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  • mistermuse 9:09 am on November 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Grand Central Station, history, Nancy, Nellie, Nina, ,   

    THE N DAME 

    In doing research for the posts of this fem song series, I occasionally come across an old tune which not only is unfamiliar to me, but has a ‘trivia’ connection that catches my attention as much as the song itself. Such is the case with my first N song — NINA, recorded in 1931 by Wooding’s Grand Central Red Caps:

    Orchestras of that era often adopted the names of venues where they played extended gigs, such as Richard Himber and His Ritz-Carlton Orchestra / Billy Wynne and His Greenwich Village Inn Orchestra. These venues lent a certain prestige to the orchestra and, one assumes, vice versa — though it’s hard to see how Grand Central Station could gain prestige from being coupled with a relatively obscure band like Wooding’s. But beyond that, it seems unlikely that any orchestra would be the ‘house band’ at a train terminal ….even one so grand as Grand Central — unless a night club was ‘on board’ there (which I can find no record of). If anyone can throw some light on the latter, please comment.

    Moving on, we have a gal named NELLIE who is also waiting for some light:

    The end dame of our N game is NANCY….you know — the one with the laughing face.

     

     
    • mistermuse 6:53 pm on November 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      NOTE to Alexandra Hampton: I appreciate your “Like” on this and several previous posts, but I can’t find your blog to check it out. If you have one, please give me the link (if you wish).

      Like

    • lexborgia 7:33 am on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I must admit an unfamiliarity with such music,
      After the intro I went straight to the red caps, and liked it a lot, it relayed a special type of nostalgia. 90secs later, reading on, I thought it would never end, but after 30secs of Nellie (and not a second more) I realised just how good the caps were. Frank/Nancy was a nice finish

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 am on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Unfamiliarity with such music, being a cultural/generational thing, it doesn’t surprise me that you and most of my readers haven’t heard of most of the songs in this series. I’m just pleased that you’re open to giving them a shot.

        For those who are unfamiliar with Red Caps, they’re Pullman Porters whose history goes back 100+ years. Here’s a short clip that I hope you find interesting:

        Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 4:24 pm on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      I knew you had to have Nancy With The Laughing Face. You couldn’t do this without it But this was another difficult one. The only song I could think of was No No Nanette but not because I even knew the song but the story associated with it. And that story was that Harry Freeze then owner of the Boston Red Sox sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $100,000 so he could finance the show. But then some people say it didn’t exactly happen that way. Like a lot things.

      Don

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:20 pm on November 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I did have a few other N choices, but none of them appealed to me as much as the 3 songs I chose. The next letter is going to be the most difficult so far, as I know of only one old song title with a girl’s name beginning with O. If I can’t come up with one or two more, I may end up combining O and P in my next post.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 6:41 pm on November 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Instead of waiting till you post and knowing this is a tough one I know I mentioned Miss Otis Regrets. There’s also the song Ophelia but it’s not much of a song, And it’s obvious that you not just going for anything but good music as well. But after those Muse I’m tapped out. If I think of anything I’ll post it here.

      Don

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:11 pm on November 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I’m trying to stick to girl’s first names, but I’d use Miss Otis Regrets as a last resort if I hadn’t come up with another idea. I’m putting the finishing touches on it now and will post it late tonight. Thanks again.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Crow Jane, history, , , , Sweet Jennie Lee   

    J TALK 

    Let’s talk a bit about the “J” ladies who will join us on this 9th walk into my feminine song series. Our stroll starts with a century-old blues, the title of which has origins lost in haze beyond where the crow flies. Speculation has it that the Crow in the title refers to racist Jim Crow laws in Southern states in those vestigial days, or to the name of a Native American tribe, but no one seems to know for sure. In any case, CROW JANE is a ‘blues J’ that’s a jewel of its genre, performed here New Orleans street-style:

    Next, we have a sweet little number from 1930. You’ll love her when you see….

    I don’t know about you — I could go for more of this gal. But enough walking. This time, we’ll go by Cab (the fare is quite good):

     
    • arekhill1 10:53 am on October 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:44 pm on October 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Not exactly my cup of Java, Ricardo, but at almost 50 years old, Sweet Jane will soon qualify as a golden oldie by my loose definition. Even then, though, this one from 1966 will remain my preferred Jane:

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:09 am on October 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great song and great footage of my home town. I’m always amazed at how crowded it was even back then, when the population was a lot less. Although more people were always crowded into lower Manhattan. The boros were sparsely populated. There were even farms in Queens when I was a kid.

      It’s a good thing I’m not trying to do this as all I could think of for J is Now It’s Judy’s Turn to Cry. For L though I thought of the old great Civil War Song ‘Lorena’. Not that you should use it just that I was happy I could think of it.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:37 am on October 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Great footage indeed, Don. Although NYC isn’t my hometown (hardly even been there), I find those old scenes fascinating. As for the song, it’s one of my favorites by the prolific but forgotten composer of such old standards as LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME, YOU’RE DRIVING ME CRAZY and LITTLE WHITE LIES, Walter Donaldson.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jackie 3:21 pm on October 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m so sorry I have been basically MIA from the blogosphere. Things have been shifting and changing so I got knocked off balance. Things are finally settling down so I should be able to keep up better now. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:59 pm on October 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        No apology necessary, Jackie — I’d prove it here with a clip of a J song titled JACKIE, but unfortunately I know of no such song. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 12:50 pm on October 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Mary Clark, Writer and commented:
      Great American music

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:42 pm on October 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Mary. Great American music then, and always — and thus (luckily for us), one less thing for Trump to make great again.

        Like

    • literaryeyes 1:03 pm on October 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on Mary Clark, Writer.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:07 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Helen, history, , Ida, , She Looks Like Helen Brown,   

    H I 

    Sixty-plus year old song titles with girl’s names beginning with ‘H’ and ‘I’ are scarce, which makes it expedient to ‘HI’light both in a two-for-the-price-of-one post.

    If there is so much as a hint of a hanger-on among America’s all-but-forgotten H songs, it is HARD-HEARTED HANNAH….but even that haughty harridan has hardly been heard hereabouts since hapless Herbert Hoover was handed his heave-ho from the White House hundreds of historic happenings ago.

    Still, I would give Hard-Hearted Hanna a play if not for a gal who looks like Helen Brown (whereas the previous paragraph looks like hell in black and white):

    As for the letter I, if you were around in 1903, you may remember IDA, who was sweet as….apple cider?

    And, just to show that IDA is not just for us old geezers, here some young’uns show her a little love:

    I’d-a like-a to be shown-a little love too, but no one has ever written an enduringly endearing ditty titled Mistermuse. When will they invent a time machine so I can go back and change my name to someone like Barney Google? (If you don’t remember Barney, Google him.)

    Eyes-a waitin’.

     

     
    • The Indecisive Eejit 3:52 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Lol @ Sparkplug. It has a certain ring to it that I doubt many young ones would say to their motors. Giddy up there Sparkplug lol

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:31 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I once bet on a horse named Sparkplug, but he was a slow starter. Actually he never made it out of his stall.

        Like

    • inesephoto 7:03 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great videos. Old and young love Ida and jazz.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:38 am on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Barney Google with the goo-goo-googly eyes? My father used to sing it in the shower.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:59 pm on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The song’s next line rhymed eyes with “had a wife three times his size.” But, just to be safe, your father probably sang it “had a wife he’d IDOLIZE” (especially if your mother was in hearing distance).

        P.S. Any humor that joke has may be outweighed by being in bad taste (however unintended), so I apologize for any offense taken, Ricardo.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:51 pm on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      This one wasn’t easy Muse but you got the job done. It’s good to see the kids playing the music still. Great music like great writing never dies.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:47 pm on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Writing the post wasn’t easy, Don, but choosing the songs was — especially SHE LOOKS LIKE HELEN BROWN, because I love the wordplay, and as you’ve probably noticed, there’s nothing (well, almost nothing) I like to play with more than words. As for IDA, it’s simply a great old song.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bat Masterson, , female Marshals, history, , , lawbreakers, , My L:ittle Chickadee, Philadelphia, , saloons, , six-shooter, U.S. Marshals, , Wild Bill Hickok, Wild West,   

    MARSHAL LAW and SOILED DOVES 

    I have often not been asked who my favorite Old West marshal is. Just as often, I have not replied: “I have not often given it any thought.” I suppose that if, for some desperate reason (such as drawing a blank for something to write about for this post) I had given it any thought, I would’ve come up with Wyatt Earp, Wild Bill Hickok or Bat Masterson. Don’t ask me to name other famous marshals. Were there any other famous marshals?

    Today is the 228th anniversary of the creation of the U.S. Marshal Service, so I decided to marshal my resources, round up a posse, and pursue my query. Unfortunately, it wasn’t posse-ble to corral volunteers for such a questionable undertaking; I will have to go it alone. If I don’t come out of this post alive, please pray that I have gone to a better place. Philadelphia will do.

    As you may have noticed in the above clip, Mae West was mighty handy with a six-shooter….but in yesteryear’s wild and wooly West, female marshals were scarcer than beer and whiskey drinkers on the wagon in a one-horse town with two saloons — a sobering thought, indeed. Thus, it mae be necessary to put up wanted posters in order to uncover additional famous marshals (preferably female).

    Well, that didn’t take long; there WERE female marshals in the Old West. Here they be:

    https://glitternight.com/tag/female-marshals/

    That appears to be the extent of their ranks — out of hundreds of marshals/deputy marshals, only four were of the fair sex. But that seems only fair. After all, 99% of the ‘bad guys’ were just that — ‘guys’ — so why should women be charged with maintaining law and order in the Wild West when almost all of the lawbreakers were men….though it’s no stretch to assume that certain upstanding citizens weren’t above regarding certain ladies as ‘hardened’ offenders:

    As Jesus and mistermuse not often say (therefore it bares repeating):  Let he among you who is without sin cast the first stein.

    Needless to say, I’ll drink to that!

     

     
    • Carmen 6:11 am on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      “Needless to say, I’ll drink to that!”
      On this fair Sunday morning, that’s a benediction worthy of discipleship. 🙂
      (Think you’d down a Sour Toe Cocktail?).

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:59 am on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Sorry, I’m not a cocktailer, Carmen….but I wouldn’t be above a sweet finger-lickin’ good. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:12 pm on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Salud, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 6:55 pm on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse I was trying to get the picture to copy directly but my computer doesn’t want to cooperate so this will have to be opened but least we forget Josephine Sarah Marcus aka Mrs. Wyatt Earp. And, she’s not wearing a bra here.

      http://richardelzey.com/kaloma.html

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:55 am on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Very interesting, Don. That period of time in American history is unique. No doubt thousands of stories could be told.

        Like

        • Carmen 9:17 am on September 25, 2017 Permalink

          Don, that’s a fascinating story! I love the picture, too! Thanks for the share. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 1:11 pm on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Calamity Jane was a wild one too, and I suspect on both sides of the law. It’s said by some historians that communities of men out West, for instance, the gold-miners, were out of control until the women came. That is, wives and no-nonsense types. Women have been a civilizing influence, but I rankle at giving them the whole burden of keeping the humanity in human beings.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:09 pm on September 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The Creator seems to have put superior physical strength in the wrong hands when He/She/It gave men that advantage over women. On the other hand(s), human nature being what it is, who’s to say women wouldn’t be the ones “out of control” if their positions were reversed? Nonetheless, women could hardly do a worse job than men running things over the course of recorded history, so why not?

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 12:34 am on March 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Fields’ “It’s A Gift” is truly a comic masterwork. continue….

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:21 am on March 30, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        They don’t make comic geniuses like Fields, Chaplin, Keaton, and Laurel & Hardy anymore. Today we have “stable” geniuses like Trump. It’s enough to make a groan man cry.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alexander Graham Bell, , , , Don Ameche, , , Grace Kelly, history, , , Lily Tomlin, Rosalind Russell, , telephone switchboards,   

    WHAT CAN I SAY? IT’S EMMA NUTT DAY! 

    “I’m very thankful that my first name was not Imma.”EMMA NUTT

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Who was Imma — I mean Emma — Nutt….and why do we celebrate her day today? Imma glad you ask-a that question. For the answer in a Nuttshell, click here:

    Emma Nutt, The World’s 1st Woman Telephone Operator

    Hello, Central? (I’d explain what Central was, but it’s less than central to our conversation.)

    I’m calling because, as you can tell from Emma’s hiring by A. Bell, it was soon clear to him that this was both a Nutt job and a switch for the better. But back in those simpler times, being a telephone operator wasn’t all that simple:

    Even a switchboard manned by a male in a military school wasn’t off the hook when it came to complications (sorry about the clipped picture in this clip, but unfortunately I can’t find this scene in full screen (it’s from a Billy Wilder film starring Ginger Rogers):

    Telephones have played a major part in many movies. Here are more of my ‘phoney’ favorites from yesteryear, starting with the one that started it all:

    THE STORY OF ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL* (1939), starring Don Ameche as Bell
    BELLS ARE RINGING (1960), starring Judy Holliday and Dean Martin
    DIAL M FOR MURDER (1954), starring Ray Milland and Grace Kelly
    SORRY, WRONG NUMBER (1948), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Burt Lancaster
    HIS GIRL FRIDAY (1940), starring Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell

    *If you ever pay a call on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, don’t miss the outstanding ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL MUSEUM at Baddeck. It’s a ringleader among museums!

    Of course, telephones weren’t featured only in classic films. Remember this TV skit?

    And now I’m going to GET SMART and quit while I’m ahead….and Agent 86 is afoot:

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:08 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Lol! That is name I don’t want either!😂😂Hilarious read👍

      Liked by 2 people

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:02 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      My father had a Top Secret security clearance level from the time he was a young man working on his Ph.D. (advised by Einstein & Land). After working in the missile program for much of his career, his last job in the Air Force was Congressional Liaison.

      He loved to tell the story of the time he and his best friend Miles (a NASA bigwig at the time) both took off their shoes at the same time, held them to their respective ears (a la Get Smart) and said, sotto voce, “Can’t talk now, I’m with Congress,” put their shoes back on and tried to keep neutral faces until the startled Representatives nearby walked away quickly.

      Loved this post – for more than that reason, one-ringy-dingy.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 4 people

    • scifihammy 2:47 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hilarious clips and Yes – The old switchboard was amazing! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. BTW, that’s Rosalind Russell in the AUNTIE MAME clip — the same gal who co-starred with Cary Grant in HIS GIRL FRIDAY (last film on my movie list).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:58 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      Least we forget these guys, the first users of the cell phone.

      .

      Liked by 3 people

    • linnetmoss 6:16 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant! Cell phones figure largely in Liam Neeson’s “Taken” thrillers, but they cannot compare to the oldies 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:58 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of oldies, I’ll take this occasion to refer back to the “Hello Central” in my post with this clip of a song which was a big hit during WWI when American troops were fighting and dying on the battlefields of Europe:

        Liked by 2 people

        • linnetmoss 3:53 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink

          Wow, I know who Al Jolson is but that one is new to me!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 4:32 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink

          Al Jolson’s singing could be a bit over-dramatic, but he knew how to put over a song in those days. He recorded HELLO CENTRAL in 1918 near the beginning of his fame as “The World’s Greatest Entertainer” (a title now apparently assumed by our humble President).

          Like

    • First Night Design 7:30 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      They don’t make ’em like they used to! Lovely to be reminded of the great Lily Tomlin in Rowan & Martin – joyous memories of that particular series of sketches.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:03 pm on September 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry that I inadvertently overlooked your comment until today. As I mentioned in a Sept. 5 reply to BroadBlogs, Lily’s birthday was Sept 1 and I overlooked that as well when I wrote this post….sure signs that age is creeping up on me. Take my advice and don’t get old! 🙂

        Like

    • Ricardo 11:57 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Whenever somebody on Facebook posts “Name something that you remember that doesn’t happen anymore” I put down “Waiting for somebody to get off the phone so you can use it.”

      Liked by 4 people

      • literaryeyes 8:41 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Remember party lines? You’d pick up the phone and hear your neighbor talking to someone else, say sorry, hang up, and wait?

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:48 am on September 6, 2017 Permalink

          There were a number of movies in the 1930s & 40s in which party line (or crossed line) scenes with overheard conversations played a part in the plot (SORRY, WRONG NUMBER, listed in my post, was one of them). I personally experienced only a few times picking up the phone and hearing someone on the line….but then, I never was a ‘frequent try-er’ when it came to conversing on the telephone! 🙂

          Like

    • mistermuse 2:26 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Coincidentally, yesterday I was looking for quotes I might use in this post and came across this oldie: “If you think the art of conversation is dead, you have probably never stood around waiting outside a public phone booth.” –Evan Esar

      Liked by 2 people

    • BroadBlogs 3:27 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You have a mind that is great at putting things together!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:42 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, but I’m not sure my wife would agree. Every time something goes haywire on the computer, I have to ask her to fix the problem! 😦

        Like

    • restlessjo 5:02 pm on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I worked on the Continental Exchange, just off Fleet St., many long years ago and that first scenario looks alarmingly familiar. Many thanks for your kind visit. 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • thefirstdark 3:19 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on ReBirth: The Pursuit of Porsha.

      Liked by 1 person

    • BroadBlogs 8:23 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      EMMA NUTT — can’t believe that’s a real name. And the perfect quote: “I’m very thankful that my first name was not Imma.”

      Interesting that telephones are featured so much in movies. Something about “the space between” and trying to connect in an imperfect world?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:00 pm on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Indeed. Lily Tomlin practically made a “calling” out of her many telephone company skits like the one in my post. BTW, when I published this post on 9/1, I didn’t realize that 9/1 is her birthday. Belated Happy Birthday, Lily!

        Like

    • Maria H. 5:24 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I loved all the puns! Old telephones are before my time, but I cannot imagine having to connect all those different people to each other! It looks really complicated.

      Thank you for stopping by and liking my book review for Dark Matter by Blake Crouch. I just posted a new review on another science fiction book, so stop by again if you are interested.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:33 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Switchboard operators in those days must have had a lot of influence because they all had connections (if you still love all my puns after that one, I can only assume that you’re a glutton for punishment)! 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , D.B. Cooper, egotist, famous disappearances, history, , James Hoffa, , , Virginia Dare,   

    WHERE’S THE CHIEF? 

    Bridge is a trick-taking game using a standard 52 card deck. –Wikipedia

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I don’t play bridge, but in perusing last Thursday morning’s newspaper, I couldn’t help noticing this headline atop the daily bridge column: DISAPPEARING TRUMP TRICK.

    Given the kind of column it is, I might’ve known what I hoped for was too good to be true. Let’s face it: the notion of learning how to make America’s Look-at-me President magically disappear is a bridge too far. As for voluntarily leaving office at the prospect of obstruction of justice charges, Donald Trump may be a master at the game of evasion, but a disappearing act isn’t in the cards anytime soon; he’s too addicted to tweeting/hearing himself talk. At times, one wonders where his lips shtick comes from: an out-of-control ventriloquist, or from being an egocentric blowhard & shameless con man (for the record, the word dummy appears in the bridge column six times…but I vote for choice #2).

    Actually, it wouldn’t be unprecedented for an American President to disappear. Remember Jimmy Hoffa, ex-(in more ways than one)President of America’s largest union, The International Brotherhood of Teamsters? He was last seen in the parking lot of a suburban Detroit restaurant on July 30, 1975 — the day he was to meet with Mafia bosses Anthony Giacalone and Anthony Provenzano. He hasn’t been heard from since.

    Speaking of a restaurant (not where one of the above two CEOs of their respective fiefdoms was last seen), do you remember this commercial?

    In the case of Hoffa, the question isn’t “Where’s the beef?”, but “Where’s the Chief?” Two weeks before his disappearance, the feds discovered that hundreds of millions of dollars had disappeared from the Teamster’s largest pension fund. Hoffa’s remains remain unfound, although the FBI has checked out numerous tips: under a section of the now-demolished Giants Stadium in New Jersey; in the concrete foundation of Detroit’s Renaissance Center; under a horse barn or backyard swimming pool in Michigan; a swamp in Florida; a vacant lot 20 miles north of that last scene Detroit restaurant  — seemingly everywhere but under Trump Tower in Manhattan (no tip to the FBI intended).

    There have been many other mysterious disappearances in American history (Ambrose Bierce, D.B. Cooper, Virginia Dare, Amelia Earhart, etc.), but I say none is more mysterious than the above….or my real name isn’t James Riddle Hoffa.

     
    • scifihammy 7:05 am on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hi James! 🙂
      It is a pity a few more politicians don’t just disappear.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:22 am on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Hi yourself, Sci! BTW, I didn’t make up the middle name of James RIDDLE Hoffa (you can look it up)!

        Liked by 1 person

        • scifihammy 8:05 am on June 25, 2017 Permalink

          I seem to vaguely remember there was a US President (?) who went swimming on his own in the ocean – and disappeared. Another Riddle perhaps? 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:35 am on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I’m not aware of a US President who went swimming and disappeared. Perhaps it was some other country’s President.

      Like

    • Margarita 12:22 pm on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      There is something to be said for a steady and methodical disappearance. Meanwhile, it behooves us to pay attention to what the professional politicians are doing and keep the apprentice in his place. 😉 xoM

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:36 pm on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Perhaps someone will invent a time machine and make Trump disappear back to Wild West days as a red (rather than orange) man having to communicate via smoke signals rather than middle-of-the-night tweets. It would still be mostly hot air, but at least if he did it at 3 a.m., nobody would see what he was saying.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 1:20 pm on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Looking for Jimmy Hoffa from the Observation Post. ..hmmm. . . 🙂

      I agree with you, however, that there’s no chance Trump’s going anywhere. His motto seems to be, “Attention to my misbehaviour is still attention – I want it all!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Skipah 11:07 pm on June 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      D.B. Cooper is still the most fascinating thing in history. Did he live? How Hoffa has never been found this many years later tells me that there isn’t nothing to find. There is no body to find, he was fed to a gator or ran through a wood chipper!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:01 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Shipah, I think you’re right, in the sense that there’s no doubt that Hoffa didn’t survive his disappearance, but we don’t know if D.B. Cooper survived his (of even if that’s his real name). Still, the fact that Hoffa’s remains (if any) have never been found is fascinating in itself.

        Like

      • literaryeyes 8:46 pm on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I’d say what I’ve heard happened, but I won’t because I don’t want to disappear too.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:40 pm on June 26, 2017 Permalink

          I was going to say you can trust me with what you heard, Mary, because I wouldn’t tell a soul….but on second thought, those who are concerned about their soul aren’t the ones you have to worry about. 😦

          Like

    • Ricardo 1:10 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I, too, want to see Trump disappear, Sr. Muse.I don’t think it’s going to happen. But if he suffered a heart attack at the frenzied height of one of his rallies, that would be just as good. Think of that happening. It’ll help you sleep better at night.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:05 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Well, I wouldn’t go that far, Ricardo. Rather than a heart attack, I’d settle for an impeachment that removes him from office. That would make him the one thing he can’t abide — a LOSER.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 5:50 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Geez Muse you seem to be one of the few Trump haters who figured out that he’s just not going to leave office after the next nasty article or unhinged hissy fit by some celebrity or Talking Head. Congratulations!

      BTW the Presidential succession is Vice President, Speaker of the House, President of the Senate, Sec of State, Sec of the Treasury, Sec of Defense and the rest of the Presidential cabinet. It never gets to the losing candidate from the other party unless that person also happens to be in the line of succession. Like losing VP candidate Boy Scout Ryan.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:51 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Don, you classify me as a Trump hater, but as someone who was raised Catholic, I was taught to hate the sin, not the sinner. In like manner, I despise a lot of what Trump says and does, but I see him as someone who can’t help himself, almost like a drug addict (except that most drug addicts are probably aware of what they’re doing to themselves — I think Trump is too narcissistic to see himself as others see him). In short, he’s more to be pitied than hated.

        Liked by 1 person

      • literaryeyes 8:50 pm on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        It’s true the V.P. would be next in line, etc. and I think Trump is preferable to cruel men with amiable smiles. At least we know the truth about him because he can’t help telling us.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 10:03 pm on June 26, 2017 Permalink

          Perhaps Trump can’t help telling the truth about himself; unfortunately, everything else he says has to be taken with a towering grain of salt. Not that they’re lies — they’re just “alternative facts.”

          Like

    • linnetmoss 7:13 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I have entertained the thought that he will indeed disappear because all of this is actually a big hoax, and Donald Trump is nothing more than a Saturday Night Live sketch. One of their more outrageous efforts…

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:15 am on June 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      The Donald is a hoax, all right, but a hoax of a President. Still, about a third of the country loves him, so it seems it’s not all that hard to take a lot of people in. As P.T. Barnum (supposedly) said, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” Well, maybe not suckers, but I can’t think of a more apt description at the moment.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gettysburg Address, history, , intellectual stimulation, , , , , Twenty Questions   

    20/20 BEHINDSIGHT 

    When the world ends, I want to be in Cincinnati because it’s always 20 years behind the times. –Mark Twain

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Today being the 20th day of the month, and me being a Cincinnatian of long standing (and other less upright positions), what better time than now and what better person than your humble scribe to put history in context with 20/20 hindsight, and delve into stuff you need to know. Why? You don’t want to go out as an ignoramus when the world comes to an end (20 years sooner for you than me), do you?

    Starting with the basics, are you aware of the etymology of  the word TWENTY? It’s from ye olde English twënig (literally “two tens”). I hope you agree that lacking this knowledge makes it evident that your imagination was in need of intellectual stimulation. For example, now you should be able to see how much more memorable Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address could have been had it begun: Four twënigs and seven years ago….

    Speaking of “two tens,” by counting the letters of the alphabet on the digits of your two meat hooks twice, you will find (unless you’re missing a finger) that the twënigth letter is T, which may come in handy in situations where you wouldn’t want to take off your stinky shoes and socks (not that counting on your toes is anything to be ashamed of).

    Moving on as I sit on my behind, there was once a quiz show on radio and TV titled TWENTY QUESTIONS, based on an old-timey traditional game called TWËNIG QUESTIONS. While I am not quite ancient enough to give eyewitness to the latter, I was around in the 1950s when the former appeared weekly (or weakly, if you had bad reception) on the DuMont Television Network. If you are too dilatory to have been around at that time, here’s a DuMontstration of what you missed:

    I could go on, but my vast research team and I don’t want to feed you more knowledge than you can digest at one sitting. Tune in again May 25, when (if I feel like it) I shall once again attempt to enlighten you with more of same. Remember, you heard it here last, because we are committed, and you can be too.

     

     
    • calmkate 12:29 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      oh oh MrM now you are starting to sound like TrulyUnplugged .. not daring to refer to your committed status, I refer to another blogger who writes in a similar vein! Look her up as I feel you two have a great deal in common!
      Can find an interview with her plus a link to her blog on my 2nd site Meet the Bloggers …

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:29 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the reference to TrulyUnplugged. I liked her blog, but based on her three most recent posts, I’m not convinced that we “have a great deal in common.” For one thing (make that two), I see myself as more private and less loquacious (please don’t take that negatively — it’s just different strokes for different folks). But that’s based on just three posts — when I have time, I’ll read more of her work and perhaps find that “similar vein” (or at least give it a shot). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:32 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          I think you will find it .. she is dealing with some personal stuff just now, so reading some earlier posts is a good idea.

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 8:35 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          she may be more chatty but she weaves music in and out of her posts and has some interesting twists .. each to our own

          Liked by 1 person

      • trulyunplugged 9:32 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I thought the very same thing, Kate….wordplay, “twisted sense of humour”…my “Ebony And Irony” post is likely a better example of commonalities 🙂
        (and, thanks for the plug 🙂 )

        Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 3:06 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Enjoyed EBONY AND IRONY — especially the part about Kramer and Seinfeld. Overall, I thought the post was a bit too rambling — but when you’re “truly unplugged,” I can’t say you’re not being true to your name. In any case, my opinion is only a matter of taste — “each to our own,” as Kate put it — just as I know that the way I write isn’t everyone’s cup of tea (or cup of “T” as in “Twënig”).

          Liked by 1 person

        • trulyunplugged 3:24 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Yes, Kramer reference was my fav part, too. And, you’re right, to each their own–I appreciate your candor 🙂 As for the “rambling” that is my fav brand of creative expression…I find it freeing and fun. It’s open-minded of you to read that which goes against your grain…which I’m sure gives you a richer appreciation for “your cup of tea” tastes 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 6:12 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          hey now he might get it if he reads that post .. glad you could see it

          Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 12:53 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Well THAT was a highly amusing intro to a little piece of broadcast history – black and white, even. I’m not sure I ever saw this show, but it reminds me of What’s My Line, which I recall dimly and To Tell the Truth (which my father was on when I was a child — the other contestants were supposed to be him). TV has certainly changed quite a bit over the years, hasn’t it? Measured intellect has been replaced by reality brawn and fast pace car chases – in color!

      Since I am currently residing in Cincinnati myself, I guess I will be the beneficiary of those twënig extra years as well – but I’m not sure that’s such a pleasant proposition, given the direction we seem to be headed of late.

      Great post!
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to educate a world!”

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 1:04 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        PS. Early this evening I was invited by a friend and colleague to my first Meetup (Boomer edition), where I spoke to a man who may well show up on your blog ere long. It came up during the obligatory “What do you do?” conversation. He teaches music history at the college level – not the classics, btw, popular music. My next question seemed at first a non-sequitur: “Do you blog?”

        I had hoped that perhaps I had run into the Muse himself. When the answer was no, I sent him your way.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:39 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Thanks, Madelyn. I’m glad you didn’t run into me because bones break much more easily at my age. Hopefully he’ll identify himself if he shows up on my blog, otherwise we shall be as two ships that pass in the night without giving each other the time of day.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC 10:25 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          ::groan:: — his lack of punning might have been a clue. 🙂

          If I go to another of their events and see him again I’ll make sure to tell him to let you know I said hello.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • Carmen 6:53 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Madelyn,
      I can see why you’d think the guy was Mr. Muse. Was he brilliant and funny, too? 🙂

      Mr. Muse –
      1953 – the year of hubby’s birth! Also the year our house was built, which we purchased in 1978. A good year, to be sure.

      That film clip — wow! Have ads regressed, eh? I don’t know about you, but I often have no idea what product is being pushed with the ads on TV these days; they leave me wondering what was going on. .. I just shake my head. I mean, I still think of monkeys swinging on chandeliers when I see Red Rose tea. And remember, “Never – no never – put water in a Habitat soup!”
      Here in Canada, we watched ‘Front Page Challenge’ for years, which was obviously based on ‘Twenty Questions’.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:05 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Good observation about the film clip and ads, Carmen. My wife and I feel likewise (“no idea what product is being pushed”) about some of the commercials on TV….but my reaction is to grab the remote, change channels and return to the program in a minute or two, which (for some reason) she doesn’t appreciate. Apparently she’s afraid I won’t get back in time, that that only happens about 9 times out of 10. 😦

        Like

        • Carmen 9:13 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink

          Oh, my. Are you related to my husband? 😉

          Liked by 1 person

    • trulyunplugged 9:32 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love this post…just delightful…thanks for sharing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ricardo 9:39 am on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Your research team is far vaster than mine, Sr. Muse

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:47 am on May 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      20 questions is an old parlor game that people would play before video games, TV and radio. It doesn’t translate well into a TV show but it obviously morphed into What”s My Line and To Tell the Truth.

      What I remember of old TV and this bears it out, is they had no idea what to put on the air most of the time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:48 am on May 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You’re right, Don — it is an old parlor game (dating back to the 1800s) and didn’t translate well into a TV show, as that clip makes evident….though the subsequent What’s My Line did a much better job along the same lines.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Charles de Gaulle, , falsehoods, golf, history, , , Julie Andrews, , , LOVE IS WHERE YOU FIND IT, Michelangelo, , , , , ,   

    02/20 VISION 

    In the tumult of men and events, solitude was my temptation; now it is my friend. What other satisfaction can be sought once you have confronted History? –Charles de Gaulle

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Indeed.  Where else but in my solitude can equilibrium’s vision be sought (much less found), if the following selection of February 20 events from “confronted History” is representative of “the tumult of men and events”:

    1513 Pope Julius II (aka The Fearsome Pope and The Warrior Pope) died and was laid to rest in a huge tomb sculptured by Michelangelo [In those days, Catholic artists regarded such Popes as ‘Patron’ Saints

    1839 U.S. Congress prohibits dueling in the District of Columbia [What a bad idea this turned out to be, given that since then, no one in D.C. has had a clue how to better resolve differences]

    1907 President Theodore Roosevelt signed an immigration act which excluded “idiots, imbeciles, feebleminded persons, epileptics, and insane  persons” from being admitted to the U.S. [Unfortunately, there has not been a comparable act excluding such persons from becoming politicians]

    1909 F.T. Marinetti, Italian poet, published the first Futurist Manifesto in the Paris newspaper Le Figaro and in Venice, including the statement “We want to glorify war – the only cure for the world.” [Evidently a utopian exception to “The cure is worse than the disease”]

    1927 Golfers in South Carolina were arrested for violating the Sabbath [Talk about playing a-round!]  

    1933 Congress completed action on an amendment to repeal Prohibition in the U.S. [and “I’ll drink to that!” rang out across the land]

    1942 Mitch McConnell, the Republican Senate Majority Leader, was born [Coincidentally, the cartoon character Pruneface premiered (in a Dick Tracy comic strip) the same year]

    1996 Gangsta rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg acquitted of murder in 1993 shooting of alleged gang member [Draw your own conclusions]

    2002 The Pentagon stated that its recently created “Office of Strategic Influence” would not spread falsehoods in the media to advance U.S. war goals. Office was shut down six days later (Feb. 26) [Apparently the bummed guy in this snapshot was the last to get the message]:

    Love’s labor lost. Lament in SOLITUDE. But despair not. It seems that Love, like the passions and madness of history, is where you — and a buoyantly young Julie Andrews — find it. So don’t be [Venetian] blind, it’s/all around you/everywhere.

     

     

     
    • scifihammy 5:45 am on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Very funny! 🙂
      And what a lovely old recording of Julie Andrews. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:29 am on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      For the foreseeable future, Sr, Muse, despite my wish to honor Snoop Dogg and the repeal of Prohibition, February 20th will be Not My President’s Day over here.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:28 am on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Actually, I think all (not just two) of the enumerated events which occurred in history on Feb. 20 are too sacred to profane by celebrating President’s Day on the same day. But not to worry — I expect The Donald to prevail upon Congress to move President’s Day to June 14 (his birthday).

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 5:22 pm on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Indeed!!!

      “1907 President Theodore Roosevelt signed an immigration act which excluded “idiots, imbeciles, feebleminded persons, epileptics, and insane persons” from being admitted to the U.S. [Unfortunately, there has not been a comparable act excluding such persons from becoming politicians]”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 9:40 am on February 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As they would say on Game of Thrones Feb 20th was “a day of days”. I think that’s what they say. But I do feel for the guy who got fired there. I was a government employee and trust me no one cared and then you realize it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 2:43 pm on February 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I have no doubt that you could pick any day of the year at random, and that date in history would yield similar “bummer” examples — many even worse than Feb. 20 (by the same token, any date would have many examples of beneficial feats — not to mention hands and other body parts). I guess that helps explain what makes the world go ’round, and why the spin makes us dizzy.

      Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:49 pm on February 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I love your wry commentary, despite how depressing some of it is. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:01 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Eddie Cantor, , history, , , Margaret Whiting. Bob Hope, , , , records, Richard Whiting, , World War I, World War II   

    NOTES FROM THE ALLEY 

    Now that the madness of America’s interminable election season is over, it’s time to get back to the saner things in life. It has been a while since I devoted an entire post to a subject which is right down my (Tin Pan) Alley, namely the Golden Age of Popular Music (between WWI and WWII). I assume that, unlike me, few (if any) of you were alive during that era….but, since I feel reasonably certain you wouldn’t miss that opportunity again if you had the chance, I forgive you for such a lamentable shortcoming.

    Speaking of lament-able, I’ll start with a song written toward the end of the era by a 15 year old wunderkind, Mel Tormé, who went on to decades-long fame as a jazz vocalist:

    For those who are unfamiliar with the term TIN PAN ALLEY, I quote excerpts from a 1975 book of that title by researcher Ian Whitcomb about the beginnings of pop music:
    The name “Tin Pan Alley” applied to the railroad flats around 28th and Broadway in NYC where the music publishing houses were clustered. Around the 1890’s a canny bunch of businessmen, keenly aware of the new mass-market created by the Industrial Revolution, decided to manufacture songs. They fed theaters and parlors, cafes and dance halls with their wares. By 1910 The Alleymen had pushed hundreds of songs into million-selling sheets. These tall piano copies, fronted with colored art-work and spotted with ads for other songs, were the sole pop moneymakers until records, radio and talking pictures became the chief pop vehicles.

    This brings us to the period immediately following the end of WWI on Nov. 11, 1918, and to one of the biggest hits of the next year, when our doughboys were returning home by the hundreds of thousands from the battle fronts of Europe and the pleasure fronts of Paris. With un peu d’imagination, perhaps you can appreciate the question….

    Two years later (1921), song writers were still asking questions, including this one posed by its composer Richard Whiting (whose birthday was three days ago, Nov. 12, 1891), sung here by his daughter and Bob Hope:

    Of course, the above words and recordings have barely scratched the surface of  the sounds you would have savored had you been around in those days (and make no mistake, that music would have seduced you as much then as today’s music seduces you now). And so on that note….

    (TO BE CONTINUED)

     

     

     

     
    • scifihammy 1:20 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      What a lovely post. 🙂 They really don’t make music like this any more!

      Liked by 1 person

    • painkills2 2:26 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It’s all about electronic music now. Well, not all, but a lot. I feel like an old grandma complaining about young people’s music, but electronic music hurts my ears. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:04 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        It hurts your ears because it’s noise (at least, some of it). But, as an old song title says, “To Each His Own.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • eths 3:10 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great music!

      Liked by 1 person

    • GP Cox 8:00 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 8:57 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t realize Mel Tormé was a songwriter on a bigger scale. I know he wrote “The Christmas Song.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:18 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Mel was multitalented: musician, vocalist, arranger, songwriter. He wrote THE CHRISTMAS SONG with lyricist Bob Wells in 1946, but previously wrote both words and music. Here is another example of his solo work from 1945:

        Like

    • Don Frankel 9:24 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I always like the way guys like Bob Hope who really can’t sing will talk their way through a song and really do a good job of it. Rex Harrison in My Fair Lady comes to mind. You can watch that movie and think he’s singing when he never does.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:23 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Excellent observation, Don. Another great example of someone who couldn’t really sing but put over a song better than most guys who could sing was Walter Huston (SEPTEMBER SONG).

        Like

    • L. T. Garvin, Author 10:25 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      What wonderful, wholesome songs. Love the instrumental background. It harkens back to a time when we didn’t have to have all these obscenities to have entertainment, I mean I don’t want to sound like a grandma either, but seriously, the verses of today’s “music.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:32 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        My sentiments exactly! It’s good to know I have readers like you who can appreciate, and don’t dismiss, songs like these simply because they’re old. Stay tuned for more of the same in my next post.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 10:55 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Haven’t really paid much attention to music of any kind since I kicked a daily pot habit back in my early twenties. Now that weed is legal out here in CA, maybe I’ll start again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:46 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I have just the song for you, Ricardo, as you sleep on your “To weed or not to weed” question:

        Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 11:20 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Today’s music doesn’t seduce me at all…it’s mostly adolescent, barbaric noise. I really enjoyed listening to these. I know them well. Listening to them again is like a lovely visit with my dear grandparents.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:57 am on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I couldn’t agree more, but I’ll bet neither you nor your grandparents listened to (or even knew of) the song in my previous comment (actually there were many such songs in the 20s & 30s, though I doubt they got played on the radio in those days)!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia Jobin 12:02 pm on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      You’re right. I didn’t know that song, nor, I venture, did my grandparents. The underworld stayed under, in those days.

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 5:39 pm on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Such a delightful post, I always loved music of that era.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:10 pm on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise. I also like some of the music of other eras, but “Golden Age” music remains #1 on my ‘hip parade.’

        Liked by 1 person

    • Resa 6:17 pm on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      What a fab post this is!
      Thank you so much for the info re: Tin Pan Alley! I had no idea.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:05 pm on November 15, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Resa. I’ll have more to say about Tin Pan Alley in my next post.

        Like

    • Mark Scheel 1:15 am on November 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I remember hearing some of these songs played on the piano when as a little boy visiting relatives on my mother’s side–a fun bunch. Anyway, before you leave politics totally, suggest you read Bernie Goldberg on why New York media missed the boat so badly with the last election. Great analysis that I can relate to, living in the Midwest. Here’s the link:

      http://bernardgoldberg.com/the-media-elite-didnt-see-the-tsunami-coming/

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:53 am on November 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I’d already heard similar analysis (in substance, if not in spirit) in the heathen liberal media, Mark, but I didn’t know that Goldberg has written a book called ARROGANCE, which I would’ve guessed to be the title of a Donald Trump biography….but then, we on the near-left (or am I on the FAR-left in the black-and-white world) are wrong about so many things.

        Anyway, I’m glad to hear that you can dig this music. There has been a piano in my house for most of my life, but after several years of piano lessons in my boyhood, I forgot what I learned and still can’t play it.

        Like

    • BroadBlogs 1:17 am on November 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I’d thought I would feel better after the election. I don’t. Thanks for bringing some sanity back into my life. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:11 am on November 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of “sanity” reminds me (what with the Christmas shopping season already in full swing) of this bit of Marx Brothers insanity:

        Like

    • Carmen 12:42 pm on November 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Do you mean to say that Torme was 15 when he sang that song? If so, quite amazing!
      I have to say that listening to these tunes is a much better pursuit than reading political commentary of late . . . 🙂 I’m finding a station on my TV that plays ‘oldies’ now. Lovely sounds!! Thanks so much, mister muse!
      Were you subscribed to Lady sighs blog? Haven’t heard anything from her lately and was wondering if she’s ill. .

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:27 pm on November 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Actually, Tormé wrote the song when he was 15, but he didn’t sing it — at least not on that Columbia record. If you check the small print on the label, you’ll notice that the vocal is by Dick Haymes (see, that’s what happens when you don’t read the small print!). 🙂

        I didn’t subscribe to Ladysigh’s blog, but I was a regular reader and frequent ‘liker’ and commenter. As I recall, she took a rather lengthy hiatus due to illness a few years ago. Hopefully, she’ll come back again like before, but I don’t know the reason for her absence this time.

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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , history, , , , lawyers, , November 30, , , punning, , , ,   

    30 NOVEMBER — TO THE SWIFT 

    As 3o days hath the month of November,
    Today marks the end of a month to remember.
    Swift doth the day pass into December,
    Ere the twain shall meet….in a glowing ember.

    The above is my Lilliputian ode to two literary giants who were born on this day: Jonathan Swift  in 1667, Mark Twain in 1835. This post celebrates the former, the latter having been extolled in a post one year ago today (THE UNIVERSAL MARK TWAIN).

    Jonathan Swift’s pièce de résistance, of course, was GULLIVER’S TRAVELS, a book I gobbled up when about 12 years old (in an abridged version for children), and still own. However, at that age I didn’t fully appreciate that it was much more than a grand adventure tale — it’s also a masterpiece of parody and social/political satire, as exemplified by the enmity between the empires of Lilliput and Blefuscu over which end of an egg should be broken first before being eaten — a conflict which put Gulliver in the middle between the Big Endians and the Small Endians. Well, I suppose that makes just as much sense as real people fighting over whose god is the Big Enchilada.

    Let us turn now to three quotations from the unabridged GULLIVER’S TRAVELS:

    Here commences a new dominion acquired with a title by divine right. Ships are sent with the first opportunity; the natives driven out or destroyed; their princes tortured to discover their gold; a free license give to all acts of inhumanity and lust, the earth reeking with the blood of its inhabitants: and this execrable crew of butchers, employed in so pious an expedition, is a modern colony, sent to convert an idolatrous and barbarous people.

    The tiny Lilliputians surmise that Gulliver’s watch may be his god, because it is that which, he admits, he seldom does anything without consulting.

    It is a maxim among these lawyers, that whatever hath been done before may legally be done again: and therefore they take special care to record all the decisions formerly made against common justice and the general reason of mankind. These, under the name of precedents, they produce as authorities, to justify the most iniquitous opinions; and the judges never fail of decreeing accordingly.

    I close with three more Swift quotes, the last of which I intend to inscribe on a club to beat anyone who would disparage my stunning cunning punning:

    When the world has once begun to use us ill, it afterwards continues the same treatment with less scruple or ceremony, as men do to a whore.

    Words are the clothing of our thoughts.

    Punning is a talent which no man affects to despise except he that is without it.

     

    –30–

     

     
    • linnetmoss 7:26 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      If only there were more authors with the wit of these two! Love the quote about punning 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:34 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Both seem to have had much in common as to how they viewed their fellow man, though I gather Swift was regarded as even more of a misanthrope than Twain. In any case, is there really much difference between a realist and a misanthrope, other than a matter of degree? 😦 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 7:59 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      People are ambitious. They come up with rationales as they go or afterwards.

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      • mistermuse 1:47 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Right you are, Don — though I wouldn’t confine coming up with rationales just to the ambitious. For example, I have no problem coming up with rationales for being a couch potato on Sundays, because, as I tell my wife, watching football keeps me out of trouble.

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    • arekhill1 10:23 am on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Substitute “women” for “eggs” and the passions of the Small Endians regarding the Big Endians become more understandable. Is this what Swift really meant?

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      • mistermuse 2:13 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

        Well, given the Swift quote about how men treat a whore, it appears he was able to put himself in a woman’s place and see things from her viewpoint. He was, after all, a priest in the Church of Ireland (a branch of the Anglican Church), which afforded him somewhat more latitude (in theory) than if he’d been a Catholic priest.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:24 pm on November 30, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      You’re not a Psychopath Muse, who sees people as objects that just need to be swept out of the way on your way to wherever and whatever. Perhaps on the way to the greater good.

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    • mistermuse 12:14 am on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Don, I’m probably more of a muse-anthrope — but whatever I am….

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    • Jane 12:54 am on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I also loved Gulliver’s Travels as a child (the abridged version). It was only much later in life I understood that there was more to it than a children’s story. I must admit I have never read the unabridged version so thank you for sharing some of it along with your thoughts. Just a comment on abridged versions. I read so many as a child and they were a great way to introduce me gently and enjoyably to many great authors and playwrights. Reading Shakespeare’s plays as a book of stories with pictures as a child was great preparation for being able to understand his works later.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:57 am on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      I appreciate your comment. I didn’t appreciate Shakespeare until later because I wasn’t “properly” introduced to him as a child. But, as they say, all good things come to those who wait (if you live long enough, which, fortunately, I have).

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    • Outlier Babe 10:50 am on February 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I have read the unabridged version but see I must go back and not only do so again, but again annually or so. Will buy a copy. Hadn’t read “Travels” since college. Decades later, I’m slower–less swift 😉 –but more patient. That makes me smart enough now to read Swift properly.

      (Aspie ego-saving non-sequiter: I was always smart enough to read Twain properly.)

      I like your posts so far, Muse-Man. Maybe I’ll read some more some time. If I’ve got nothin’ better to do.

      –O. Babe

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 9:15 pm on February 7, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      That makes two of us, O. Babe, but I hope to read more of your posts sooner rather than….well, as soon as possible after researching, writing and editing my next post on Feb. 10 (I’m cursed with being something of a perfectionist, so it takes me a few days put it all together & get it – hopefully – right).

      Like

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