Tagged: Stardust Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 9:46 am on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , consolation, , , , , problems, Stardust   

    A CONSOLATION OF STARS 

    What with all the problems in this crazy world of ours, my fellow earthlings, is there consolation in knowing that my previously-posted problems don’t amount to a proverbial hill of beans by comparison? After all, everyone in Casablanca has problems — mine may work out:

    In fact, I think mine will work out — help is on the way (by beautiful way of my tech-angel daughter) on Father’s Day. But until then, I’ll seek my consolation in the Stardust of a song (or two):

    If we could clear the dust from our eyes, friends, aren’t we all more or less lost in the stars? Maybe most of us just don’t see it: little stars, BIG STARS, blowing through the night….and we’re lost out here in the stars….

     

     
    • Carmen 10:02 am on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just wanted to add that I think you’re a ROCK star!! I’m looking after six of the grandchildren right now – I’ll get to hear the selections later, when I can relax and appreciate them! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 11:28 am on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      And you’re obviously a rock star of a grandma, Carmen….but looking after only six grandchildfren? Unless your children are hiding some, tell them to get back to work. Haven’t they heard that they’re….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 1:31 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great selections!

      Liked by 1 person

      • waywardsparkles 3:47 pm on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Okay, I’m not used to this format, but here goes nutin’! Love Louis but I’ve never seen Casablanca. I KNOW!!! Myrna Loy is one of my all time favs, though, and I love Cheaper by the Dozen, both the book and the movie. It seems like there was a second book, too, maybe? Or am I remembering wrong? Anyway, in life, it’s all about the systems you have in place to deal with whatever you have to deal with. And a lot of luck! 🙂 Mona

        Liked by 3 people

        • mistermuse 7:01 pm on June 5, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for the comment. I’m not used to a lot of formats, so welcome to the club!
          Never seen Casablanca? You are indeed wayward! 😉
          As for Cheaper By The Dozen, I don’t know if there was a second book, but there was a sequel to the movie two years later called Belles On Their Toes. I think I saw it decades ago, but I don’t remember it, so either it’s not very memorable or I’m losing my memory.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 2:05 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Casablanca and Satchmo. It doesn’t get much better than that!

      Like

      • mistermuse 2:58 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Unsurpassed performances, an unsurpassed film, and unsurpassed music = “it doesn’t get much better than that.” 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:37 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      So glad that your beautiful tech-angel daughter is helping you to resolve your problems with WordPress 🙂 Enjoyed the Casablanca video clip.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:27 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Rosaliene. That clip is a classic example of why Casablanca is one of the greatest films of all time: exquisite Dialogue, fine Acting, and superb Direction: a DAD for the ages — not unlike mistermuse, who is a well(?) aged dad.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 7:29 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink

          I can’t believe it — all of a sudden, “Loading” has mysteriously disappeared and “Likes” have reappeared since the last time I was here a few hours ago. It’s a miracle (and I wasn’t even praying to the computer gods for one)!

          Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 7:46 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      aha souds like you two might be each others biggest fans!

      First two clips were supremo, third one didn’t work … a dozen, his poor wife!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:18 pm on June 4, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Kate, Carmen and I are not only each other’s biggest, but each other’s oldest, fans — would you believe we go back to the days when she sang and danced with fruit on her head:

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 7:58 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My favorite version of Stardust…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:13 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Likewise. Louis was at the top of his game in 1931 when he recorded Stardust.

      Liked by 1 person

      • masercot 8:18 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        That’s about the time he recorded I’ll Be Glad When You’re Dead You Rascal You, right?

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:28 am on June 5, 2020 Permalink

          Right. He also recorded Rascal again in 1941, by which time he was past his peak (as a trumpeter, not as an entertainer).

          Liked by 2 people

    • annieasksyou 1:53 pm on June 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve visited Rick’s Place many times over the years but never tire of it. This time, the emphasis on kindness TO strangers seemed most appropriate.
      And the great Satchmo: immediately following Stardust was his rendition of We Shall Overcome. I was overcome by it.
      Then Lotte Lenya singing of the stars in all their manifestations reminded me of the peaceful demonstrators. All told, this was a meaningful and emotional journey.

      Thank you, mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:45 pm on June 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I anticipate doing a follow-up to this post in a few days, Annie….provided I can overcome some issues I’m having with my outdated browser before my techie daughter comes to my rescue on Father’s Day. The follow-up will probably be my last post until after Father’s Day, as it’s too time-consuming and too much of a hassle trying to work around the problems.

      Meanwhile, I’m glad this post (and hopefully the next one) were, and will be, to your liking. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 12:22 am on June 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Fathers Day; enjoy your well-earned break. I hope you’ll visit my blog again soon, mistermuse. Haven’t been doing much punning and rhyming of late, but I do have a little political acrostic posted today. Cheers!

      Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 3:57 am on June 14, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I so enjoyed that excerpt from Casablanca. A little escapism on a Sunday morning. Thank you! 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:11 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love, LOVE the way you began this post. Brilliant.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:25 pm on July 5, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, SS (I would also have accepted semi-brilliant, luminous, superb, or ingenious). 😉

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Jelly Roll Morton, , , , , , Satchmo, , Stardust, trumpet,   

    MEMORIES OF SATCHMO (Aug. 4, 1901-July 6, 1971) 

    “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” –Louis (“Satchmo”) Armstrong

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Awake at night, at sunrise, every sunset too, seems to be bringing me….

    But that was long ago, and now my consolation is in the….

    My only sin is in my skin — what did I do to be so….

    In contrast to our current culture of celebrity-for-celebrity’s-sake, today we celebrate the memory of a man who was the genuine article: a true game-changer, unsurpassed in the history of America’s contribution to the music world, namely jazz. To quote Scott Yanow, author of CLASSIC JAZZ:

    Although jazz existed before Louis Armstrong (including important giants Jelly Roll Morton, James P. Johnson, Freddie Keppard, Sidney Bechet, and King Oliver), Armstrong had the biggest impact of any jazz musician. Whether it was transforming jazz from an ensemble-oriented music into one showcasing solos by virtuosos, popularizing both scat singing and hornlike vocalizing, infusing pop songs with the blues, making dramatic statements with the inventive use of silence and dynamics, and (via his sunny personality) making jazz accessible to millions who had never heard it before, Armstrong’s contributions are so vast [that] jazz would have been a lot different if he had not existed.

    To help the reader (who isn’t a jazz buff or remembers only the past-his-prime Armstrong) understand something of the impact of the early Armstrong, I’ll close with this 1928 recording — his favorite (and mine) of his own playing:

    There, brethren, you have the earthly counterpart of The Rapture enrapturing you from the West End of jazz heaven. May you abandon yourself to the American Gabriel’s clarion call as his golden trumpet leads you to Blues paradise. Or just enjoy.

     

     

     

     
    • leggypeggy 12:30 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I was lucky enough to hear Satchmo perform live.

      Liked by 4 people

    • calmkate 3:01 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      one of my heroes, thanks for this delightful tribute!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 4:58 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These are beautiful oldies but goldies😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:54 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “Incomparable” is the only word you need to describe Armstrong…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:25 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hello there. I saw him once in concert, in a stadium in the borough of Queens, which is part of New York City. He lived in Queens with his wife. Their home has been turned into a museum.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:43 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Neil. I didn’t know their home had been turned into a museum. It could have just as fittingly been turned into a shrine.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:29 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Love that last piece….the best!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:48 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s what’s known as saving the best for last (though, in this case, it’s the best of the best)..

        Like

    • scifihammy 8:37 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Excellent post and music. 🙂
      My Mum really like Satchmo. 🙂
      Once when I was talking about him to my kids, I called him Sasquatch!! But my kids knew who I meant. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:53 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Glad to hear you talked to your kids about Sasquatch — I mean Satchmo. All most kids today know about music is today’s music.

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 10:16 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink

          That’s true. But I think it’s important to share with your kids things that you appreciate 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 10:40 am on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Classic!
      Great clips… I’d never heard Black and Blue from 1929.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:08 pm on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In 1929, only a black man with the stature of Louis Armstrong could ‘get away with’ performing such a song sympathetic to the black man’s perspective. Then, in 1939, a black woman first sang this much more outspoken song that continued to outrage white racists for years, including during the McCarthy hearings of the early 1950s. Here she sings it in a 1959 TV appearance:

        Like

    • In My Cluttered Attic 3:34 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Satchmo, truly was one of the very best. Thanks for this post, Jazz. :O)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:53 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Neil for getting me out of the funk caused by this horrible weekend. I found that playing my wide selection of Satchmo’s recordings helped me see in spite of what’s happening, deep down I agree with him when he sings ‘What a Wonderful World.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:09 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      My oldest daughter is a Red Cross volunteer in Dayton, helping with the human aftermath of the horrible weekend there. Words cannot adequately convey what the victims’ families are going through. We can only hope that, with time, it will become a Wonderful World for them again, although it will never be the same.

      Like

    • thelonelyauthorblog 8:27 pm on August 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A great one from our past.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 4:05 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ah, these songs are a marvellous soundtrack to this gorgeous, sunny Wednesday. Thanks so much. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:27 pm on August 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the comment, SS. You inspire me to write this:

      I screening, Silver Screening, we all screening for ice creaming.

      Actually, I wouldn’t blame you for screaming at me to stop being so inspired.

      Like

    • America On Coffee 12:15 am on August 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Such an amazing personality with a loving style and loving smile. Great song!

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 3:04 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      MM, i had the great honor of Louis Armstrong recording one of my songs; Not a great jazz piece just a little feel good thing. I am eternally humbled by it. Here it is:

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:28 am on August 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Love this kind of “little feel good thing,” Tony! Although no one could do it like Louis, it’s the kind of song I think a good Dixieland band could also ‘have a party’ with.

        Like

  • mistermuse 8:52 pm on November 22, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Best Years of Our Lives, , , , Heart and Soul, , , , Lazy River, , , Stardust, To Have and have Not, Young Man With A Horn   

    THE AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF HOAGY CARMICHAEL (Book Review) 

    On this, the 114th birthday of Hoagy Carmichael (11/22/1899 – 12/26/1981), I daresay you could mention his name to 100 random people under age 60, and 99 (maybe all 100) would say, “Hoagy who?”  But why waste time lamenting the fate awaiting almost all “celebrities” sooner or later? Fame is indeed fleeting — perhaps now more than ever — and relative few are the songwriters, actors and singers (for Hoagy was all three) who will be remembered on their triple-digit birthdays by succeeding generations. So it is with Bloomington, Indiana’s Hoagy — but his star shines on, nonetheless, for those who appreciate the timelessness of creative magic.

    For this occasion, I have pulled from my bookshelves a 1999 Hoagy double-autobiography which is a republication of The Stardust Road (1946) and Sometimes I Wonder (1965), with a new introduction by John Edward Hasse. I’d read this volume a few years ago, and it’s as good a way as any to re-visit Hoagland Howard Carmichael, a man whose music and film roles I’d known since my youth in the 1940s. As Hasse puts it in his introduction:

    Hoagy Carmichael was a true American original. First of all, there was his name…. Then there was that singing voice–the flat, Hoosier cadences–and that laconic public persona, impossible to mistake for anyone else’s. And there was his unusual career path–from law student, lawyer, and Wall Street employee to hit songwriter and celebrity via records, motion pictures, radio and television.
    But most original of all were the songs Carmichael wrote, songs that typically sound like nobody else’s.

    I love the way Hoagy begins The Stardust Road:
    The phone rang and I picked it up. It was Wad Allen. “Bix died,” he said
     (referring to Hoagy’s close friend and legendary early jazz trumpeter, Bix Beiderbecke).
    Wad laughed a funny laugh. “I wonder if it will hurt old Gabriel’s feelings to play second trumpet?” Wad asked.
    I could hear Wad’s breathing, then suddenly, but gradually getting clearer, I heard something else.
    “I can hear him,” I said. “I can hear him fine from here.”
    Over and around the sound I heard Wad’s voice.
    “Sure,” he said shakily. “So can I.”
    “I guess he didn’t die, then.”
    And so it went back and forth, until Hoagy said, “Call me up again,” I told him, “when somebody else doesn’t die.”
    But Wad had hung up. I tilted back in the chair before my desk and felt tears behind my eyes.  

    These are the kind of personal reminiscences you can only get from those who experienced them. If you’re a true lover of classic jazz and the Golden Age of popular music, you will find Hoagy’s autobiographies irresistible. THE STARDUST ROAD/SOMETIMES I WONDER combo is available on Amazon.com, AbeBook.com and elsewhere.

    And speaking of combos, let’s close with two versions of Hoagy’s immortal Star Dust, the first by Louis Armstrong, whose incomparable 1931 rendition still sets the standard after all these years, and the second, by Hoagy himself:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r94-7nJt-WM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2fbOAyNOpM

     
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