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  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: aging, Charles Bukowski, , , , , , Faith Baldwin, Hans Christian Andesen, , , , , Martin Amis, , , , , Vincent Van Gough, William Faulkner   

    IT’S ABOUT TIME AGAIN 

    Time is a dressmaker specializing in alterations. –Faith Baldwin

    A year ago today, I published a post titled IT’S ABOUT TIME which, as it happens, was about time. That post featured songs about time, such as TIME WAITS FOR NO ONE (which is all about time playing the role of an impatient gadabout). For this year’s edition, with Daylight Saving Time coming up this upcoming weekend, I thought I’d save myself time by posting quotes, like the Baldwin above, that carry on the time theme (which almost rhymes with crime scene, which is a site where it is suspected a pun has been committed in bad Faith). So, without further ado, it’s time to get down to cases:

    Things money can’t buy: Time. Inner peace. Character. Manners. Respect. Morals. Trust. Patience. Class. Dignity. –Roy T. Bennett [almost identical with ‘Things on Trump’s Top Ten Never To Do list’]

    I have no faith in human perfectibility. Man is now only more active – not more wise – than he was 6,000 years ago. –Edgar Allan Poe [man “more active” in Poe’s time? Of course he was — humans had yet to become Couch Po(e)tatoes]

    Throughout history man’s inventions have been timesavers — then came television [100 years post-Poe]. –Evan Esar

    I’m afraid of time…I mean I’m afraid of not having enough time — time to understand people, how they really are, or to be understood myself. I’m afraid of the quick judgments or mistakes everybody makes. You can’t fix them without time. –Ann Brashares

    It is looking at things for a long time that ripens you and gives you a deeper meaning. –Vincent Van Gough

    I am almost a hundred years old; waiting for the end, and thinking about the beginning. There are things I need to tell you, but would you listen if I told you how quickly time passes? –Meg Rosoff

    The past is never dead. It’s not even past. –William Faulkner

    It takes a lifetime to die and no time at all. –Charles Bukowski

    And meanwhile time goes about its immemorial work of making everyone look and feel like shit. –Martin Amis

    Enjoy life. There’s plenty of time to be dead. –Hans Christian Andersen

    Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time. –Jorge Luis Borges

    Over the silent sands of time they go/lovers come/lovers go/and all that there is to know/lovers know/only lovers know. –“Sands Of Time” lyrics, from 1955 film KISMET

     

     

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:02 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Loved the quotes, but I REALLY loved the video. Kismet is one of my favorite scores – only coincidentally the first professional show I ever saw (with Alfred Drake and the original cast!!!) – a gift from my wonderful mother when I was a theatre-obsessed youngster.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:06 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I absolutely agree re KISMET. Not only is it one of my favorite scores, but one of my favorite musicals (the film version is highly underappreciated, in my opinion). I own the original Broadway cast album and film sound track album — both Alfred Drake and Howard Keel are magnificent!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 10:50 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink

          Back in my acting days my dream role was Lalume – but it was never produced during the years I was acting, so I didn’t even get to audition for it.

          I love everything about the show as well – and the Wright & Forrest lyrics for the Borodin source material were delightfully on the money. God bless my mother for insisting that my father pop for the tickets. I’m sure he thought they were a huge waste of money for kids (my next oldest brother was taken as well). In my case, obviously, nothing could have been farther from the truth. I can still recall almost every moment, decades later and can sing along with every song in the entire score.

          I had the original cast album as well, and played it often. Unfortunately, none of my albums made it through one of my many moves (early Beetle albums as well). I actually wept when I unpacked and realized they were missing – didn’t even have a list!
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 7:16 am on March 11, 2017 Permalink

          Love your ‘back’ story — thanks for taking time to share it.

          P.S. I dig your “father pop for the tickets” pun. Keep it up and one day you’ll become as notorious a punster as yours too-ly. 😦

          Like

    • scifihammy 5:37 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Seems like everything’s covered here – except Time on your hands. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:18 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        If you’re speaking of the song TIME ON MY HANDS, I’ll try to remember to include it in my 3/10/2018 post. It’s not that there wasn’t time to include it here or in my 3/10/16 post — it’s just that there are too many great ‘time’ songs to cover in two posts! 🙂

        P.S. As for “Time on your hands” personally, I don’t have any — at least, none EXTRA!

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 9:18 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink

          haha I was referring to your PS rather than the song, which I don’t know.
          Most of us don’t have enough Time, let alone any left over for our hands! 😀

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:37 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Tide doesn’t wait either. But this can’t be complete without.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:33 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks to CASABLANCA, “As Time Goes By” is probably the most famous ‘time’ song ever written. But I suspect few people know that the song wasn’t written for the movie — it first appeared in the 1931 theater musical EVERYBODY’S WELCOME. The composer, Herman Hupfeld, wrote over 100 songs, but this was his only big hit, and doubtless would have become long forgotten if not for CASABLANCA.

        Like

    • Garfield Hug 8:19 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      👍👍👍

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:59 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      But now the television has been supplanted by the computer, Sr. Muse, a device on which you can work and idle simultaneously.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:33 am on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The difference is that I seldom fall asleep at my computer, but frequently do so watching TV. On the other hand, some people probably fall asleep reading my posts — maybe I should market my blog as a cure for insomnia.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 12:25 pm on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the laughs. I get such a kick out of the quotes and the wry take on time. So many good ones, but I have to say the one by Hans Christian Andersen is my favorite. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:49 pm on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I must say this is probably one of the best batches of quotes I’ve ever put together…and speaking of “together,” I love the Jorge Luis Borges quote because, in its depth, it is to romance like love is to infatuation.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 1:54 pm on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      No one could fall asleep reading your posts, Mr. Muse! Too busy thinking! 🙂 Thanks for the music vids. . . I like the one from Casablanca, too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 3:14 pm on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Carmen. If my posts cause people to think, maybe it’s because they’re aimed higher than Trump’s half-cocked tweets….but then, I have an unfair advantage — I have a ‘refined’ (yet down-to-earth) audience.

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 9:02 pm on March 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You find the best quotes! Even when they’re a bit depressing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:05 am on March 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you. Some of the quotes are depressing (and some aren’t), but I always look for the best and wisest quotes relative to the subject matter of my post….and in this case, I wouldn’t have done the subject (TIME) justice if I’d left out the depressing ones.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: aging, , , comedy of manners, , , , loneliness, , , THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, trust, ,   

    THE IMPORTANCE OF QUOTING ERNEST 

    Did you fathom that the title of my last post (THE OLD MAN AND THE SEASON) was a play on Ernest Hemingway’s last completed novel, THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA? Because that post was about aging and autumn, perhaps I was remiss in not including a Hemingway quote (such as the first one below) among those I gathered for the occasion.

    This post will attempt to make up for that shortfall with a selection of Hemingway quotes, starting with this autumn-appropriate eulogy he wrote for a friend:

    Best of all he loved the fall/the leaves yellow on cottonwoods/leaves floating on trout streams/and above the hills/the high blue windless skies./Now he will be part of them forever.

    For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.

    The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.

    There is nothing to writing. All you have to do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed. 

    When you go to war as a boy, you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed, not you… Then, when you are badly wounded, you lose that illusion, and you know it can happen to you.

    In modern war, there is nothing sweet nor fitting in your dying. You will die like a dog for no good reason.

    True nobility is being superior to your former self.

    No weapon has ever settled a moral problem. 

    Writing, at its best, is a lonely life. For he does his work alone and if he is a good enough writer he must face eternity, or the lack of it, each day.

    There is no lonelier man, except the suicide, than that man who has lived with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other, there can be no happy end to it.

    But hold on — happy or not, this isn’t the end. The title of this post is another play on words, this being Oscar Wilde’s peerless comedy of manners titled THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST….a parody of Victorian age social standing previewed in this trailer for the 1952 film (not to be confused with the inferior 2002 remake) of the Wilde play:

    Now (as the movie says when it’s over) this is THE END

     
    • linnetmoss 7:15 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, Michael Redgrave! What a great cast this version has. Thanks for the trailer 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:34 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great cast, great movie. Just seeing the trailer makes me want to watch the whole film again!

      Like

    • arekhill1 9:59 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      While I am not sufficiently versed in Hemingway, not having read any since my extreme youth, the competitors in the Bad Hemingway Contest have always had my respect: http://articles.latimes.com/1987-04-09/news/vw-142_1_bright-boy

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 11:18 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great stuff Muse. And, I got the reference to the the Old Man and The Season. But a slight correction on that. The Old Man and The Sea was the last novel Hemingway wrote while he was alive. He wrote a whole bunch of novels after he was dead. None of them were any good. But let’s cut Papa a little slack as it must be tough writing when you’re dead. I mean it’s hard enough when you’re alive.

      In case people reading this don’t understand, his last wife Mary, kept finding manuscripts in the attic that Papa had never published. Either he didn’t publish them because they weren’t very good or the people who wrote them using his name weren’t very good. Take your pick.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:52 am on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree that it must be tough writing when you’re dead, Don — for one thing, you get terribly stiff, and it has to be hard to type with stiff fingers. The light can’t be too good six feet under, either. But at least he didn’t need no ghost writer, because he was one himself.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Don Frankel 4:23 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink

          Great one Muse. He was his own Ghost Writer.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:52 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Singielka, thank you for your “Like” — this is just to let you know that I tried to submit a comment on one of your blog posts, but it didn’t go through (something about an insecure connection). Sorry.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:40 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        How lovely of you to attempt to follow up, and to comment that you did so. I get a more than a few folks whose online presence is impossible to access or locate – but I lack the time to leave them each a comment once I’ve tried and failed. I’m impressed.

        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 10:06 pm on October 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve never cared for Ernest Hemingway’s works and it was a suffering to have to put up with them when they were assigned in English classes. Oscar Wilde, on the other hand, is a real favorite of mine. I loved reading The Importance of Being Earnest, and was part of a group that performed the original stage play in college….what great lines! Very interesting, the trailer you show here; I never happened to see “Earnest” as a movie. It seems it is a perennial.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 7:59 am on October 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I also love the Wilde wit (wild wit too, for that matter) — unfortunately, each succeeding younger generation seems less connected to an appreciation of such wordly delights….and “more’s the pity” (to repeat a phrase I used in my last post). BTW, I now find that the 1952 & 2002 films aren’t the only versions of the play; there was a 1986 remake as well. I think all three can be viewed online in their entirety.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sarita 7:56 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 10:09 pm on October 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’m not sure what you mean. If you mean why don’t I click Like, I don’t see where I can click Like on your posts. Apparently your internet connection is incompatible with mine. In any case, I do not have sufficient computer expertise to know what to do about it. Sorry.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mél@nie 7:38 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      EXCELLENT post, Monsieur Muse… I always love your puns & intellectual “blendings”… 🙂

      I love Oscar Wilde’s works – he is one of the titans of world’s literature, and you certainly know he passed-away in Paris – his “chosen” city…(I saw his tomb in Père Lachaise cemetery) btw, he’s still present in Paris these days: 🙂
      http://www.rtl.fr/culture/arts-spectacles/oscar-wilde-l-impertinent-absolu-est-a-decouvrir-au-petit-palais-7785456107

      • * *

      speakin’ of “papa Hemingway”, he’s been one of my favourite-US writers since high-school… I visited his villa in Key West a few years ago… you may have read my blog-post:
      https://myvirtualplayground.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/ernesto-mi-amor/

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mél@nie 7:40 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        P.S. désolée, but I forgot WP does NOT accept 2 links in the same comment… 🙂 that’s why, my comment is awaiting moderation… 🙂

        Like

      • mistermuse 11:34 am on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I knew Wilde died in Paris, but your link filled in details I did not know. Merci!

        P.S. I do recall reading your Key West post & recommend your 2nd link to those who haven’t.

        Liked by 1 person

    • D. Wallace Peach 6:52 pm on October 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hemingway has some great quotes. Bleeding on the typewriter is a favorite as well as the one about trust. Oh, and the eulogy is beautiful. And the one about no happy end to love. And….

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:21 am on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree. I would add the one about being superior to your former self. Sorry to interject politics into this, but could there be a clearer example of not being superior to your former self (i.e. not growing as a human being) than the Republican candidate for President of the U.S.?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Mark Scheel 5:09 pm on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,

      The typewriter and bleeding–or some version of it–is more likely from Red Smith, the great sports writer. Although many have been credited with some variation. Yeah, I got the first Hemingway word play. He was one of my favorite authors early on and I studied his work endlessly–even into grad school. The comments on being dead and writing–were you aware that there’s a fellow who channels Hemingway and did a book on the conversations? It’s utterly fascinating–if it isn’t Hemingway’s ghost talking, it’s a remarkable imitation! Well, I won’t comment on the Trump allusions, just let the renewed e-mail discoveries and coming Wiki-Leaks dumps lead where they may! LOL

      Good post, muse!

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 5:50 pm on October 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No, I wasn’t aware of the fellow who channels Hemingway — he must be English (if you think that pun was bad, wait till you see my next post). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 2:48 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Clever title. Wilde was a childhood favorite, but I never really warmed up to Hemingway. For me, a small book of quotes is about all I can get through where he is concerned – so thanks for yours.

      The comments on this post were fun to read too – and I love your theme (blog look) – which one is it?
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
      – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:36 pm on December 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks. I try to respond to comments with ‘in kind’ (as opposed to generic) replies, as I feel that anyone who takes the trouble to read what I have to say and to comment specifically (as opposed to generically) deserves a thoughtful reply.

      As for Hemingway, I think he captures the meaning of inspiration perfectly with the quote that ends “Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.”

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: aging, , , , , , , October, , , ,   

    THE OLD MAN AND THE SEASON 

     

    In the unscheduled post which appeared here on my birthday (October 18th), my youngest daughter let the cat out of the bag — her old dog of a dad had just turned certifiably ancient, though I didn’t feel more than a day older than I did on October 17 as a young pup of 79. More’s the pity. Some say age is only a number….but it goes without saying that October is autumn. Yes, if you look at the calendar, September and November lay claim to autumn as well, but let’s be clear — nobody does autumn as well as October. So this will be a post of poems and quotes about aging and autumn, in that order (age before beauty).

    AGE DEPLORE(s) BEAUTY

    What passed for time
    Before time was invented?
    Before there was time,
    How was time prevented?

    If time had a beginning,
    When did time start?
    When it’s time that time end,
    How will time depart?

    Why are there times
    When time frustrates and vexes….
    And last, why must time
    Do its thing to the sexes?

    THE BIG FIX

    While passing through,
    I noticed that
    this world is too much.
    What big teeth it has.
    What big eyes you need.
    What big talk is heard.
    Speak to me.
    But not big.

    I OF THE BE OLDER

    If you think
    I take life
    too seriously you

    are either

    a night and
    day younger than
    I am or

    I do.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I am so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers. –L.M. Montgomery

    Listen! The wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves;
    we have had our summer evenings, now for October eves.
    –Humbert Wolfe

    Anyone who thinks fallen leaves are dead has never watched them dancing on a windy day. –Shira Tamir

    The tints of autumn … a mighty flower garden blossoming under the spell of the enchanter frost. –John Greenleaf Whittier

    For anyone who lives in the oak-and-maple area of New England, there is a perennial temptation to plunge into a purple sea of adjectives about October. –Hal Borland  

    Autumn is a second spring where every leaf is a flower. –Albert Camus

    Spring is too rainy and summer’s too hot;
    fall is soon over and winter is not.
    –Evan Esar

    Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns. –George Eliot

    Autumn sunsets exquisitely dying. –Langston Hughes

    Now Autumn’s fire burns slowly along the woods and day by day the dead leaves fall and melt. –William Allingham

    NOTE: There have been many recordings of AUTUMN LEAVES over the years; I chose the French chanteuse Edith Piaf’s version because it was originally a 1945 French song titled “Les Feuilles Mortes”  (“The Dead Leaves”), and because October (1963) is the month Edith Piaf died and drifted by the window.

     

     

     

     

     
    • painkills2 1:43 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I searched and searched the internet for just the right Happy Birthday video. Enjoy 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 8:38 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Birthday. Autumn is a wonderful time of year and life. 🙂 Enjoy.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 11:18 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      ‘Tis the season of big talk, Sr. Muse, so one of your efforts is well said and particularly well-timed.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:55 am on October 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t wait for the voters to turn the biggest talker into the biggest loser. But of course The Donald hates losers, so rather than admit he lost, he’ll claim (as he’s already doing) that the election was rigged. What a guy!

      Like

    • Don Frankel 10:05 am on October 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      The Fix is in Muse. The Fix is in. Nothing we can do about it except squeeze every last drop out of it.
      BTW your daughter did a helluva job there.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:59 am on October 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        All the more “helluva job” when you take into consideration that she has Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, an incurable disease by which physical and/or mental exertion cause extreme fatigue and ‘knock her for a loop’ for several days.

        As for the “Fix is in,” The Donald’s antics would be laughable if they didn’t exacerbate an already over-polarized atmosphere in this country. The immediate aftermath of the election could be very interesting, to say the least.

        Like

    • Mél@nie 11:53 am on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mille merci for Edith Piaf… ❤ here's the most popular version performed by Yves Montand who first recites Jacques Prévert's famous poem:"les feuilles mortes…"

      Liked by 2 people

    • Cynthia Jobin 12:58 pm on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Prévert est un poète que j”aime bien…

      “…Et la vie sépare ceux qui s’aiment,
      Tout doucement, sans faire de bruit.
      Et la mer efface sur le sable,
      Les pas des amants désunis…”

      merci bien d”avoir présenter ce “video”….

      Like

    • Mark Scheel 7:31 pm on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      mistermuse,

      Wonderful tribute–and most educational–by your daughter. And you certainly outdid yourself with the punning poems. Well, that’s your forte. Oh, and yes, belatedly here’s a very happy birthday wish. 🙂

      Mark

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:23 pm on October 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks to all for your comments. May you all age as beautifully as the autumn leaves. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 6:33 pm on October 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Happy belated birthday! I am sure nothing changed two weeks later 🙂
      Love the song Autumn leaves.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:02 am on October 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Just as an aside, the English lyrics for AUTUMN LEAVES (originally a French song) were written by Johnny Mercer, who you no doubt know from his many hit songs such as MOON RIVER, DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES, and BLUES IN THE NIGHT (which gave me the idea for the title of my latest post, BOOS IN THE NIGHT).

      Like

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