Tagged: James P. Johnson Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , James P. Johnson, , Jelly Roll Morton, , , , , , Satchmo, , , trumpet,   

    MEMORIES OF SATCHMO (Aug. 4, 1901-July 6, 1971) 

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis (“Satchmo”) Armstrong

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Awake at night, at sunrise, every sunset too, seems to be bringing me….

    But that was long ago, and now my consolation is in the….

    My only sin is in my skin — what did I do to be so….

    In contrast to our current culture of celebrity-for-celebrity’s-sake, today we celebrate the memory of a man who was the genuine article: a true game-changer, unsurpassed in the history of America’s contribution to the music world, namely jazz. To quote Scott Yanow, author of CLASSIC JAZZ:

    Although jazz existed before Louis Armstrong (including important giants Jelly Roll Morton, James P. Johnson, Freddie Keppard, Sidney Bechet, and King Oliver), Armstrong had the biggest impact of any jazz musician. Whether it was transforming jazz from an ensemble-oriented music into one showcasing solos by virtuosos, popularizing both scat singing and hornlike vocalizing, infusing pop songs with the blues, making dramatic statements with the inventive use of silence and dynamics, and (via his sunny personality) making jazz accessible to millions who had never heard it before, Armstrong’s contributions are so vast [that] jazz would have been a lot different if he had not existed.

    To help the reader (who isn’t a jazz buff or remembers only the past-his-prime Armstrong) understand something of the impact of the early Armstrong, I’ll close with this 1928 recording — his favorite (and mine) of his own playing:

    There, brethren, you have the earthly counterpart of The Rapture enrapturing you from the West End of jazz heaven. May you abandon yourself to the American Gabriel’s clarion call as his golden trumpet leads you to Blues paradise. Or just enjoy.

     

     

     

     
    • leggypeggy 12:30 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I was lucky enough to hear Satchmo perform live.

      Liked by 4 people

    • calmkate 3:01 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      one of my heroes, thanks for this delightful tribute!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 4:58 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These are beautiful oldies but goldies😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:54 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Incomparable” is the only word you need to describe Armstrong…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:25 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hello there. I saw him once in concert, in a stadium in the borough of Queens, which is part of New York City. He lived in Queens with his wife. Their home has been turned into a museum.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Neil. I didn’t know their home had been turned into a museum. It could have just as fittingly been turned into a shrine.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:29 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Love that last piece….the best!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:48 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s what’s known as saving the best for last (though, in this case, it’s the best of the best)..

        Like

    • scifihammy 8:37 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent post and music. 🙂
      My Mum really like Satchmo. 🙂
      Once when I was talking about him to my kids, I called him Sasquatch!! But my kids knew who I meant. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:53 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad to hear you talked to your kids about Sasquatch — I mean Satchmo. All most kids today know about music is today’s music.

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 10:16 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink

          That’s true. But I think it’s important to share with your kids things that you appreciate 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 10:40 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Classic!
      Great clips… I’d never heard Black and Blue from 1929.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:08 pm on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In 1929, only a black man with the stature of Louis Armstrong could ‘get away with’ performing such a song sympathetic to the black man’s perspective. Then, in 1939, a black woman first sang this much more outspoken song that continued to outrage white racists for years, including during the McCarthy hearings of the early 1950s. Here she sings it in a 1959 TV appearance:

        Like

    • In My Cluttered Attic 3:34 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Satchmo, truly was one of the very best. Thanks for this post, Jazz. :O)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:53 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Neil for getting me out of the funk caused by this horrible weekend. I found that playing my wide selection of Satchmo’s recordings helped me see in spite of what’s happening, deep down I agree with him when he sings ‘What a Wonderful World.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:09 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My oldest daughter is a Red Cross volunteer in Dayton, helping with the human aftermath of the horrible weekend there. Words cannot adequately convey what the victims’ families are going through. We can only hope that, with time, it will become a Wonderful World for them again, although it will never be the same.

      Like

    • thelonelyauthorblog 8:27 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A great one from our past.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 4:05 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, these songs are a marvellous soundtrack to this gorgeous, sunny Wednesday. Thanks so much. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:27 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the comment, SS. You inspire me to write this:

      I screening, Silver Screening, we all screening for ice creaming.

      Actually, I wouldn’t blame you for screaming at me to stop being so inspired.

      Like

    • America On Coffee 12:15 am on August 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Such an amazing personality with a loving style and loving smile. Great song!

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 3:04 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      MM, i had the great honor of Louis Armstrong recording one of my songs; Not a great jazz piece just a little feel good thing. I am eternally humbled by it. Here it is:

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:28 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Love this kind of “little feel good thing,” Tony! Although no one could do it like Louis, it’s the kind of song I think a good Dixieland band could also ‘have a party’ with.

        Like

  • mistermuse 9:04 am on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , George Pal, Hildegard, James P. Johnson, , , , Puppetoons, , Victor Herbert   

    THE PASSING GAME 

    How do you do?  Glad to see you. It’s game day, guys and gals, so let’s get right to it. No, this isn’t about football (whatever gave you that idea?). This is a game about how many of the following ten names ring a bell, and what do they have in common (other than the fact that none were football players)?

    Victor Herbert, James P. Johnson, John Ford, Clark Gable, Langston Hughes, S. J. Perelman, Hildegard, George Pal, Muriel Spark, Boris Yeltsin.

    How did you do? You say there’s several you didn’t recognize? That will never do. There are no passes here, so before we proceed to what they have in common, here are the names again, followed by year of birth and claim to fame:

    1. VICTOR HERBERT, 1859, composer (father of the operetta style Broadway musical, including Babes in Toyland, Naughty Marietta and Sweethearts)

    2. JAMES P. JOHNSON, 1891, composer and jazz pianist (king of Harlem stride piano & composer of such standards as The Charleston, Old Fashioned Love and If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight)

    3. JOHN FORD, 1894, movie director (famous for westerns and winner of four Academy Awards for best director: The Informer, Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley and The Quiet Man, none of which were westerns)

    4. CLARK GABLE, 1901, actor (Frankly, my dear, I don’t think I need say more)

    5. LANGSTON HUGHES, 1902, poet, playwright and social activist (leader of the Harlem Renaissance and pioneer of literary art form known as jazz poetry)

    6. S. J. PERELMAN, 1904, humorist, screenwriter and playwright (credits include humor for the New Yorker, scripts for Marx Brothers films Monkey Business and Horse Feathers, and Academy Award for screenplay for Around the World in Eighty Days)

    7. HILDEGARD, 1906, American cabaret singer and most elegant, well-known female supper club entertainer of her time; #1 song Darling, Je Vous Aime Beaucoup. Longest-lived (to age 99) of the ten.

    8. GEORGE PAL, 1908, film director, producer and innovator of stop-motion animation (Puppetoons); probably the least familiar name here, thus this 1994 biographical documentary (narrated by Pal’s widow Zsoka) should be both edifying and interesting:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlRyE4U-dDM

    9. MURIEL SPARK, 1918, novelist and writer (most famous work The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie)

    10. BORIS YELTSIN, 1931, Russian politician. First President of Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.

    OK, I’ll keep you in suspense no longer. What the above have in common is their birthday: February 1.

    But wait — there’s more! What do the following have in common?

    Rene Descartes, philosopher; Mary Shelley, novelist; Buster Keaton, comic actor; George Abbot, director; and Gian Carlo Menotti, composer.

    They all passed away on February 1.

    Today, on this notable day in history, The Observation Post has them coming and going. I hope you had a ball.

    Gotta run.

     
    • arekhill1 11:31 am on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Langston Hughes, at least, is noted elsewhere on the Net today–he’s in AOL’s Search Spotlight, where notables like Kim Kardashian and Justin Bieber usually romp. Had no idea why, until you elucidated me. Happy Groundhog Day Eve!

      Like

    • mistermuse 1:13 pm on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Same to you, Ricardo, and may I recommend for tomorrow’s viewing pleasure the great Bill Murray film “Groundhog Day” (on AMC at 5:30 p.m. Eastern time). I predict you’ll dig it even if you’ve seen it before, which you probably have.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 11:14 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Good one Muse, quite a few smiles here. I knew six which is barely passing. But today is Groundhog Day and Staten Island Chuck is not coming out. He doesn’t want to sleep with the fishes.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:36 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I’m guessing the six you knew are 2,3,4,5,7 & 10. If I’m right, you owe me free advice from Dr. Don (I’ll let you know when I need it).

      Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 2:31 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Fine posting for Ground Hog Day. To avoid repeating myself like the Bill Murray film, I actually knew 9 of the 10 posted. Honestly, I guess it comes from what I’ve learned from watching Turner Classic Movies.

      Like

    • mistermuse 4:37 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats, Michaeline. I doubt if anyone will top your 90%. If I had to guess which one you didn’t know, it would be either #6 or #9. As for me, I “missed” #9 (the name sounded familiar, but I couldn’t place her until I looked her up).

      Like

    • arekhill1 7:03 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Have it on disc, Sr. Muse, so no need to let AMC interrupt it with commercials. When the security question is “What is your favorite movie?” that’s my answer. Although “The Wizard of Oz” is close.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:53 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        I have too many favorite movies to name one, but both of those would be on my list.

        Like

    • Michaeline Montezinos 8:27 pm on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Mr. Muse you were close since I missed #5, the one about Langston Hughes. My security answer involves an actor but I don’t think anyone would know that. The first question, arekhill!, is about my best friend from childhood. We were sent to different schools after a certain grade. So she is not in my yearbook either. I hope I didn’t blow my cover…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Michaeline Montezinos 2:47 am on February 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Since I am a night owl I want to wish everyone here a post Happy Ground Hog Day.
      February 3 is the night of the Full Moon so be forewarned and watch out for lunatics!

      Liked by 1 person

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel