentine’s Day and Romance Awareness Month.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , commercialization, , , , Napoleon Bonaparte, , Oscar Wilde, , , , , ,   

    HUMOR INCORPORATED 

    Humor must both teach and preach if it would live forever; by forever, I mean 30 years.
    –Mark Twain

    If Webster’s definition of humor as the “quality of imagination quick to perceive the ludicrous or express itself in an amusing way” is on the mark, Twain underestimated the staying power of his humor by nigh onto 100 years (and counting). But “staying” is just one of humor’s possible powers, and because (as Lord Acton famously observed) power tends to corrupt, humor cannot absolutely avoid Acton’s axiom.

    My musing on this subject is occasioned by April being National Humor Month — so proclaimed in 1976 by Larry Wilde, Founder/Director of The Carmel Institute of Humor: http://www.larrywilde.com/

    As you might expect, The Carmel Institute of Humor is not without serious competition. A similar entity I’ve come across is The Humor Project, Inc., founded by Joel Goodman in 1977 “as the first organization in the world to focus full-time on the positive power of humor” — a claim that suggests a merger of Norman Vincent Peale’s “The Power of Positive Thinking” with funny business. And, from such appealing funny businesses as Goodman’s, have big businesses grown (judging by their “power” promotions): https://www.humorproject.com/

    Now, far be it from me to regard the corporatizing of humor as a phony business — hey, there are worse things to make of humor than a commodity, and worse ways to earn a buck than to commercialize the process. But, purist that I am, I see making humor in the same light as making love: much to be preferred on a human level than as an industry (the virtues of consumer capitalism notwithstanding). Nonetheless, I’m not so doctrinaire as to deny either humor or sex to potential customers when free(?) enterprise comes a-courting.

    Unlike Larry Wilde and Joel Goodman, mistermuse does not have a Speaker’s Bureau, a three-day Annual Conference (discounted fee for early registration), a five-point humor program, seminars or workshops. But mistermuse does offer an every-five-days discourse on subjects of interest (his, if not yours) — usually with tongue in cheek, and never with hat in hand. Dis course today concludes with ten humorous quotes, which come with a funny-back guarantee if he doesn’t think they’re priceless:

    Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same.Oscar Wilde (not to be confused with Larry – or Curly or Moe, for that matter)
    Conference: a meeting held to decide when the next meeting will take place. –Evan Esar
    You can’t study comedy; it’s within you. –Don Rickles (the Donald Trump of insult-comics)
    Start every day off with a smile and get it over with. –W.C. Fields
    Everything is funny, as long as it’s happening to somebody else. –Will Rogers
    Culture is roughly anything we do and monkeys don’t. –Lord Raglan
    In politics, an absurdity is not a handicap. –Napoleon Bonesapart (I’ve been waiting a long time for the opportunity to butcher that name)
    Politicians do more funny things naturally than I can think of doing purposely. –Will Rogers
    Humor is just another defense against the universe. –Mel Brooks
    Wit – the salt with which the American humorist spoils his intellectual cookery by leaving it out. –Ambrose Bierce

    Over, and out.

     

     
    • Cynthia Jobin 9:52 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Why do some people have to ruin the best things in life by turning them into a National Month or an institution/organization of some sort? I thoroughly enjoyed this post, and being partial to the more sardonic (sarcastic? satirical?) edges of humor, was glad to see some of my favorites featured…Oscar Wilde, W.C. Fields, Ambrose Bierce, and of course, Mark Twain.
      On the distaff side, one of my favorites is Dorothy Parker. I offer this bon mot of hers when she was hanging out with her fellow wits challenging each other to compose a funny sentence using the word “horticulture”….Parker’s contribution was: “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:28 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I love Dorothy Parker’s wit and probably should have included a Parker quote, but I’d set myself a limit of ten and liked the ten I’d chosen (plus, I think I already used that great quote before, though it certainly would’ve fit well here, and I thank you for offering it).

      To me, the quote that surprised me the most (in that I didn’t expect such profundity from the likes of Mel Brooks – what’s more, in so few words) was his “Humor is just another defense against the universe.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:03 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like the Rickles quote. Well, I like all of them, but that one has always struck me as true. I would love to be funny, but just don’t have the gene. Fortunately, we don’t have to be funny ourselves to enjoy good wit and a belly laugh 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Fat people take heart – the bigger the belly, the more capacity to laugh! No wonder Santa Claus is so jolly! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 11:09 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Humor is what separates humans from animals. That, and making tools. And not being afraid of vacuum cleaners.

      Like

      • mistermuse 12:21 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Such separation is fortunate indeed, otherwise animals would be laughing themselves silly at what fools we humans be.

        Like

    • Garfield Hug 11:26 am on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great share 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:23 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Share and share a like, I always say. 🙂

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 8:42 pm on April 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      One good belly laugh extends human life by one year ( My daughter the nurse .)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Todd Duffey Writes on Things 11:21 am on April 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Why do witticisms always come from people at least two generations before ours? Those people were way ahead of their time…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:06 pm on April 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      As one of those people born more than two generations before this one, I thank you for the tribute. 🙂 Seriously, though, I think there still are such people – they just don’t get the recognition they did in the days before mass instant gratification “re-conditioned” us and became the norm. Wit demands at least a bit of reflection. Who does that anymore?

      Like

    • Don Frankel 11:30 am on April 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.” Mark Twain. My hero.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:30 pm on April 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I would stand corrected if I didn’t happen to agree (well, except for politicians – they’ve been withstanding the assault of laughter since most of them evolved from baboons).

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    • Don Frankel 7:03 am on April 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No Muse you’re right. Laughing at elected officials is actually a healthy sign of a society and poking fun is a good thing too. But when they are cooked and ushered off the stage laughter is the last thing they hear. Think Anthony Weiner here and Nixon too.

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:42 am on April 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Good point, Don. We in the West take our freedom to laugh at politicians for granted. Any North Korean who dared so much as think about laughing at President Kim Jung-un wouldn’t live to think again.

      Like

  • mistermuse 5:03 pm on December 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Oscar Wilde,   

    ACT NOW! 

    Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today. –Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * *  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I’m not big on New Year’s resolutions. I mean, what is there about a resolution on New Year’s day that couldn’t just as well, if not better, be undertaken any day — like today? For example, if you’re a couch potato with overlapping buns, why wait until January 1 to start dieting and exercising?

    Or, if you’re a nine months pregnant woman, why would you wait until a January 1st due date, when you could get to work now on producing a tax deduction for this year? Time is money! Really — which do you believe is more likely to deliver the goods: the title of this post, or the title of this song:

    Still not convinced? Consider these pearls of wisdom; they won’t make you more resolute, but this article is too short for me to stop now (or it would be, if I were getting paid by the word):

    New Year’s Day is now the accepted time to make your regular annual good resolutions. Next week you can begin paving hell with them as usual. –Mark Twain

    Good resolutions are simply checks that men draw on a bank where they have no account. –Oscar Wilde

    A New Year’s resolution is something that goes in one year and out the other. –Anonymous

    New Year’s resolutions should be taken with a grain of salt — and two aspirins. –Evan Esar

    A man and his resolution are soon parted. –Evan Esar

     
    • Michaeline Montezinos 7:45 pm on December 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I could not have said this any better, mistermuse. Great post and it makes good sense. I did make three “New Year” resolutions in February of 2014. And I did keep two of them; still working on turning the jelly buns into buns of steel. Did I ever tell you that you are one of my favorite guys? No need to worry…I have several favorite guys., including my better half. He is not the jealous type, either.

      Like

    • arekhill1 7:56 pm on December 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’ll drink to that.

      Like

      • Michaeline Montezinos 8:06 pm on December 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Have one for me, arekill 1, since I am trying to stay away from adult beverages. Happy New Year to you and your loved ones, my partner in rhyme and one of my favorite guys.:-)

        Like

    • mistermuse 8:49 pm on December 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Cheers and good resolutions to you both. As a reward for your faithful patronage, you are each hereby granted free admission to my blog for the next 100 years (I’d make it longer, but my lease expires in 2114).

      Like

    • ladysighs 8:14 am on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I always make them and wish that I could keep them.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:15 am on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I never break them (because I never make them).

      Like

      • Michaeline Montezinos 3:25 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t usually make those resolutions because it can cause brain confusions.
        Yet this year my brain got creased; so I resolved not be deceased.

        Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 3:28 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      OOPS! this should read:
      I don’t usually make resolutions because it can cause brain confusions,
      Yet, this year my brain got creased; so I resolved to be not deceased.

      Like

      • mistermuse 4:33 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        I hope that your crease gets ironed out, Michaeline, and that you wear 2015 well.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 3:40 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      My New Year’s Resolution is to never make New Year’s Resolutions. I haven’t broken it yet.

      That’s a great I never heard it before recording from Sinatra. Way to go Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:24 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Don, that Sinatra song is from a 1939 Charles Boyer/Irene Dunn film titled LOVE AFFAIR, which was remade in 1957 as AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER, and remade again in 1994. Nowadays, it would be classified as a “chick flick,” but the original was well done (six Academy Award nominations) and still holds up fairly well. I haven’t seen the remakes.

      Like

      • Michaeline Montezinos 10:37 pm on December 30, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Muse, I don’t recall seeing the original LOVE AFFAIR with Mr. Boyer and Ms Dunn but I may have. I am a big fan of TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES. I did enjoy Frank Sinatra’s songs you posted awhile ago. I think I am giving away my birth certificate age. However I still like Michele is 39. I think the one song Sinatra sangYOU MAKE ME FEEL SO YOUNG plus the way he stylized it is just an incredible sign of how very talented he was.
        I am glad you have these recordings; please keep them until you are 100, Capisz?

        Like

    • mistermuse 6:16 am on December 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I heard on the news yesterday that LPs are making a comeback. If that continues, all my Sinatra LPs may actually be worth some money (not that I plan on getting rid of them).

      Like

  • mistermuse 8:51 am on October 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Clare Booth Luce, , , , , , Oscar Wilde, phrase inversion, Samuel Johnson, ,   

    IT IS BETTER TO AMUSE A FOOL THAN FOOL A MUSE 

    I’ll bet you don’t know what the above title is an example of….I mean, besides an example of a title.  And far be it from me to intend it as an example of an insult, or an insult of an example. It’s called chiasmus, which is defined as a rhetorical inversion of two parallel phrases. Friends, is this blog an education, or is this education a blog, or what?

    Truth be told, I likewise had never heard of the word until I bought a book with the fascinating title NEVER LET A FOOL KISS YOU OR A KISS FOOL YOU, by Dr. Mardi Gras (my “made-in” name for Dr. Mardy Grothe — sorry about that). Of course, I’d read chiasmus for years not knowing what they’re called. As Dr. Grothe points out, profound thinkers and great wits have long been masters of the form: Shakespeare, Winston Churchill, Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Ben Franklin, Mark Twain, Dorothy Parker and Anonymous, to name more than a few.

    No doubt you too are familiar with some of the following chiasmus, but with the likes of these, if familiarity breeds contempt, you may have contempt for the familiar….or, more likely, I’m guilty of stretching a chiasmus / making much ado about nothing. Or something.

    I wasted time, and now doth time waste me. -Shakespeare (King Richard II)

    The desire of the man is for the woman, but the desire of the woman is for the desire of the man. –Germaine de Stael

    I find Peale appalling and Paul appealing. –Democratic Governor/Presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson (comparing conservative Minister/author Norman Vincent Peale and the Apostle Paul)

    In the bluegrass region / A paradox was born: / The corn was full of kernels / And the colonels were full of corn. -John Marshall

    I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. -Randy Hanzlick

    When you have nothing to say, say nothing. -Charles Caleb Colton

    Don’t worry that other people don’t know you; worry that you don’t know other people. -Confucius

    A fool often fails because he thinks what is difficult is easy, and a wise man because he thinks what is easy is difficult. -John Churton Collins

    Friendship is love minus sex plus reason. Love is friendship plus sex minus reason. -Mason Cooley

    No woman has ever so comforted the distressed — or so distressed the comfortable. -Clare Booth Luce, on Eleanor Roosevelt

    Your manuscript is both good and original, but the part that is good is not original, and the part that is original is not good. -Dr. Samuel Johnson, to an aspiring writer

    Boy meets girl; girl gets boy into pickle; boy gets pickle into girl. -Jack Woodford, on typical plot of Hollywood movies 

    That’s all for the present. I thank all present, and recommend the book as a present to all.

     

     
    • Joseph Nebus 8:55 pm on October 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know the name for that kind of sentence structure but am glad to know it.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:33 pm on October 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’d be surprised if anyone but a few knew. Who knew? Maybe the new gnu in the zoo knew, as gnus travels fast there (they’re a kind of antelope, you know).

      Like

    • arekhill1 10:04 am on October 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      It sounds vaguely like a disease name, so no wonder only the truly erudite such as yourself are bold enough to use it.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:30 am on October 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Ricardo. A muse has to do what a muse has to do.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 pm on March 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Book of Kells, , , , Importance of Being Earnest, , , , , Oscar Wilde, , , satiric masterpieces, St. Patrick, ,   

    DON’T BLAME ME — I’M IRISH (PART FOUR) 

    I contemplated concluding this four-part series with thoughts and reminisences on my tour of the Emerald Isle some thirty years ago, but I have so many fond memories that I lack the time, and perhaps the words, to do them justice. Besides, recounting personal vacation trips is a dubious proposition of boring potential at best, so I’ll spare you (and me) the task, and go instead with a few swigs of St. Patrick’s Day trivia and a wee bit of Irish Lit, writ and wit.

    Let’s start with St. Patrick himself. One might assume that St. Patricks Day is celebrated on March 17 because that’s his birthday, but in fact, his exact birth date is unknown. March 17 is the day he died (in the year 461).

    The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place in NYC on March 17, 1762. For more on this and other things Irish, click on these short video clips:

    http://www.history.com/topics/st-patricks-day/history-of-st-patricks-day/videos/nyc

    As for Irish Lit, one of the earliest surviving manuscripts is the painstakingly crafted and astonishingly beautiful Book of Kells (circa 800), which I had the pleasure of viewing at Dublin’s Trinity College Library. See for yourself at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Kells

    Ireland, of course, has produced some of the greatest satirists and masterpieces of wit in history, including Jonathan Swift (Gulliver’s Travels), Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest), George Bernard Shaw (Pygmalion, on which My Fair Lady is based), and John Millington Synge (The Playboy of the Western World). Excellent movies (and some not-so-excellent re-makes) have been made of all, and I close with a quote or a clip from each:

    The tiny Lilliputians surmise that Gulliver’s watch may be his God, because it is that which, he admits, he seldom does anything without consulting.  –Gulliver’s Travels (1939)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eymdx4xomM  –The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EADz07k_wXU  –Pygmalion (1938)

    …if it’s a poor thing to be lonesome, it’s worse maybe to go mixing with the fools of earth.  –The Playboy of the Western World (1962)

    May this St. Patrick’s Day find you neither lonesome nor with the fools of earth.

     
    • arekhill1 1:45 pm on March 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Been years since I read the Playboy of the Western World. thanks for reminding me of it.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:07 pm on March 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I own a two-record (33 1/3 rpm) box set of the play recorded by Cyril Cusack (who played the playboy) Productions of Dublin in 1955. The accompanying booklet relates how the play’s first performance in Dublin in 1907 caused a riot because, as the Irish Times wrote, “the majority of theatregoers are not accustomed to remoreless truth.” The 1911 American premiere caused “one of the noisiest rows ever seen in a New York theatre.”

      I find it extremely interesting that one of the play’s champions was none other than ex-President Teddy Roosevelt, who wrote that “The little crowd of denaturalized Irishmen who tried to prevent the performance of The Playboy of the Western World by the Irish players in New York City have succeeded in doing precisely what was needed to bring the play to public attention.”

      How much, and yet how little, people and times have changed since then.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 4:53 pm on March 6, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , love of writing, , , Oscar Wilde, , , writer quotes, ,   

    WRITE OF PASSAGE 

    There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.
    –Ernest Hemingway 

    Before becoming an internet blogger several years ago, I had been a much-published “typewriter” poet and writer for over twenty years in various literary journals and magazines….yet I don’t recall ever being asked why I write. Perhaps the motivation is obvious. I write because I’m a writer — writing is in my blood. The reason I write is akin to the answer Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid) gave Rick (Humphrey Bogart) in CASABLANCA: We might as well question why we breathe.

    This is not to say that everyone who writes is a writer who must write. Just as there are all kinds of people, there are all kinds of writers with all kinds of agendas, many of whom (from a passion standpoint) appear more agenda-driven than writing-driven….and that’s all well and good, though I’m not sure you can have it both ways and call yourself a creative writer. It seems to me that anyone who doesn’t love writing for its own sake is not on the same page as a creative writer….and it seems that I am not alone in that opinion:

    A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.
    –Maya Angelou

    The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug. –Mark Twain

    We live and breathe words. It was books that made me feel that perhaps I was not completely alone. They could be honest with me, and I with them. Reading your words, what you wrote, how you were lonely sometimes and afraid, but always brave; the way you saw the world….  –Cassandra Clare

    Fantasy is hardly an excape from reality. It’s a way of understanding it.
    –Lloyd Alexander

    There is no such thing as a moral or immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all.  —Oscar Wilde

    Or maybe that isn’t all. There are many more quotes from writers worth repeating, and I expect I’ll be repeating some of them sometime soon.

     
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