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  • mistermuse 12:03 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Ethel Waters, , , , The Love I Long For,   

    TWO IN ONE 

    April 23 is both LOVER’S DAY and TAKE A CHANCE DAY. As it happens, one of my favorite composers wrote a song which encompasses both of those gambols/gambles in one title:

    The name of that composer is Vladimir Dukelsky, better known to lovers (of The Golden Age of Popular Music) as VERNON DUKE, writer of such all-time standards as APRIL IN PARIS and AUTUMN IN NEW YORK. Here, in keeping with our ‘double take’ on this occasion, is one of his lesser known songs:

    On this April day, I will keep our celebration short and bittersweet by closing with the above-noted ‘song of the month’:

     
    • calmkate 1:29 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      absolutely loved Ethels voice and that young dancer would be up there with Fred!

      As for Ella, what a legend, thanks for such a cheerful musical interlude 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:51 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You mean Mister (Fred) Rogers, of course! (Just kidding — thanks for stopping by my neighborhood.)

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:22 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink

          yes it’s getting a bit dangerous over there … guns, viral deaths, rallies, no foreigners … you take care 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 4:52 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Watching Ethel Waters gives me another three and a half hours of hope…

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 10:36 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Let’s not settle for just 3 1/2 hours of hope. Here, courtesy of Ethel, is what I’m hoping for on Nov. 3:

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 11:48 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink

          When Esso changed to Exxon, there were commercials with the Esso tiger singing just that song. Not as well as Waters, but pretty good for a tiger…

          Liked by 2 people

        • magickmermaid 5:46 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink

          Great tunes and dancing! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 8:04 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I was fascinated with Ella’s scat when I was a child. I’d watch an old movie and skip around the house scatting. My parents were very tolerant people…
      😉

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:43 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        The first to scat may have been Satchmo, but Ella certainly did scat mo’ (never miss a chance to make a bad pun, I always say). 😉

        Liked by 3 people

    • Ashley 8:14 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My oh my! What a joy to watch and listen to Ethel Waters! A delight. I smiled all the way through and I’m playing it again as I write. (Also the 2 dancers are amazing!) There’s so much missing in our lives these days that I’m glad you’re there to remind us of happiness.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:53 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. That clip is from the 1943 film CABIN IN THE SKY, one of the few Hollywood films of that era with an all-black cast, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Eddie “Rochester” Anderson, and Duke Ellington & His Orchestra. It was also the first movie directed by Vincente Minnelli (future husband of Judy Garland and father of Liza Minnelli).

        Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 11:33 am on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s the Apocalypse, too, Sr. Muse…https://www.richardcahill.net/home/the-rapture-is-today

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:32 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope it holds off until after the NFL draft tonight, Ricardo, because I’m so starved for sports, I wouldn’t mind if my Cincinnati Bengals drafted Donald Trump. Hey, if he can make America great again, think what he could do for the Bengals.

        Liked by 1 person

    • willedare 1:01 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What a wonderful post — Vernon Duke and Ethel Waters and Eddie Anderson (and one other great dancer!) and Ella and then another Ethel Waters song in the comments! I have long loved and been astounded by Ella’s musical gifts, but only recently begun appreciating the wonderful Ms. Waters. Turns out a bunch of great songs were written for her to debut in clubs, on Broadway, and in the movies — and she sang (or in the case of movies sang and then lip-synched) them so well! I saw a video recently of her performing Irving Berlin’s “Suppertime” on a TV show hosted by Diana Ross. Ms. Waters had debuted the song many years before in a hit Irving Berlin revue — and her performance on TV many years later was still masterful and heart-breaking. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5Zvjjbc-Hk

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:00 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m with you on both Ella and Ethel, as shown by the many LPs of both in my record collection. The clip of Ethel (in the comments) is particularly interesting because the record was made in 1921 when recording equipment was primitive and the band behind her was rather primitive also….yet her voice cones through beautifully.

        I’ve read quite a bit about her, including in a bio (of her contemporary, lyricist Andy Razaf) titled BLACK AND BLUE which I’ve just finished. It seems she was a bit of a prima donna until she “got religion” late in life. But who can blame her — black artists had it rough in those days, to say the least.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 2:34 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for bringing this wonderful, talented group of old time greats to the attention of many who weren’t familiar with them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:25 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I do this kind of post fairly often, and would do them even more often if I thought there was a sufficient ‘audience’ for that era among my readers. Perhaps there is, and maybe I’ve underestimated it (in any case, “sufficient” is in the eye of the beholder), so look for more “as time goes by.”

        Like

        • Don Ostertag 3:35 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink

          I would hope there would be a lot of interest in your blogs of this type. Our youngsters should not live by rap alone.

          Liked by 1 person

    • annieasksyou 5:03 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      This was a loverly trio—and encore—and I’m happy I dropped in by chance (not!) The Ethel Waters recording was tip-tap, and Ella never fails to delight me. I’ve heard April in Paris a zillion times, but I don’t ever remember the singer enunciating WHOM can I run to? So viva la grammariana!
      When you responded to a comment by enriching your Nov 3 response with an Ethel reprieve, I thought of you as a Harpo Marxist—making a point with a recorded song instead of a horn.
      While I’m here, I thank you for your like of my women and successful leadership in pandemic post. Unlike your previous likes, that like did go through. I’m assuming you didn’t comment, but since I just read an entire post of people complaining that WP was swallowing their comments, I wanted to make sure.
      I did respond to one of my respondents on that post with a triple pun, which I feel obliged to report to you due to our shared pun-y weakness.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:31 pm on April 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t remember commenting on that post, but I see you commented there on Nov. 12 that you “LOVE bad puns” — which leads me to think your comment may have been in response to a comment of mine that WP subsequently “swallowed.” In any case, that seems like an eternity ago, so (moving on) I’m glad you enjoyed the ‘Ethel and Ella’ show and noticed the to “WHOM” it may concern — namely, us.

        Like

    • Elizabeth 4:52 pm on April 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hadn’t heard from Waters in a long time and was glad to have a chance to listen to her again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:28 pm on April 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Ethel was born in poverty, but went on to become a great vocalist, and the first black woman to integrate Broadway’s theater district and have her own TV show. What a woman!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 6:16 pm on April 25, 2020 Permalink

          Did she have any roles where she didn’t have to dress down as in “Cabin in the Sky?”

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:54 pm on April 25, 2020 Permalink

          Female blues singers were the rage in the 1920s, which is how she became famous. There were few opportunities for black women in film then (and for years to come) other than as maids and housekeepers, so dressing up was ‘out of the picture,’ if you’ll pardon the pun. Here’s more info:

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethel_Waters

          Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Betty Grable, CABIN IN THE SKY, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, , Ethel Waters, , glamour girls, , , Lana Turner, , , Rita Hayworth, sex goddess, ,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: THE GLAMOUR GIRLS 

    A glamour girl is one who looks good enough to eat and dresses with taste. –Evan Esar

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    In my “preview of coming attractions” post of Oct. 13, the subject of Hollywood glamour girls (in general) and Rita Hayworth (in particular) came up in an exchange of comments. October 17 being Rita’s birthday, it seems the appropriate day to do the appropriate post, focusing not only on Rita, but on several other becoming attractions who fill the bill by becomingly filling their dresses.

    My glamour girl choices here are both limited and subjective, due not only to length-of-post considerations, but the implicit broadness of the term, e.g.: is, or is not, glamour girl of a piece with sex goddess? For the arbitrary purposes of this opus, I’ve drawn a distinction between the two by disqualifying actresses considered to be ‘pure’ sex symbols, such as Jayne Mansfield, Jane Russell. and (perhaps unfairly) Marilyn Monroe. They (and European sex symbols like Brigitte Bardot) may “look good enough to eat,” but dressing with taste was hardly their strong suit.

    With that model of suitability out of the way, here are the glamour girls I think stand out as epitomizing Hollywood’s Golden Age by virtue of such disparate criteria as a touch of class, sex appeal more than skin deep, talent, and even pin-up popularity with WWII GIs.

    Let’s start with the birthday girl, Rita Hayworth, who said “I like having my picture taken and being a glamorous person. I never really thought of myself as a sex goddess.”:

    https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/10/31/rita-hayworth/

    My next choice is the actress called the most beautiful woman in the world in her day:

    Next, the actress called the last major star to come out of the Hollywood studio system:

    With apologies to the likes of Veronica Lake, Lana Turner, and Betty Grable, I will close with this glamorous actress who, but for the overriding racism of the period, could and should have been a major Hollywood star (seen here in a scene with Eddie “Rochester” Anderson and Ethel Waters from CABIN IN THE SKY (1943):

     

     
    • calmkate 1:32 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      she is hot … sounds like racism has increased over there from what we hear … white cops killing black girls in their own bedroom, they are trigger crazy!

      Liked by 2 people

    • America On Coffee 1:48 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Glamour has certainly changed, right? And with that change came other big impacts.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ashley 4:39 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant!

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:10 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You must’ve forgot Myrna Loy… the sexiest of all the glamour girls and one of the longest lasting (from the twenties to the fifties).

      BTW, I saw Lena Horne live in Dallas, TX. As good as she is in your clip, she was even better just standing at a microphone…

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:54 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I never looked at Myrna as being in that category — she had much more than a “touch” of class and was too unique and good of an actress. To be thought of as primarily a glamour girl would be doing her a disservice, in my opinion.

        As for Lena, I never saw her in person, but she certainly was dynamic in her TV appearances later in her career. In 1943, when CABIN IN THE SKY was made (Vincente Minnelli’s directorial debut, btw), TV was still waiting in the wings, and movies (along with radio) were king, with CABIN being one of the few all-black cast films produced by a major studio.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:11 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Good group. Would be interesting to see who you think would be considered glamorous today…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry, Rg, but I’ll have to plead ignorance — I’m not into today’s celebrity scene and wouldn’t know one “glamorous” gal from another. Chalk it up to the generation crap….er, gap.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 2:34 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 3:52 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve just finished reading Gone With the Wind . . .Vivien Leigh sprang immediately to mind when I read the blog post title. Loved those clips mister muse! I always learn something.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:20 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I never even thought of her, Carmen — probably because she wasn’t thought of as the typical Hollywood type of glamour girl. She certainly was beautiful, though. Anyway, I’m glad you’re “always learn something” here. Maybe I’ll tell my wife and try to make her jealous.

        On second thought, I’d better leave well enough alone.

        Like

        • Carmen 6:51 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink

          You know what they say about teaching a teacher. .. 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:04 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink

          They also say: Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach. For some reason, my wife (a retired teacher) never cared for that one.

          Like

    • America On Coffee 4:06 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      …and Hedy Lamarr was one of the quiet tops! 💕

      Liked by 3 people

    • Richard A Cahill 5:21 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The world does not lack for beautiful women, Sr. Muse, then and now. But the photography is better now. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZ1XM9LwS64

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:24 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        The photography is certainly slicker now, but I don’t know that it makes beautiful women look more beautiful, Ricardo. To my mind, most commercials (like that clip) promoting a product with beautiful women (often with pouty, supposedly sexy facial expressions) are more of a turn-off than a turn-on, and I’m not buying what they’re selling (at least, not in that venue).

        Like

    • mlrover 10:13 am on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The sad irony is that superficial beauty distracted from the talent and intelligence of many Hollywood “glamour” personalities. They were exploited and used. It was no wonder that Lamarr became bitter at the end. I have no sympathy for Weinstein. So many before him got away with it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In those days, only ‘strong’ female stars like Katherine Hepburn could fight off exploitation. Of course, it didn’t hurt that she wasn’t the “glamour girl” type to begin with. Nonetheless, she had the box office clout to be her own woman, and she knew it.

        Like

    • Silver Screenings 11:21 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Lena Horne certainly should have been a bigger star. She was beautiful, she could sing, and she could act. (I love her in Cabin in the Sky!) She truly was glamourous.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:06 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethel Waters, , , , , , , rain rain go away, , SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, , weather,   

    THE RAIN IN TWAIN FALLS MAINLY ON THE BRAIN 

    It is best to read the weather forecast before we pray for rain. –Mark Twain

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    It’s funny — April is NATIONAL HUMOR MONTH, but soddenly I don’t feel very humorous. It’s coming down in buckets out there, and some of what’s in the buckets is making its way into my basement. I hope whoever’s praying for rain is satisfied — now how about praying for it to stop? It’s bad enough that Mother Nature keeps raining on my head when I go outside — I don’t need her to greet my feet as a dweller in my cellar when I go down in the dungeon.

    ‘s no use. No letup in sight. Keeps rainin’ all the time….

    But am I going to let a reign of rain ruin what I’m doin’? No way! Others can be a Debbie Downer, despairing in the deluge. It’s in my Genes to be….

    P.S. The title of this post is word play on a song from a hit 1956 Broadway musical later made into a movie starring Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn. Can you name the song?

     

     
    • rivergirl1211 12:56 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Please go splash in your cellar puddles while imitating Gene Kelly…. we’ll wait.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:14 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, r.g.. I could dance up a storm if I weren’t feeling under the weather. I’ll let you know when I feel up to it (which will be about as long as it takes you to forget the whole thing). 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 1:12 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Singin’ in the Rain by Gene Kelly is one of my oldie’s favorites.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 4:31 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe you could soak your feet in the basement!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Elizabeth 4:58 pm on April 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        No you have written about your feet, not your head. My husband was soaking his feet at the time I replied which probably influenced my response!

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:04 pm on April 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Elizabeth, I’m glad you didn’t tell me to go soak my head, because I would’ve had to take off my wig (instead of my shoes), which would be embarrassing because it’s glued on to my bald spot with Elmer’s Glue, and I’d have to get more glue from Elmer. 😦

        Like

    • calmkate 11:22 pm on April 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      the rain in spain stays mainly in the plain ….

      Love your play of words and emotions here, great song picks!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 2:15 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Congrats for knowing the song in answer to my “P.S.” question, Kate! For those who don’t know, the song is from MY FAIR LADY, Lerner and Loewe’s great Broadway musical based on George Bernard Shaw’s PYGMALION.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 7:08 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink

          know it very well, my parents used to torture us as children with My Fair Lady and South Pacific!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Garfield Hug 3:50 am on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Not true! I loved your post and laughed heartily, especially at your tweaked quotation! Good one Mistermuse and happy weekend ahead.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on April 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, G.H. — same to you, and give Garfield an extra big hug for me. 🙂

        Like

    • America On Coffee 10:38 pm on April 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wetheads are bad. Good that the seasons change. But then, there are the hotheads and airheads .😕

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:45 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and then there are the snotheads and the potheads, not to mention the roundheads and the squareheads, and the rumpheads and the Trumpheads (the last of whom has been known to dump heads, as in “You’re fired!”).

        Like

    • Marietta Rodgers 3:15 pm on April 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had no idea there were so many songs about rain. Sorry about all the rain, but you know what Longfellow says, “The best thing one can do when it’s raining, is to let it rain.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • awisewomansjourney 6:44 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This was a great play on a lot of words! Thank you for the songs I especially love that oldie but goodie Stormy Weather! ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 8:35 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for including Gene’s version of singing in the rain. I love, LOVE that scene and the way Gene dances in the rain.

      I hope the rain will end soon in your area and bring lovely spring flowers in its stead. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:59 pm on April 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That scene is indeed a classic, as is the whole film (SINGING IN THE RAIN). Some consider it the best musical of all time. I wouldn’t go that far, but I’d include it AMONG the best musicals.

        As for the rain, we’ve had a reprieve the past several days, but tonight stars a new round which will test whether my hydraulic cement repairs hold. If not, maybe I’ll grow some aquatic plants in the basement rather than seek spring flowers. 🙂

        Like

    • moorezart 7:42 pm on April 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

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