Tagged: Barbara Stanwyck Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ball Of Fire, Barbara Stanwyck, Dixieland jazz, , Firehouse 5 + 2, Hotter Than That, , International Jazz Day, , , Old MacDonald Had A Farm, ,   

    INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY 

    April 30 is INTERNATIONAL JAZZ DAY. Mistermuse could write a book about jazz, but many books have already been authored by jazz writers more authoritative than he, so mistermuse will settle for doing a post — and on this post, he has a chick who can sing a lick here, scat a lick there, wing a lick everywhere:

    You may think that’s hotter than a chicken wing or a pig on a spit — but here’s a cat who can scat too, and when he blows his bugle, he’s even….

    Is your computer smoking yet? We don’t want to alarm the Firehouse brigade, so before your pc bursts into a

    ….let’s do one number more and stop at four, because….

     

     

     
    • calmkate 2:25 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      ah you managed to warm my heart on a cold wet winters day!
      Thanks Mr M … everyday should be jazz day 😎

      Liked by 1 person

    • blindzanygirl 3:37 am on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 12:05 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      • mistermuse 2:59 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the link. Haven’t heard that version, but I know the song — it was recorded by the great Bessie Smith in 1928. I love the vocal on your clip — who is the vocalist?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 12:22 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      gives me an excuse to play my jazz collection, as if I needed an excuse. Bit of trivia – Firehouse 5 had a day job. The were animators for Disney.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:18 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Don. Actually, I did know about the Disney connection. I own a few of their record albums, and the notes on one of them say that band founder trombonist Ward Kimball and tin whistle player Walt Kelly (of Pogo fame) first met at Disney Studios in 1934. They’re not my fav Dixieland band, but I still enjoy listening to them.

        Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 7:32 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Who says that’s a plenty? I wouldn’t my have minded several more. And a Happy International Jazz Day to you, mistermuse. Sure glad I got to this today; otherwise it wouldn’t have had the same cachet.

      And that chick Ella (my feathers were a little ruffled by your so naming her til the song began): anyone who can elevate a children’s nursery rhyme to art…well, she’s one cool scat.
      Such delight!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:51 pm on April 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        it was a feather in my cap, not only to have found the Ella clip, but the clip which is my favorite of the four: HOTTER THAN THAT. The “cat who can scat” in that recording is of course Louis Armstrong, and I’ve never heard him scat better than he does starting one minute and twenty seconds into the clip. It doesn’t get any hotter than that!

        Liked by 1 person

        • annieasksyou 8:15 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink

          At a high school reunion years ago, I was talking with the guy who was my senior prom date. He insisted that after the dance, we went into New York and saw Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. I was appalled at myself: how could I have NO recollection of such a significant event? Just months ago, I found an old scrapbook I’d made (we did that in those days), and I’d written how awful my date was and noted the performers we’d seen: much lesser lights than those two musical giants.
          I shall revisit your Satch video to see if I’ll be further tickled by his scats.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:54 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for that interesting remembrance.

          For decades, I’ve owned well over a dozen Louis LPs, at least one of which includes HOTTER THAN THAT….and I’M appalled at myself that I didn’t recollect how great his scatting was on that 1920s recording (until I found the video). Of course, he was at the peak of his creative power (both playing and scatting) back then, and that was only one of many unbelievable performances, so I suppose I should forgive myself for forgetting one of them.

          Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 9:01 am on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Right—I think we both have to stop being appalled at ourselves…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 6:32 pm on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It would have been wonderful to have had Ella as a grandmother entertaining us with that version. I wonder what she could do with the other standard nursery rhymes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:11 am on May 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Wonder no more, Elizabeth. As a matter of fact, her first big hit record was a song she co-wrote in 1938 based on the nursery rhyme A-TISKET A-TASKET. Here, she sings it in a clip from the 1942 Abbot & Costello film RIDE ‘EM COWBOY:

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 9:19 pm on May 1, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:14 am on May 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Moorezart for more jazz, and more jazz for moorezart. I dig it!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 10:14 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for including that great scene from Ball of Fire! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:28 pm on May 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Any scene with Barbara Stanwyck is a pleasure to watch — though I must say (when it comes to screwball comedies) that I liked THE LADY EVE (with her and Henry Fonda) better than BALL OF FIRE.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Silver Screenings 8:39 am on May 5, 2020 Permalink

          Agreed. I prefer The Lady Eve, too. Stanwyck is perfectly cast in that film – I can’t imagine anyone else in that role.

          Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 8:49 pm on May 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love jazz covers today which are going in many directions and genre incorporations. I wonder too,if Scat is the grandparent of rap…đŸ€”

      Like

    • lorraineanne 11:10 am on May 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      this is amazing~ thank you for sharing.
      If you get a chance, I’d really appreciate if you can check out my music/ art blog.
      It would mean a lot!
      https://thehighsnlows.com

      lo

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:47 pm on May 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment. I read your latest (Jazz Festivals) post, but currently have too much on my plate to read more. At this point, I can only say I liked what I saw and will try to check out a few more of your posts when I have time.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alexander Graham Bell, Barbara Stanwyck, , , Don Ameche, , , Grace Kelly, , , , Lily Tomlin, Rosalind Russell, , telephone switchboards,   

    WHAT CAN I SAY? IT’S EMMA NUTT DAY! 

    “I’m very thankful that my first name was not Imma.”EMMA NUTT

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Who was Imma — I mean Emma — Nutt….and why do we celebrate her day today? Imma glad you ask-a that question. For the answer in a Nuttshell, click here:

    Emma Nutt, The World’s 1st Woman Telephone Operator

    Hello, Central? (I’d explain what Central was, but it’s less than central to our conversation.)

    I’m calling because, as you can tell from Emma’s hiring by A. Bell, it was soon clear to him that this was both a Nutt job and a switch for the better. But back in those simpler times, being a telephone operator wasn’t all that simple:

    Even a switchboard manned by a male in a military school wasn’t off the hook when it came to complications (sorry about the clipped picture in this clip, but unfortunately I can’t find this scene in full screen (it’s from a Billy Wilder film starring Ginger Rogers):

    Telephones have played a major part in many movies. Here are more of my ‘phoney’ favorites from yesteryear, starting with the one that started it all:

    THE STORY OF ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL* (1939), starring Don Ameche as Bell
    BELLS ARE RINGING (1960), starring Judy Holliday and Dean Martin
    DIAL M FOR MURDER (1954), starring Ray Milland and Grace Kelly
    SORRY, WRONG NUMBER (1948), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Burt Lancaster
    HIS GIRL FRIDAY (1940), starring Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell

    *If you ever pay a call on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, don’t miss the outstanding ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL MUSEUM at Baddeck. It’s a ringleader among museums!

    Of course, telephones weren’t featured only in classic films. Remember this TV skit?

    And now I’m going to GET SMART and quit while I’m ahead….and Agent 86 is afoot:

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:08 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Lol! That is name I don’t want either!😂😂Hilarious read👍

      Liked by 2 people

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:02 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My father had a Top Secret security clearance level from the time he was a young man working on his Ph.D. (advised by Einstein & Land). After working in the missile program for much of his career, his last job in the Air Force was Congressional Liaison.

      He loved to tell the story of the time he and his best friend Miles (a NASA bigwig at the time) both took off their shoes at the same time, held them to their respective ears (a la Get Smart) and said, sotto voce, “Can’t talk now, I’m with Congress,” put their shoes back on and tried to keep neutral faces until the startled Representatives nearby walked away quickly.

      Loved this post – for more than that reason, one-ringy-dingy.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 4 people

    • scifihammy 2:47 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hilarious clips and Yes – The old switchboard was amazing! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. BTW, that’s Rosalind Russell in the AUNTIE MAME clip — the same gal who co-starred with Cary Grant in HIS GIRL FRIDAY (last film on my movie list).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:58 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Least we forget these guys, the first users of the cell phone.

      .

      Liked by 3 people

    • linnetmoss 6:16 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Cell phones figure largely in Liam Neeson’s “Taken” thrillers, but they cannot compare to the oldies 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:58 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of oldies, I’ll take this occasion to refer back to the “Hello Central” in my post with this clip of a song which was a big hit during WWI when American troops were fighting and dying on the battlefields of Europe:

        Liked by 2 people

        • linnetmoss 3:53 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink

          Wow, I know who Al Jolson is but that one is new to me!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 4:32 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink

          Al Jolson’s singing could be a bit over-dramatic, but he knew how to put over a song in those days. He recorded HELLO CENTRAL in 1918 near the beginning of his fame as “The World’s Greatest Entertainer” (a title now apparently assumed by our humble President).

          Like

    • First Night Design 7:30 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      They don’t make ’em like they used to! Lovely to be reminded of the great Lily Tomlin in Rowan & Martin – joyous memories of that particular series of sketches.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:03 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry that I inadvertently overlooked your comment until today. As I mentioned in a Sept. 5 reply to BroadBlogs, Lily’s birthday was Sept 1 and I overlooked that as well when I wrote this post….sure signs that age is creeping up on me. Take my advice and don’t get old! 🙂

        Like

    • Ricardo 11:57 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Whenever somebody on Facebook posts “Name something that you remember that doesn’t happen anymore” I put down “Waiting for somebody to get off the phone so you can use it.”

      Liked by 4 people

      • literaryeyes 8:41 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Remember party lines? You’d pick up the phone and hear your neighbor talking to someone else, say sorry, hang up, and wait?

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:48 am on September 6, 2017 Permalink

          There were a number of movies in the 1930s & 40s in which party line (or crossed line) scenes with overheard conversations played a part in the plot (SORRY, WRONG NUMBER, listed in my post, was one of them). I personally experienced only a few times picking up the phone and hearing someone on the line….but then, I never was a ‘frequent try-er’ when it came to conversing on the telephone! 🙂

          Like

    • mistermuse 2:26 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Coincidentally, yesterday I was looking for quotes I might use in this post and came across this oldie: “If you think the art of conversation is dead, you have probably never stood around waiting outside a public phone booth.” –Evan Esar

      Liked by 2 people

    • BroadBlogs 3:27 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You have a mind that is great at putting things together!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:42 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, but I’m not sure my wife would agree. Every time something goes haywire on the computer, I have to ask her to fix the problem! 😩

        Like

    • restlessjo 5:02 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I worked on the Continental Exchange, just off Fleet St., many long years ago and that first scenario looks alarmingly familiar. Many thanks for your kind visit. 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • thefirstdark 3:19 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on ReBirth: The Pursuit of Porsha.

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 8:23 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      EMMA NUTT — can’t believe that’s a real name. And the perfect quote: “I’m very thankful that my first name was not Imma.”

      Interesting that telephones are featured so much in movies. Something about “the space between” and trying to connect in an imperfect world?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:00 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed. Lily Tomlin practically made a “calling” out of her many telephone company skits like the one in my post. BTW, when I published this post on 9/1, I didn’t realize that 9/1 is her birthday. Belated Happy Birthday, Lily!

        Like

    • Maria H. 5:24 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I loved all the puns! Old telephones are before my time, but I cannot imagine having to connect all those different people to each other! It looks really complicated.

      Thank you for stopping by and liking my book review for Dark Matter by Blake Crouch. I just posted a new review on another science fiction book, so stop by again if you are interested.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:33 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Switchboard operators in those days must have had a lot of influence because they all had connections (if you still love all my puns after that one, I can only assume that you’re a glutton for punishment)! 😩

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barbara Stanwyck, , , Diamond Lil, , Henry Fonda, , , , , ,   

    EAST IS EAST AND WEST IS BEST? 

    Hat-check girl in Mae West’s first film: “Goodness, what beautiful diamonds.”
    Mae West: “Goodness had nothing to do with it, dearie.”

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Some actors and actresses (and I don’t mean this pejoratively) basically play themselves in their films, while others are so believable and natural in varied roles and genres, they completely inhabit whatever given character they portray. An example of the latter, going back to Hollywood’s Golden Age, is Henry Fonda (if you think he played only serious parts, you haven’t seen the classic 1941 comedy, THE LADY EVE, in which he co-starred with Barbara Stanwyck — another of the most versatile players of that era).

    Mae West was of the first category, very much the Diamond Lil character she created. Today being her birthday (8/17/1893), it’s her day to sparkle:

    It has been said that “Mae West literally constituted a one-woman genre.” Basically playing herself, she was one of the country’s biggest box office draws in the 1930s, despite being almost 40 years old when offered her first movie contract (by Paramount) in 1932. Previously, she’d appeared in a number of rather risquĂ© plays, including Diamond Lil and her first starring role on Broadway (appropriately titled Sex), which she wrote, produced and directed. As with all the plays she wrote and performed in, there was much controversy and publicity, and it was only a matter of time before Hollywood came calling.

    Her first film (see opening quote) was NIGHT AFTER NIGHT, making such an impression that co-star George Raft reportedly said, “She stole everything but the cameras.” Her next film, SHE DONE HIM WRONG (1933), featured Cary Grant in one of his first major roles, and was nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award. It was such a big moneymaker that it saved Paramount from bankruptcy in the midst of the Great Depression.

    West went on to make six more movies in the 1930s, but in 1934, the Production Code began to be strictly enforced, and censors doubled down on her double-entendres. By today’s standards, such censorship seems ludicrous, but those were moralistic times, and after her last ‘naughty’ picture for Paramount in 1937, they thought it best to terminate her contract if they knew what’s good for them. She did manage to make one more hit movie, co-starring with W. C. Fields in My Little Chickadee for Universal Pictures in 1940.

    Unbawdied and unbowed, when asked about puritanical attempts to impede her career, West wisecracked, “I believe in censorship. I made a fortune out of it.” Not for nothing was one of her nicknames “The Statue of Libido.” She died in 1980 at the age of 87.

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Coincidentally, August 17 is also the birthday of my mother, who passed away 17 years ago. Happy Birthday, Mom — YOU WERE THE BEST.

     
    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:25 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Birthday to one of my favorites – and risque she was. In the elevator, a man said to her (as she was nearest the console), “Ballroom, please.” Her reply? “Oh, I didn’t know I was crowding you.”

      I’m sure your mother was a great deal more appropriate, but I’ll bet she was just as memorable. Raise a birthday toast to her for me.

      FUN post!
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:50 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        That’s a great quote, Madelyn — I hadn’t heard it before…. And thank you for the “memorable” thoughts concerning my mother: much deserved by her and appreciated by me.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 4:53 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink

          Have you heard the one about her climbing a staircase lined with young men in one of her films? She never lifted her eyes above their belts and, at one point she paused and said, “Oh, a new one!” Outrageous always.

          You are most welcome, btw, for my comment about your mother. After all, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • The Muscleheaded Blog 12:42 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Outstanding tribute to Mae !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:47 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Too bad she never made a movie with Groucho Marx. They wouldn’t have needed a script.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:18 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        That would’ve been one hell of a movie, Don. Throw in Dorothy Parker (even though she never acted), and we wouldn’t have been able to ‘keep up’ with the double-entendres.

        Like

      • literaryeyes 9:31 pm on August 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        She wrote her own material. I bet grouch did too. Geniuses like that are rare these days.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:44 pm on August 24, 2017 Permalink

          I can appreciate why you might think Groucho wrote his own stuff. However, having read several books on the Marx Brothers, the fact is that Groucho didn’t write the scripts for their movies; the Marx’s were so zany and hard to hold to script that their ad libs/antics usually took precedence over what was written for them (even though very good writers, such as George S. Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind, worked on their films).

          Like

    • moorezart 8:25 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:26 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I re-thank you for another public service (or disservice, depending upon one’s point of view) on my behalf. Remind me to give you a raise if you keep this up. 😩

        Like

        • moorezart 12:07 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink

          LOL – I find what you do most engaging. I simply can’t help myself. Even as a child I couldn’t help sharing with my friends whatever treasure I had found in my Cracker Jack’s Box.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:01 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink

          I remember Cracker Jacks well — I think they’ve been around even longer than I have, if that’s possible (not that I liked them all that much). I vaguely recall a time or two, as a boy, buying a box just for the “treasure” and throwing away the Cracker Jacks. Too bad I don’t still have the treasures — I could take them on Antiques Roadshow and find out if they’re worth thousands today. One never knows, do one?

          Like

    • Carmen 8:38 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I wonder if she was the inspiration for the, “Did you get your ears lowered?” comment. I use it regularly at school and get lots of blank stares in response – from High School folk. 🙂 Once in awhile I get, “Hey! My grandparents say that!” (which gives me pause, as you would think)

      Nice post, mister, from the East ‘girl’! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:31 am on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        For those who aren’t familiar — make that ACQUAINTED — with Carmen, she lives on EAST-HER ISLAND, hence the last sentence of her comment. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 12:17 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Fulsome praise for the filthy-minded, Sr. Muse. We hear it so infrequently. Muchas gracias.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carmen 2:00 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        “Fulsome praise for the filthy-minded” – excellent – ha, ha! 🙂 (the mister is hesitant in replying; he’s having a hard time with a rejoinder, methinks)

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 2:24 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink

          Carmen, contrary to unpopular belief, I don’t sit in front of my computer for hours at a time (except when I fall asleep) waiting for comments to pop up that I can shoot down….though I will admit that in the hours after I post, I wish I didn’t have to get up from my chair to go to the john every 15 minutes (just kidding, of course — and now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to go see a man about a horse). 😩

          Like

        • Carmen 2:29 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink

          Ha, ha! Well, I’ve been making Barbie clothes for several days so every time the computer dings I welcome the interruption. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:32 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        No problem, Ricardo. I’d say more, but I’m having female problems (not that Carmen isn’t well worth it — haha).

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 2:38 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Queen of the one-liners 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:42 pm on August 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of which, here’s one of her quotes: “I’ve no time for broads who want to rule the world alone — without men, who’d do up the zipper on the back of your dress?” 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

    • literaryeyes 9:29 pm on August 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m a Mae West fan and have been known to binge on her movies. In one she does a naughty dance that was so naughty they filmed her from the waist up! Seriously, she was a pioneer in promoting women as sexy AND intelligent. She put gays and transvestites in her plays. She didn’t do it just to shock, she did it because she believed in respect for people no matter what their sexuality or gender orientation, and especially for women.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:56 pm on August 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Although I own a number of biographies/autobiographies of Hollywood Golden Age movie stars, I’ve never read one by or about Mae West, so I didn’t know some of what you describe. Thanks for the info.

      Like

    • MĂ©l@nie 3:43 pm on August 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Salvador Dali was also fascinated by her… she was a FREE woman – une avant-gardiste!!! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:02 pm on August 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed! Mae was both a woman of her time (1920s-early 1930s) and too much woman for highly puritanical times (from 1934 on, when rigid censorship curtailed, and subsequently ended, her freedom to make the movies she wanted to make).

        Like

    • scifihammy 3:02 pm on August 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Mae West was an amazing woman! As I’m sure was your Mother too. Always nice to remember our loved ones on special days.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:09 pm on August 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. Personality-wise, my mother was as much the opposite of Mae as East is from West, but as they say, variety is the spice of life. Life would be very dull if everyone were the same!

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Barbara Stanwyck, , , Dashiell Hammett, Edgar Allen Poe, , , , Howard Hawks, , , , , movie poster art, , , Raymond Chandler, , ,   

    HOLLYWOOD, DEAD LEFT ON VINE* 

    The film noir of the classic period (1941-59) is normally associated with the so-called Golden Age of Hollywood and its aftermath. In truth, the creative impetus for its most influential literary content dates back a full century.
    In April 1841, Graham’s Magazine in Philadelphia published the first detective story, The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allen Poe and thus, mystery fiction was born. –
    -Lawrence Bassoff, CRIME SCENES

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    In my 11/30/16 post titled BOOKS RIGHT DOWN MY ALLEY, I wrote of finding a large cache of old movie books at a local library’s used book sale. One of those books was CRIME SCENES (subtitled Movie Poster Art of the Film Noir), from which the above quote is taken. How could I resist buying such a book, given that Film Noir has long been one of my favorite film genres, which includes such classics as THE MALTESE FALCON (1941), MURDER MY SWEET (1943), DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944), LAURA (1944), THE BIG SLEEP (1946), SUNSET BOULEVARD (1950), and STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951). The introduction states it “is the first genre retrospective collection of movie poster art on the topic ever published in book form.”

    Bassoff writes that in the summer of 1946, ten American films whose French releases had been blocked by WW II (including the first five of the above) arrived in Paris theaters to be viewed by “new product-starved French filmgoers”….films based on American novels the French called “Serie Noire” by such authors as Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. The term “film noir” (first attributed to Frenchman Nino Frank in 1946) literally means “black film” for the “often low key, black and white visual style of the films themselves.”

    And what great films they are! Even after having seen some of these films more than once, I could return to the scene of the crime once again;  no doubt you could too — assuming you’re a film noir buff, which it would be a crime if you’re not. The test? Can you name at least half of the directors and stars of the above films? Answers (directors in CAPS):

    THE MALTESE FALCON — JOHN HUSTON (making his directorial debut), Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor, Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet
    MURDER MY SWEET — EDWARD DYMTRYK, Dick Powell
    DOUBLE INDEMNITY — BILLY WILDER, Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robinson
    LAURA — OTTO PREMINGER, Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews, Clifton Webb, Vincent Price
    THE BIG SLEEP — HOWARD HAWKS, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall
    SUNSET BOULEVARD — BILLY WILDER, William Holden, Gloria Swanson
    STRANGERS ON A TRAIN — ALFRED HITCHCOCK, Farley Granger, Robert Walker

    Moving on: if Basssoff’s book were not confined to Hollywood film noir, no such list would be complete without THE THIRD MAN (1949), a British-made classic directed by Carol Reed, starring Orson Wells and Joseph Cotton. And of course there are many other Hollywood tour de force classics worthy of being kept alive, including such killer-dillers as:

    WHITE HEAT is considered by some to be in the gangster film realm rather than film noir, but there’s no law against crossover — in fact, WHITE HEAT is classified as film noir in CRIME SCENES and gangster film in CLASSIC GANGSTER FILMS (the latter being another used book sale find, which I may review in a future post). Meanwhile, I highly recommend the former — as Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart) said of the bogus Maltese Falcon: It’s “the stuff dreams are made of.” And nightmares.

    *HOLLYWOOD, DEAD LEFT ON VINE is a play on the famous intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street. I heard on the grapevine that the site was a ranch, and then a lemon grove, until 1903.

    20161005_Hollywood_and_Vine_historical_marker

     

     
    • linnetmoss 7:03 am on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Good fun–I will never forget the creepiness of seeing Fred MacMurray in “Double Indemnity,” after growing up with him in Disney movies like “Son of Flubber”!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:41 am on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Now that you mention it, I recall thinking the same thing the first time I saw “Double Indemnity.” And I can’t think of a better way to characterize these ‘bad’ movies than as “good fun” — seriously!

        Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:29 am on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Living la vida noire out here on the Left Coast, Sr. Muse. Did you see that the head of the European Union was going to start advocating for US states to leave the Union in retaliation for Trump promoting the dissolution of the EU? Ohio was specifically mentioned. Hopefully, I won’t need a passport to visit you if I ever get the chance.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:24 am on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I hadn’t heard (or seen) that, Ricardo, but I think the best place to start would be to advocate for Trump to leave the union….better yet, leave the planet (though I can’t imagine that the inhabitants of any other world would be gullible enough to fall for Trump’s con job).

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 4:28 pm on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My mom loves old movies. She’d love this list!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:22 pm on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Prudence dictates keeping my posts to a reasonable length, or I’d have listed many more movies. Sometimes I wish Prudence would mind her own business! 😩

        Like

    • Don Frankel 5:04 pm on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great movies of course I’ve seen them all and more than once. They did a remake of Out Of The Past called Against All Odds with Jeff Bridges, Rachel Ward and James Woods. In a bit of smart casting they also had Jane Greer in there.

      But White Heat is one of the all time any type of movie you want to call it and no mention of it would be complete without…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:20 pm on March 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        These movies had it all: great writing, atmosphere, directors, stars, supporting casts — the works. I’ve only watched WHITE HEAT once or twice, but I’ve seen MALTESE FALCON and THE THIRD MAN at least 5 or 6 times each, DOUBLE INDEMNITY and SUNSET BOULEVARD probably about 3 times.

        Like

    • MĂ©l@nie 11:00 am on March 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I did watch them all… just like you, I may have seen “Maltese Falcon” 4-5 times! 🙂

      • * *

      @film noir – en français dans le texte, SVP… 🙂 MERCI, Monsieur Muse!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:34 pm on March 31, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Mercy me — I fear my very limited French fails me in getting the gist of the sentence before “SVP” (which I understand stands for “s’il vous plait”). If you please, please translate into English. Merci!
        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • MĂ©l@nie 3:25 am on April 5, 2017 Permalink

          SVP = s’il vous plaĂźt = please… 🙂 you’re too modest, Sir… my very best and respectful regards, MĂ©lanie Bedos

          Liked by 1 person

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