Tagged: Irving Berlin Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 1:46 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , FLYING HOME, , Irving Berlin, , Lionel Hampton, Red Norvo, REMEMBER, vibraphone, , xylophone   

    GOOD VIBES 

    They’ve used jazz xylophones as an aid in diagnosing depressives: If a subject is listening to more than a few minutes of jazz xylophone a day, there’s a better than fifty percent chance that he’s about to step in front of a train. –from THOUGHTS ON JAZZ, a tongue-in-cheek post on the surfeit-of-potatoes blog of our friend MASERCOT: https://morepotatoes.com/2019/07/19/thoughts-on-jazz/

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Well, I suppose every potato is entitled to its own opinion, but (though I dig potatoes as much as the next yam) I can’t let this riposte pass without defending the jazz xylophone, regret though I may that this puts non-diggers of ‘jazz x’ on track for a depressing end. But why step in front of a train when you can Take the “A Plane” and  go Flying Home….

    If you recognized that “A Plane” was a play on words on Duke Ellington’s “Take The A Train,” give yourself an A+.  Here’s vibraphonist Milt Jackson’s take (the main dif between xylophone and vibraphone: the former has wooden bars, the latter has aluminum bars):

    And, so you’ll have something beautiful to remember when you get home, here is (to quote jazz critic George Simon) “a magnificent xylophonist of exquisite taste,” Red Norvo and His Orchestra with their “smoldering version” of Irving Berlin’s REMEMBER (Red’s solo begins at the 1:16 mark):

    So there you have it: three jazz xylophone/vibraphone masters at their best, bar none.

     

     
    • masercot 2:04 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, it’s on, now!

      Wait a minute… no it isn’t…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:02 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 4:58 am on July 22, 2019 Permalink

          Being a Cab Calloway fan, I LOVE that big band sound in the back… How many great vocalists started with vocalist for a big band? I can only think of several…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 9:05 am on July 22, 2019 Permalink

          The big band in the back is Benny Goodman’s, and the date of the recording is actually 11/22/39, not 1940 as stated on the clip. Bailey’s first gig as a “big band” vocalist was in 1929 with, of all people, Paul Whiteman! Other great “girl” vocalists who started with big bands include Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee, Rosemary Clooney and many more. And you probably know that Ol’ Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra, was a big band singer with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey before he went out on his own.

          Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 9:17 am on July 22, 2019 Permalink

          Plus, one of my favorite actresses: Doris Day…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 12:18 pm on July 22, 2019 Permalink

          My favorite Doris Day film was her first, the all-but-forgotten ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS (1948). If you’ve never seen it, you might want to check TCM’s movie schedule — I last saw it on TCM a few months ago, and it reappears periodically.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 5:27 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      • sits back and enjoys the show…*

      Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 6:41 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      what absolutely divine music, loved every clip, thanks heaps Mr M 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:57 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. I ‘ll reward your comment with a bit of trivia: The “Peace, Brother!” vocalist in the above clip is Mildred Bailey, who was the wife of Red Norvo of the “Remember” clip (the last clip in my post). Both can be seen in that clip’s photos.

        Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 6:41 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a close call for me, R.g.,
      but I think I’d just as soon be….

      ….watching all the girls go by
      & giving them the evil – I mean eagle – eye.

      Liked by 4 people

    • blindzanygirl 6:53 pm on July 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for all these mistermuse.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 11:28 am on July 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Really enjoyed the MJQ back in the 70’s. If I had stepped in front of a train back then, it was because I was generally baked out of my mind in those days, not depressed.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:35 pm on July 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Hope this brings back some of those good MJQ vibes, Ricardo:

        That’s Milt Hinton, of course, on vibes.

        Like

    • Eliza 4:33 pm on July 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      How can people be so pretentious??
      Enjoy your music 🙂
      Love, light and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:18 pm on July 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Now I am singing “Good Vibrations” even though that was not what you had written. My mind is a jukebox as I said.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Christie 1:46 pm on July 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the good vibes!! Right back to you, too🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:48 pm on July 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for commenting, Christie. Love, light, glitter, and vibes, coming and going — it’s all good!

        Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 3:53 pm on July 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love the Paris gig. It’s always a treat to hear Lionel! After reading through the comments, here’s one of my BB singer favorites, M. Whiting. They all had that amazing, smooth vocal line.

      https://www.bing.com/search?q=margaret+whiting+time+after+time&qs=RI&pq=time+after+time+whiting&sk=AS1&sc=3-23&cvid=B3729409374B474397EB328C2BD88184&FORM=QBLH&sp=2

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:22 pm on July 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the Margaret Whiting clip. She was another of those big band “girl singers” I spoke of in a previous comment — her first hit record was THAT OLD BLACK MAGIC with the Freddie Slack Orchestra in the early 1940s. As you may know, she was one of two daughters of Richard Whiting, one of the best composers of the 1920s-30s, whose song MY IDEAL was Margaret’s second big hit

        There’s another reason I’m glad you commented, as it gives me a chance to refer you to a very funny clip of Randy Rainbow, who you’ve said you like a lot. You will find it among the comments to my next post THINK NOTHING OF IT. Enjoy!

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 8:31 am on July 29, 2019 Permalink

          My favorite rendition of Old Black Magic is Keely Smith with her husband dancing around her to get a reaction. They were a pair.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:30 am on July 29, 2019 Permalink

          I remember that. What a great (and one-of-a-kind) pair!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 5:37 am on August 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Just brilliant! ALL of this! Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 11:56 am on August 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Never heard of the Proms in London, but the Warner Bros movie music and Duke Ellington evening are ‘right down my alley.’

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ashley 12:25 pm on August 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It’s mostly “Classical” but they do mix in some others. The Duke Ellington is “sacred” music? That will be something new for me!

        Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 10:24 pm on August 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      love Norvo’s phrasing. thanks. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 5:16 am on August 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Lionel is awesome and a Quincy admiration!

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:06 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: a walk in the park, foot talk, , Irving Berlin, , Midge Williams, , , The Rooftop Singers, Walk Right In, Walkin' The Dog,   

    TAKE A WALK IN THE PARK DAY 

    March 30 is TAKE A WALK IN THE PARK DAY. Notwithstanding the condition of my feet (as you can understand from my March 20 FOOT TALK post), I thought I’d prepare ahead of the event by going for a walk on my post-erior, which is parked chair-side inside a blog somewhere in my PC, waiting to be liberated. So, let’s get a head start PDQ with a song befitting the occasion:

    So you see, my fellow carcass parkers: as escapism goes, that really wasn’t so hard, was it? You might even say it was a walk in the park. Let’s keep it going with this humdinger:

    Of course, if you’re a man’s-best-friend-lover, you wouldn’t think of taking a walk in the park without….

    Speaking of walkin’ the dog, I’ll be doggone if I didn’t forget to bring along my pooper scooper — not to mention my dog. Wait a minute — I don’t own a dog. Nonetheless, my dogs are killing me, so it’s time to switch gears and leave the rest of the walking in park. When you gotta go, you gotta go. Like post-haste.

     

     
    • Paul Sunstone 12:34 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s so cool there is a “Walk in the Park Day”.

      Colorado Springs has some nice parks, MM. If you would like to see one of the best in town just Google “Garden of the Gods” images.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:27 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Been to Rocky Mountain National Park, but not Garden of the Gods. Probably more like Garden of the Tourists in summer. Anyway, Googled the images — makes me think I should be one of the tourists.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Paul Sunstone 9:53 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink

          You nailed it about “Garden of the Tourists”! But at least most of them stay off the Park’s back trails. Mountain lions. Only city park I know of anywhere with large wild cats, although there might be a few in Africa or perhaps even the Indian Subcontinent.

          The lions aren’t much of a threat to humans, but it can be pretty unnerving if and when one tackles a deer in front of you — that happened to a friend of mine once, MM. Years before she went hiking again.

          Liked by 1 person

    • carmen 12:45 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      It’s still below zero here (C!) so I think I’ll just rest on my a.. .umm.. .laurels. . For awhile yet. 🙂 (It makes two of us)

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:32 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Good idea, Carmen. In a few more months, you’ll be sitting pretty (weather-wise) and I’ll be sweating my laurels off. 😦

        Like

    • Rakkelle 8:47 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Man, these old songs are classic..Saw what I did there? The pun was intended. 😂 I’m not as good at it as you are but maybe one day I’ll get there.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:23 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Rakkelle, I’m older than any of those songs, so I guess that makes me SUPER CLASSIC (or super ancient, if you want to be contrary). 🙂 In any case, I dig all three — not a ‘dog’ among them, IMHO.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 8:57 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Did you ever do the yoyo trick “walking the dog?”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:27 pm on March 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I remember it, Elizabeth, but I don’t think I ever did it (yoyo was a no-no as far as my ability to master it). 😦

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 12:19 am on March 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      lol fun one!

      Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 5:36 pm on March 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Paul Sunstone 9:27 pm on March 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hey MM! I want to personally invite you to enter my random drawing for a totally free novel! Check it out:

      https://cafephilos.blog/2019/03/24/act-now-get-your-free-novel/

      Liked by 2 people

    • America On Coffee 2:10 am on March 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Nostalgically captivating!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Lazos 8:38 am on April 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Some of my favorite nights are taking a blanket in the park and listening to live music which has become a popular summer activity where I live. :0)

      Liked by 2 people

    • Paul Sunstone 5:18 am on April 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      MM! I’m pleased to tell you that you have won my random drawing for a totally free copy of Tom Robbins’ immortal classic, “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues”! Please contact me through the contact form on my blog for the details. Congratulations!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 10:45 pm on April 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love the song “Walk Right In” – and I love the way folks used to dress up for television appearances in the old days. I guess that means I’m getting old, too…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:59 pm on April 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        WALK RIGHT IN is getting old too, SS. Long before it became a #1 hit for The Rooftop Singers in 1962, it was composed by blues musician Gus Cannon and recorded by his Jug Stompers:

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:18 am on April 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        My pleasure, SS. I love the Jug Stompers version too. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • equipsblog 10:09 pm on April 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You dish out severe pun-nishment.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 1:13 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Irving Berlin, , , , ,   

    TIME FLIES 

    It is said that “Time flies when you’re having fun.” As for me, time flies when you can’t believe a certain young woman and I will celebrate our 50th wedding anniversary this fall, and next year on June 23, the oldest of our two daughters (Big One and Little One) will celebrate(?) her 50th birthday. How is it possible that one day the young woman and I got married, and the next thing we know, our girls are older than my oldest clothes (though not by much). Time and fun fly when ‘hangers-on’ in the closet look the same as decades ago….but the reflection in the mirror looks like Methuselah’s grandfather. 😦

    The moral of the story?

    Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
    Old Time is still a-flying;
    And this same flower that smiles today
    Tomorrow will be dying.

    Then be not coy, but use your time
    And while ye may, go marry;
    For having lost but once your prime,
    You may forever tarry.

    –Robert Herrick (from his poem TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME, 1648)

    In other words, take the advice of legendary songwriter Irving Berlin (1888-1989) and….

    Oh….I almost forgot: Happy 49th Birthday, Big One!

     

     

     
    • arekhill1 2:05 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I’m the eldest of seven, Sr. Muse, and a honeymoon baby like Big One. My mother is continually startled by how old I am.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 4:03 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        I lost my mother years ago, Ricardo, but I’m sure she would react the same as yours if she were still alive.

        Like

    • calmkate 3:34 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      lol wow 50 years is most impressive! Well done both of you, love the song …

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:07 pm on June 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. The song is one of Irving Berlin’s lesser-known ones but, I think, one of his best, despite (or maybe because of) its simplicity.

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 8:17 am on June 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Time does fly!
      Happy Golden Anniversary for later this year. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • Don Frankel 9:51 am on June 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Happy Anniversary Mister and Mrs Muse. Guess it is safe to say…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:02 am on June 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. I guess, having made it through the first 50 years, Mister and Mrs. Muse can make it through the next 50….and then we’ll be in better position to see if we can handle Everlasting.

        Like

    • pjlazos 6:46 am on June 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      So many milestones! Have fun!! Oh, and time is all happening at once so re-live it at your leisure. 😘

      Liked by 2 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 2:53 pm on June 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Time does fly, doesn’t it? I went to my grandson’s 5th birthday party yesterday. He’s starting school in the fall. How did that happen? He was just born last week. 🙂
      An early Happy Anniversary, and Happy Birthday to the Big One.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:39 pm on June 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        How lucky can you be, to have a grandchild of that age (or any age), Diana. Enjoy his childhood “while ye may,” because TIME FLIES! And thank you for the Anniversary and Birthday wishes.

        Liked by 1 person

    • RMW 12:50 am on June 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Fifty years of wedded bliss…. congrats…. that’s a lot of cat lifetimes. I actually had to use the calculator to figure out what year that was… 1968. For me, life is a lot better now.

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 1:20 am on July 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you MM for all the reading…I love this music and thanks for the follow. Barking in the Dark will always endeavor to inform, agitate and, above all, amuse. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kally 7:15 am on July 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Love this song. Advance congratulations to your anniversary and a loving wish for your elder one’s birthday.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:30 am on July 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kally. You remind me of the Dr. Pepper commercial on TV–you’re “the sweet one.” 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Kally 10:16 am on July 7, 2018 Permalink

          Awwww! I haven’t seen that commercial. We don’t have Dr. Pepper over here but I Guess I’ll YouTube to find out which one! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 1:26 pm on July 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Every day is a good day for Art Landry & Co., in my opinion.

      Hey, Congrats on your upcoming 50th Anniversay! Woohoo! That is a remarkable achievement.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:31 pm on July 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, S.S.

        Art Landry’s was one of many popular big bands back in the Roaring Twenties. I should probably devote a post or two to remembering some of them: Paul Whiteman, Fred Waring, Ben Selvin, Leo Reisman, George Olsen, etc.

        Liked by 1 person

    • franklparker 11:49 am on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Loved this. You may have beaten to 80 by a year three but I claim victory in the marriage duration stakes and having a child over 50. (55 and 53 respectively this September). Must follow you and read more of your poetry and politics.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:59 am on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Frank. I, too, must read more of your posts as time permits — as if it ever does….so I’ll just have to take time and like it (which shouldn’t be too difficult, based on what I’ve read so far).

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Andy Razaf, , , Irving Berlin, Jimmy Van Heusen, , , , , , ,   

    A com-POSE-r BY ANY OTHER NAME…. (Part 1 of 2) 

    Tomorrow, Feb. 15, is the birthday of one of America’s greatest composers of popular songs, Hyman Arluck. Hyman WHO, you ask? Never heard of him? If you’re a fan of America’s Golden Age of Popular Music, this song of his is probably one of your favorites:

    ….not to mention this one:

    You say you thought those songs were composed by HAROLD ARLEN?
    From what I hear, no doubt they was….
    because…because…because…because…
    of the wonderful whiz he was.
    But before a wonderful whiz he was, he was Hyman Arluck, so born on Feb. 15, 1905. If you were fooled, you should be grateful because, as Arlen (nee Arluck) notes in another of his songs, it’s….

    Speaking of which, I thought it might be fun (for me, anyway) to fool around with a selection of birth names of other great Golden Age songwriters (each of them listed with one of their most popular songs), followed by a list of their noms de plume in scrambled order. Unless you Arluck-y, you’ll probably be unable to correctly pair more than 70% of the names (but at least half are guessable even if you don’t know them):

    a. Israel Baline (HOW DEEP IS THE OCEAN?)
    b. Benjamin Anzelwitz (SWEET GEORGIA BROWN)
    c. C. K. Dober (BARNEY GOOGLE)
    d. Vladimir Dukelsky (APRIL IN PARIS)
    e. Charles N. Daniels (CHLOE)
    f. Albert Gumm (TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME)
    g. Johnny Kluczko (RACING WITH THE MOON)
    h. Edward Chester Babcock (LOVE AND MARRIAGE)
    i. Andrea Razafkeriefo (MEMORIES OF YOU)
    j. William Samuel Rosenberg (I’VE GOT A FEELING I’M FALLING)

    1. Albert Von Tilzer
    2. Irving Berlin
    3. Ben Bernie
    4. Con Conrad
    5. Vernon Duke
    6. Neil Moret
    7. Billy Rose
    8. Andy Razaf
    9. Jimmy Van Heusen
    10. Johnny Watson

    In Part 2, I’ll post the answers plus clips of a few of the above songs. Meanwhile, if you’d like to hear one of the songs in particular, comments are open — please make a request. I’ve got a feeling I’m filling it.

     

     
    • Superduque777 12:08 am on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 7:09 am on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you for the Over the Rainbow clip. I never tire of hearing Judy Garland sing it. 🙂
      I’m rubbish at guessing the real names!
      But I’d like to hear April in Paris Thank you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 8:57 am on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      I knew Israel Baline was Irving Berlin as a relative of one of my relatives was his accountant. Sometimes I got some really great seats at the Music Box Theater. Then I knew who Edward Chester Babcock was as he worked with and was a close friend of Sinatra. I could guess who Billy Rose was as the names are pretty similar but then I had a lot of fun looking up the other ones.

      I’ve always thought that Somewhere Over The Rainbow is one of the finest examples of blending words and music you can ever find.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:55 am on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Glad you enjoyed it, Don. Unbeknownst to me, your comment came in while I was in the middle of replying to scifihammy’s comment, so my Billy Rose example had already been guessed by you. I guess great minds really do think alike (at least, I prefer that explanation over coincidence, How About You?).

        Like

    • mistermuse 9:21 am on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, scifihammy — I’ll be glad to play “April In Paris”….maybe even before April in Paris (like in my next post). 🙂

      As for guessing at matching the songwriters’ names, what I meant by “half are guessable even if you don’t know them” is best shown by this example: the real name of the writer of I’VE GOT A FEELING I’M FALLING, William Rosenberg, can be deduced from its similarity to his professional name, Billy Rose. Thus, j. is 7. There are several other instances whereby a match can be made by comparing the first and/or last names in the first list with those in the second list.

      Like

    • moorezart 9:52 pm on February 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on February 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks, moorezart. I wonder if a reblog by any other name would smell as sweet? A thorny question indeed. 😦

        Like

    • Don Frankel 7:53 am on February 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      That’s a great song by Morris Hyman Kushner but I had to go look that up. When I did I found out that he also wrote the musicals ‘On a Clear Day’ and ‘Finian’s Rainbow’ in addition to a lot of other great songs. I also found out he discovered Francis Gumm.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:57 pm on February 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        HOW ABOUT YOU? was indeed composed by Morris Hyman Kushner (aka Burton Lane), with lyrics by Ralph Freed (aka Ralph Freed). I wonder if Francis Gumm (aka Judy Garland) was related to Albert Gumm, composer of TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME? I’ll have to check that out.

        Like

    • arekhill1 1:21 pm on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Let’s make this about me. I’ve never changed my birth name. One of my many shitty career moves, probably.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:24 pm on February 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe it’s not too late, Ricardo — which, by the way, suggests a name you could change to and gain instant fame: Ricardo Montalban Jr. After all, the original Ricardo Montalban had good luck with it until he died, but that could happen to anyone.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Gilbert and Sullivan, , , Irving Berlin, Joseph Cotton, , , , , , , ,   

    HIGH FIVE FOR FIVE STARS 

    Each of the five days since my last post was the birthday of at least one iconic figure in music or film who left lasting memories for those who appreciate legacies in artistry. I could easily go overboard writing in depth about any of these mid-May arrivals, but maybe it’s best to lessen my losses by not overly testing readers’ patience (O me of little faith!):

    May 11 — IRVING BERLIN (1888-1989). Perhaps the most prolific composer in American history, with an estimated 1,500 songs to his credit, including the scores for 19 Broadway shows and 18 Hollywood films (three of which were Astaire-Rogers musicals). Writing both words and music (relatively rare for his era), his hits include seasonal evergreens White Christmas and Easter Parade, as well as the red, white and blue God Bless America. His lyrics may lack the wit and sophistication of Cole Porter and Lorenz Hart, but there’s no denying the emotional appeal of such songs as….

    May 12 — KATHERINE HEPBURN (1907-2003). In the Golden Era of Hollywood, was there ever a more successful, fiercely independent woman than Katherine Hepburn?  Successful? It’s hard to argue against receiving a record four Academy Awards for Best Actress, and being named the greatest female star of Classic Hollywood Cinema by the American Film Institute. Independent? Her own words say it all:

    “I have not lived as a woman. I have lived as a man. I’ve just done what I damn well wanted to, and I’ve made enough money to support myself, and ain’t afraid of being alone.” (Hard as it may be to imagine the Bryn Mawr-educated Hepburn uttering “ain’t,” I ain’t about to correct her quote.)

    “We are taught you must …. never blame yourself. It’s never your fault. But it’s always your fault, because if you wanted to change, you’re the one who has got to change.”

    “As one goes through life, one learns that if you don’t paddle your own canoe, you don’t move.”

    “Life gets harder the smarter you get, the more you know.”

    “Politicians remain professional because the voters remain amateur.”

    NOTE: For my ode to another May 12 bundle of joy, see my post of May 12, 2015.

    May 13 — ARTHUR SULLIVAN (1842-1900). Can’t place the name? How about Arthur Sullivan of GILBERT AND SULLIVAN fame? Who doesn’t enjoy their great comic operas such as THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE, THE MIKADO and H.M.S. PINAFORE — the latter of which I have loved since When I was a Lad:

    May 14 — SIDNEY BECHET (1897-1959). This is a name you almost certainly can’t place unless you’re a classic jazz fan….but if you are such a fan, you know him as a major figure in jazz annals since his recording debut in 1923. New Orleans born, he spent the last decade of his life in France, where he died on the same day — May 14 — that he was born. Here he is on soprano sax in a 1950s recording from the soundtrack of Woody Allen’s magical MIDNIGHT IN PARIS:

    May 15 — JOSEPH COTTON (1905-1994). I have previously mentioned Joseph Cotton in regard to his co-starring role (with Orson Welles and Alida Valli) in one of my favorite films, THE THIRD MAN. He first met Welles in 1934, beginning a life-long friendship and on-and-off association with Welles in numerous plays, radio dramas and films, as well as co-starring with Katherine Hepburn in the 1939 Broadway play THE PHILADELPHIA STORY. But it is in his role as Holly Martens in THE THIRD MAN that he stands alone (literally so, in the end), and I can think of no more fitting way to end this post than with that indelible closing scene from the film (to the tune of Anton Karas’ Third Man Theme):

     
    • calmkate 3:49 am on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Nice to know I share my birthday with someone better known lol

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:10 am on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Being better known isn’t necessarily something admirable — in evidence, I offer that supreme IT’S-ALL-ABOUT-ME showman, Donald Trump. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 3:55 pm on May 15, 2017 Permalink

          well you know how to burst a girls balloon .. what a truly terrible comparison … now I want to stay anonymous forever!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Jay 12:17 pm on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Isn’t it nice to imagine a big party where they’re all celebrating?

      Liked by 2 people

    • Don Frankel 12:41 pm on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Irving Berlin was born Israel Isidore Baline in what is now Belarus. I always think of that when I think of such songs as Easter Parade and White Christmas since he was a good Jewish boy.

      One of my relative’s relative was his Accountant.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 4:23 pm on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Don, Berlin once wrote a song titled I PAID MY INCOME TAX TODAY. It figures that he might have gotten the idea from your relative (the accountant).

      Like

    • Ricardo 6:02 pm on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      True dat about the voters, Sr. Muse

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 9:27 am on October 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Irving Berlin, , , , ,   

    COLE IN ONE (PART TWO) 

    One year ago today, on the 50th anniversary of the death of Cole Porter, I published a post titled COLE IN ONE. Porter was one of the two preeminent composer-lyricists  (the other being Irving Berlin) of his day, a time in the history of popular music when most songs were written by a team of one (or more) composer(s) and one (or more) lyricist(s)….think George and Ira Gershwin, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, and DeSylva, Brown and Henderson, for examples.

    What made Porter one of a kind was a combination of the unique quality of his melodies and the wit and urbane sophistication of his lyrics, for which he was unrivaled (excepting Lorenz Hart, who wrote lyrics only). This made such a big impression on me when I was young that I “fell in love” with witty, amusing and sometimes poignant rhyme — the kind exemplified non-musically by light verse master Ogden Nash….and even Nash could team up on occasion to write a great song, such as Speak Low (When You Speak Love) with composer Kurt Weill for the 1943 musical One Touch of Venus.

    For this post, I have taken the liberty of taking Cole Porter’s What Is This Thing Called Love for a re-write, interposing my interpretation of the well-known refrain onto Porter’s as-written (but seldom-heard) verse which precedes it. You might call it COLE PORTER A LA MUSE:

    I was a humdrum person,
    Leading a life apart,
    When love flew in through my window wide
    And quickened my humdrum heart.
    Love flew in through my window,
    I was so happy then.
    But after love had stayed a little while,
    Love flew out again.

    What is this thing
    Called love of light verse?
    This funny thing
    I love, called light verse.

    Just who can solve
    Its mystery.
    Why should it make
    A muse of me?

    I saw humor there
    One wonderful day;
    Youth took my heart
    And threw it away.

    That’s why I ask the Lord
    In light of this curse
    What is this thing
    Called love of light verse?

    In case you’ve forgotten how the real refrain goes, here is the song sung as originally written:

     
    • Don Frankel 4:01 pm on October 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      You’re not going to believe this Muse and I’m not joking. Earlier this morning I played golf. On the second tee which is a short par 3, 120 hole, I hit a very nice shot that was headed for the tee. Now if was early and foggy and the green was covered with dew. So when I got the green i couldn’t find the ball. After looking around for a good five minutes it dawned on me where the ball might be that I wouldn’t see it. You got it in the hole. An actual hole in one.

      The fates sometimes are kind and that’s why you are a Muse or should I say The Muse.

      Like

    • mistermuse 5:49 pm on October 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats on the hole-in-one, Don. What would be even more amazing is if that was the second hole-in-one you’d ever shot (to match the “PART TWO” of my post). Actually, if you want to claim it’s your second hole-in-one (even if it’s not), I won’t tell anyone. 🙂

      Like

    • linnetmoss 6:16 am on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing early version of the song! I’m fond of Porter and Nash too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:39 am on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      The vocalist here was Leslie “Hutch” Hutchinson, who was the Bobby Short of his day (both were sophisticated black cabaret singers with a preference for the songs of sophisticated song writers like Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart, etc.). Hutch (a generation before Short) was one of the biggest stars in England in the 1920s & 30s and recorded prolifically – I own a few dozen of his original 78 rpm records.

      Like

    • arekhill1 8:03 am on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Cole and a hole? Golf is one of the few vices I haven’t experimented with so far, Sir Don, but congratulations.

      Like

    • ladysighs 8:55 am on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Something needs to be done about this. 🙂

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:55 am on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Not sure what, but I’m open to suggestions. 🙂

      Like

    • BroadBlogs 3:02 pm on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Have you seen the movie, De-Lovely, based on his life? I thought it was pretty interesting.

      Like

    • mistermuse 3:57 pm on October 16, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Haven’t seen it, but (despite mixed reviews) I hear the improvement over the first Cole Porter biopic starring Cary Grant was like the difference between Night and Day, which just happens to be the title of the first one (which I did see, & thought was awful). Most reviewers say Kevin Kline was excellent as Cole Porter in De-Lovely.

      Like

    • mistermuse 11:27 am on October 17, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      With reference to ladysighs’ comment above that “Something needs to be done about this,” she has indeed “done something” – something completely unexpected, but greatly appreciated. Why not scroll up to her comment, click on her blog and see (and hear) what I mean?

      Like

    • rielyn 7:57 pm on October 17, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Here is the direct link to ladysighs’ vocal stylings for you, Dad, and your readers too. I sense a great collaboration in the making!

      Amusing Muser

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:11 pm on October 17, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      Your internet-challenged dad thanks you very much. One of these years I must learn to do that myself. 🙂

      Like

    • barkinginthedark 5:10 pm on August 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      so great! but where do you find these rare gems? anyway, continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 5:11 pm on August 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      P.S. you must have a terrific record collection.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:46 pm on August 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I did have a terrific record collection, but now I have only half a terrific record collection, as I sold my thousands of 78s for reasons I’d rather not think about. I still have my LPs, many of which are compilations or re-issues of old 78s, so between those and the memories of what is gone, I have a lot to draw on when it comes to posting “rare gems.”

        Like

    • barkinginthedark 1:02 am on August 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      thousands – wow…i’m sorry you had to sell them…a shame. i can only imagine from what you’ve posted what you had. “rare gems” indeed. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on June 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Irving Berlin, , , , the 1920s. the 1930s, The Great Depression,   

    SOUNDS OF THE TIMES 

    You’ve got to hand it to Cole Porter. He’s a rich boy who made good. 
    –Oscar Levant (said jokingly of his born-into-wealth friend)

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    If you, like me, are a child of parents born in the first decade of the 20th Century, you no doubt have at least a second-hand feel (if not first-hand familiarity) for that time in America known as “The Roaring Twenties” (AKA “The Jazz Age”) and “The Great Depression” (the 1930s). I was born too late in the Depression to recall what I saw then, but what I heard transcends the times. It’s the music, Cupid. Not that it was entirely romantic.

    You remember music (take that however you wish). In the words of Lorenz Hart: It’s Easy To Remember (but so hard to forget)….or, put another – Irving Berlin’s – way: The Song Is Ended (but the melody lingers on). Today, however, we celebrate a master songwriter of those times whose music is Easy To Love: Cole Porter, born June 9, 1892.

    To that end, I quote Fred Lounsberry, Editor of “103 lyrics of Cole Porter” (Random House):
    Mixing of opposites, wide knowledge, spunk, individuality, realism, restraint, rascality, maturity. This is a pretty complete list of what makes Cole Porter’s lyrics delightfully different, but the really primary strength of his lyrics is intelligence, putting all his facts, facilities and philosophies into the right balance to make good entertainment.

    So, without further ado, Let’s Do It — let’s do a few of those 1920s & 30s Cole Porter songs that are as likely to parody romantic bliss as to evoke it (including two versions of Let’s Misbehave):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iqqAIZpp2c

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ceMwgadNFM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2AiQgnylrE

    There, now — that wasn’t so bad, was it?

     

     
    • Thom Hickey 12:45 am on June 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks. CP pure class. Regards thom

      Like

    • mistermuse 9:09 am on June 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Thom. I tried to comment on one of your posts (“Fanfare For the Duke”), but it didn’t seem to “take,” so I’ll say here that your mention of Duke Ellington calls to mind other “royalty” from the golden age of jazz: Count Basie, King Oliver and (a little more recent) Nat King Cole.

      Like

    • Don Frankel 8:05 am on June 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Without any doubt one of the greatest and one of my favorite recordings of all time is…

      Like

    • mistermuse 8:46 am on June 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Don, it doesn’t get much better than a great singer singing a great song by a great writer….but let it also be noted that for every well-known great Porter song like “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” there are many little-known great Porter songs like “At Long Last Love,” “I Concentrate On You,” “Every Time We Say Goodbye” and the two I linked to at the end of my post, “Let’s Misbehave” and “It’s Bad For Me.” They’re good for us to know too!

      Like

    • Don Frankel 4:33 am on June 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      You’re right Muse. Another of my favorites and a little Jobin thrown in too.

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:22 am on June 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Don. I own a whole bunch of Sinatra records, but none with Jobim.

      Like

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