Tagged: West End Blues Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Jelly Roll Morton, , , , , , Satchmo, , , trumpet, West End Blues   

    MEMORIES OF SATCHMO (Aug. 4, 1901-July 6, 1971) 

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis (“Satchmo”) Armstrong

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Awake at night, at sunrise, every sunset too, seems to be bringing me….

    But that was long ago, and now my consolation is in the….

    My only sin is in my skin — what did I do to be so….

    In contrast to our current culture of celebrity-for-celebrity’s-sake, today we celebrate the memory of a man who was the genuine article: a true game-changer, unsurpassed in the history of America’s contribution to the music world, namely jazz. To quote Scott Yanow, author of CLASSIC JAZZ:

    Although jazz existed before Louis Armstrong (including important giants Jelly Roll Morton, James P. Johnson, Freddie Keppard, Sidney Bechet, and King Oliver), Armstrong had the biggest impact of any jazz musician. Whether it was transforming jazz from an ensemble-oriented music into one showcasing solos by virtuosos, popularizing both scat singing and hornlike vocalizing, infusing pop songs with the blues, making dramatic statements with the inventive use of silence and dynamics, and (via his sunny personality) making jazz accessible to millions who had never heard it before, Armstrong’s contributions are so vast [that] jazz would have been a lot different if he had not existed.

    To help the reader (who isn’t a jazz buff or remembers only the past-his-prime Armstrong) understand something of the impact of the early Armstrong, I’ll close with this 1928 recording — his favorite (and mine) of his own playing:

    There, brethren, you have the earthly counterpart of The Rapture enrapturing you from the West End of jazz heaven. May you abandon yourself to the American Gabriel’s clarion call as his golden trumpet leads you to Blues paradise. Or just enjoy.

     

     

     

     
    • leggypeggy 12:30 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I was lucky enough to hear Satchmo perform live.

      Liked by 4 people

    • calmkate 3:01 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      one of my heroes, thanks for this delightful tribute!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 4:58 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These are beautiful oldies but goldies😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:54 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Incomparable” is the only word you need to describe Armstrong…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:25 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hello there. I saw him once in concert, in a stadium in the borough of Queens, which is part of New York City. He lived in Queens with his wife. Their home has been turned into a museum.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Neil. I didn’t know their home had been turned into a museum. It could have just as fittingly been turned into a shrine.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:29 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Love that last piece….the best!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:48 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s what’s known as saving the best for last (though, in this case, it’s the best of the best)..

        Like

    • scifihammy 8:37 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent post and music. 🙂
      My Mum really like Satchmo. 🙂
      Once when I was talking about him to my kids, I called him Sasquatch!! But my kids knew who I meant. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:53 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad to hear you talked to your kids about Sasquatch — I mean Satchmo. All most kids today know about music is today’s music.

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 10:16 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink

          That’s true. But I think it’s important to share with your kids things that you appreciate 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 10:40 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Classic!
      Great clips… I’d never heard Black and Blue from 1929.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:08 pm on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In 1929, only a black man with the stature of Louis Armstrong could ‘get away with’ performing such a song sympathetic to the black man’s perspective. Then, in 1939, a black woman first sang this much more outspoken song that continued to outrage white racists for years, including during the McCarthy hearings of the early 1950s. Here she sings it in a 1959 TV appearance:

        Like

    • In My Cluttered Attic 3:34 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Satchmo, truly was one of the very best. Thanks for this post, Jazz. :O)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:53 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Neil for getting me out of the funk caused by this horrible weekend. I found that playing my wide selection of Satchmo’s recordings helped me see in spite of what’s happening, deep down I agree with him when he sings ‘What a Wonderful World.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:09 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My oldest daughter is a Red Cross volunteer in Dayton, helping with the human aftermath of the horrible weekend there. Words cannot adequately convey what the victims’ families are going through. We can only hope that, with time, it will become a Wonderful World for them again, although it will never be the same.

      Like

    • thelonelyauthorblog 8:27 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A great one from our past.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 4:05 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, these songs are a marvellous soundtrack to this gorgeous, sunny Wednesday. Thanks so much. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:27 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the comment, SS. You inspire me to write this:

      I screening, Silver Screening, we all screening for ice creaming.

      Actually, I wouldn’t blame you for screaming at me to stop being so inspired.

      Like

    • America On Coffee 12:15 am on August 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Such an amazing personality with a loving style and loving smile. Great song!

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 3:04 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      MM, i had the great honor of Louis Armstrong recording one of my songs; Not a great jazz piece just a little feel good thing. I am eternally humbled by it. Here it is:

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:28 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Love this kind of “little feel good thing,” Tony! Although no one could do it like Louis, it’s the kind of song I think a good Dixieland band could also ‘have a party’ with.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on April 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: East of the Sun, , , , , , , , West End Blues, Westwind,   

    EAST MEETS WEST DAY 

    EAST IS EAST, AND WEST IS WEST, AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHALL MEET. –Rudyard Kipling

    The above quote notwithstanding, it’s not too late if you want to meet Twain. Forget East/West, and return to the site of my previous post (MARK TWAIN ON DONALD TRUMP), where Twain still lives. I could quibble that you should have met him there then, but I am magnanimous enough to forgive those of you who didn’t read that post (so long as you promise never to let it happen again).

    Be that as it may, this is April — April 24th, to be exact, which just happens to be East Meets West Day, which just happens to give me an excuse to engross you with some of my favorite East and/or West songs, such as this old standard by an old favorite:

    Keely Smith (born Dorothy Keely) died four months ago at age 89, one of the best (though underappreciated) female vocalists of the 1950s-60s.

    Next, we change directions for this Kurt Weill classic from the 1943 musical ONE TOUCH OF VENUS:

    Let us end, fittingly, with WEST END BLUES by Louis Armstrong, one of the all-time great recordings in jazz history:

    That performance was recorded in 1928; 90 years later, you can travel far and wide, east and west, and never the same shall meet.

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 1:21 am on April 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I am curious too as to how the meeting with N Korea will pan out?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:56 am on April 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        You’re really going East — Far East — with that one, G.H.! Though your question is a bit off-subject with the theme of this post, I’ll venture to predict that if ‘Past is prologue,’ N. Korea will agree to, but not keep, a treaty. Herbert Hoover wasn’t the greatest of American Presidents, but he wisely said, “Peace is not made at the council table or by treaties, but in the hearts of men.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • Garfield Hug 12:59 pm on April 24, 2018 Permalink

          Yes, I did digress! But thanks for sharing the info you gave. I strayed as the title of your post reminded me of how the west as in Trump is planning to meet eastern Asia’s N Korea Kim. 😊

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 4:13 pm on April 24, 2018 Permalink

          No problem, G.H.! If “digression is the better part of valor,” who am I to say you stray? Unfortunately, the old saying is “discretion” (not “digression”) is the better part of valor” — but I digress. 😦

          Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 1:53 pm on April 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mr. Kipling also assured us that…
      “But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth,
      When two strong men stand face to face, tho’ they come from the ends of the earth.”

      Sorry to hear about the passing of Keely Smith. She was a great singer. And, here’s her take on the subject.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:35 pm on April 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        As you may know, Don, “Sing, Sing, Sing” was a huge hit for Benny Goodman’s big band in 1937 and was one of the songs which helped establish him as the “King of Swing” in the Swing era. Interestingly, the song was written by Louis Prima, Keely Smith’s first husband, who famously partnered with her professionally in the 1950s.

        Liked by 1 person

    • dunelight 6:29 pm on April 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Keely Smith..I love her. What a dream to have seen her in Vegas. She had killer timing as a comedienne. I can watch her play off Louis Prima for days.

      Like

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel