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  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Let's Do It, lust, , , , , sin, , Uncle Sam   

    THE WAGES OF SIN TAX 

    Pardon the intrusion —
    I don’t mean to pry —
    But the deficit’s soaring;
    The figures don’t lie.

    Uncle Sam’s in a pickle —
    Needs money like mad —
    So he sent me to tell you
    You must pay to be bad.

    He’s taxed income and outgo
    And capital gains;
    Now, an excise on excess
    Is all that remains.

    Uncle wants to be fair —
    No sin taxes he’ll seek
    ‘less you go making love
    More than one time a week.

    I’m installing surveillance
    To monitor your behavior.
    Lusting under covers won’t save you —
    I’ll hear your cries to the Father of your Savior.

    But please don’t take this personal —
    It’s my job to listen and view it.
    Hey, you know what they say:
    Someone’s got to do it.

    So….

     

     

     

     

     
  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , I'm My Own Grandpa, , , sin   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 04 1/2) 

    At the end of Part 04 of this series, I said it ain’t over until the fat lady sings, which wouldn’t happen until Part 05. Unfortunately, the fat lady has yet to show (something must be holding her up), so I’ll have to put Part 05 on hold. Meanwhile….

    If you’re not having any fun, what’s holding you back? It’s good to let loose. For example….

    ….and Dance Around in Your Bones.

    Think dancing sans skin is a stretch? Mark my words — stranger things have happened:

    Getting back to the fat lady, I can feel it in my bones that she’ll show up soon — hopefully, in skin and singing. After all, who ever heard it’s not over until the fat lady dances (the very thought sends shivers down my spine). Verily, the future end of this series hangs in the balance. Give me (Post) five.

     
    • D. Wallace Peach 10:48 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m looking forward to some fat lady singing, but it will be sad to see/hear this series end. It’s been fun. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 10:53 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I am my own Grandpa is priceless.

      Since “fortune favors the bold” I say go for it with the Fat Lady in part 5. And remember in New York “it ain’t over till it’s over”, Fat Lady or not.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:00 pm on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Don, your comment made me curious about which came first: “It ain’t over till it’s over” or “It ain’t over till the fat lady sings.” Turns out the Yankees’ Yogi Berra said the former in 1973 and a Texas sports information director first said the latter in 1976. But Yogi also said he never said everything he said, though I’m pretty sure he really did say what he said when he said it ain’t over till it’s over.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:46 pm on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That reminds me of when General Sherman learned he’d said. “War is all hell!” because he hadn’t said it. But he liked it so he kept saying it till he said it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:02 am on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Let’s be pc gentlemen–it ain’t over until the body-shamed lady sings.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of pc, it’s polemically certain that the morning ain’t over until The Donald tweets.

        Like

    • markscheel1 6:50 pm on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      You might have led off with Chicago’s “All That Jazz”? Ah, I remember in little country school our teacher had a record of Spike Jones and we loved listening over and over. Ha. Yep, memories. Great dancing in the “skin”!

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:27 pm on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Apparently I attended the wrong schools, Mark — I don’t remember listening to records where I went to school. But I definitely like both the song and the dancing in the “skin” clip.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 6:50 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , blasphemy, Chosen People, Christianity, , , Good Friday, peace, , , , sin   

    A GOOD DAY TO WONDER 

    I was going to title this awkward post GOOD FRIDAY FARE, but thought better of it (a little too light to fill the bill). Or I could have titled it REALLY?. Really? I may be an ex-Catholic, but I still respect the meaning of Good Friday for the hundreds of millions who take the premise of this day at faith value. My breach of faith is not with the faithful, but with the premise of their faith — as explained in the poem which follows this paragraph of Christian apologia:

    What’s So Good about Good Friday? asks Episcopal priest Justin Holcomb in a recent article. The origin of the term, he says, is debatable, but “Regardless of the origin, the name Good Friday is entirely appropriate because the suffering and death of Jesus, as terrible as it was, marked the dramatic culmination of God’s plan to save his people from their sins….all in accordance with what God had promised all along in the Scriptures.” We can all agree, can we not, with the gross understatement that people have been sinning since time immemorial? But….

    DIDN’T THE ANCIENTS EVER WONDER?

    One of the earliest questions which presented itself to my youthful mind was that of election: Why had God chosen the Jewish people as the sole recipients of  His divine revelation and of the messianic promise? By what creative caprice had he excluded all others? –Morris West, Catholic novelist & playwright (1916-99)

    After the Lord God said Let there be light, there was no one
    to share the scene. God looked down and beheld a creation
    too wondrous to keep to Himself. Flesh forward.
    Adam, meet Eve.
    But, inevitably, Adam and Eve stray.
    They have a bad day.
    ‘Twas the serpent, they say.

    Boys and girls, welcome to hard times
    where life becomes a chance bet
    begetters scatter and beget
    until they forget
    without regret
    where they came from and divine not
    what they’re about

    until at last there emerges a Chosen People on
    whom it never dawns that revelation comes with
    implications: were untold others not equally in need
    of deliverance from their benighted nature? If
    what you don’t know can’t hurt you, why now the
    Voice in the wilderness….and if it can hurt you,
    how was silence justified? You see we still live
    in the shadows of tribal primitives, still die in
    the wake of unasked questions….save for He who
    would die to save us from our sins, without asking
    if the creator was in need of saving from His own?

    Did my poem blaspheme, or did it pose a serious question (or did it blaspheme in posing a serious question)? Does your answer depend on whether you believe in an ALL-PERFECT, ALL-LOVING GOD, a MIGHT-MAKES-RIGHT GOD, or NO GOD at all? How far would you go to try to convince or force (as if belief can be forced) others to believe as you do? Isn’t it sad enough when members of one family can’t agree to disagree, much less the human family writ large? How much longer would you and your god have the world pay the price of religion’s aggressive side?

    Peace, however awkward, be with you on this Good Friday.

     

     

     

     
    • carmen 7:13 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Of course, the answer to your question, “Did my poem blaspheme, or did it pose a serious question (or did it blaspheme in posing a serious question)?” would be a resounding “YES!” to many people . . . those who believe in the myth will be insulted that you would even ask such a thing.
      But for me (having decided a few years ago that the whole thing is nothing more than a comforting ‘tale’ to many) it is a very insightful suggestion to all who read – please do consider the negativity associated with people’s religious beliefs.

      Let’s hope we all don’t get sucked into the great fight over whose invisible (and – I think – imaginary) god is the mightiest. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • Michaeline 8:07 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Carmen makes a good point in saying our God may be is an invisible God. The ancient Jews rolled up their tents and gathered their other things, put it all on donkeys and headed out for the next oasis. No temples and no statues for them. Just 10 rules to live by and that was it in the beginning. God the Creator is more to my liking as he will not interfere in my life decisions. If I do wrong, there is Yom Kipper to make it right once a year. I live with the knowledge that I have a creative, intelligent mind and I let common sense be my guide .I was a serious Catholic like mistermuse and it was a fairly good experience until my ex divorced me.

        I did not know how vicious gossip among the church going ladies could make my Mother feel so bad. Then I researched many religions and found I liked Reform Judaism the best. It is a fact many millions of people fought and died in religious wars..Maybe that is why my husband and his three brothers are all atheists after being raised as Conservative Jews.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:26 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for your thoughts, Carmen. It seems we both have no problem with religious beliefs per se – but when believing is held to be the same as knowing, each differing belief becomes an absolute, and when absolutes are pitted against each other – well, human nature being what it is, bad things happen, and agreeing to disagree is out of the question (because questioning is anathema to absolutes).

        Like

    • Michaeline 8:18 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I like being a Reform Judaic Jewess. Became one after my studies with the rabbi. No one has all the answers about whether there is a God or not. My husband and his brothers were brought up as sons of a Conservative Jew. Once they grew up, attended college and worked diligently for a living, they became atheists. I like a religion where I can exercise my creative intelligence. I do not think mistermuse is guilty of blasphemy. He is sharing his thoughts and a very well written poem with us, Thank you, mistermuse

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:32 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for your thoughts as well, Michaeline. What I said about respecting the Catholic faithful goes for the Jewish falthful as well, despite my profound differences with their faiths.

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    • Don Frankel 8:35 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Following up on what I was saying about screaming or praying, add writing.

      People are constantly manipulating people. For the greater good, of course. They use religion, politics, pills, potions and whatever they have because of course they are orchestrating the greater good. What is the greater good? That depends on each manipulator’s perception of it.

      As to what is truth? Your guess is as good as mine and anybody else’s. The brain like all the other organs in the body has it’s limitations. It can only do what it does. I don’t think its omniscient although some people think their’s is.

      Like I mentioned to you in the past I was brought up in an atheist household. My wife was a Catholic and because of that I read the Gospels and more than once. If you listen to the things Jesus says, actually says and not the centuries of other people’s interpretations of them, you can’t really go wrong in this life. Which is kind of amazing if you stop to think about it as it’s been a little shy of two thousand years.

      Liked by 1 person

      • carmen 8:42 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        I agree to that last bit, Don (and who knows whether Jesus was divine or an apocalyptic preacher of his time?). Unfortunately, the imposter Paul got hold of the ‘gospel’.

        Like

    • Cynthia Jobin 10:33 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      When you know, you do not have to believe. Because you know. You believe things that you do not actually know….you believe the authority, the expert, your own wish for how you want the world to be. In Belief are the seeds of violence. You find yourself needing to defend your belief against the unbelief of others. Other beliefs are an affront to the validity of your belief. You want others to lend greater credence to your belief by believing it along with you. Others may not want to share your belief, they may feel imposed- upon by your belief….this is the rising of conflict. Actuality is all that we know….the rest is silence. And belief.

      I remember–having been raised a Catholic—how we used to keep silent between noon and 3 o’clock on Good Friday. I don’t practice that religion anymore, but I put no label on myself in terms of belief or disbelief. As I accept the impossibility of absolute abstract answers, the same old questions seem to grow dimmer and dimmer and fade into the silence.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:05 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

        Well put, as always, Cynthia. The problem seems to be that, for too many people, there is no difference between believing and knowing….which, ironically, I believe qualifies as ignorance.

        It’s interesting to me that, as I get to know more of my readers better, I’m finding that more of them were once practicing Catholics. I guess, depending on the eye of the beholder, that makes us serious thinkers, or heretics, or feckless, or confused, or lost souls (whatever connotation the beholder puts on “lost soul”). I prefer to think that we’re multi-dimensional. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:38 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Perceptive words, Don. I would only add, “Amen.”

      Like

    • arekhill1 11:15 am on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Anything that ever happened to anybody else can happen to you. That’s the only thing that’s certain here, God, Jesus and Jews notwithstanding. Have a Good Friday every Friday is my motto, and my wishes for you, Sr. Muse and friends.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:35 pm on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Since I retired from gainful employment, Friday is just like every other day — the same with Good Friday since I retired from Catholicism. So I thank you and wish you a good everyday today and every day, Ricardo.

      Like

    • arekhill1 1:37 pm on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Saw on SWI that your sister passed, Sr. Muse. My sympathies.

      Like

    • carmen 3:09 pm on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, Mister Muse – I am sorry to hear of her passing. 😦

      Like

    • mistermuse 7:41 pm on March 25, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you both. She was 7+ years younger than I, and my only sibling. In this life, it seems that, sooner or later, time makes visitors of us all.

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    • restlessjo 1:27 am on April 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      It’s good to think and question. I don’t do enough of either, being more of a head in the sand lady, but you raise some good points. 🙂 Hope Easter was peaceful for you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:55 am on April 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you. Perhaps it is just as well not to think and question too much, as we can tie ourselves into knots trying to find answers which are beyond our capacity to find. On the other hand, a guy or gal has to go where a guy or gal has to go, even if we end up back where we started! 🙂

      Like

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