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  • mistermuse 3:32 pm on March 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bert Williams, , , , old songs,   

    GOODBYE AGAIN 

    I have never been able to discover anything disgraceful in being a colored man. But I have often found it inconvenient. –Bert Williams

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Yesterday marked the 96th anniversary of the death of the great “colored” comedian Bert Williams, whose humorous 1920 song I WANT TO KNOW WHERE TOSTI WENT (WHEN HE SAID GOODBYE) appeared in my last post. You can learn a bit more about this pioneering black entertainer in the racist America of the late 1800s/early 1900s by clicking here: https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200038860/

    To commemorate the anniversary of the day Bert Williams said “Goodbye forever,” I thought I would extend that post’s theme with a curtain call of several later “goodbye” songs from America’s Golden Age of Popular Music (if not yet America’s Golden Age of race relations). Just a little something to keep in mind, every time we say goodbye (courtesy of Cole Porter):

    So, what’s good about goodbye? I’m glad you asked (courtesy of Harold Arlen):

    Perhaps next post, I’ll transition into some ‘hello’ songs. It would help the transfiguration if I could put this song title in reverse:

    P.S. The first several readers of this post may have been confused by changes made in the last clip after I posted it. What I initially thought was a clip of another vocalist singing “Hello, My Lover, Goodbye” turned out to be in error, so, left with few choices, I hastily tried to switch to a clip of Doris Day (NOT one of my favorite vocalists) singing the song. After a few ‘haste-makes-waste’ starts, I made the substitution, but probably left a few of you wondering if I hadn’t said goodbye to my mind. But all’s well that ends well (I hope).

     

     
  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Irwin Shaw, , old songs, , , silence, whispering   

    THE DEAD HAVE SPOKEN…. 

    There are too many books I haven’t read, too many places I haven’t seen, too many memories I haven’t kept long enough. –Irwin Shaw, playwright, screenwriter, novelist and author of Bury The Dead

    The dead have spoken….
    but the living have moved on.
    Hear their voices left in your mind,
    keep their memories in the images
    that are reborn in shared solitude.
    Who among us has not known the haunting fear,
    whispering we might not survive the silence?

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:18 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Good share Mistermuse!

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:37 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said Mr. Shaw.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 1:23 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      The living have also spoken — thank you both.

      I started this post without the well-said Shaw quote, then decided it complemented my poem reasonably well, so I welcomed the ‘help’ — especially since I didn’t have to pay for it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • pendantry 2:39 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Who among us has not known the haunting fear,
      whispering we might not survive the silence?

      *shivers*

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:18 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        The warmth and reborn life of approaching spring offer the hope of an alternative to winter’s shivers. At least, that’s what I’d say if I were an optimist (and even sometimes as a poet).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Lisa R. Palmer 11:27 am on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Beautiful… compelling… and oddly comforting, knowing we are not alone in grief, sorrow, fear or healing.

      Bravo, mistermuse!! Bravo!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:08 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Lisa, they say a picture is worth a thousand words, but I say a bravo (or two) can be worth a thousand pictures. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 2:49 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
      No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
      And makes us rather bear those ills we have
      Than fly to others that we know not of?
      Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,”

      And you thought I’d send you this as the quintessential recording of In My Solitude.

      Ooops I guess I did.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:59 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Shakespeare couldn’t have said it better.

        I’m glad you sent the Billie Holiday recording of SOLITUDE, because I was torn between that one and Duke Ellington’s recording. I finally decided on Duke’s, mainly because he’s the composer.

        Like

    • tref 4:24 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Two great songs!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:19 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Tref. WHISPERING is a real oldie dating back to 1920, when Paul Whiteman’s recording became hugely popular and propelled him and his orchestra to fame. The Comedian Harmonists (a German vocal group) rendition is typical of their very appealing style. Unfortunately several members of the group were Jewish, and after Hitler came into power….well, I highly recommend a 1997 film which tells their story. Here’s an excerpt from the movie:

        Liked by 1 person

    • tref 5:38 pm on February 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Moreover, I have just added the Comedians version to my playlist. Thanks, MM!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:16 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Memories of You. The Ink Spots. humor, , old songs   

    A com-POSE-r BY ANY OTHER NAME (Part 2 of 2) 

    I am pleased to announce (as is often said when making an announcement) the proper pairings of birth names with noms de plume listed in Part 1:

    a. 2
    b. 3
    c. 4
    d. 5
    e. 6
    f. 1
    g. 10
    h. 9
    i. 8
    j. 7

    Next (as is often said when making another announcement), I am pleased to announce that I have selected the following song from the requests made by readers of Part 1 to be played in Part 2, which I am pleased to announce totaled one request, which was a considerable help in deciding the final choice. So, after much soul searching — not to mention weeping and gnashing of my remaining teeth — here is the request winner:

    But wait — there’s more! I have my own favorite song from the list. Composed by Eubie Blake with lyrics by Andy Razaf, here is MEMORIES OF YOU, with vocal refrain:

    I close with the 1930 instrumental version played by Eubie Blake & His Orchestra:

     

     
    • scifihammy 4:30 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Yay! It was Me! I asked for April in Paris 😀 Thank you for this great Frank clip 🙂
      Also really like the Ink Spots Memories of you. No-one seems to be able to sing like this any more!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:24 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Growing up, the Ink Spots were my favorite singing group — so much so that I formed my own group to emulate them, called THE STINK SPOTS, but for some reason, we bombed. 😦

        Liked by 2 people

    • carmen 11:30 am on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mr. Muse,
      I am in the middle of Gr. 9 Art class. For a distraction, I checked my emails and – lo and behold! – a hilarious post from your brilliant mind. I’d love to share your ‘artwork’ with these folks, but unfortunately I think it’d be lost on them. . . 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 3:29 pm on February 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m glad to hear that, when it comes to the art of distraction, my posts are in a class by themselves — which is good, because if they were to be let out among the population at large, I could be locked up. Still, if you wish to share my “artwork” with the Art class, it’s probably just as well that I be the instrument of their disillusion now rather than the ‘real world,’ which will discolor their ideals soon enough.

      And on that less than ideal note, I thank you for being your usual gracious self. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:37 am on February 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know we could make requests or I would have requested this one by Vladimir Dukelesky.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:42 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, this brings up an interesting tale, not of two cities, but of two songs by Vladimir Dukelsky aka Vernon Duke: APRIL IN PARIS (listed in Part 1), and AUTUMN IN NEW YORK. Rather than try to condense the tale, let me relate it as told by author Warren Vaché in THE UNSUNG SONGWRITERS:

        APRIL IN PARIS, of course, was a tremendous hit in 1932, but AUTUMN IN NEW YORK, which was introduced in the stage show “Thumbs Up” in 1935, made no such impression.
        In 1947, or thereabouts, my [Warren Vaché’s] good friend Ross Doyle, a pianist and composer, was performing double duty as band manager and manager of Tommy Dorsey’s music publishing house. In the latter capacity he was entitled to a tiny office in Manhattan’s Brill Building with a piano and a few chairs. The chairs were usually occupied by song pluggers hopeful of persuading Ross into persuading Tommy to play the latest gem on their push lists. One day I decided to drop in and see Ross, and before long I was in conversation with a man I had never met before about the great songs of the past. During this spirited exchange the man put his heart into a comment that went something like this: “What a great tune APRIL IN PARIS was! I’d give my right arm to have another tune like that one.”
        “Yes, it is a great tune,” I agreed, “but Duke wrote another one that I like just as well, and it has been completely forgotten. In fact, it was hardly recorded at all. The only reason I know about it is because I happen to have an old Victor record of it by Richard Himber’s band.”
        The man’s head came up like a rabbit sniffing a carrot. “That so?” he asked eagerly. “What’s the name of it?”
        “AUTUMN IN NEW YORK.”
        He reached into an inside pocket of his jacket and brought out a little black notebook and after running a finger down one of the pages, nodded his head.
        “We’ve got it!” he announced delightedly. He stood up, acknowledged my contribution with a quick “thanks” and left.
        I never ran into the man again, but shortly afterwards it seemed that AUTUMN IN NEW YORK was being played by every band, recordings were being made by both bands and singers, and all at once the tune attained the hit status it had never achieved in 1935. Which only goes to prove, I guess, that of such chance conversations great hits are made.. I can only hope that Vernon Duke appreciated the revival of his lovely composition, even if he never knew what brought it about.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carmen 4:04 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink

          That’s a great story, Mr. Muse! I was going to comment earlier this morning so here goes.
          I couldn’t listen to the music on the blog b/c I was at school all week and unable to play the videos. I finally got a chance to listen to all the songs (including yours, Don) this morning as I was cleaning up my kitchen. (I’m one of those cooks who manages to dirty every dish, utensil, and litter all counter-spaces, so the old tunes made my drudgery that much more bearable . . .) I thought to myself, “Is there a theme here?” When I listened to “April in Paris” and “Autumn in New York”, followed by the thought, “That guy got around!” After reading through your story, I thought the same thought – you really did get around, Mr. Muse!! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • Don Frankel 7:29 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink

          Great story. hey you never know in this life.

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:07 pm on February 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Carmen, speaking of “chance conversations,” which is at the heart of that story, here is a quote on the subject which I know you’ll love:

      “A chance remark is anything a man gets a chance to say when two women are talking.” –Evan Esar

      See, I told you you’d love it! 😦

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mél@nie 6:58 am on February 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      great post, Sir… and I also love “April in Paris”, as I lived there for several years! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:01 pm on February 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, Mél@nie. I “lived” in Paris for one day (on a European tour) — it wasn’t in April, but I still loved it!

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , old films, old songs, , The Fat Lady Sings   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 05) 

    If you haven’t been following this series, you don’t know what you’ve been missing (athough some might claim ignorance is bliss). If you are a follower, you may think the humor has been pretty juvenile. This first selection of Part 05 should assuage all concerns:

    3 to 1 you now think this series is for the birds….but you ain’t heard nothing yet. Here’s a real turkey:

    OK, I don’t need a straw vote to tell me the next selection has nowhere to go but up….

    Now that’s what I call ending on a high note (as opposed to starting on a high chair). And so we come to the moment you’ve all been waiting for….

    You’re welcome.

     
    • Garfield Hug 12:28 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Not at all juvenile as I enjoy these very much! Thanks for the laughs!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:09 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I intended “juvenile” in a tongue-in-cheek way, but no matter how you took it, I’m glad you appreciated the clips. Two of the four were very obscure, and I was fortunate to find them.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 9:32 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Great clips here. I’m not sure which is the best but I’ll give the nod to Laurel and Hardy.

      Now in the interests of political correctness let us say the opera ain’t over till the plus sized lady sings. Or maybe we could use the medical code E66.3 which is used to indicate overweight. It would be like spelling a word in front of a two year old because you don’t want them to hear it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:36 am on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I agree with your nod to the Laurel & Hardy clip, which is from one of their best movies, WAY OUT WEST (1937). I thought TURKEY IN THE STRAW (one of the two obscure clips I mentioned in a previous comment) was relatively well done, given that many ‘hayseed’ films of this type are just plain cornball.

        As for “the plus sized lady sings,” that description may be more politically correct, but it ain’t nearly as FUNNY as “it ain’t over until THE FAT LADY sings” — though I admit I probably wouldn’t think it was funny if I were a fat lady. On second thought, make that “if I were a plus sized lady.” 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    • 2017blogpresse 2:24 pm on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      nice blog, I like very much.

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 3:42 pm on February 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful. Thanks for the giggles!

      Liked by 2 people

    • moorezart 1:18 pm on February 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:30 pm on February 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you, moorezart. May the Fat Lady never sing on your blog!

      Like

    • tref 11:40 pm on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “Turkey in the Straw” is one of those songs I like to suddenly start whistling when I’m in line for a movie or something.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:29 am on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Probably no one in line who hears you whistling knows the title of the song, because if they did, they’d might say there’s a turkey in the theater (just kidding — I’m sure you whistle beautifully, tref).

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , I'm My Own Grandpa, , old songs,   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 04 1/2) 

    At the end of Part 04 of this series, I said it ain’t over until the fat lady sings, which wouldn’t happen until Part 05. Unfortunately, the fat lady has yet to show (something must be holding her up), so I’ll have to put Part 05 on hold. Meanwhile….

    If you’re not having any fun, what’s holding you back? It’s good to let loose. For example….

    ….and Dance Around in Your Bones.

    Think dancing sans skin is a stretch? Mark my words — stranger things have happened:

    Getting back to the fat lady, I can feel it in my bones that she’ll show up soon — hopefully, in skin and singing. After all, who ever heard it’s not over until the fat lady dances (the very thought sends shivers down my spine). Verily, the future end of this series hangs in the balance. Give me (Post) five.

     
    • D. Wallace Peach 10:48 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m looking forward to some fat lady singing, but it will be sad to see/hear this series end. It’s been fun. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 10:53 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I am my own Grandpa is priceless.

      Since “fortune favors the bold” I say go for it with the Fat Lady in part 5. And remember in New York “it ain’t over till it’s over”, Fat Lady or not.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:00 pm on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Don, your comment made me curious about which came first: “It ain’t over till it’s over” or “It ain’t over till the fat lady sings.” Turns out the Yankees’ Yogi Berra said the former in 1973 and a Texas sports information director first said the latter in 1976. But Yogi also said he never said everything he said, though I’m pretty sure he really did say what he said when he said it ain’t over till it’s over.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 5:46 pm on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That reminds me of when General Sherman learned he’d said. “War is all hell!” because he hadn’t said it. But he liked it so he kept saying it till he said it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:02 am on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Let’s be pc gentlemen–it ain’t over until the body-shamed lady sings.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:19 am on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of pc, it’s polemically certain that the morning ain’t over until The Donald tweets.

        Like

    • markscheel1 6:50 pm on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      You might have led off with Chicago’s “All That Jazz”? Ah, I remember in little country school our teacher had a record of Spike Jones and we loved listening over and over. Ha. Yep, memories. Great dancing in the “skin”!

      Mark

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:27 pm on February 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Apparently I attended the wrong schools, Mark — I don’t remember listening to records where I went to school. But I definitely like both the song and the dancing in the “skin” clip.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on February 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Beatrice Kay, , , , old songs   

    JAZZ FOR LAUGHS (PART 04) 

    The first three posts in this series have been monopolized by guys, so what…do you say we turn to the gals for amusement? What a muse meant by that remark is more songs of the same type, but with ladies leading the way — as with this girl-before-boy title tune:

    Beatrice Kay (1907-86), for the benefit of those who have never been to She-boy-gan, Paducah, Elmira, or Tacoma, was a NYC-born singer specializing in parodies of songs which, in some cases, have seen better days — but then, haven’t we all?

    The quarrel of the story is that no matter what depths of depravity women fall into, men are to blame for it all (with the possible exception of mistermuse’s male followers). Therefore….

    So, men, let us close by resolving to resist lady fingers, she’s-cake and all other such she-nanigans (no matter how tempting), O-Kay? However, this does not mean that Part 04 is the end of this series. If that’s what you were thinking, I have news for youse guys: it’s not over until the fat lady sings. You’ll have to wait 4 Part 05 be4 that happens.

     
    • Don Frankel 6:18 pm on February 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, you’ve brought another great talent out of the mist. Ms Beatrice Kay was not just a wonderful singer she was an actress. She was in a lot of those old TV shows we watched and I must have seen her in those old westerns.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:09 pm on February 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, I remember her singing the MENTION MY NAME IN SHEBOYGAN song when the record first came out because I thought it was very funny and she sang it so well. I especially like the line “I know the big-shots in their city hall — they’ve even got my picture on the post office wall,” which harkens back to the days when posters with photos of most wanted men (by the FBI, as I recall) adorned the walls of post offices everywhere (even in those old westerns).

        Liked by 3 people

    • Silver Screenings 11:02 pm on February 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      THANK YOU for this introduction to Beatrice Kay. I’ve not heard of her before, but I became an instant fan. A previous commenter says she was in old Westerns, and I’ll have to keep a lookout for her.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on February 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for your comment. If you go to Wikipedia’s article on Beatrice Kay, you’ll find the names of some of the Western TV series she was in. BONANZA was one of them.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:06 am on January 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alexander the Great, , , , , , , old songs, pied piper, ,   

    ANOTHER “GREAT” POST 

    Great” is a great multi-purpose word which can be used in many ways: from prosaically (“Have a great day”), to pompously (Alexander the Great), to — if you follow me — pied piper-ly (“Make America great again!”).*

    *pied piper: 1. One who entices others with delusive promises. 2. An appealing but irresponsible leader. –Webster’s New College Dictionary

    In my previous post (GREAT EXPECTORATIONS), I used it playfully. I hope the great writer Charles Dickens would have approved (I hold no Great Expectations that he would have). In any case, in this post, I will play it musically. It’s gonna be a Great Day!

    If a Great Day isn’t enough, how about a Great Life?

    Or, put another way, It’s Great To Be Alive.

    Of course, it’s hard to have a great life without great leaders — men like Napoleon, Disraeli, Alexander the Great, The Pied Piper….contenders, all. But who’s the greatest?

    Sorry about that, Pied Piper. You promised pie in the sky, but Wintergreen said Let ’em Eat Cake. Looks like Pied will be paying the Piper and eating crow before all is said and done….speaking of which, I am.

     

     
    • Don Frankel 9:02 am on January 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Another great one Muse.

      Now this one doesn’t belong here musically but goodness, gracious…

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:56 am on January 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I didn’t realize this song became the title of a 1989 movie about the life of Jerry Lee Lewis. Obviously I didn’t see it, but I have seen BALL OF FIRE (1941) starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck, which was a great BALL OF FIRE.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 12:22 pm on January 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Great post.

      Liked by 2 people

    • markscheel1 1:24 pm on January 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      muse
      Hope you meant you’re at the end of the piece, and not that you’re eating crow. But, you never know, don’t be too hard on the old piper–he’s actually got the economy roaring and the market blowing the roof off. Ha. As for the previous post, I didn’t get past the title as it precipitated a coughing fit (yeah, got some kind of bug in the pipes now, but the nurse pract. tested me and said it ain’t the killer flu). Anyway, I’d sing along with some of those “great” songs, if I didn’t fear another coughing fit.

      Mark

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:43 pm on January 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        If I’m not mistaken, Mark, the economy was already on the upswing when Obama turned the reins over to The Donald. But all Presidents take credit when the economy is going good and blame their predecessor (or other factors) when the economy is bad, so what else is new? If any President deserves some credit for rescuing the economy, think back to the financial crisis that Obama inherited when he was first elected in 2008.

        Sorry about your coughing fit, but don’t blame me — blame Charles Dickens for the title that I merely tinkered with. The Republicans probably had something to do with it too. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

        • markscheel1 1:40 pm on January 23, 2018 Permalink

          Hi muse,

          Well, my sources (such as John Mauldin, the financial guru) would indicate just the opposite. Bush had begun remedial efforts in the last months of his term when he saw the normal and natural downswing in the economic cycle and when Obama got in he instituted policies that were focused on “social justice,” not economic prosperity, and we thus fell into a full recession and continued to lag behind throughout his two terms. When Trump got in, economic optimism began to prevail and as he removed hamstringing regulations and got the tax cut, things began to really take off. So, pick your poison. Where do we go for actual facts today? The major media has surrendered all credibility. I made friends recently with a distinguished Jewish journalist who is an avid Trump supporter. She has written in detail of the accomplishments of his administration in the first year (in spite of everybody working against him) that are never discussed by the big media outlets. And it’s amazing and most encouraging. We have to distinguish between the man and the agenda. While one may dislike the man, the agenda has many positives, if properly understood (and most liberals refuse to properly understand anything, opting instead to run completely on emotion–IMHO). Of course, if one supports a communist philosophy, one will hate the agenda too. But note where that leads–to wit, the breakdown of the socialized medical system in the UK right now with the flu epidemic.

          Yes, the “establishment” Republicans do precipitate fits on my part at times, why not coughing spasms too? LOL Now, do you see why I’m opting to quit writing about politics today on my blog and go back to times and places that make sense? Thanks for sticking with me.

          Mark

          Like

    • Madame Vintage 3:00 pm on January 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I would protest as i am sure many will, that Donald Trump can make anything ‘good’ in America let alone great so let me put that in the shadows of pretence. Moving along this is indeed a great post with a great set of tunes.

      Sincerely Sonea

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 4:09 pm on January 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well, Trump is certainly great at turning aside questions about his behavior and trying to divert attention elsewhere. America once suffered through the Great Depression; now we’re going through the Great Diversion.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 11:08 am on January 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      A wonderful selection of music! A perfect way to start the day. Thanks!

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 1:02 am on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: By the Sea, , , , La Mer, , , old songs, ,   

    MER-SEA 

    In comments to a Jan.2 Peach of a post titled Fallen Angel, I included links to BEYOND THE SEA and LA MER (English and French versions of the same song). Diana Peach’s preternatural post & both song links can be found here: https://mythsofthemirror.com/

    I bring this up because that song is just one of several ‘beautiful’ sea songs I recall, and I thought I’d take a stroll down memory lane — or should I say, memory beach. I invite you to join me….that is, if you don’t mind getting sand — as I don’t mind getting….

    And now let us start our stroll:

    Of course, there is more than one way to see the sea — you can join the Navy:

    You say the Navy’s not your cup of sea? Then let us end our stroll like Mr. Bean, oblivious to all else, bidding glorious adieu to….

    Mer-sea beaucoup.

     
    • Don Frankel 11:00 am on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Muse there are other great sea songs like ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’, ‘C C Ryder’ and ‘Good Night Irene’ that has the line “I’ll see you in my dreams”. But that’s enough out of me. I’ll see you later.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:08 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Don, “I’ll see you in my dreams” is actually a song in itself, written in 1924, pre-dating “Good Night Irene.” It was one of lyricist Gus Kahn’s biggest hits — so much so that it served as the title of the hokey 1951 biopic directed by Michael Curtiz, starring Danny Thomas as Gus Kahn. Here is the Mills Brothers’ version:

        Like

    • Carmen 1:27 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Mornin’ mistermuse,
      Of course you must realize that I live on the sea bound coast. . .
      The first video mentioned the sand on Havana beaches – gorgeous! We’ve been to several around Cuba and they are, indeed, as good as the lady sings about. 🙂
      Lovely song selections!
      (and you were worried I’d unleash a sea of slights)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:05 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Good afternoon, Carmen. Not only do I remember that you live on the sea bound coast, but I think I mentioned in a comment a few years ago that I’ve been in your lovely neck of the woods (and coast) on vacation….when it was slightly warmer, of course.

        Glad you enjoyed the song selections. I think the last one (from the film MR. BEAN’S HOLIDAY) is a visual delight, as well as an auditory one.

        As for your last sentence, I wasn’t worried in the slightest. 😦

        Like

        • Carmen 5:48 pm on January 5, 2018 Permalink

          Well, I am sorry to have mist you. . . 😉 (and excuse my foggy memory)

          Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:01 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Donald O'Connor, Easy come easy go, , Fit as a fiddle, , , , If it looks like a duck, , , old songs, , , , , Tweety Bird,   

    DUBIOUS PROPOSITIONS 

    I’m a big fan of old sayings, but even I concede that some sayings could no more pass the proverbial smell test than a rodent could pass a spell(ing) test. They may seem innoscent enough, but smellegant isn’t the same as elegant, and you must admit that a proverb like A turd in the hand is worth two in the tush is less than elegant. Really, close encounters of the turd kind could leave you holding your nose….if not checking your rear-view mirror.

    That said, are such askew old sayings any less farcical than the twisted tweets America’s Tweeter-in-Chief oft twitters? “Fake news!”…”fake news!”…”fake news!” And if ANYONE can smell (like) a rat when it comes to fake news, it is obviously President Tweety Turd.

    Leaving the President’s behind for a moment, here are some classic old sayings. Can you make out the fakeout — aka smell the rat — in these venerable gems?

    If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and mocks like a mocking bird, duck — it’s The Donald.

    A watched pot never boils….but it may get a bit peeved.

    A rolling stone gathers no animosity.

    A fool and his honey are soon parted.

    Faint heart ne’er won bare lady.

    Oil and water don’t mix — got that, Slick?

    You can’t get blood out of a turnip, but you can get honey out of two-lips.

    Monkey pee pee, monkey do do (easy come, easy go).

    Dead men tell no tales, but some may leave a will which does.

    Friends and would-be heirs, some of the above were almost enough to make me gag, but I can assure your butt that not every old phrase strays in dubious ways. For example:

    ….and this:

    ….and this:

    Oh….and I almost forgot this old saying: HAPPY NEW YEAR!

     

     

     

     
    • Garfield Hug 6:30 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year Mistermuse! Love your “old” sayings🤗

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:27 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you. Here’s an “old” saying that’s so bad, it goes without saying: A GARFIELD HUG AROUND THE TUSH IS WORTH TWO IN THE BUSH. Sorry about that — especially if you mind Garfield hugging you around the tush. 🙂

        Like

    • Carmen 7:41 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As hubby’s grandmother used to say (referring to the first video), “Those fellas are SOUP-le”. 🙂
      Great videos as usual, mistermuse! (Although the second one wasn’t available -in my country, I assume)
      Meanwhile, here in the Maritimes, we are bringing in the brass monkey at night. Brrrrr. . Happy New Year, eh? 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:44 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        “SOUP-le” sounds like French for “supple.” I’d supple-ment that with something witty, but it’s not supple-meant to be.

        The second video is a 1939 song titled SNUG AS A BUG IN A RUG, which I hope you and your hubby are staying in this “Brrrrr” weather.

        Warmest wishes for the New Year.

        Like

        • Carmen 9:57 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink

          That was the joke. She meant to say ‘supple’, as in ‘can bend easily’ but it came out mispronounced. It was one of those endearing things she said which no one ever corrected – she was a character! 🙂
          We’ve got fires in both the furnace and the kitchen wood range. . . we’re managing! Even took the kids on a not-exactly-sleigh-ride yesterday (it was a balmy minus 8 C) — a trailer hooked to an old tractor, complete with straw bales and blankets. Seventeen children, eight on down to eight months, thought it was a great time!

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:01 am on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      That “sleigh ride” sounds like a blast (of cold air), but who cares about the cold when you’re “eight on down.” It’s a different story when you’re eighty on up….but it beats the alternative of being six feet under. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

    • manoloprofe 1:16 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year & thanks a lot for being in the observation post…! 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:33 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        It has been my pleasure. Hopefully 2018 will be another good year of observation and posting for both of us.

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 2:27 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Still in love with Gene Kelly after all these years…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:37 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        And well you should….after all, Gene Kelly danced almost as well as I (in my dreams). 🙂

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:52 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year Muse!

      Remember ‘Actions Speak Louder Than Words’.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:25 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        B.B. King must’ve thought he was indeed a king, singing “You don’t do as I tell you, baby” in that song — apparently her INaction spoke louder than words, as far as he was concerned. The nerve of the woman, not doing as he told her!

        Don, if you’re heading for Times Square tomorrow night to ring in the New Year, stay warm and sober (or at least warm). 🙂

        Like

        • Don Frankel 9:28 am on December 31, 2017 Permalink

          Muse I’m just going to post last year’s picture from last year. I’m not going out of the house today.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Superduque777 8:05 pm on December 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 1 person

    • inesephoto 4:47 pm on January 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Happy New Year! Love your blog ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • lexborgia 11:32 pm on January 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      You can’t get blood out of a turnip…..leave a will which does.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 1:00 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A to Z, Charles Boyer, Come with me to ze Casbah, , , , , old songs, The Weavers, , Ziguener   

    Z END (AT LAST) 

    With Z 26th letter of Z alphabet/26th post of this series, we come equally to Z end of both. This calls for Z celebration….so “Come wiz me to ze Casbah” and we make sweet music together. Z girl songs, zey may be few, but zat does not mean we need end on Z sour note.

    Ah, ze Casbah in old ALGIERS — where French-turned-American actor Charles Boyer famously put the above Come to ze Casbah come-on on the beautiful Hedy Lamarr….or did he? To answer zat question, you must comme see for yourself:

    http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/121579%7C0/Algiers.html

    Comme saw?

    But I digress from the music, for which we turn first to beautiful American-turned-French (due to racism in America) entertainer, Josephine Baker:

    We turn next to one of England’s finest (and one of my favorite) composers, Noel Coward, whose urbane, wistful lyrics graced such great songs as A ROOM WITH A VIEW and….

    And now we come to the song I referred to (in reply to a comment to my previous post) as, strictly speaking, not qualified for this post….the reason being that it starts with T. However, the T is silent; for all intents and purposes, and in a pronounced way, it’s a Z song….and a rousing, joyous one it is, for “Dawn will find us laughing in the sunlight, dancing, dancing, dancing with my Tzena”:

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    This is my last post until after the holidays, as this series has been music to my ears at the expense of other demands and endeavors (once I got on a roll, I got caught up in posting every third day despite not intending such frequency). Now, before catching up becomes the impossible dream, it behooves me to hustle while I work at getting around to tackling those other endeavors….such as catching some more Zs.

    If I’m too sound asleep to be ‘alarmed’ by all this by the end of the year, wake me when it’s over.

     
    • carmen 8:55 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Ze end. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:14 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        ZE end? EZ for U to say!
        But welcome back any way!
        🙂

        Like

        • carmen 12:59 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink

          A line from a book hubby’s reading is: “I’m busier than a four-balled tomcat!” I can relate. Well, err. .. you know what I mean. . .

          Have a great Christmas, mistermuse — I enjoyed the ‘series’ from afar. Where the temps were way above zero, not below – like here! (I just had to sneak in a ‘zed’ word there. *cough* – it’s ZED, not ZEE, you see. :).
          Merry Christmas in your neck of the woods, eh? 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 1:31 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink

          I don’t know about ZED, but I remember ZEE, as in ZUIDERZEE, where you could freeze your backside if you reside on ze seaside by ze Zuiderzee side of ze North Sea side at high tide.

          Sorry about zat. You have a great Christmas as well, Carmen.

          Like

    • Don Frankel 9:23 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, this has been a great run. I’m sorry we’re at Z end. And Z was not easy but you got a great selection here which is even more amazing when you consider the limited amount of songs about women who’s names start with Z.

      Now this is a stretch because it’s not an oldie although it has a title similar to a great old song. It’s not about a woman with a name starting with Z but since it’s ‘All of Me Love’s All of You’ and the singer’s name is Jane Zhang, she is sort of singing about a woman with the name starting with Z.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:36 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. It waZ a great run, if I do say so myself.

        As for the clip, the comparison may not be fair, but here is the ALL OF ME that I remember:

        Like

    • arekhill1 10:36 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoy your Christmas break, Sr. Muse. Ho, ho, ho.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:49 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise, Ricardo. Christmas may leave me broke, but I’ll try not to lose any sleep over it.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:44 am on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Merry Criztmas and Happy New Yearz! Thanks for the muzic and enjoy your break. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:56 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Diana, and same to you. I’m pleased that you enjoyed my “muzic” — Muzak, eat your heart out! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 12:15 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse, I’ll see you and raise you one.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:02 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I almost picked Billie’s clip myself, but chose Louis’ rendition — let’s call it a draw, because you can’t go wrong either way.

        Like

    • Don Frankel 6:32 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Agreed Muse and I think we can also agree that the original All of Me by Marks and Simon is the better song.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 8:44 pm on December 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, although it’s a great song, Gerald Marks (composer) and Seymour Simons (lyricist) initially couldn’t get the song published despite making the rounds of all the music publishing houses on Tin Pan Alley. It was only after Marks went backstage at a Michigan theater where Belle Baker (an important vaudeville star at that time) was performing, and played & sang the song for her that they got a break. She loved the song and said she would “see what she could do.”

      Time went by and they didn’t hear anything, but one night she was interviewed on a Newark radio station (WOR) and sang the song without accompaniment. The station was bombarded with calls asking where they could buy the song, but none of the publishers had it. All of a sudden Marks started getting telegrams, “Dear Gerry, we knew you could do it. Have a great deal for you.”

      Guess what. The song was published and became a big hit — the same song they turned up their noses at before the public demanded it!

      Like

    • Madame Vintage 12:52 pm on December 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the ever enchanting and classy set of tunes to add to such writing. It’s been a pleasure to have come across your blog. I hope the z’s do you much goodness and you have a good holiday over the festive season and a wonderful New Year.

      Sincerely Sonea

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:26 pm on December 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        You are most welcome, Sonea. There’s nothing like an appreciative audience to help make it a “festive season.” Happy holidays to you as well.

        Like

    • Mél@nie 4:53 pm on December 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      ah, Josephine Becker… an icon in France! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:32 pm on December 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I know she was a sensation in pre-WWII France, and it’s good to know she’s still well remembered. America’s loss was, without a doubt, France’s gain. 🙂

        Like

    • restlessjo 4:29 am on December 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You do have fun! 🙂 🙂 No time to linger but I hope this Christmas time will bring you joy. Thanks for your company.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Cheryl Wright 1:10 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Loved these videos! Have a wonderful Christmas!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 4:00 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Cheryl, and same to you! I watched each of the videos several times, which must mean I love them too. 🙂

        Like

    • RMW 9:49 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As I listen to that song I conjure up an image of Mr. Coward sitting at the grand piano in his drawing room, surrounded by his witty and urbane (or maybe not so urbane) friends. But he would have said: “It’s pronounced Zed, my boy!” Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:04 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Best holiday wishes to you as well, Roslyn…, and thank you for getting back to Noel Coward.

        I didn’t realize it at the time, but his birthday is Dec. 16 — the same day I wrote this post. I will therefore do him the belated honor of listing some more of his great songs: I’LL SEE YOU AGAIN, I’LL FOLLOW MY SECRET HEART, SOMEDAY I’LL FIND YOU, MAD ABOUT THE BOY, MAD DOGS AND ENGLISHMAN, and IF LOVE WERE ALL.

        Liked by 1 person

    • literaryeyes 10:25 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      May your holidays be filled with music of long ago, simple and elegant, sassy and extravagant.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:11 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate those “simple and elegant” words, Mary.

        Although it’s been said, many times, many ways….

        Like

    • markscheel1 11:08 pm on December 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Muse,

      I congratulate you on a clever and delightful trip down memory lane alphabetically! Well done. Now, enjoy your ZZZZZ, and have a very merry Christmas.

      Mark

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:37 pm on December 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Likewize, Mark. May Santa be good to you at Christmas, even though you (I surmize) usually vote Republican! 🙂

        Like

    • Superduque777 5:47 pm on December 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 4:57 pm on December 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 4:58 pm on December 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Zees iz zimply fab-u-luz!

      Liked by 1 person

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