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  • mistermuse 12:07 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barney Google, Helen, , , Ida, , She Looks Like Helen Brown,   

    H I 

    Sixty-plus year old song titles with girl’s names beginning with ‘H’ and ‘I’ are scarce, which makes it expedient to ‘HI’light both in a two-for-the-price-of-one post.

    If there is so much as a hint of a hanger-on among America’s all-but-forgotten H songs, it is HARD-HEARTED HANNAH….but even that haughty harridan has hardly been heard hereabouts since hapless Herbert Hoover was handed his heave-ho from the White House hundreds of historic happenings ago.

    Still, I would give Hard-Hearted Hanna a play if not for a gal who looks like Helen Brown (whereas the previous paragraph looks like hell in black and white):

    As for the letter I, if you were around in 1903, you may remember IDA, who was sweet as….apple cider?

    And, just to show that IDA is not just for us old geezers, here some young’uns show her a little love:

    I’d-a like-a to be shown-a little love too, but no one has ever written an enduringly endearing ditty titled Mistermuse. When will they invent a time machine so I can go back and change my name to someone like Barney Google? (If you don’t remember Barney, Google him.)

    Eyes-a waitin’.

     

     
    • The Indecisive Eejit 3:52 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Lol @ Sparkplug. It has a certain ring to it that I doubt many young ones would say to their motors. Giddy up there Sparkplug lol

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:31 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        I once bet on a horse named Sparkplug, but he was a slow starter. Actually he never made it out of his stall.

        Like

    • inesephoto 7:03 am on October 21, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Great videos. Old and young love Ida and jazz.

      Liked by 2 people

    • arekhill1 10:38 am on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Barney Google with the goo-goo-googly eyes? My father used to sing it in the shower.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:59 pm on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        The song’s next line rhymed eyes with “had a wife three times his size.” But, just to be safe, your father probably sang it “had a wife he’d IDOLIZE” (especially if your mother was in hearing distance).

        P.S. Any humor that joke has may be outweighed by being in bad taste (however unintended), so I apologize for any offense taken, Ricardo.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Don Frankel 5:51 pm on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      This one wasn’t easy Muse but you got the job done. It’s good to see the kids playing the music still. Great music like great writing never dies.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:47 pm on October 22, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Writing the post wasn’t easy, Don, but choosing the songs was — especially SHE LOOKS LIKE HELEN BROWN, because I love the wordplay, and as you’ve probably noticed, there’s nothing (well, almost nothing) I like to play with more than words. As for IDA, it’s simply a great old song.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 9:38 am on May 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barney Google, , , , , , , , Sunday funnies   

    A FUNNY THING HAPPENED…. (PART TWO) 

    Part One of this Smithsonian Collection-based series on newspaper comics noted that weekday comic strips began in Hearst newspapers in the early 1900s. These strips, however — unlike Sunday strips — were not in color, appeared irregularly (up to 2 or 3 days a week) and were aimed more at adult readers than at children. The nation’s first full daily comic page appeared in Hearst’s New York Evening Journal on Jan. 31, 1912.

    The Sunday comics in those days featured demon children, clownish buffoons or humanized animals. On the other hand, the order of the day in weekday strips after 1907, according to Smithsonian, was satire, cheerful cynicism and subdued slapstick, centered on helpless husbands, burlesque detectives and inept scoundrels.  Quoting from “The Real Mission of the Funny Paper” in Century Magazine, March 1924: “The funny paper has …. become not only a faithful reflection of the tastes and ethical principles of the country at large; it is also manifestly an extremely powerful organ of social satire.”

    The 1920s to mid 1930s saw a proliferation of new strips; a dozen or more syndicates were by then supplying an insatiable newspaper market, while the old and established strips retained their audiences. This was the period in which Sunday comic sections went from 4 to 8 to 16 to as many as 32 pages, and it brings us to the list of 1933 cartoon characters in my May 9th post FUNNY ON PAPER (PART THREE). This marked the last great period of full Sunday pages for each strip. By the 1940s, half pages or less for major strips became common, and “The galaxy of the comic strip never again was to glow so brightly as during these last marvelous years of its springtide.” Here’s the scoop on some of those strips:

    MUTT & JEFF  http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com/Home/4/1/73/1016?articleID=46633
    BARNEY GOOGLE  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StkJTSAq0dE
    DICK TRACY  http://dicktracymuseum.com/chester-gould/timeline/
    GASOLINE ALLEY  http://www.tcj.com/growing-old-in-gasoline-alley-ninety-four-years-and-counting/
    POPEYE  http://popeye.com/history/

    TO BE CONCLUDED

     

     

     

     
  • mistermuse 10:01 am on May 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barney Google, Boob McNutt, Buck Rogers, , , , , , Joe Palooka, , Krazy Kat, Little Orphan Annie, Mickey Mouse, , , , , ,   

    FUNNY ON PAPER (PART THREE) 

    Comic strip

     The first two installments in this series were devoted primarily to statistics/the funnies’ business side (Part One) and profiles of two “colorful characters” (Part Two) of the 1933 comic strip world, based on a 1933 magazine article. Part Three will wrap up this article by asking you to imagine you’ve just awakened to find that you’re becoming a 1933 cartoon character, and you need to find out fast who your comics cohorts are, and what they’re up to.

    So you’re looking to be filled in, but drawing a blank.
    You wonder, “Am I still dreaming? Is this a prank?”
    Relax, my good man/gal, you have nothing to fear —
    You are among friends, as you can see here:

    MUTT & JEFF
    BARNEY GOOGLE
    DICK TRACY
    HAIRBREADTH HARRY
    LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE

    BOOB McNUTT
    THE GUMPS
    MOON MULLINS
    GASOLINE ALLEY
    WINNIE WINKLE

    TARZAN
    POLLY & HER PALS
    KATZENJAMMER KIDS
    KRAZY KAT
    SKIPPY
    BLONDIE

    TOONERVILLE FOLKS
    THE BUNGLE FAMILY
    POPEYE
    MAJOR HOOPLE (OUR BOARDING HOUSE)
    MICKEY MOUSE

    COUNT SCREWLOOSE
    BUNKY
    BUCK ROGERS
    MAGGIE & JIGGS (BRINGING UP FATHER)
    JOE PALOOKA

    Alas, the 1933 magazine article assumes that its readers know all about these characters, and so we will have to turn elsewhere to find out what they’re up to. As it happens, your faithful correspondent owns exactly the elsewhere to turn to: a book titled THE SMITHSONIAN COLLECTION OF NEWSPAPER COMICS. That’s next.

     

     
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