Updates from October, 2019 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:09 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Edward Everett Horton, , , , , , Mantan Moreland, , , S. Z. Sakall, Way Out West,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: WHAT A CHARACTER (ACTOR)! 

    “Nobody needs a mink coat but the mink.” –S. Z. “Cuddles” Sakall, character actor (Feb. 2, 1883-Feb. 12, 1955)

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    There have been so many great male character actors in Hollywood Golden Age history that, for this post, I’m going to narrow the field to comedic character actors….and even then, I’ll probably leave out some of your favorites. Of course, if you don’t have any old comedy film favorites, you’re probably not an old comedy film fan, so you’re excused (even though that’s no excuse….actually, you should be ashamed of yourself).

    Leaving that aside, let’s move on, starting with the author of the above quote….a quote which probably didn’t go over too well with most of the Hollywood glamour girls he knew — speaking of which, did you know that Sakall was born in, and is strictly from, Hungary (btw, he was also in Casablanca). Here’s more scuttlebutt about Cuddles but…it’s not a lot:

    Next, Laurel & Hardy fans will remember the trademark ‘double-take’ look of this gent, who appeared in many of their films, including here in one of their best, WAY OUT WEST:

    Remember double features (two films for the price of one in movie houses of the 1930s-50s)? Here’s a double feature of two great comedic actors for the price of one in a scene from SHALL WE DANCE, one of three Astaire-Rogers movies in which they appeared together:

    If you’re a fan of Charlie Chan movies, you may recall the pop-eyed comic who played Chan’s chauffeur in over a dozen films, as well as parts in Preston Sturges’ THE PALM BEACH STORY (1942), CABIN IN THE SKY (1943), CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK (1944), and many others. Here he is in a scene from THE SCARLET CLUE (1945):

    In closing, I’ll mention several other great comedic character actors I could’ve/should’ve profiled here, but I have to stop somewhere: William Demarest, Edgar Kennedy, Frank Morgan, Franklin Pangborn, Erik Rhodes, Victor Moore, and many more. Thank you, one and all, for bringing character to comedy.

     
    • masercot 4:38 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Fine examples! Might I add Tom Kennedy?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:50 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Absolutely! I remember the name but couldn’t place the face until I checked — how could I have forgotten? I saw him in many a Marx Brothers, W.C. Fields, Laurel & Hardy and Three Stooges movie. My bad!

        Liked by 2 people

        • masercot 8:59 am on October 24, 2019 Permalink

          It was a time when any big Irishman could find work in the movies… My favorite line of his? “I feel a poem coming on”

          Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:28 pm on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I never knew the names of any of these actors, though I remember all of their appearances. I loved the banter in the last clip. That comedic timing is priceless.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 7:00 pm on October 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I believe that that banter came straight out of an old vaudeville skit which Mantan Moreland probably performed many times previously. An oldie but goody!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 11:37 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      These posts are treats. Thanks for curating these lists and choosing such fab videos to share with us.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:20 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for your comments, SS. I very much enjoyed doing this series of posts, time-consuming though it was to do the work of putting them together.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Silver Screenings 10:29 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink

          Oh yes, I can imagine the hours spent in this series. The end result is fabulous: A tour through classic Hollywood.

          Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 11:18 am on December 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Memorable picks! Love them all!!💕❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:06 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , Margaret Hamilton, Marjorie Main, , , Wicked Witch,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: THE GRAMMAR GIRLS 

    Speaking of distinctive actresses from Hollywood’s Golden Age, we turn from glamour girls (in my previous post) to a group of gals who made up in individuality what they lacked in allure. There were perhaps no actresses more unique and unforgettable in any category than the so-called character actors. Bring up such names as Margaret Hamilton, Marjorie Main, and Margaret Dumont (apart from their photos) to any classic film buff, and there’d be no problem matching which name belongs with which (or witch) face; same with their immediately recognizable voices. In a manner of speaking, they were vocal gold.

    BTW, I have something in common with That Hamilton Woman. Like my wife, she was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and was once a teacher….but unlike my wife, she was unlike my wife (and vice versa….or is it verse vica).

    Character actresses may not be leading ladies, but there’s one who was always the Main attraction :

    My last post started with a birthday girl; this post ends with one….and what a one: Margaret Dumont (born Oct. 20, 1882), the gloriously inimitable foil of Groucho in nine of the Marx Brothers’ thirteen films, as typified by the following story.

    In a play in which she played Mrs. Rittenhouse (and which was later made into an early Marx Brothers film), the brothers abandoned the script during one performance and began improvising scene after scene….from here, I quote from the book THE MARX BROTHERS AT THE MOVIES:

    After some time she decided to take her chances and enter in the middle of it all. At that moment, Chico and Harpo simply walked off the stage, leaving the great dowager face-to-face with Groucho. So Groucho, with his characteristic speed of mind, gestured to a nearby divan. “Ah, Mrs. Rittenhouse,” he proclaimed. “Won’t you…er…lie down?” It had gotten a laugh on Broadway, so the brothers simply took it with them when they traveled to the Astoria studio [to make movies].

    There’s a scene in my favorite Marx Brothers movie, DUCK SOUP, in which Dumont’s character addresses Groucho’s character, Rufus T. Firefly, President of Fredonia, as “Your Excellency!”…to which he replies, “You’re not so bad yourself.”
    To which I can but add, You Bet Your Life!

     
    • calmkate 3:46 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      great history lesson, thanks!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:12 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you, Kate. The title of the post is admittedly a bit of a stretch, but I couldn’t resist the play on words with HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: THE GLAMOUR GIRLS (the previous post).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 9:10 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I recognized ‘the witch with the green face’ (one of our daughters always referred to her that way) but the other two were unknowns to me… Well, until I read the post! 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:13 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Carmen, did you have to remind me how much older I am than you because Marjorie Main and Margaret Dumont were known to me, and unknown to you!!! Nonetheless, I forgive you, so here’s a short clip to give you a better idea of why I dig Dumont (note the “You’re not so bad yourself” remark at the end of the clip which relates to the end of my post):

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 9:33 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A Marx Brothers movie without Dumont is a sad thing indeed…

      I did a piece on Kathleen Freeman, speaking of character actresses. She’s definitely one of my favorites…

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 11:31 am on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, masercot. I didn’t realize, until I checked, that Kathleen Freeman played (uncredited) the part of diction coach Phoebe Dinsmore in one of my fav musicals, SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN. Here’s a clip:

        Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 5:52 pm on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Watching Groucho is one of my favorite childhood memories. I just loved when that duck came down. Great clips.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 6:16 pm on October 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Elizabeth. I’m glad you made the connection between the last four words of my post and the name of Groucho’s TV show. I watched it often back in the day.

        Liked by 2 people

    • mlrover 7:59 am on October 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      What a wonderful post! I loved all of these ladies and especially the vocal coach clip. Jean Hagen should have gotten an Oscar for the Lamont role.

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 8:30 am on October 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Absolutely! What a “character!”

      Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 11:53 am on October 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love the old b&w films. Especially the Marx Bros. Margaret Dumont was priceless!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 5:55 pm on October 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        The Marx Bros. without Margaret Dumont is like a comedian without a Trump card — except that Dumont is aces and Trump is a jack(ass).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 11:30 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful tributes to all these women. I’m so pleased to see these women made the list, especially Marjorie Main. She is one of my all-time faves.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:11 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Marjorie appeared in over 80 films, including some of my favorites, such as MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, THE HARVEY GIRLS, and FRIENDLY PERSUASION. Truly a wonderful character actress.

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:01 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Betty Grable, CABIN IN THE SKY, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, , , , glamour girls, , , Lana Turner, , , Rita Hayworth, sex goddess, ,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: THE GLAMOUR GIRLS 

    A glamour girl is one who looks good enough to eat and dresses with taste. –Evan Esar

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    In my “preview of coming attractions” post of Oct. 13, the subject of Hollywood glamour girls (in general) and Rita Hayworth (in particular) came up in an exchange of comments. October 17 being Rita’s birthday, it seems the appropriate day to do the appropriate post, focusing not only on Rita, but on several other becoming attractions who fill the bill by becomingly filling their dresses.

    My glamour girl choices here are both limited and subjective, due not only to length-of-post considerations, but the implicit broadness of the term, e.g.: is, or is not, glamour girl of a piece with sex goddess? For the arbitrary purposes of this opus, I’ve drawn a distinction between the two by disqualifying actresses considered to be ‘pure’ sex symbols, such as Jayne Mansfield, Jane Russell. and (perhaps unfairly) Marilyn Monroe. They (and European sex symbols like Brigitte Bardot) may “look good enough to eat,” but dressing with taste was hardly their strong suit.

    With that model of suitability out of the way, here are the glamour girls I think stand out as epitomizing Hollywood’s Golden Age by virtue of such disparate criteria as a touch of class, sex appeal more than skin deep, talent, and even pin-up popularity with WWII GIs.

    Let’s start with the birthday girl, Rita Hayworth, who said “I like having my picture taken and being a glamorous person. I never really thought of myself as a sex goddess.”:

    https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/10/31/rita-hayworth/

    My next choice is the actress called the most beautiful woman in the world in her day:

    Next, the actress called the last major star to come out of the Hollywood studio system:

    With apologies to the likes of Veronica Lake, Lana Turner, and Betty Grable, I will close with this glamorous actress who, but for the overriding racism of the period, could and should have been a major Hollywood star (seen here in a scene with Eddie “Rochester” Anderson and Ethel Waters from CABIN IN THE SKY (1943):

     

     
    • calmkate 1:32 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      she is hot … sounds like racism has increased over there from what we hear … white cops killing black girls in their own bedroom, they are trigger crazy!

      Liked by 2 people

    • America On Coffee 1:48 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Glamour has certainly changed, right? And with that change came other big impacts.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ashley 4:39 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Brilliant!

      Liked by 2 people

    • masercot 5:10 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You must’ve forgot Myrna Loy… the sexiest of all the glamour girls and one of the longest lasting (from the twenties to the fifties).

      BTW, I saw Lena Horne live in Dallas, TX. As good as she is in your clip, she was even better just standing at a microphone…

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 7:54 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I never looked at Myrna as being in that category — she had much more than a “touch” of class and was too unique and good of an actress. To be thought of as primarily a glamour girl would be doing her a disservice, in my opinion.

        As for Lena, I never saw her in person, but she certainly was dynamic in her TV appearances later in her career. In 1943, when CABIN IN THE SKY was made (Vincente Minnelli’s directorial debut, btw), TV was still waiting in the wings, and movies (along with radio) were king, with CABIN being one of the few all-black cast films produced by a major studio.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:11 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Good group. Would be interesting to see who you think would be considered glamorous today…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry, Rg, but I’ll have to plead ignorance — I’m not into today’s celebrity scene and wouldn’t know one “glamorous” gal from another. Chalk it up to the generation crap….er, gap.

        Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 2:34 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Carmen 3:52 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve just finished reading Gone With the Wind . . .Vivien Leigh sprang immediately to mind when I read the blog post title. Loved those clips mister muse! I always learn something.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:20 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I never even thought of her, Carmen — probably because she wasn’t thought of as the typical Hollywood type of glamour girl. She certainly was beautiful, though. Anyway, I’m glad you’re “always learn something” here. Maybe I’ll tell my wife and try to make her jealous.

        On second thought, I’d better leave well enough alone.

        Like

        • Carmen 6:51 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink

          You know what they say about teaching a teacher. .. 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:04 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink

          They also say: Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach. For some reason, my wife (a retired teacher) never cared for that one.

          Like

    • America On Coffee 4:06 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      …and Hedy Lamarr was one of the quiet tops! 💕

      Liked by 3 people

    • Richard A Cahill 5:21 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The world does not lack for beautiful women, Sr. Muse, then and now. But the photography is better now. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZ1XM9LwS64

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:24 pm on October 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        The photography is certainly slicker now, but I don’t know that it makes beautiful women look more beautiful, Ricardo. To my mind, most commercials (like that clip) promoting a product with beautiful women (often with pouty, supposedly sexy facial expressions) are more of a turn-off than a turn-on, and I’m not buying what they’re selling (at least, not in that venue).

        Like

    • mlrover 10:13 am on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The sad irony is that superficial beauty distracted from the talent and intelligence of many Hollywood “glamour” personalities. They were exploited and used. It was no wonder that Lamarr became bitter at the end. I have no sympathy for Weinstein. So many before him got away with it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:18 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        In those days, only ‘strong’ female stars like Katherine Hepburn could fight off exploitation. Of course, it didn’t hurt that she wasn’t the “glamour girl” type to begin with. Nonetheless, she had the box office clout to be her own woman, and she knew it.

        Like

    • Silver Screenings 11:21 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Lena Horne certainly should have been a bigger star. She was beautiful, she could sing, and she could act. (I love her in Cabin in the Sky!) She truly was glamourous.

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: actors and actresses, , , , , , , Norma Desmond, screen immortals, , The Little Tramp, the silver screen   

    MAY AULD ACQUAINTANCE NOT BE FORGOT 

    On August 30, I did a post (titled “MAC”) about the late great actor Fred MacMurray. In recent comments to the MAC post, faithful reader Thom Hickey and I opined that I should publish more posts on actors and actresses from Hollywood’s Golden Age, even though most of them are now little remembered, long forgotten, or unheard of. To the point, how many of these once-upon-a-time familiar film faces and names are familiar to you?

    I know not who you know not (above), but I’ve spent some of my happiest hours being entertained (and often drawn in) by such silver screen sorcerers/sorceresses working their magic on my imagination. Watching that clip, it seemed almost unfathomable that nearly all those ‘reel-life’ characters I knew almost as well as I knew real-life family and friends, have gone over THE END. Rapt in their world, how was I to know immortals were mortal?

    So, you can take this as a preview of coming attractions featuring close-ups of some of my favorite stars and character actors from the days when the likes of Charlie Chaplin was The Little Tramp….

    ….and Gloria Swanson was Norma Desmond….

    Are you ready for your close-ups?

     

     

     

     

     
    • America On Coffee 12:17 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Beautiful. I believe the featured actress is Barbara Stanwyck. I love her.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 12:58 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Likewise. Not only was she one of the most versatile actresses in screen history, but one of the most professional and well thought of.

        Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 2:20 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      what a trip down memory lane … know most of them, but a few I’ve not seen or heard of … I must be younger than you 😉
      Had not realised Charlie was such a good-looker, he always acted the clown so I had no idea!

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 8:38 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and yet, that “Remembrance of Classic Hollywood Actors and Actresses” barely began a thoroughgoing trip down that memory lane. For example, what classic movie buff wouldn’t recall the likes of Buster Keaton, Lon Chaney, Boris Karloff, The Marx Brothers, Errol Flynn, Charles Laughton, Walter Huston, and so many more. In upcoming posts, I hope to take us a little farther down the road.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 9:32 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink

          yea, I’m looking forward to it … and please don’t forget Charles Bronson 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:09 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love classic Hollywood. Such glamour!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:57 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Rg. I’ll be sure to include one or more of those Hollywood “glamour girls” in an upcoming post (I’m sure you would qualify if not for the Hollywood part).

        Liked by 1 person

        • Rivergirl 4:01 pm on October 13, 2019 Permalink

          I always had a soft spot for Rita…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:07 pm on October 13, 2019 Permalink

          Did you know that Fred Astaire said Rita Hayworth (not Ginger Rogers) was his favorite dancing partner? She is probably not best remembered for her dancing, but was in fact a superb dancer and starred in two musicals with Astaire.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 10:05 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A wonderful post. The “Remembrance” video had me smiling, and with tears in my eyes!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:00 pm on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I know what you mean, Ashley. It’s sad to think that so many of those who gave us so much joy are gone.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Ashley 5:17 am on October 14, 2019 Permalink

          Of course, I am constantly reminded of these old movies since my mother told me where my name came from; I always thought it was something to do with Ash trees (ash trees surrounded by a meadow-a ley) but it turns out that Mum’s favourite film was Gone With the Wind! Thank goodness I wasn’t called Rhett!

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 4:07 pm on October 14, 2019 Permalink

          If you had been called Rhett, you could always claim the BULER did it (ha ha).

          Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 11:37 am on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A lovely trip down memory lane. 🙂 I wonder how many of today’s actors will be as well-remembered?

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 12:12 pm on October 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Shakespeare (in HAMLET) said, “I shall not look upon his like again.” That’s how I view yesterday’s actors compared with today’s, scifi.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mlrover 8:56 am on October 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Just saw a clip about Audie Murphy. If only people looked up to true heroes like him instead of sports stars. But a man like Audie is so rare. The pain in his eyes from his lifelong struggle with PTSD is haunting. And all through it, he continued to serve. Loved him best in the film The Unforgiven.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:12 pm on October 16, 2019 Permalink

          Sorry to say I haven’t seen The Unforgiven, as (with a few exceptions) I’m not a big fan of westerns. However, I should have made this one of the exceptions, as I notice The Unforgiven was directed by John Huston and has a great cast. My bad.

          Like

    • Don Ostertag 4:29 pm on October 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      One of the little granddaughters asked why I always watched movies with the color turned off.

      Liked by 4 people

    • D. Wallace Peach 4:31 pm on October 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I used to watch Barbara Stanwick in Big Valley. Remember that show? She was the matriarch. Gloria and Charlie not as much, but I remember them. Fun clips.

      Liked by 3 people

    • mistermuse 5:26 pm on October 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t watch Big Valley, but I’ve seen many of her movies — some of them (such as THE LADY EVE and REMEMBER THE NIGHT) multiple times. Truly a wonderful actress!

      Like

    • Thom Hickey 3:37 pm on October 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Looking forward to an extensive series!

      Regards Thom

      Liked by 2 people

    • Cheryl Wright 12:17 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Watching the video In Remembrance brought back memories of when I used to watch old movies with my grandmother. She also got me into watching soap operas…lol

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:34 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Watching soap operas is one habit I never got into….but I did watch many a ‘horse opera’ (western) when I was a kid. Oddly enough, I’ve never heard a fat lady sing in a horse opera, but I have heard many a horselaugh when the fat lady sings in The Marx Brothers At The Opera.

        Like

    • Susi Bocks 10:15 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m not from that era but I was fortunate to have a step-father who exposed us to a lot of the generations we weren’t a part of. Lovely! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:38 am on October 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’m so old, I’m a part of many generations (but ‘apart’ from today’s).

        Liked by 1 person

        • Susi Bocks 11:21 am on October 23, 2019 Permalink

          Sorry to hear that?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:30 pm on October 23, 2019 Permalink

          To clarify, I simply feel that so much of today’s politics and culture are so beyond the pale and so debased, that this generation has become increasingly foreign to the values and ideals we should stand for.

          Like

    • Silver Screenings 8:34 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m very much looking forward to this series. At some point this weekend, I’m going to settle down with a cup o’ tea and binge read you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 10:02 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Enjoy the multi-post series, SS. You’ll know it’s over when the fat lady sings.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Greta Garbo, , I want to be alone, Jo Stafford, Joel McCrea, , Paul Tillich, , Sullivan's Travels, The Lone Ranger, Tonto,   

    I WANT TO BE ALONE 

    “Language has created the word loneliness to express the pain of being alone, and the word solitude to express the glory of being alone. –Paul Tillich, philosopher/theologian

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    Sept. 18 (1905) is the birthday of famed “I want to be alone” actress (and real-life recluse) Greta Garbo, who (unlike many movie stars) valued solitude over the celebrity spotlight:

    Now, dear reader, you may not have a problem with “I want to be alone” — but, as Joel McCrae asked Veronica Lake (40 seconds into this film clip)….

    So, when you stop and drink about it (unless you take Joel McCrea’s question literally), there’s no reason why you can’t be….

    After all, even the Lone Ranger wasn’t really a Lone Ranger (heaven forbid that his faithful Indian companion Tonto was just along for the ride)….

    That’s all for now, boys and girls. Hi ho Silver, away!

     

     

     
    • calmkate 1:37 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      lol mentioned some of my favourites here, about to enjoy your clips!

      Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 6:10 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Jay Silverheels was a funny guy in interviews. They asked him how he was able to memorize his lines because they made so many shows and he replied that all he had to know was “Mmm, What we do now, Kemosabe?”

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:42 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That IS funny! Thanks for that very interesting aside — it leads me to want to know more about Jay Silverheels/Tonto pronto.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 6:36 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “How can I be alone if you’re with me?” Good question! Answers please on a postcard to….

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:50 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Good question indeed — but it leads to another: How do I answer on a postcard to ….? Seriously, though, in a certain sense, we’re never alone. Our demons are always with us.

        Liked by 1 person

    • JosieHolford 7:00 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      That is a really useful distinction between loneliness and solitude.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:55 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Josie — but useful, perhaps, only to a reflective person. I can’t imagine someone like Donald Trump giving it a second thought (or even a first thought).

        Like

    • Mary Lou Rigdon (@RigdonML) 9:18 am on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I get fklempt every time I see that opening just as I did when a girl, sitting on the linoleum floor in front of the TV. I didn’t care much for the program, all the shooting and fighting. I just wanted to look at Silver. Years later, when my family moved to LA, I got to see Traveler and often rode my horse in the places where westerns filmed stock footage. Strange how life turns out.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:23 pm on September 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Strange indeed. I loved westerns as a boy. Now, with few exceptions (such as RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY), I consider them to be mostly the same old same old.

        Like

      • mistermuse 9:26 am on September 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        My apologies for not letting you know that the link you sent didn’t work and I deleted it. I shouldn’t have done that without informing you. If you want to try sending it again, perhaps we’ll get a better result. Again, my sincere apologies.

        Like

    • magickmermaid 7:24 pm on September 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      hehe My mother used to ask me if I thought I was Greta Garbo because I was always saying ‘I want to be left alone’. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:31 am on September 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It sounds like this Duke Ellington classic could’ve been your theme song, mm:

        P.S. I’d originally intended to use this clip in my post after the Paul Tillich quote, but decided against it…..now, thanks to your comment, I have the opportunity to use it after all!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 6:27 pm on September 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Jo Stafford: What a voice! How come she doesn’t get much fan love these days? She seems to be almost unknown.

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 1:34 am on October 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great memories…Great quote via Paul Tillich…All in all Trigger was my favorite. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 2:23 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Remember The Night, Shirley MacLaine,   

    MAC 

    No, this isn’t a post about the Apple of your eye(s), computer-wise — nor is this a post about a Mac big enough to contribute to a heart attack (calories/cholesterol-wise). This is about a guy who’s the apple of my eye, versatile actor-wise:

    Today being MacMurray‘s birthday (August 30, 1908), I thought I’d honor the memory of perhaps the most underrated movie star of Hollywood’s Golden Era, starting with the above clip and continuing with the trailer for one of the most underrated films of his era:

    Next, when it comes to film noir, it doesn’t get any better than this all-time classic with a powerhouse cast (including MacMurray, who was reluctant to play the role), director (Billy Wilder), and screenwriter (Raymond Chandler), from the James M. Cain novel:

    Speaking of “Double” and classic films, how about two Macs (including Shirley MacLaine) in one of my all-time favorites….

    We end with this from near the start of Fred’s career (before becoming an actor):

     

     
    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:50 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Never saw any of these Hollywood classics. Will check them out when the opportunity arises.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:30 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It may be hard to find REMEMBER THE NIGHT (the full 1940 movie) online for free, but it does appear occasionally on TCM. It’s such a good film that it’s well worth paying for it if necessary.

        Liked by 1 person

    • GP Cox 3:15 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      He was always one of my favorites. A real down-to-earth kind a guy – but talented too.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 3:46 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Agreed. He was so believable in a wide variety of roles that he didn’t seem to be acting, compared to guys who essentially played themselves and were very good at it, like John Wayne (not to be critical, because no one “played himself” better, but he was no Fred MacMurray).

        Liked by 2 people

        • GP Cox 7:14 am on August 31, 2019 Permalink

          John Wayne (no disrespect intended), I’m afraid did not play himself – he avoided war and confrontation in real life.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:00 am on August 31, 2019 Permalink

          Although my previous comment put “played himself” in quotation marks (to indicate that that was the impression, if not the reality, he gave), perhaps “played his own persona” would’ve been more accurate. In any case, he obviously lacked the wide-ranging acting talent of Fred MacMurray.

          Like

    • Elizabeth 4:29 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I will love him always as the absent minded professor of my childhood.

      Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 8:50 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Fred had charm and talent by the truck load … maybe I need to find these old classics, thanks for the reminder! Particularly liked that tribute to him by his ‘son’ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:10 pm on August 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You can’t go wrong with any of those three old classics, Kate, but unless you’re a film noir fan, DOUBLE INDEMNITY is probably the one you could put last on your list. In my opinion, the other two are ‘must-sees’ for ANY mature film fan.

        Liked by 1 person

    • mlrover 6:12 am on August 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wasn’t he in The Egg and I with C. Colbert? That movie made a star out of Marjorie Maine.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:58 am on August 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, he was. Marjorie Main was well known before The Egg and I (in supporting roles). For example, remember her in MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS and THE HARVEY GIRLS? Her film career dates back to the early 1930s, but I don’t think she became The Star in any film until the MA AND PA KETTLE series from 1949 to 1957.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 1:17 pm on September 2, 2019 Permalink

          My favorite line of hers from the E&I is at the table when she tells one of her horde of kids something and the answers back that it isn’t his name. She comes back with “Whoever you are, do it.” That’s paraphrasing but I still laugh remembering it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:50 pm on September 2, 2019 Permalink

          I haven’t seen the E& I in decades, so I tried to find a clip of the scene you describe. The best I could come up with is this trailer which includes part of that scene:

          Like

    • mlrover 8:58 am on September 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks!!! I always admired Colbert’s energy on the screen. She often had a tension that mesmerized. And those big eyes. You must have enjoyed Fred in My Three Sons.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 6:22 pm on September 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      He was one of the best, Fred was. Comedy or drama – and singing, too!

      Loved this tribute to one of my favourite actors. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:53 pm on September 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Speaking of Fred and comedy, check out the clip from MURDER HE SAYS in the comments section of my Sept. 11 post NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS — it’s LOL funny!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Thom Hickey 4:22 pm on October 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks

      Great to see such a fine and under valued actor celebrated here.

      Regards Thom

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:38 pm on October 11, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Thom. I should do more posts on undervalued actors and actresses from Hollywood’s Golden Age. Problem is, almost no one knows who they are anymore!

        Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:32 pm on October 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You talked me into it, Thom. It’s time to get my act(ors) together and do it! Perhaps I’ll even do a series of posts about them. Stay tuned.

      Like

  • mistermuse 1:55 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Paint Your Wagon, The Wind In The Willows, They Call The Wind Maria,   

    RIDE THE WIND DAY 

    August 23 is RIDE THE WIND DAY. I can think of no better way to celebrate the day than musically. On the other hand, you may think I should go fly a kite. Why not do both — you might call it killing two words with one song:

    You didn’t really think I was going to stop after one song, did you? So, did you know the wind has a name?

    But no matter the name, The Wind In The Willows whispers it. Listen for it….

    And in that plaintive, melancholy way, I bid you a good Ride The Wind Day.

     

     
    • calmkate 7:33 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      some old favourites that brought back memories there!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 7:57 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Wonderful music from my parents era!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 8:05 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The Wind in the Willows! That brings back some lovely childhood memories…
      And have you seen the movie Saving Mr. Banks? It’s a marvelous film about the genesis of Mary Poppins and Go Fly a Kite takes on a much deeper meaning that made me weep.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:17 am on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry to say I haven’t seen Saving Mr. Banks (nor, for that matter, have I saved Seeing Mr. Banks). But thanks for the heads-up — I’ll check into it.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rivergirl 7:52 am on August 24, 2019 Permalink

          Tom Hanks as Walt Disney, Emma Thompson as Pamela Travers. Beautiful movie. Sweet, sad, funny and well directed. You’ll never look at Mary Poppins the same way…

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 10:50 am on August 24, 2019 Permalink

          While Googling to watch the trailer for SAVING MR. BANKS, I came across this clip of the first showing of the film in London’s Leicester Square (where MARY POPPINS officially opened in 1964), and thought you might like to see it:

          Liked by 2 people

    • scifihammy 8:11 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had no idea this was a special Wind day! But well done on finding so many wind songs. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:21 am on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. Actually I had to restrain myself from posting more wind songs, as there are quite a few more I could’ve shown, but they didn’t ‘blow me away’ as much as the three I chose — hahahaha.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 8:28 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hi. One day I’m going to rewatch Matt Poppins. Haven’t seen it in a thousand years.

      Neil Scheinin

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 8:52 am on August 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Of course I was referring to the Wind in the Willows music from my parents era! I remember watching Mary Poppins with my own children but never saw Paint My Wagon! All of this blew me away, just what you wanted wasn’t it?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:33 am on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Paint Your Wagon (the movie) is from the Lerner & Loewe play set in California ‘s Gold Rush days, starring Clint Eastwood & Lee Marvin, who sings another song from the film that I like, titled Wand’rin’ Star. It shows up on TCM once in a great while and is worth watching (for).

        By the way, thanks for the “blew me away” idea, which I borrowed for my reply to scifihammy.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Ashley 8:15 am on August 25, 2019 Permalink

          Absolutely wonderful clip from Leicester Square. It’s typical London musical / music hall, drawing in the crowds and the tourists and EVERYONE enjoying themselves. A breath of fresh air….blew me away….I’ve even sent it to my children (not anymore)….sent it to my grandchildren as well!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 9:48 am on August 25, 2019 Permalink

          Thanks, Ashley, for letting me know that clip “blew you away.” I’m glad I went to the trouble of including it in my reply to Rivergirl.

          Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 1:05 pm on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 2:39 pm on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I hadn’t heard of Van Phillips before, so I’m glad to learn about yet another musical group from you. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:22 pm on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        The Van Phillips Band was a typical British orchestra in the 1930s, but wasn’t one of the most well known British dance bands of the period (such as Ray Noble, Lew Stone, and Roy Fox). THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS, which was composed by British songwriters, is a song I like a lot, but I didn’t have a lot (of clips) to choose from (the rendition I like best isn’t on YouTube).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:54 pm on August 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Where in the world do you come up with these quirky day names?

      Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 5:36 pm on August 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      What, no Christopher Cross?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 6:57 pm on August 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Although this land I have crisscrossed,
        I’d never run across Chris Cross.
        But a Googling muse gathers no moss,
        And now I’m no longer at a loss
        For I have found that Christopher Cross is
        A man who seems to know his hosses:

        Liked by 1 person

    • restlessjo 4:02 am on August 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Never heard of the day but I do love Maria (and Wind in the Willows 🙂 )

      Liked by 1 person

    • barkinginthedark 4:19 am on September 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      in the How Soon We Forget category: i nominate “Blowin’ in the Wind” as arguably the greatest “wind” song. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 8:37 am on September 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I agree that it’s at least one of the greatest — I think I used a clip of that song in a previous post.

        Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 12:14 pm on September 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m in the u s. I wonder why the video is unavailable.💕

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:36 pm on September 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I’ll try to find a substitute if you’ll let me know which of the 3 videos is unavailable to you: LET’S GO FLY A KITE (form “Mary Poppins”), THEY CALL THE WIND MARIA (from Paint Your Wagon”), or THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS.

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:02 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , classic films, friendship, , , , , , Peter Bogdanovich, , race hate, the good old days, the human spirit,   

    WELL(ES) SAID 

    “My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four….unless there are three other people.” –Orson Welles (in his obese later years)

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  * * * * * * * *

    Today being the birthday (5/6/1915) of the great director/actor Orson Welles, I’m going to risk repeating myself by repeating myself….with a few selections (including the following clip) from a past post acclaiming Welles and his role in the classic film THE THIRD MAN:

    To those who think the likes of this 1949 film has appeal only for seniors (like me), I’d say such films are called classic because they’re ageless, not made to capitalize on what’s ‘in’ at the moment. To demonstrate, here is a non-senior citizen explaining why she loves it:

    Of Welles, the man grown from “boy genius,” much has been written, but I won’t go into the details of his life/legend here — they can be readily culled by clicking this link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orson_Welles (or less readily culled from recommended books like ORSON WELLES, a 562 page biography by Barbara Leaming). Instead, I will call on some of the wisdom he left behind….and I quote:

    Even if the good old days never existed, the fact that we can conceive such a world is, in fact, a confirmation of the human spirit.

    Living in the lap of luxury isn’t bad except that you never know when luxury is going to stand up.

    I don’t pray because I don’t want to bore God.

    Race hate isn’t human nature; race hate is the abandonment of human nature.

    Don’t give them what they think they want. Give them what they never thought was possible.

    We’re born alone, we live alone, we die alone. Only through our love and friendship can we create the illusion for the moment that we’re not alone.

    When people accept breaking the law as normal, something happens to the whole society.

    Well(es) said, I’d say.

     

     

     

     
    • Red Metal 12:09 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      He was one talented filmmaker, that’s for sure, and I really do like his pearls of wisdom. It’s a shame more directors don’t use that ethos in their work. Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil, and The Lady from Shanghai are all personal favorites of mine, and even if they had messages, they were still ultimately stories first, which is a large reason they’re able to stand the test of time. I also have a copy of The Magnificent Ambersons and F for Fake lying around; I want to give them a spin at some point.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:02 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        To “stand the test of time” is indeed the measure of a classic film (or any creative work, for that matter), and it goes almost without saying that a film doesn’t have to be ‘serious’ to be classic (think Charlie Chaplin, for example).

        Liked by 2 people

        • Red Metal 1:35 pm on May 7, 2019 Permalink

          Yeah, the problem with a lot of modern filmmakers is that they’re more interested in being timely than timeless. The other problem is that they make films in a way that you’re only ever allowed to enjoy them on their terms, depriving them of any kind of applicability. Welles was always a storyteller first – even when he was tackling heavy subjects such as racism as he did in Touch of Evil. I make it a point that I always favor the storyteller over the preacher.

          Also, the fact that a film doesn’t need to be serious to be good is something more critics need to understand. As it stands, what they consider to be good is quite limited.

          Liked by 2 people

        • mistermuse 4:04 pm on May 7, 2019 Permalink

          I couldn’t agree more, R M. Thanks for commenting again.

          Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 3:36 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      ‘I don’t pray because I don’t want to bore God.’ Awesome, Orson. And thanks etc. I like and enjoy wordplay so I’m following along.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 9:09 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s one of my favorite quotes as well. As an evolved deist, I stopped boring God years ago — at least, when it comes to praying.

        Like

    • mlrover 8:01 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      “When people accept breaking the law as normal, something happens to the whole society.” MLKing said something similar that I also like about injustice. Haven’t had morning coffee or I would look it up.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:14 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        When I came upon that quote, the rise and reign of Donald Trump immediately came to mind. Something is indeed happening to the whole society, and the longer his reign continues, the more normal it becomes.

        Liked by 1 person

    • rivergirl1211 8:03 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      A visionary film maker to be sure. I’ve seen many, but am always pleased to discover a new ( to me ) one.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:24 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        “A visionary film maker” indeed (and a towering presence as an actor, as well). What a pity that so many of his films were taken out of this hands and/or re-edited out of his vision.

        Liked by 1 person

    • scifihammy 11:47 am on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always admired Orson Welles, so enjoyed your post very much 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 12:48 pm on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I too have long admired Welles, despite admitting that his work isn’t for all tastes….though the same could be said of how the “masses” have viewed many a ‘misunderstood genius’ and innovator.

        Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 1:12 pm on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The War of the Worlds panic was related to me by both my parents, although both denied being personally panicked. I’ve forced myself to sit through Citizen Kane twice, without it improving me measurably. Kind of wish the man had chosen to bore God instead of me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:36 pm on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t count CITIZEN KANE among my favorite Orson Welles films, although it did make quite an impression on me when I first saw it. When I watched it again years later, I came to the conclusion that it doesn’t bear repeated viewings for those who aren’t “auteurs” (unlike, say, films such as CASABLANCA or THE THIRD MAN) and I haven’t watched it again again.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 2:42 pm on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      MisterMuse, you’ve convinced me that I need to see The Third Man 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Elizabeth 8:16 pm on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I saw The Third Man a few months ago after seeing it recommended on another blog. I loved it and could certainly watch it again.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:56 pm on May 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for sharing your enthusiasm for The Third Man, Elizabeth. I’ve watched it at least a half dozen times over the years, though I do allow a few years to pass between viewings because of the old saying that “familiarity breeds contempt” (though I doubt that would be the case with this film or several others I’ve watched many times).

        Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 1:29 pm on May 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love those quotes! Especially the I don’t pray because I don’t want to bore god, and friendship creates an illusion.
      Love, light and glitter…

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 5:20 pm on May 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I love those two quotes too, Eliza, as well as the last one because it’s so relevant to the reign of Trump and his cronies today and the resulting “new normal” surrounding him.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Eliza 12:41 pm on May 8, 2019 Permalink

          ha ha. What’s the ‘new normal’ with him as president?

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 6:09 pm on May 8, 2019 Permalink

          Perhaps I should have said “the new abnormal,” Eliza. The very fact that you asked the question shows that abnormal has become so normal with Trump that it seems normal. But you’re right in implying that, after two-plus years as “acting” President, it’s no longer new.

          Like

    • blindzanygirl 3:11 am on May 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I just love those quotes. And I also love the film. Many thanks to you

      Liked by 1 person

    • Chris Karas 6:42 pm on May 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great quotes. I chuckled at the lap of luxury bit. Definitely a timeless individual.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 6:38 pm on May 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      In his obese later years, Welles probably didn’t have much lap left — either physically, or of luxury. So he no doubt knew whereof he spoke.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 4:57 pm on May 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love listening to Peter Bogdanovich talk about film, especially Orson Welles films. Thanks for sharing this clip. I hadn’t seen it before. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 7:53 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Since I first saw THE THIRD MAN I had it in my top 5 favorite movies. As I grew older I realized it is my number one favorite. I watch it about every 6 months. So much fine acting, direction, script, cinematography, music. And once you are over-thralled by just how fine it is, the last scene comes on and compounds the feeling that it is truly a work of art.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on June 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I absolutely agree. Everything comes together so perfectly in this film that I don’t think it could improved on. How many movies can you say that about?

        Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 9:53 am on January 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Hot Lips, , , Loretta Swit, MASH, , Red Lips   

    LIPS SERVICE 

    The title of today’s post is LIPS SERVICE — as distinguished from ROOM SERVICE — although I’m informed there are major hot-els and inns, both in-and-outside of iniquitous areas, where hot lips can be ordered (what one might call inn-clusive room service).

    And then there’s Major Hot Lips Houlihan, which may be a stretch (what one might call post thematic stretch syndrome), but hopefully you can use the exercise as much as I can use the connection:

    Coincidently (speaking of seeking hot lips), Robert HOOKER was the author of the novel MASH, on which the movie of that name (1970) and TV series M*A*S*H (1972-83) were based. HOOKER, born 2/1/1924, was the pen name of Korean War Army surgeon H. Robert Hornberger Jr. A very Happy upcoming Birthday to you, good sir, wherever you are.

    Two years before “Hot Lips” creator Hooker was born, this red hot song was conceived by composer/orchestra leader Henry Busse:

    So you see, friends, this post is not just paying lip service to LIPS SERVICE. This lips service is a hip service because it’s a ‘sound’ follow-up to last week’s THE KISSING POST. It’s in the groove. It’s on record.

    Will my next post continue along the lines of this post and THE KISSING POST?

    My lips are sealed.

     

     

     

     
  • mistermuse 12:00 am on December 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Twentieth Century Blues, Yosemite Sam   

    OH, THE JOY! OH, THE JOY! 

    “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.” –Aldous Huxley

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    I consider myself to be both a lover of ‘adult’ music and a pretty fair writer, but I’ve never felt capable of being an authoritative writer about music. For example, when I listen to music that moves me, I’m at a loss for words to express why it does so — case in point, the joy of re-experiencing this clip which I’d posted once before (OH, THE JOY! on 7/21/15):

    I’ve played this clip several times, and it draws me in every time. Why? Is it the power of the music, the build-up of the way it’s staged, my identification with the gathering crowd, especially the children, reacting like they can’t resist the allure of beckoning Christmas or birthday presents? Beats me.

    Speaking of Christmas and birthdays, Dec. 16 is the birthday not only of ODE TO JOY composer LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN, but of another composer (as well as playwright, singer, actor, etc.) whose sophisticated songs are always like Christmas presents to my ears, NOEL COWARD. Here, from the 1933 Academy Award-winning best picture CAVALCADE, is one of my favorite Noel Coward songs:

    But wait — there’s more! What’s more, I saved it more or less as the best(?) for last. I refer to none other than YOSEMITE SAM, who made his entrance into the world in STAGE DOOR CARTOON on Dec. 16, 1944. So, without further ado, I present for your listening pleasure, my man Sam performing a looney tune which is, without question, the most magnum opus of merry melodies since Ode To Joy (eat your heart out, Ludwig):

    So, if you were born tomorrow (Dec. 16) and haven’t yet joined your birthday brothers in pursuing musical fame and fortune, I hope you will take note and give it a shot.

    That’s all, folks!

     
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