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  • mistermuse 12:01 am on December 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: chance, , , , , poem, social issues, ,   

    WINTERDREAM 

    Suppose a homeless man found
    what survived of a tattered old jacket,
    abandoned, like himself, to the elements
    ….and, in that tattered garment,
    crumpled inside a pocket, a winning
    lottery ticket could transform his life.

    But, first he must find it, and then,
    having found it, not toss it aside to be
    blown wherever discarded debris blows.
    Let us further suppose
    the deadline to claim its prize
    came at midnight of that very day.

    Late that night, in winter’s turn,
    he dreamed a new-day dream
    that he could live his life over again,
    knowing as much in his youth as
    he knew now, so that all the choices
    and hidden chances of wasted
    turning points lay exhumed ahead.

    But the thought made him cringe; regret
    was a fire that gave pain without heat.
    He awoke in cold sweat to the taste
    of snow on the cracks of his lips
    and pulled tight around his neck
    the collar of yesterday’s fortune.
    What luck to have found
    a buffer against fate.

     

     

     

     
    • mistermuse 12:04 am on December 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      In the spirit of the not-merry-for-everyone season, I have given this previously published poem a new life here, almost 25 years after I first wrote it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 12:20 pm on December 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      This started me thinking, would I rather find that lottery ticket (I do buy them from time to time) or be able to start over again with today’s knowledge (something I have to admit appeals to me). But in the end, rather than sitting around wondering about either, I am grateful to be where I am with what I have compared to so many other people. Thank you for sharing this lovely poem.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 2:54 pm on December 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I can’t think of a better attitude to have, RMW. What’s done is done – still, I can’t help but question the depth of people of middle age & older who say they have no regrets in life. I find it hard to believe that anyone goes through life without having hurt someone, either by words or deed. This tells me that the “no regret-er” is either a surface person or an “it’s all about me” person to whom others are mere bit players in the movie of his/her life. Lacking such regret, it seems to me, the “no-regret-er” hasn’t earned the right to say “What’s done is done.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:21 pm on December 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Ah Muse a lot of money only gets me in trouble. And, regrets… “I’ve had a few but then again too few to mention.” Do it all over again? Wouldn’t that be Deja Vu all over again?

      “regret was a fire that gave pain without heat” Great line.

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:03 pm on December 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, there IS one thing (love) about which one need have no regrets:

      Liked by 2 people

    • Resa 4:52 pm on December 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Pretty great!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 3:17 pm on December 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Having regrets does come with the territory. Not dwelling on them has to as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:31 pm on December 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Robert Frost pretty much said as much: “In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.”

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , lawyers, , November 30, poem, , punning, , , ,   

    30 NOVEMBER — TO THE SWIFT 

    As 3o days hath the month of November,
    Today marks the end of a month to remember.
    Swift doth the day pass into December,
    Ere the twain shall meet….in a glowing ember.

    The above is my Lilliputian ode to two literary giants who were born on this day: Jonathan Swift  in 1667, Mark Twain in 1835. This post celebrates the former, the latter having been extolled in a post one year ago today (THE UNIVERSAL MARK TWAIN).

    Jonathan Swift’s pièce de résistance, of course, was GULLIVER’S TRAVELS, a book I gobbled up when about 12 years old (in an abridged version for children), and still own. However, at that age I didn’t fully appreciate that it was much more than a grand adventure tale — it’s also a masterpiece of parody and social/political satire, as exemplified by the enmity between the empires of Lilliput and Blefuscu over which end of an egg should be broken first before being eaten — a conflict which put Gulliver in the middle between the Big Endians and the Small Endians. Well, I suppose that makes just as much sense as real people fighting over whose god is the Big Enchilada.

    Let us turn now to three quotations from the unabridged GULLIVER’S TRAVELS:

    Here commences a new dominion acquired with a title by divine right. Ships are sent with the first opportunity; the natives driven out or destroyed; their princes tortured to discover their gold; a free license give to all acts of inhumanity and lust, the earth reeking with the blood of its inhabitants: and this execrable crew of butchers, employed in so pious an expedition, is a modern colony, sent to convert an idolatrous and barbarous people.

    The tiny Lilliputians surmise that Gulliver’s watch may be his god, because it is that which, he admits, he seldom does anything without consulting.

    It is a maxim among these lawyers, that whatever hath been done before may legally be done again: and therefore they take special care to record all the decisions formerly made against common justice and the general reason of mankind. These, under the name of precedents, they produce as authorities, to justify the most iniquitous opinions; and the judges never fail of decreeing accordingly.

    I close with three more Swift quotes, the last of which I intend to inscribe on a club to beat anyone who would disparage my stunning cunning punning:

    When the world has once begun to use us ill, it afterwards continues the same treatment with less scruple or ceremony, as men do to a whore.

    Words are the clothing of our thoughts.

    Punning is a talent which no man affects to despise except he that is without it.

     

    –30–

     

     
    • linnetmoss 7:26 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      If only there were more authors with the wit of these two! Love the quote about punning 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:34 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Both seem to have had much in common as to how they viewed their fellow man, though I gather Swift was regarded as even more of a misanthrope than Twain. In any case, is there really much difference between a realist and a misanthrope, other than a matter of degree? 😦 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:59 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      People are ambitious. They come up with rationales as they go or afterwards.

      Like

      • mistermuse 1:47 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Right you are, Don — though I wouldn’t confine coming up with rationales just to the ambitious. For example, I have no problem coming up with rationales for being a couch potato on Sundays, because, as I tell my wife, watching football keeps me out of trouble.

        Like

    • arekhill1 10:23 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Substitute “women” for “eggs” and the passions of the Small Endians regarding the Big Endians become more understandable. Is this what Swift really meant?

      Like

      • mistermuse 2:13 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Well, given the Swift quote about how men treat a whore, it appears he was able to put himself in a woman’s place and see things from her viewpoint. He was, after all, a priest in the Church of Ireland (a branch of the Anglican Church), which afforded him somewhat more latitude (in theory) than if he’d been a Catholic priest.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:24 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      You’re not a Psychopath Muse, who sees people as objects that just need to be swept out of the way on your way to wherever and whatever. Perhaps on the way to the greater good.

      Like

    • mistermuse 12:14 am on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I’m probably more of a muse-anthrope — but whatever I am….

      Like

    • Jane 12:54 am on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I also loved Gulliver’s Travels as a child (the abridged version). It was only much later in life I understood that there was more to it than a children’s story. I must admit I have never read the unabridged version so thank you for sharing some of it along with your thoughts. Just a comment on abridged versions. I read so many as a child and they were a great way to introduce me gently and enjoyably to many great authors and playwrights. Reading Shakespeare’s plays as a book of stories with pictures as a child was great preparation for being able to understand his works later.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:57 am on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I appreciate your comment. I didn’t appreciate Shakespeare until later because I wasn’t “properly” introduced to him as a child. But, as they say, all good things come to those who wait (if you live long enough, which, fortunately, I have).

      Like

    • Outlier Babe 10:50 am on February 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I have read the unabridged version but see I must go back and not only do so again, but again annually or so. Will buy a copy. Hadn’t read “Travels” since college. Decades later, I’m slower–less swift 😉 –but more patient. That makes me smart enough now to read Swift properly.

      (Aspie ego-saving non-sequiter: I was always smart enough to read Twain properly.)

      I like your posts so far, Muse-Man. Maybe I’ll read some more some time. If I’ve got nothin’ better to do.

      –O. Babe

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:15 pm on February 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      That makes two of us, O. Babe, but I hope to read more of your posts sooner rather than….well, as soon as possible after researching, writing and editing my next post on Feb. 10 (I’m cursed with being something of a perfectionist, so it takes me a few days put it all together & get it – hopefully – right).

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: cardinals, , , , Moses, poem, , , sexual attraction, ten, Ten Commandments, Tender Is The Night   

    TEN 

    Ten: The cardinal number equal to 9 plus 1. –Webster’s New College Dictionary

    Well, I must say Webster’s definition of ten seems simple enough. Obviously, if you have nine cardinals and add one, you should end up with ten cardinals….unless you left the cage door open when you went to get one more, in which case, an empty birdcage plus one cardinal equal one cardinal plus an empty birdcage, which is what you deserve, because you’re not supposed to cage wild birds. It’s a cardinal sin.

    Of course, everyone is susceptible to cardinal sin except Catholic cardinals, who rose from their flock to become cardinals by attending the College of Cardinals….after having been grounded for years in Catholic tenets and the Ten Commandments, which you may be surprised to learn were originally Fifteen Commandments — before this happened:

    Why all this bird seed about the number ten, you ask….you are asking, aren’t you? Again, the answer is simple: this is the tenth day of the tenth month of November, which used to be the eleventh month until I — yes, I dropped one. Hey, if Moses can drop five commandments, what’s the big deal if one of the Muses drops one lousy month? Mistermuse says good riddance — who needs a month like February anyway?

    All of which leads us to the day’s feature presentation, dedicated to all you lovebirds out there:

    TEN, DEAR, IS THE NIGHT

    Sexual ‘traction is
    a driving force —
    it leads
    down the road
    to intercourse….

    better, of course,
    if intimate when
    our love
    lines seem like
    a perfect ten.

     

     

     
    • ladysighs 6:45 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Glad you only post every five days or so. Gives me time to recover from laughing. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:08 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I wish you could’ve had as speedy a recovery from what ailed you several months ago as I’m sure you’ll have from laughing! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • ladysighs 9:20 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink

          Thank you for being observant. Posting in WP, forums, FB etc etc plus reality, reminds me of the old show I Led Three Lives. Things get mixed up and confused and sometimes traumatic. Does take time to recover. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

      • Michaeline Montezinos 2:39 am on November 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        In my unsolicitated opinion, ladysighs has connected with so many websites, etc, that she sounds like she needs a vacation. Or like me sometimes when I become overwhelmed and try to do too much. I would like to invite her over to my home for a nice weekend break. Of course you have to pay your own air fair but meals and laughter and trips to see dolphins and quiet moments by the beautiful Tampa Bay are provided. Oh! I forgot to mention I am supposed to be “and I now live in St. Petersburg, Florida.retired”

        Like

    • Midwestern Plant Girl 8:55 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I agree. February has to go. .. and take your weather too!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:46 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I think that, by the end of January, most of us in the northern half of the Northern Hemisphere have had it with winter, so I’m all for just skipping right to the first of March. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

      • Michaeline Montezinos 2:32 am on November 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Leave February alone! It is the one month devoted to lovers. Have you forgotten Valentine’s Day? My husband and I always observe this day no matter the weather. You are from the Midwest? I guess I am stronger than you and know how to survive in the cold of Detroit where I was born and raised.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:42 am on November 11, 2015 Permalink

          Judging by what the website CATHOLIC ONLINE has to say about St. Valentine and Valentine’s Day, the day could just as easily be ‘celebrated’ in the month of Fictionary:
          “In 1969, the Roman Catholic Church removed St. Valentine from the General Roman Calendar, because so little is known about him. However, the Church still recognizes him as a saint, listing him in the February 14 spot of Roman Martyrolgy.”
          “The legends attributed to the mysterious saint are as inconsistent as the actual identification of the man.”
          The Church holds that he was martyred on Feb. 14, 269, however (again quoting CATHOLIC ONLINE), “other tales of St. Valentine’s life claim he was executed in the year 270, 273 or 280.” Such is the stuff that romantic dreams are made of!

          As for surviving in the Midwest cold, I’m still here after 75+ years — where did you say you’re writing from? 🙂 (Sorry, I couldn’t resist – I really don’t begrudge you your retiring to Florida!)

          Like

    • arekhill1 9:09 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Never have I seen a work of literature that combined insights into religion, sex, mathematics and ornithology into such an admirably few pithy paragraphs. Congratulations, Sr. Muse.

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:54 am on November 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Muchas gracias, Ricardo. There’s no money in such work, but my reward shall be great in heaven?

        Like

        • Michaeline Montezinos 2:28 am on November 11, 2015 Permalink

          Why this obsession with the number 10? It is my mother’s birthday and my father’s death day which I choose to ignore.. I know a Catholic who has a memory like an elephant. She knows every birthday and the dates of each death day in all her family and her husband’s too, Unfortunately she chose or had six children, good little catholic that she was. How she accomplished this makes me wonder because she worked and her husband worked at three different jobs. Passing like ships in the night,she claims. Yet there must have been some connection for all those kids. Unless her belief in the Virgin Mary some how rubbed off on her. All I can say we live one day/night at a time and who can foresee what number will pop up from the bingo wheel? Nice poem, mistermuse and I have discovered that the shorter the poem the better the audience. Not every one can multiply by 12 but most know what 1 + 1 equals.

          Like

      • Michaeline Montezinos 2:44 am on November 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I know a brown nose when I see their uncompromising flattery. What do you expect of mistermuse? And you must tneed som compliments yourself since you had to use the dictionary to come up with that vocabulary, arekhill 1. Correct me if I am wrong. I just will say I liked his poem. Amen, Sir Richard the Knight of Satire.

        Like

    • mistermuse 8:54 am on November 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Michaeline, for the kind words about my poem, and thanks to F. Scott Fitzgerald for inspiring my take on the title of his novel TENDER IS THE NIGHT.

      P.S. Although it may seem self-serving, I think you’re wrong in calling arekhill1’s “uncompromising flattery” “brownnosing.” If I know him (and I think I do), he calls ’em as he sees ’em, and he wouldn’t have said what he said if he didn’t think so.

      Like

    • Mél@nie 6:41 am on November 12, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Monsieur Muse, Sir… you’re really too much!!! 🙂 I’ve already learned “TEN, DEAR, IS THE NIGHT” – by heart=par coeur… ❤ MERCI!!! you've made my day serene and happier… 🙂

      • * *

      @"Catholic tenets and the Ten Commandments" – with due respect, they're just "theory" to me… 😉 for about 2 decades, I've adopted and I've been more into the 10 Commandments of the Native Americans:

      1. The Earth is our Mother, care for Her.
      2. Honor all your relations with your fellows.
      3. Open your heart and soul to the Universal Spirit.
      4. All life is sacred, treat all beings with respect and tolerance.
      5. Take from the Earth what is needed and nothing more.
      6. Do what needs to be done for the good of all.
      7. Speak the truth but only for the good in others.
      8. Follow the rhythm of Nature: rise and retire with the sun.
      9. Take full responsibility for your actions.
      10. Enjoy life’s journey, but leave no tracks; look after the well-being of Mind and Body…

      • * *

      may the Universal Spirit be with you, now and always! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:41 am on November 12, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      May the Universal Spirit be with you as well, beautiful lady….and beautiful, too, are the 10 Commandments of the Native Americans (although #8 seems more than a bit impractical for modern civilization!). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mél@nie 4:45 am on November 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        mille merci, Mr Muse! 🙂

        • * *

        yep, you’re right @ n°8… in France, we’d say:”you go to bed at the same time as birds…” 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:23 am on November 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I’m a night owl, myself 🙂

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:10 am on September 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , life journey, , poem, roots, time and distance, , woods   

    NOW 

    Go in our woods and witness the varying fortunes of the trees. How many are diseased or dying at the top or decaying at the root. How many have been mutilated by the fall of other trees. In fact, the fortunes of individual trees are much like those of men and women. –John Burroughs, naturalist, ACCEPTING THE UNIVERSE

    S6300557

    We see roots
    surge through dirt
    in time-lapse photography
    seed to distance
    in mere moments

    but trees understand
    this above all
    as a long
    journey of attachment
    living with the

    vagaries of fate
    knowing that where
    they are now
    is one with
    where now began…..

     
    • Don Frankel 4:37 am on September 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Good one Muse, good one. They get to know more than we do.

      But you know I have to ask this. You had to know. If you were a tree what kind of a tree would you be?

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:32 am on September 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I suspect that trees know more than we do because they’re more grounded….which might lead yew to think I would be a pun tree (a palm tree that can’t pronounce it’s name correctly), but as a practically life-long Ohioan, I should probably choose loyalty over punditree, and be a Buckeye tree.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:49 am on September 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I thought you would be a Pundittree. Me, I’m an Oak.

      Like

      • mistermuse 12:20 pm on September 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        One thing about being an Oak — you can count on being loved by squirrels (at least, as long as you keep makin’ with the acorns).

        Like

    • arekhill1 10:01 am on September 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Me, I’d rather be a vine–grow fast, get around and maybe get in some strangling on the side.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:25 pm on September 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      It might be hard to get away with the strangling part — people might hear it on the grapevine that you did it.

      Liked by 4 people

  • mistermuse 2:51 pm on July 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , poem,   

    OH, THE JOY! 

    No way can today’s girls and boys
    Hear music that’s more than mere noise?
    Then along comes Ludwig van B. —
    Though deaf, his sound still resounds. See:

     
    • arekhill1 7:20 pm on July 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I knew a euro bought more than a dollar, but I didn’t know it was quite so much more.

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:36 pm on July 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Well said, Ricardo (the setting is Sabadell, Spain, on the occasion of the 130th anniversary of the founding of Banco Sabadell).

      Like

    • scifihammy 8:33 pm on July 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you so much for this uplifting clip. Beethoven, speaking through the decades- Magic! And how lovely to see a mass of people united in the enjoyment of his music.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:54 pm on July 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I got goosebumps the first time I watched this clip, and then I knew I had to compose a short poem to introduce it into a post.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:37 pm on July 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Nice poem Muse and a really nice film clip. But gee I sure hope these people get paid better for their next gig.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:20 pm on July 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I’m sure those musicians do what they do for love, Don – if they wanted to make money, they would become poets like me (believe that, and I’ll tell you another whopper).

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:29 am on July 24, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      A note to Enigma (Superduque): Gracias for the “like.” I very much like your most recent post “Hay vida en Marte?”, but cannot find a way to click “like” on your post. This is just to let you know I tried.

      Like

    • Cardboard Express 8:57 pm on July 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I got chills just from watching the video. You can see people’s faces light up as the individual musicians join in the performance. Beautiful.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:57 pm on July 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      That’s the same reaction I had the first time I watched the video. I’ve probably watched it 4 or 5 times since then, and I react the same every time. The shared emotional involvement with everyone there grabs you and doesn’t let go.

      Like

  • mistermuse 6:35 am on June 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , poem, questions and answers   

    WHACK-A-MUSE 

    Where is the poet
    Who wrote the poem
    Which raises the question
    What is the answer
    When prosaic people ask
    Why poets raise questions
    While answers go begging?

     
  • mistermuse 4:07 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: boyhood, , , , , poem,   

    HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU, KID 

    All I ever wanted was for someone to know what’s inside me. -Dane Clark to Ida Lupino, death scene, DEEP VALLEY, 1947

    Surrounded by color,
    now we look back
    at memories of ourselves
    and see that no
    one knew us as did
    our celluloid stand-ins.
    Not our parents.
    Not our siblings.
    Not our friends.
    Not even ourselves.

    The stuff dreams
    were made of?
    It was all
    up there
    in black
    and white.
    But
    it
    all
    wentbysofast.

     

     
    • arekhill1 7:06 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah I been wondering…this whole you get old and die thing–who signed off on that anyway?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:59 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Well, you can eliminate me – but if I had signed off on it, I question how I could live with myself.

        Like

    • scifihammy 8:22 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I think there you have it – ‘Not even ourselves’.
      I really like this poem; Nicely written. 🙂

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:03 pm on April 18, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I appreciate that. BTW, the movie I referenced (DEEP VALLEY) was in black and white. It’s a little-known, but very good, film.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 6:01 am on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      “and our little life
      Is rounded by a sleep.”

      I got that one on my wall. Nice one Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 6:36 am on April 19, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      And a good one to have on your wall (hanging Shake-ily o’er your bed), it is!

      Like

  • mistermuse 7:02 am on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , cosmetics, fashion, , , makeup, poem, the beauty industry   

    MIRROR’S LOOKING AT YOU, KID 

    The beauty industry is the beast. -Katherine Dodds

    Painted ladies
    preparing to face
    a waiting world
    look long to
    make up for
    possible shortcomings
    while their daughters
    practice
    practice
    practice

     
    • retrostank 7:18 am on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      The title is the coolest, Outkast used it in Idlewild for the first line of “Makes No Sense At All.”

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:35 am on April 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the info, which I wasn’t aware of (hip hop/rap isn’t my thing). I don’t know when Outkast used it, but I wrote this poem in 2002, and it was published in 2003 in a poetry mag called ABBEY.

      Like

    • arekhill1 1:03 pm on April 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Makes just looking in the mirror to shave a piece of cake. Guys have it easy, which is good–we couldn’t handle it any other way.

      Like

    • mistermuse 2:56 pm on April 8, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      You got that right, Ricardo. I even hate to shave every day….and since I’ve been retired, I don’t.

      Like

  • mistermuse 4:41 pm on February 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , hooters, , opinions, poem, ,   

    NO BRAINER DAY 

    February 27 is NO BRAINER DAY. I think, if the day only had a theme song, it would be:

    For a be-careful-what-you-wish-for opinion, an “in the KNOW BRAINER might say this:

    The brain is a thinking machine whose chief use is to find reasons to keep thinking as we already do. –-Evan Esar

    Yet, what good is thinking if we can’t say what we think:

    Should headstrong opinions ever be repressed?
    ‘twould be a shame to leave them unexpressed.
    Relative thinking gets no respect from the majority;
    To impress, you must express opinions with authority.
    mistermuse

    But let’s look at it scientifically:

    Men’s minds are merely neurons;
    Men’s brains are but computers.
    Men’s eyes: brain switch-offs in the head
    When activated by women’s hooters.

    –mistermuse

    In my humble opinion, that’s enough to think about on NO BRAINER DAY. If you have an opinion, save it….unless it agrees with mine.

     
    • arekhill1 5:25 pm on February 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t want to think about it.

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:35 pm on February 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      No problem, Ricardo. I know you’re a big Oz fan, but as Scarlett O’Hara said in that “other” 1939 film, “Tomorrow is another day.”

      Like

    • Don Frankel 2:02 pm on February 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, you know how people say this is my day. Well this is my day. Why? That’s a no brainer.

      Great clip. Great movie.

      Like

    • mistermuse 2:16 pm on February 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      You got that right, Don. Outside of CASABLANCA, I guess I watched WIZARD OF OZ more than any other movie (especially when I was younger).

      Like

    • Mélanie 1:48 am on March 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      @”unless it agrees with mine.” – hopefully and fortunately, it does… 🙂 I also loved “Oz” as a kid and I did watch it several times… as for “Casablanca”, I still continue to watch it – each time it’s on some TV channel… so welcome to the “Oz & Casablanca” fan club and play it again, Mister Muse! 🙂

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:03 am on March 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Melanie, you’re obviously a gal after my own heart — if I only had one! I’m off to see the wizard…..

      Like

    • Joseph Nebus 5:10 pm on March 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I missed the whole day, and went about thinking over too much stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 11:13 am on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , poem, regrets, ,   

    CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE 

    You can see them
    In once-upon-a-time spaces.

    You can hear them
    Regretting choices.

    You can see them
    In well-worn faces.

    You can hear them
    Remembering rejoices.

    You can see them
    In leftover traces.

    You can hear them
    Reflecting where time’s voice is.

    Circumstances alter places.
    Circumstances alter voices.

     
    • arekhill1 11:44 am on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Nicely said, Sr. Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:34 pm on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Ricardo.This is one of those poems I spent more time on than I should, never did get it as right as I wanted, and finally said to hell with it and clicked PUBLISH. Under the circumstances, I’ll take your comment as evidence I didn’t completely waste my time.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:13 pm on February 10, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for your testimony, Michaeline, but I think I’ll get back to funny business next time, as this poem gave me a “serious” case of the doubts!

      Like

    • Don Frankel 9:38 am on February 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Bleep happens. Then we try to make sense of it. Nice one Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:29 am on February 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      So I moved on to the next post, made funny, and got screwed anyway. Bleep!

      Like

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