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  • mistermuse 6:41 pm on September 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , German, good news, , Italian, Latin, , Pig Latin, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, The Andrews Sisters, Turkish   

    NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS 

    No news is good news, except in a newspaper. –Evan Esar

    Sept. 11 is NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS DAY. This blog is not a newspaper, so today I will go with all the NO NEWS I know because I know NO NEWS is GOOD NEWS so far as NO NEWS being GOOD NEWS goes. Assuming you are with me so far, let’s see where in the world NO NEWS takes us:

    1. No noticias

    2. Icksnay ewsnay

    3. Nao noticias

    4. Nessuna notizia

    5. Keine nachrichten

    6. Pas de nouvelles

    7. Brak wiadomosci

    8. Habersiz kalmak

    9. Nihil nuntium

    How many of those “No news” languages do you think you recognized? Take a fun-guess. Remember, this is not a test, so….

    Just to prove I’m not going to hog all the answers, here’s a clue to #2:

    So much No News for now; let us revel in the Good News.

    Modo vincis, modo vinceris.

     
    • David Scott Moyer 7:28 pm on September 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m sure of 5

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:07 pm on September 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great, Scott! As the post’s last line says in Latin, “You win some, you lose some” — and you won a majority.

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 12:40 am on September 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Only 5 for sure … is 7 Polish?
      This post intro sounds a bit like Abbott and Costello’s “Who’s on first base”!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:11 am on September 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You nailed the “Pole” position, Kate — 7 is indeed Polish. I already gave away Pig Latin as 2. Here’s how the rest line up:
        1. Spanish 3. Portuguese 4. Italian 5. German 6. French 8. Turkish 9. Latin

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 1:12 am on September 12, 2019 Permalink

          well done you, the Deutsche was easy to pick … I’m better with the sound or accent of a language than the written word ūüôā

          Liked by 2 people

        • Lindi Roze 6:48 pm on September 16, 2019 Permalink

          Well, I got the Latin languages, including pig latin! Easy peasy- the others were “Greek to me” ūüėČ

          Liked by 1 person

      • Lindi Roze 6:46 pm on September 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Clam kate, That’s one of my favorite routines. Our local radio station would always play it on opening day when I was a kid.

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 8:28 pm on September 16, 2019 Permalink

          I worked with a well know radio presenter who was called “Groover” cos it was his theme song … they forgot his given name ūüôā

          Liked by 2 people

    • MG WELLS 1:33 am on September 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Glad to see you make an infamous day a bit lighter. Thanks for sharing and wishing you a blessed day.

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 8:27 am on September 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I DO love me some Andrews Sisters!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:31 am on September 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That clip is from ROAD TO RIO (1947), one of the better films in the famous Bing Crosby-Bob Hope “Road” series.

        Like

    • Elizabeth 4:59 pm on September 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Best song ever is from The Wiz sung by the wicked witch. “Don’t you bring me no bad news.” I think it is Trump’s theme song.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 1:49 pm on September 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      No news is good news. Or may be good news. After all, no one plans a murder out loud.
      Love, light and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:50 pm on September 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Funny you should mention “murder out loud,” as it reminded me of a film called MURDER, HE SAYS (starring Fred MacMurray, who was the subject of my Aug. 30 post titled MAC). Here’s a funny scene from that film:

        Liked by 1 person

        • Eliza 2:05 pm on September 15, 2019 Permalink

          Can you copy the link out as for some reason I can’t open it even if I copy and paste

          Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 5:33 pm on September 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

    • Silver Screenings 6:38 pm on September 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The Singing Sophomores is another new group you’ve introduced me to. I did an online search and was pleased to see they were quite famous back in the day, and rightly so.

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 2:43 pm on September 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 6:15 am on February 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: E pluribus unum, , Latin, , t. p.,   

    LATIN STUDENT JOHN 

    Staying on course, we turn now from Latin Lover Don to Latin Student John. In as much as¬†Latin¬†is an ancient language, it seems only fitting to go with an¬†ancient poem —¬†a poem¬†I scriboed (that’s as close as I can come¬†to Latin for¬†“scribbled”)¬†back when poetry was¬†written on¬†paper (you remember paper, don’t you, fellow¬†writers and historians?).¬†You might want to keep that¬†in mind, otherwise the poem’s last three or four¬†lines — not to mention the¬†post’s and poem’s titles —¬†make no sense….which¬†they make very little of anyway.

    POETRY COMES TO AN END

    Spes mea in gregis
    Means “My hope’s in the group.”
    Ignarus est bliss
    Means “I’m out of the loop.”

    Dominus vobiscum
    Means “God be with your soul.”
    Momentus momentum
    Means “You’re on a roll.”

    E pluribus unum
    Means “One out of many.”
    Discipulus egeo craniums
    Means “Some students¬†haven’t any.”

    Est Latine in nobis
    Means “Latin is stately.”
    Latrine est absentis papyrus
    Means “This poem is now t.p.”

    Ire debeo.
    I gotta go.

     
  • mistermuse 7:30 pm on February 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Latin, Latin lovers, , pickup lines, , Rudolph Valentino,   

    FOR DON, THE LATIN LOVER 

    My good buddy, New Yorker¬†Don Frankel, stated today¬†that he’s into Latin mottos lately (see comments to yesterday’s¬†It’s Girl Scout Cookie Time post under Speak Without Interruption, which you can¬†access and¬†click¬†via the¬†Blogroll¬†in the right column).

    Don doesn’t say exactly¬†why the sudden interest in Lingua Latina.¬†Perhaps this beautiful weather we’ve been having lately has him thinking thoughts of spring, when a young man’s fancy turns to¬†amare,¬†and an old man wishes he were young again (not that Don is old, but why wait until the last minute). The time to start practicing those Latin pickup lines is now, because you never know when you might run into a fellow lover of Latin in Manhattan who’s not a fellow.

    So, here we go, Don. Start memorizing these now, and before you know it, the feminas will be flocking around you like a reincarnated Rudolpho Valentino:

    Nonne alicubi prius convenimus?
    Haven’t we met somewhere before?

    Apparet te habere ingenium profundum.
    You strike me as a very deep person.

    Credo fatum nos coegisse.
    I think fate brought us together.

    Romani quidem artem amatoriam invenerunt.
    You know, the Romans invented the art of love.

    Apudne te vel me?
    Your place or mine?

    O Deus! Plus! Perge! Aio! Hui!
    Oh God! More! Go on! Yes! Ooh!

    Non sum paratus me committere.
    I’m not ready to make a committment.

    Spero nos familiares mansuros.
    I hope we’ll still be friends.

    Likewise.

     
    • arekhill1 7:34 pm on February 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Google Translate–Making everybody sound erudite. It’s a good thing.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:34 pm on February 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Apropos good things, here’s an appropriate theme song to help get Don in the spirit:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jtyty4HRrHI

      Like

    • Don Frankel 9:11 am on February 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you Muse. It is great to be the subject of a mistermuse article and better still now I know what to say. Now it has been awhile and people not just you but others I know, seem to have forgotten. Just last week someone asked me. “Do you want to meet someone?” :”Of course.” I replied. “Riahnna. Do you know her?”

      I will use Credo fatum no coegisee, at the appropriate time. The motto I was looking for was ‘Write and find your audience’. The computer told me it was ‘Et scriba, et aures vestrae’. Someone else told me that that wasn’t grammatically correct but gave a big long sentence. Mottos have to be short like Semper Fidelis and Sic sempter tyrannis. They also gave me Pro buono publico which I might start putting at the end of my articles. I mean i was a Civil Servant for 25 years why abandon the dream.

      I loved the song too.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:30 am on February 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Coincidentally, the lyricist (Al Dubin) of that song died on a February 11th, the same day I wrote this post. Although little remembered today, Dubin was one of the greatest and most prolific lyricists in the history of American popular music. His songs include Shuffle Off To Buffalo, You’re Getting To Be A Habit With Me, I Only Have Eyes For You, Lullaby Of Broadway, September In The Rain and hundreds more.

      Like

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