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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Rene Descartes   

    SET IN STONE 

    I think, therefore I am. –René Descartes

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    You will (hopefully) recall that my last post, STONE COLD DEAD, featured some of my favorite epitaphs published 4 years ago on SWI (a blog due to bite the dust in November). Ah, but the best laid plans….  The SWI editor announced on 9/1 that he would now need to pull the plug first thing on Sept. 6; thus today becomes SWI’s last full day on this earth.

    This sudden passing prompts me to salvage another of my previously published posts from that body of work: a poem which poses a question I believe naturally arises out of STONE COLD DEAD. Unlike that post, it ain’t funny, but perhaps the poem’s saving grace is that what it lacks in humor, it makes up in brevity. It’s the least I can do on Labor Day.

    LUCKY STIFFS

    Are the faithful
    dead better positioned
    to be saved
    than those who
    lived with doubt?
    Even a God
    can’t help being
    what He thinks.

     

     

     
    • painkills2 12:13 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Saved from what? After you’re dead, no one can save you. But if this is about hell, then I don’t want to be saved — that’s where all the fun people go. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:44 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Think of this poem as if it were written by an agnostic. Then the question becomes: If there is a God and an afterlife, is He any more morally fit to judge you than you are to judge Him? If there is no afterlife, it’s irrelevant whether or not there is a God, because we will never know either way.

      I might add that the God(s) of religions and myth only muddy the waters of how to think about this whole business of a possible Creator. The word “God” itself seems to me to be an impediment to rational thinking about life and all that it may imply.

      Liked by 2 people

      • painkills2 1:09 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I suppose those who believe in a god also believe that this god is always right and shouldn’t be questioned. As for anyone — supernatural or not — who thinks they have the right to judge me, well, they’re wrong. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 7:12 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Nice one 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:26 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      They say it takes one to know one, so you’re a “nice one” too. 🙂

      Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 9:41 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “God is dead.” —Nietzsche, 1883

      “Nietzsche is dead.” —God, 1900

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 9:51 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      “We’re all dead.” –Kismet, sooner or later 😦

      Liked by 3 people

    • arekhill1 11:42 am on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, death is the ultimate way of fitting in.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:32 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d call it forced integration God’s way….except for Christians, who make Book on to a different afterlife divide: heaven or hell.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:02 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      All things come to an end but nothing really dies on the internet. It just spins somewhere throughout the universe. And, since we’re doing some oldies I can’t help but recall once again my favorite Epitaph on a Tombstone in Tombstone.

      Here Lies Lester Moore
      4 slugs from a .44
      No Les
      No More

      Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 6:18 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I can never think about this topic (death) without this song running through my mind. I heard it for the first time when I was a teenager and it has stuck in my head ever since. Like this post, it’s remarkable for its brevity.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:14 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the song clip. When it comes to war and brevity, it took William Tecumseh Sherman only three words to tell it like it is: “War is hell.”

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 7:28 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know why God would punish our authenticity. Job is an interesting book to read on this topic.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:01 pm on September 5, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Well, this subject would take an entire post to address in depth, including (for starters) whether or not one accepts the story of Job as having a basis in reality. For atheists and agnostics, it’s a non-starter to begin with, because if you disbelieve or doubt that God exists, Job is meaningless. Personally, as a deist who believes in a Creator but not the so-called “revealed God” of most religions, it is not my job to take Job seriously (pun intended).

      Like

      • Carmen 5:18 am on September 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Besides which, if you do read about poor old Job – and take the ‘lesson’ seriously-, you end up wondering why anyone would think Yahweh had any redeeming qualities.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Superduque777 7:49 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply


      CARPET DIEM

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 10:09 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You would never guess from that photo what the girl is actually saying to the pope: “Ubi possum potiri petasi similis isti?” (“Where can I get a hat like that?”)

      Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 10:12 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      . . .and he’s probably saying, “Go now and spin no more”. . 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:39 am on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      No doubt Jim Beam had something to say about it too, but it looks like the pope is keeping it close to his vest-ments.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 9:04 am on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , George Pal, Hildegard, , , , , Puppetoons, Rene Descartes, Victor Herbert   

    THE PASSING GAME 

    How do you do?  Glad to see you. It’s game day, guys and gals, so let’s get right to it. No, this isn’t about football (whatever gave you that idea?). This is a game about how many of the following ten names ring a bell, and what do they have in common (other than the fact that none were football players)?

    Victor Herbert, James P. Johnson, John Ford, Clark Gable, Langston Hughes, S. J. Perelman, Hildegard, George Pal, Muriel Spark, Boris Yeltsin.

    How did you do? You say there’s several you didn’t recognize? That will never do. There are no passes here, so before we proceed to what they have in common, here are the names again, followed by year of birth and claim to fame:

    1. VICTOR HERBERT, 1859, composer (father of the operetta style Broadway musical, including Babes in Toyland, Naughty Marietta and Sweethearts)

    2. JAMES P. JOHNSON, 1891, composer and jazz pianist (king of Harlem stride piano & composer of such standards as The Charleston, Old Fashioned Love and If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight)

    3. JOHN FORD, 1894, movie director (famous for westerns and winner of four Academy Awards for best director: The Informer, Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley and The Quiet Man, none of which were westerns)

    4. CLARK GABLE, 1901, actor (Frankly, my dear, I don’t think I need say more)

    5. LANGSTON HUGHES, 1902, poet, playwright and social activist (leader of the Harlem Renaissance and pioneer of literary art form known as jazz poetry)

    6. S. J. PERELMAN, 1904, humorist, screenwriter and playwright (credits include humor for the New Yorker, scripts for Marx Brothers films Monkey Business and Horse Feathers, and Academy Award for screenplay for Around the World in Eighty Days)

    7. HILDEGARD, 1906, American cabaret singer and most elegant, well-known female supper club entertainer of her time; #1 song Darling, Je Vous Aime Beaucoup. Longest-lived (to age 99) of the ten.

    8. GEORGE PAL, 1908, film director, producer and innovator of stop-motion animation (Puppetoons); probably the least familiar name here, thus this 1994 biographical documentary (narrated by Pal’s widow Zsoka) should be both edifying and interesting:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlRyE4U-dDM

    9. MURIEL SPARK, 1918, novelist and writer (most famous work The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie)

    10. BORIS YELTSIN, 1931, Russian politician. First President of Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.

    OK, I’ll keep you in suspense no longer. What the above have in common is their birthday: February 1.

    But wait — there’s more! What do the following have in common?

    Rene Descartes, philosopher; Mary Shelley, novelist; Buster Keaton, comic actor; George Abbot, director; and Gian Carlo Menotti, composer.

    They all passed away on February 1.

    Today, on this notable day in history, The Observation Post has them coming and going. I hope you had a ball.

    Gotta run.

     
    • arekhill1 11:31 am on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Langston Hughes, at least, is noted elsewhere on the Net today–he’s in AOL’s Search Spotlight, where notables like Kim Kardashian and Justin Bieber usually romp. Had no idea why, until you elucidated me. Happy Groundhog Day Eve!

      Like

    • mistermuse 1:13 pm on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Same to you, Ricardo, and may I recommend for tomorrow’s viewing pleasure the great Bill Murray film “Groundhog Day” (on AMC at 5:30 p.m. Eastern time). I predict you’ll dig it even if you’ve seen it before, which you probably have.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 11:14 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Good one Muse, quite a few smiles here. I knew six which is barely passing. But today is Groundhog Day and Staten Island Chuck is not coming out. He doesn’t want to sleep with the fishes.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:36 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I’m guessing the six you knew are 2,3,4,5,7 & 10. If I’m right, you owe me free advice from Dr. Don (I’ll let you know when I need it).

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 2:31 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Fine posting for Ground Hog Day. To avoid repeating myself like the Bill Murray film, I actually knew 9 of the 10 posted. Honestly, I guess it comes from what I’ve learned from watching Turner Classic Movies.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:37 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats, Michaeline. I doubt if anyone will top your 90%. If I had to guess which one you didn’t know, it would be either #6 or #9. As for me, I “missed” #9 (the name sounded familiar, but I couldn’t place her until I looked her up).

      Like

    • arekhill1 7:03 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Have it on disc, Sr. Muse, so no need to let AMC interrupt it with commercials. When the security question is “What is your favorite movie?” that’s my answer. Although “The Wizard of Oz” is close.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:53 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I have too many favorite movies to name one, but both of those would be on my list.

        Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 8:27 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Mr. Muse you were close since I missed #5, the one about Langston Hughes. My security answer involves an actor but I don’t think anyone would know that. The first question, arekhill!, is about my best friend from childhood. We were sent to different schools after a certain grade. So she is not in my yearbook either. I hope I didn’t blow my cover…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Michaeline Montezinos 2:47 am on February 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Since I am a night owl I want to wish everyone here a post Happy Ground Hog Day.
      February 3 is the night of the Full Moon so be forewarned and watch out for lunatics!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Cartesian philosophy, , , March 31, philosophical humor, philosophical thinkers, , psychiatrist, Rene Descartes,   

    PHILOSOPHY A LA CARTE 

    I think, therefore I am.  –Rene Descartes

    Monsieur Descartes, famed French philosopher, was born on March 31 and is considered to be the father of modern philosophy. Coincidentally, mistermuse was not born on this day and is considered to be the fodder of modern poetry. It is only fitting, therefore, to celebrate the day with appropriate Cartesian poems:

    DESCARTES EPITAPH (1596-1650)

    I thought,
    therefore
    I was.

    PHILOSOPHICAL SKUNK

    I stink,
    therefore
    I am.

    PHILOSOPHICAL APE MAN

    I Tarzan,
    therefore
    you Jane.

    PHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHIATRIST

    I shrink,
    therefore
    I think.

    PHILOSOPHICAL JAZZ MAN

    I think,
    therefore
    I jam.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ABSENT-MINDED TRAVELER

    I think I am
    there — for
    what, I know not.

    PHILOSOPHICAL SHEEP

    I think like ewe,
    therefore
    I lamb.

    PHILOSOPHICAL MUSE

    I think,
    therefore
    Why am I?

     

     

     
    • Don Frankel 6:26 am on March 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      “I am what I am.” or “I yam what I yam.” Popeye the Sailor.

      Muse, every once in a while we all get off classics, in that something is quintessential to our styles and this is one of yours.

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:28 am on March 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I love Popeye —
      Olive Oyl too —
      I even love spinach.
      I think that will do.

      Like

    • D R (Donnie) Hosie 2:16 pm on November 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Allow me to put forward one – that particularly suggests itself:
      I think, therefore I muse.

      Like

      • mistermuse 3:41 pm on November 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of which, after taking another look at the PHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHIATRIST poem above, I think maybe I should have reversed the order:

        I shrink,
        therefore
        I think.

        ….which leads me to think I think, therefore I muse too much.
        Or maybe it should be I muse, therefore I think too much.

        Like

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