Updates from March, 2020 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carole Lombard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Yoko Ono   

    BEWARE THE BRIDES OF MARCH 

    March 15 being THE IDES OF MARCH (but still winter), I thought I’d work on a post I’d call THE BRRRR-IDES OF MARCH — however, it hasn’t been very winter-like where I live, so it’s no weather for snow jobs. Thus I’ll settle for a post about The Brides of March, of whom there have been some blushing ones, some gushing ones, some rushing ones, and a mother lode of if-at-first-you-don’t-succeed-try-try-again ones….such as singing star Peggy Lee, whose marriage to jazz guitarist Dave Barbour was her first of four such gigs.

    Here are twenty March brides who gave it the old collage (French for to stick together) try, listed by March wedding day (along with the names of the grooms, just for the wreck of it):

    March 1, 1968   JUNE CARTER / Johnny Cash
    March 8, 1952   NANCY DAVIS / Ronald Reagan
    March 8, 1943   PEGGY LEE / Dave Barbour
    March 9, 1796   JOSÉPHINE de BEAUHARNAIS / Napoléon Bonaparte
    March 13, 1946 MARY WELSH / Ernest Hemingway

    March 15, 1964 ELIZABETH TAYLOR / Richard Burton (again)
    March 16, 2002 LIZA MINNELLI / David Gest
    March 17, 1905 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT / Franklin D. Roosevelt
    March 18, 1869 HARRIET TUBMAN / Nelson Davis
    March 19, 1918 DAISY PARKER / Louis Armstrong (who recorded this song 3/2/1932):

    March 20, 1969 YOKO ONO / John Lennon
    March 21, 1945 LAUREN BACALL / Humphrey Bogart
    March 21, 1963 BARBRA STREISAND / Elliott Gould
    March 21, 1984 SARAH BRIGHTMAN / Andrew Lloyd Webber
    March 23, 1985 CHRISTIE BRINKLEY / Billy Joel

    March 24, 1950 INGRID BERGMAN / Roberto Rossellini
    March 27, 1916 GLORIA SWANSON / Wallace Beery
    March 28, 1920 MARY PICKFORD / Douglas Fairbanks
    March 28, 1939 CAROLE LOMBARD / Clark Gable
    March 28, 1957 BILLIE HOLIDAY (LADY DAY) / Louis McKay

    All but three of those ladies married multiple times, and one of the three (Daisy Parker) died soon after her divorce from Louis Armstrong. Lost passion being the fashion, this quote seems a fitting way to call it a day:

    “I guess the only way to stop divorce is to stop marriage.” –Will Rogers

    So ladies, this be your day to be given away. Gents, beware the BRIDES OF MARCH (apologies to Shakespeare) — not to mention, pity your poor (after the divorce) befuddled comrades-in-arms who married them.

     

     

     

     

     
    • calmkate 12:46 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol I think some women like the white wedding bit but can’t quite engage in the marriage commitment thing! I took Will’s advice and avoided the whole darned thing … a barrister friend took me to divorce court and that was it 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:07 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Frankly, it sounds like you could render your gender’s version of Sinatra’s I DID IT MY WAY in grand style, Kate. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:56 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      First ring out the wedding bells then all too soon ring the lawyer. Happily ever nah-ah.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:05 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Ha! Love it.
      Although Liz Taylor probably hit every month. She was a busy bride.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 9:44 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! However, in just a week’s time it will be the Spring Equinox (20th March), the halfway point of spring!

      Liked by 1 person

    • linnetmoss 10:17 am on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      What an amazing list of brides! The ones that caught my eye were June Carter, Yoko Ono, and of course the immortal Liz. But she is in a category by herself as a bride.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Don Ostertag 3:13 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post,

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:29 pm on March 15, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Don. Nonetheless, I’m not showing it to my wife, because I don’t want to give her any ideas. Who would cook my meals if she divorced me?

        Liked by 2 people

    • Moushmi Radhanpara 10:01 am on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, you gave me a good laugh 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 2:23 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Now, now, now. It works two ways.
      So, if you first don’t succeed, try, try, try again.

      But usually one should marry “up” each time because after the first divorce you usually have nothing left!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:26 pm on March 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        “Divorce is a legal separation when a man stops bringing the money home to his wife and starts mailing it.” –Evan Esar
        In that scenario, a man would have to marry WAY up because, unless the next wife is independently wealthy, he’d probably still have to send her his money after the second divorce. 😉

        Like

    • mlrover 11:21 am on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never planned to marry again after divorcing the first one, who was and is a horrible person. There was no resisting my second marriage, and even with all its ups, downs, and difficulties, it was wonderful. The “Second Time Around” turned out to be true for me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:13 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • mlrover 7:44 am on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you. It was Frankie’s rendition that came to mind. And my “.second time” happened on St. Patty’s Day. And we married in March. Forgot to mention that.

          Like

    • arekhill1 1:56 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Just missed being a March groom myself, Sr. Muse. Married on my birthday, April 12th. Bride insisted on the date so I would remember our wedding anniversary. Only had to remember it once, though.

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 6:02 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      At least you can be thankful your birthday isn’t on April 1st, Ricardo — you don’t need that kind of reminder every April Fools Day. 😉

      Like

    • Rebecca Wallick 8:53 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Great post!
      Thankfully I got my starter marriage out of the way between the ages of 18-20.
      I then went to college and law school. I became a divorce lawyer.
      Oh, the horrors. No more marriages for me!
      Just wish I’d known of the Will Rogers quote when I was still practicing law. I would have turned it into a big sign to hang in my office. Maybe some of my clients would have resisted walking down the aisle a second (or third) time. Maybe, but probably not.
      I did appreciate the repeat business 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:41 pm on March 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I like your term “starter marriage,” Rebecca. Wouldn’t it be great if, like a starter home, you could sell it when you ‘outgrow’ it and use the proceeds to acquire a better fit for your current needs?

        Hmmm. “Maybe, but probably not.” 😉

        Like

    • Bryntin 4:49 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Hello, I’m not commenting on your post exactly, just letting you know I visited here – and so might others who hadn’t before now – on my latest BLT (Blog Leap Tour). You may see a pingback link if you want to see how it went.
      Anyway, sorry to intrude.
      Carry on… 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:06 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I was about to “carry on” (recalling the old British “Carry On…” film series) when I noticed a follow-up Bryntin comment (something about a virus) which gave me pause. I’m therefore refraining from approving the second comment pending clarification, as I’m not presently in the mood for a virus…even of the “carry on” kind.

        Like

        • Bryntin 6:09 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink

          Ah, that was probably in the text of my post and carried into the link… and of course at the moment a lot of posts encompass the word ‘virus’. Sorry to give you the squeaky bottom but I am real and safe as far as I know… as far as any of us knows even.

          Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:04 pm on March 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        As you can see, your “carry on” has now passed inspection — but my post is under quarantine, along with everyone who has been in contact with it since 4:49 pm today, until further notice (or until that certain everyone sends my inspection fee — preferably sanitized — whichever comes first). 😉

        Like

    • equipsblog 8:53 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Very clever post. Maybe next you can actually riff you way through the Brrrr-ides of March.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 12:17 pm on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      My bride and I tied the knot in the month of September, so I’m not rife for a riff (or a raff, for that matter) through the Brrr-ides of March….but since we’re heading from March into April, here’s a jazzman’s riff on the transition:

      Like

  • mistermuse 9:15 pm on February 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    TRUMP AIN’T NOTHING BUT A GROUNDHOG 

    I wasn’t going to do a Groundhog Day post, but then I came across this Feb. 1, 2017 clip and, though I had second thoughts, decided (on third thought) to pass it on. Who said I ain’t nothing but a gentleman?

    Hey, nothing said (or sung) about Trump could be more vulgar (not to mention obnoxious and disgusting) than Trump himself, right?

     
    • JosieHolford 10:49 pm on February 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      He’s some kind of “pig” for sure.
      But then I think of the groundhogs who live under my deck and I think nice thoughts.
      And I have to say all the actual pigs I have met in my life have been intelligent, friendly animals.
      So tRump – you ain’t nothing like a real groundhog or pig. You are the worst of the human species.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:27 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I agree completely, Josie — tRump likes nothing better than to play dirty.

        Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 11:22 pm on February 2, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve been depressed about the traitors to the Constitution who anointed King Trump this week. This song gave me a much-needed smile. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 1:41 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I ALMOST feel sorry for the two GOP senators (Romney and Collins) who voted to allow witnesses. You can bet that Trump will turn on them just as he has on every one else who has crossed him. Trump demands loyalty but has none for even close former underlings who no longer grovel at his feet.

        Liked by 2 people

        • D. Wallace Peach 5:08 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink

          Collins was just saving her job. Romney actually sort-of has balls (pardon the French). I hope the whole lot of them get dumped in November. No one’s going to forget this, especially since Trump is going to continue to ruin the country and gloat.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 11:03 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink

          Trump is not only going to continue to ruin the country, he now has the GOP’s blessing to actively invite Russia, Saudi Arabia, and others to help him rig the next election. No one should doubt for a moment that Trump will do ANYTHING to avoid defeat in Nov. 2020.

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 12:07 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Bill Murray would be impressed … great use of talent!
      Grateful to know that you do have some over there 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:53 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I hope so, Kate. GROUINDHOG DAY is one of my fav movies of all time, and when I wake up each morning and see and hear the same old Trump repeating the same old hogwash, I almost feel like Bill Murray caught up in the same cycle (but with no happy ending).

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 5:26 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink

          I get you … I can’t believe it’s dragging on so long and only because Packer and Murdoch are his mates … I think they are taking the pi.. out of you mob!

          Liked by 1 person

    • obbverse 12:42 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Groundhogs are great- its Foxes that go rabid.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 2:04 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know if humans can go rabid….but then, I don’t know if Trump is human. He certainly has no humanity (though he pretends to at times).

        Liked by 2 people

    • obbverse 2:09 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Well, that manicured mane does have a touch of mange to it.He seems to unleash a lot of uncontrolled…errrr… twitterings.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Garfield Hug 8:56 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I am glad Trump is not my ruler. Thank goodness for good government in lil red dot and I do worry for Americans as where is USA heading in these turbulent times

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:52 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You are indeed fortunate, G H — I’m sure even Garfield is happy he doesn’t have to put up with Trump.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:25 am on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Did you see the Groundhog Day Super Bowl commercial? So cute!
      As for Hound Dog, I’m afraid I’ll never hear it again without inserting those chorus lyrics…. damn you!
      🤣

      Liked by 2 people

    • tubularsock 1:03 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you mistermuse. Tubularsock will be tapping his foot all day!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 2:08 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        You’re welcome, ts. Now if we could only get Woody Woodpecker to go tapping on Trump’s skull and let some of the sap ooze out.

        Like

    • Rivergirl 2:28 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Oh, wait…. now I see it.
      Yes! Love that one!!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 4:47 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Rg. I assume that the Groundhog Day/Bill Murray clip is the Super Bowl commercial I missed. If I’d have known it was going to be on at halftime, I probably wouldn’t have left the living room until the start of the second half like I usually do every Super Bowl. Thanks again.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:02 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you so very much. We need all the levity we can find these days. I guess we won’t find this clip preserved in the National Archives, though!

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 7:27 pm on February 3, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’m sure it won’t be, Elizabeth, but where I’d really like to see it shown is in the Congressional House Chamber during Trump’s State of the Union address tomorrow night. Now that’s a happening that would really bring the house down!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 6:17 pm on February 4, 2020 Permalink

          All the women in the House could stand together and belt it out as a flash mob!

          Liked by 1 person

    • arekhill1 4:17 pm on February 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      An insult to groundhogs everywhere, Sr. Muse.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 5:00 pm on February 9, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Every day since Inauguration Day (Jan. 20, 2018) seems like Groundhog Day, Ricardo — except it’s Trump instead of Punxsutawney Phil who keeps coming out of his hole to show his fat face .

        Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Badkward Day, , , January, , palindromes, , ,   

    TODAY IS BACKWARD DAY (aka YAD DRAWKCAB) 

    31 January >> ?know you don’t >> DAY BACKWARD is >> say sources so

    Not so fast! If you backward the numbers, today is only 13 January….which means that we’re not even halfway though the month yet. Who wants that many more winter days on top of the 29 — make that 92 — days of February (this being leap year) and 81 days of March (winter officially ends 18 March). So screw backwards!

    Of course, if you live below the equator, there’s the added downside of being upside down on top of being backward (no offense intended). But at least it’s summer down below, so you’re not freezing your backside off. Where I live, it’s so cold, I have to leave my refrigerator door open to warm up my igloo.

    Speaking of cold, have you heard the one about the mama who got the blues she can’t lose due to her feet being colder than frozen meat ‘neath an ice-cold sheet in a bed missing papa’s heat?

    Back to YAD DRAWCAB: DO GEESE SEE GOD? Whether they do or don’t, the question reads the same spelled forward and backward. This is known as a PALINDROME (which isn’t a palindrome because it’s EMORDNILAP spelled backward). However, in Alaska, they call it a SARAHPALINDROME (which is EMPTYHEADED spelled in any direction).

    Assuming you can stand more (if not, remain seated):

    Looking back on Backward Day, it dawns on me not to leave this day behind without a backward song to turn backward to when it would be a drawback not to turn backward:

    In closing, I hope today isn’t your birthday, because I wouldn’t like to think you’re a backward baby — but just in case you are, in addition to wishing you a Happy Birthday, I wish you a….

    !YAD DRAWKCAB YPPAH

     

     

     
    • The Whitechapel Whelk 1:17 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I can see you’ve heard about Brexit.

      Liked by 3 people

    • masercot 5:29 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I enjoyed you post from end to beginning…

      Liked by 4 people

      • mistermuse 9:12 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 9:22 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          That’s funny. I was listening to the Andrews Sisters and you had to pull the modern music out on me…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 12:38 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          Sinatra recorded that song as vocalist with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in March 1940, when the Andrews Sisters were at the peak of their popularity and Frank was just becoming the idol of the bobbysoxers. Not exactly the “modern” Frank most people remember today, which is just as well, because I think his mature voice and style beat the way he sang this (and other early-in-his-career songs) any day.

          Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 2:58 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          Ouch! That’ll leave a mark…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 3:15 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          No “mark” on you intended. The Swing era (mid 1930s-mid 1940s) just happens to be the musical era I was born in and am most familiar with.

          Liked by 1 person

        • masercot 4:21 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          The music and movies from the forties are great. I’m a big Myrna Loy fan… and, Ella of course…

          Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 5:45 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      lol great one, that Palindrome one really made me laugh loudly … and hey don’t rubbish us for standing on our heads! The skirt creates a breeze that way 🙂
      oooh for impeachment, what is the hold up …

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 9:22 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Far be it from me to knock a lady’s breezeway, Kate, but standing on one’s head would rub me the wrong way ’cause I don’t have any hair on top for a cushion. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 4:44 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          I think your head might be large enough to withstand the trauma 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 5:14 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink

          That reminds me of a song (written by a guy from the same city as I) which describes my head perfectly:

          Like

    • Ashley 8:09 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      According to the Celtic calendar today is the last day of winter! Tomorrow is the beginning of spring. You’re a bit behind things aren’t you?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:42 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Looking out the window as I write this comment, I see it’s snowing outside, so I hope the Celtic calendar is right, Ashley.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 9:22 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Do geese see God?
      The more important question… is God a goose?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:48 am on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Could be, R g. I’m pretty sure God’s not a chick or a duckling, because I’ve never heard a peep out of Her.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 2:48 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Tsop Nuf !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 4:02 pm on January 31, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Especially fond of “not now won ton.” Thanks for the laugh.

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , I Got Plenty Of Nothing, , , Nothin',   

    MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE ZILCH 

    Wanna know something? January 16 is NATIONAL NOTHING DAY. Since I can think of nothing I’d rather do today than filch some zilch, I’m going to take this day and make Nothing of it. Actually, Nothing couldn’t have come at a better time for this post, ’cause if there’s one thing I gotta lotta, it’s nada.

    For you language purists out there, when I said I gotta lotta nada, whata oughta said was….

    Now that you’ve had your fill of nothing and I’ve made the case that there’s nothing better than nothing, I have all the nothing that’s everything I need to amount to anything. Ain’t that something!

    Watch out, piggy!

     
    • calmkate 12:09 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      well that leaves me with very little to say … nothing in fact!

      Like

    • obbverse 2:18 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Whoa, let’s not overdo things!

      Like

    • JosieHolford 5:03 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      “Nothing will come of nothing: speak again.” – King Lear.

      Like

    • masercot 6:17 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve got nothin’ and twice that…

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:38 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I’ve heard of double or nothing, but not double AND nothing. What more can I say?

        Like

    • Rivergirl 8:28 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      If you make nothing something.. is it still nothing?

      Like

    • Ashley 10:56 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m lost for words!

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:45 am on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know where you lost them, Ashley, but look for them under the lamp post — the light is better there (sorry about that — I couldn’t resist).

        Like

    • arekhill1 1:40 pm on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Bet the Oval Office A-hole wishes there was nothing going on today, Sr. Muse.

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:40 pm on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I agree, Ricardo. Trump may put on a bravado front, knowing the GOP-controlled Senate has his back….but you can bet your backside that his “legacy” is foremost in his thinking of the aftermath.

        Like

    • jilldennison 7:43 pm on January 16, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Heh heh … you certainly are full of … nuthin’. You’ve celebrated the day in perfect style! 😉

      Like

      • mistermuse 3:53 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Now it’s the Day After Nothing Day, and I’m still doing nothing, so I must be doing something right — or rahther, I must be doing nuthin’ right. Anyway, being full of nuthin’ beats being full of BS like a certain good-for-nuthin’ President I could name.

        Liked by 1 person

        • jilldennison 7:29 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink

          Good on you! See if you can keep up doing nothing through the entire weekend! You may well be in line for an award, or perhaps a Guinness record!

          Like

    • D. Wallace Peach 4:14 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing that Congress has Nothing better to do than legislate a national Nothing day. (I know that this day wasn’t actually ratified by Congress, but wouldn’t that be apropos?) I hope you enjoyed doing nothing. 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 7:50 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Diana, if Congress (including the Senate) does nothing all year besides impeach Trump, I’ll consider it a job beyond well done (I’ll also consider it a miracle).

        Liked by 1 person

        • D. Wallace Peach 7:54 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink

          I know. I can’t wait until this Trump/McConnell nightmare is over.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 8:06 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink

          Thanks for your comments, Diana. I’ve mentioned this before, but in case you and other commenters missed it, the reason there are no Likes (by me) after comments is that when I click Like, it doesn’t “take” — no slight intended by no Likes!

          P.S. I’ve just discovered a “trick” I can use to make Like work. Hallelujah!

          Like

    • magickmermaid 7:36 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I didn’t know about Nothing Day. I failed by doing something 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 7:53 pm on January 17, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I wouldn’t say you failed, mm — let’s just say you did no harm (just think of how much better off we’d be if Trump did no harm!).

        Liked by 1 person

    • tubularsock 7:16 pm on January 18, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Wouldn’t you know, Tubularsock missed January 16th, NATIONAL NOTHING DAY!

      Fortunately for Tubularsock, nothing lost, nothing gained.

      Which makes January 18th a happy day for missing nothing.

      NOW THAT, should be a national holiday!

      So, Tubularsock has plenty of nothing and nothing has nothing on me!

      But remember if you put “something” in a box and hide it under your bed then you’ll always have “something” when NATIONAL NOTHING DAY comes round again!

      Cheers

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:17 am on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        There’s nothing I’d rather put in a box than nothing — it would save me a lot of money on Christmas and birthday gifts (though I suppose I’d still have to spend time wrapping them).

        Thanks for the idea, ts.

        Liked by 1 person

        • tubularsock 2:38 pm on January 19, 2020 Permalink

          Well it appears that Tubularsock’s waiting to receive a Christmas present next December 25th won’t be a surprise after all.

          Liked by 1 person

    • moorezart 1:52 am on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Reblogged this on From 1 Blogger 2 Another.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:59 pm on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I loved this tribute to “nothing”. And I had no idea Jan. 16 was National Nothing Day. I did an online search and was surprised to see it’s been around since 1973. The things you’ve taught me, Mistermuse.

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 2:18 am on January 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      LOL! I’m in!💕❤️💕

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Au Revoir, , , , , , , , , Rodgers and Hart,   

    THEY CALLED HIM AL 

    When I was writing about lyricist DOROTHY FIELDS and composer BERNICE PETKERE in my previous post (TWO TO GO), I had no thought of using it as a segue to this post ….but that was before I discovered that tomorrow is the birthday of a music man who sang at least a half dozen of Fields’ 1930s songs, including ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET (sung in the previous post by Diana Krall), not to mention the Petkere song CLOSE YOUR EYES (sung in the same post by that very man). They called him Al.

    The ‘another-world-ago’ Al is this world’s forgotten man, except by a relative handful of Golden Age music devotees around the world (primarily in America and Great Britain). His name was ALBERT ALICK BOWLLY (Jan 7, 1899-Apr. 17, 1941), heard here in a recording of a Dorothy Fields/Jerome Kern song from the film JOY OF LIVING:

    Did you notice from the above dates that Bowlly had his life taken from him at a relatively young age? This was the tragic result of a WW II German air raid (one of many) on London in the early 1940s. But while he lived, who was this troubadour they called Al?

    Away from the bandstand he was a vagabond. He was a jazz mad musical nomad who traveled from his childhood home, South Africa, to London and all stops between in search of musical perfection with whatever band would have him. He plied his trade as a guitarist, a banjo, concertina and ukulele player, a pianist and occasional singer of songs. He took America by storm. The story of his musical meanderings, highs and lows, could only have happened in the thirties. –Roy Hudd, British author, comedian, actor, and expert on the history of music hall entertainment

    Listening to Diana Krall in the previous post — as well as CLOSE YOUR EYES vocalist Al Bowlly — we are taken by their way with a song, their Joy of Living the songs they sang…. as further evidenced by this rendition of the Rodgers and Hart classic, BLUE MOON:

    Here is one of his few appearances on film:

    For those interested in learning more of the story of Bowlly’s nomadic life, there’s an excellent bio called THEY CALLED HIM AL, by Ray Pallett, with Forward by Roy Hudd. As for this go-around, we’ve come to the last dance — it’s time to call it a day. I bid you a reluctant Au Revoir.

     

     

     
    • Don Ostertag 1:11 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      He was so good.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 1:44 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Some thought of him as the British Bing Crosby. I think he had a better feel for a song than Bing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 9:30 pm on January 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Early in his career (up to about the mid 1930s), Bing sang with a jazz feel and what you might call soul, but after that, he was a different and very ordinary singer, in my opinion. If you listen to his early 1930s recordings and then his 1940s (and later) recordings, you wouldn’t think it’s the same singer. Bowlly’s style didn’t change, and he was the better for it.

        Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 2:46 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      good looking and talented, beats Bing hands down, no competition!

      Blue moon bought back some good memories … like these little meanders with you thanks MrM 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 7:40 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        In my opinion, no one has ever sung BLUE MOON better than Al Bowlly. I never tire of listening to it.

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 5:35 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink

          oh I’ve heard a very heart wrenching version by four drunks in Broken Hill … that was very surreal 🙂

          Like

        • mistermuse 7:01 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink

          Well, that answers the riddle of how many drunks does it take to make a quartet, but not how many quarts does it take to make the four drunk. In Broken Hill, they probably drink their liquor by the gallon.

          Like

    • scifihammy 7:25 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Lovely light voice. 🙂 I love how they could actually Sing in those days!! 😀

      Like

      • mistermuse 8:07 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Not only that, scifi, but for the most part, they had better songs to sing. In general, the music world of Fields, Kern, Gershwin, Porter, Rodgers and Hart, etc., has been largely replaced by a world of juvenile noise calling itself music — a culture without culture. A world that doesn’t know any better.

        Liked by 4 people

    • masercot 7:51 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      It’s a shame. He had a nice voice…

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:12 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        A shame indeed. Makes one wonder whether, if he hadn’t been killed by one of Hitler’s bombs, his popularity would have continued after the war years (like Bing Crosby’s did) into the 1950s.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Wistful Nostalgic 1:05 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink

          Oh he sure would have! Think of the era of the singers in the 1940s. Al’s voice was perfect for all the standards that came after the 1930s.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 9:06 am on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love those scratchy old recordings… never heard of Al though. Thanks for the introduction.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:34 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Maybe you can prevail upon husband to find and bring home to you some scratchy old records and an antique phonograph to play them on when he goes on his “treasure hunts,” Rg. It strikes me that he “owes you one” after all the old contraptions and doohickeys he buys for himself!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rivergirl 1:09 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink

          As much as I appreciate the thought?
          No…
          No more old stuff!

          Like

        • mistermuse 3:11 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink

          Like

          I hope you will make an exception for me, Rg, because even though I’m old stuff, what would you do without my puns to blighten — I mean BRIGHTEN — your day?

          Like

    • Ashley 12:23 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Goodness! Al Bowlly! How could anyone forget that wonderful voice. I wasn’t born until 1950 so it must have been in the b&w movies they showed on Sunday afternoons on the television that I heard him sing! The tunes and the voices have never left me! Thanks Mr. M. Happy New Year!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 12:42 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Ashley. I’m beginning to believe that more people remember Al Bowlly than I thought. Maybe it’s like the song says: AU REVOIR, BUT NOT GOODBYE.

        Liked by 1 person

    • magickmermaid 7:54 pm on January 6, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I never heard of Al Bowlly so it was very enjoyable to read your post and listen to the music. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 5:27 pm on January 7, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      He was new to me, but I loved the film singing of “The Very Thought of You.” I imagine my grandfather, lover of all songs on records, probably listened to him.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza 12:01 pm on January 10, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Happy new year! I hope this year brings good things your way…
      Love, light and glitter

      Like

    • mistermuse 10:49 pm on January 12, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Eliza, if you’ll Google “al bowlly looking on the bright side youtube”, there are several clips of the recording to choose from. That should take care of it, but if not, let me know. Thanks.

      Like

    • barkinginthedark 12:39 am on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      so wonderful MM…a joy. thanks. continue…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Silver Screenings 3:52 pm on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’d never hear of Al Bowlly before, but thanks to you I’m an instant fan! Loved the footage of him – he has a surprising amount of charisma on film.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 10:51 pm on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        I appreciate your comment, SS, which leads me to believe that more Al Bowlly would be good for you — so here he is with the Ray Noble Orchestra, singing IT’S BAD FOR ME:

        Liked by 2 people

        • Silver Screenings 11:38 pm on January 19, 2020 Permalink

          Thank you for this. I’ve spent the past 40+ minutes listening to Al Bowlley, especially his rendition of “Heart & Soul”, which I listened to 3-4 times in a row. A wonderful way to end the weekend. 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • Wistful Nostalgic 1:07 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink

          I love this song!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Wistful Nostalgic 1:14 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink

          There can never be too much Al! 😉 He’s a great way to start the day, and to end the day.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Wistful Nostalgic 1:06 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

        Oh he sure did! His magnetic charisma and charming personality just shines on the Pathe clip.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Wistful Nostalgic 1:13 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I love your post on Al. He is my favourite singer of all time. He was THE voice of the 20th century. I’m 52 , so he was from my Grandad’s era, but it feels my “true” era. Al was unique; nobody sounds like him; he’s got a voice of liquid gold. I especially love “Oh Mister Moon”, “Red Sails In The Sunset”, “Maybe It’s Because”, “My Woman”, and “You’re My Thrill”. But there are many more I love too. I listen to his music every day!

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 9:23 am on July 20, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Thank you. I have dozens of his albums, including those of bands (such as Ray Noble and Lew Stone) on which Al is the vocalist. Have you ever heard of Joey Nash? Some say he was the American Al Bowlly. Here he is in 1934 as a vocalist with Richard Himber’s Orchestra:

      P.S. Do you have a WordPress blog? As far as I can find, you’re only on Instagram, but I’m only on WordPress.

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bernice Petkere, , , , , , , , , On the Sunny Side of the Street, Starlight,   

    TWO TO GO 

    As 2019 goes into the history books, we close out the year and our series of 1920s-30s female songwriters with two of the best: BERNICE PETKERE and DOROTHY FIELDS.

    PETKERE, the longest lived (1901-2000) but perhaps least remembered of the women in this series, had her greatest success as a composer in the 1930s. This hit (with lyrics by Joe Young) was recorded in early 1932 by a rising star by the name of Bing Crosby:

    Petkere, primarily a composer, also wrote the lyrics to a few of her songs, including….

    Saving the class of the field for last, we turn to the most prolific lady lyricist of the era (and the first woman to be elected to the Songwriters Hall of Fame), DOROTHY FIELDS, “the only female songwriter of the golden age whose name has not sunk into oblivion with time.” –Deborah Grace Winer, author of ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET, subtitled THE LIFE AND TIMES OF DOROTHY FIELDS

    Named after Dorothy of Wizard of Oz fame, she teamed with composer Jimmy McHugh in 1927 to write many hits over the next eight years, including this all-time standard in 1930:

    Fields went on to write many songs with other composers until her death in 1974….but as much as I’d like to post links to more of Fields work, I’m going to resist temptation (you know what they say about too much of a good thing), Take It Easy*, and call it a Fields day

    ….except to say, Happy New Year!

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    *the title, it so happens, of a Fields song I resisted linking to (recorded by Fats Waller)

     

     
    • calmkate 3:22 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      wow I actually know most of Dorothy’s songs … that’s a huge achievement! I had often wondered who had written some of them … but not enough to look her up 🙂

      great way to welcome in the new decade, doubt I’ll see the next 😎

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 8:30 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. What better way to ring out the old and “welcome in the new decade” than with songs that stand the test of time, and know that if we are still around “in the next decade,” these great songs will still be around too.

        Liked by 4 people

        • calmkate 7:28 pm on December 31, 2019 Permalink

          these songs will be around for all time, they are so memorable … not sure I am that memorable!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mistermuse 1:30 am on January 1, 2020 Permalink

          Neither am I, Kate, but if it’s any consolation, it’s far better not to be remembered, than to be remembered like the likes of Donald Trump will be.

          Liked by 2 people

    • scifihammy 8:09 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve enjoyed your entertaining posts and movie/song clips this year, and look forward to more next year. 😀
      Happy New Year to you and all the best for 2020. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • mistermuse 8:23 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I appreciate that, scifi — best New Year’s wishes to you as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • GP Cox 9:53 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ashley 10:02 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great post this! And thanks for the introduction to Pamela Rose! Born in the 50’s I’m not sure where I’ve heard so many of these songs before! Also thanks for the introduction to Diana Krall, great voice, just my sort of music and that piano! Couldn’t make out the make but the old well worn sound was wonderful.
      Have a happy healthy and peaceful New Year!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:17 am on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Ashley, have I ever told you that you have great taste in music?
        But seriously, I’m seriously pleased that you dig this post. As for Diana Krall, I couldn’t agree more — I think she’s the finest jazz vocalist since Mel Tormé, and yet virtually unknown outside of jazz circles. Such a pity that great jazz singers have almost no place in recent popular music culture.

        Liked by 1 person

    • smbabbitt 3:57 pm on December 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great selection of songs!

      Liked by 1 person

    • America On Coffee 1:49 am on January 23, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      Classics live on! A great selection! 💕☕️☕️

      Liked by 2 people

  • mistermuse 2:06 am on December 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ann Ronell, Dana Suesse, lazz, movie cartoons, , My Silent Love, Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf, Willow Weep For Me   

    ANN, THEN SOME….MORE FEMALE SONGWRITERS 

    Continuing with our female songwriters of the 1920s-30s, ANN RONELL is notable not only for her music (she wrote both music and lyrics), but for the oddity of having been both born and died on Christmas day (in 1905 and 1993). Here is my favorite of her songs, which she wrote in 1932 and dedicated to her friend, George Gershwin:

    In the same Great Depression year, she kept the wolf from her door by writing lyrics to this song featured in the Walt Disney “Silly Symphonies” cartoon, THE THREE LITTLE PIGS:

    Another December baby (Dec. 3 1909), DANA SUESSE composed many songs, including the instrumental Jazz Nocturne, which (with lyrics added by Edward Heyman in 1932) became this standard:

    There’s more, but I will save the best one for last (in this series). Hint: the day I publish that post will be a Fields day.

     
    • calmkate 5:48 am on December 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love those little piggies, I know the chorus but hadn’t heard the whole song before!

      That last song is sensual 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:19 am on December 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        WHO’S AFRAID OF THE BIG BAD WOLF is one of the few songs (that I can think of off the top of my head) written for a movie cartoon that became a big hit. Another was POPEYE THE SAILOR MAN.

        Liked by 2 people

    • America On Coffee 8:13 pm on December 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Nice reflections!

      Like

      • mistermuse 12:21 am on December 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for the nice comment, AOC.

        Liked by 1 person

        • America On Coffee 5:15 am on December 28, 2019 Permalink

          Well wishes and a superb enjoyment, dear friend into the New Year!💕 Cheers!

          Like

        • mistermuse 11:40 am on December 28, 2019 Permalink

          Like-wise, AOC (I’ve mentioned this before, so pardon me for repeating myself, but my Like button to comments isn’t working –that’s why I “can’t” Like readers’ comments).

          Like

    • Elizabeth 5:23 pm on December 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I remember the Chad and Jeremy version well, never knowing it was an old song written by a woman. Thanks for the Big Bad Wolf clip. I loved that song as a kid and had it on a little Golden record we played on our little record player at 78rpm.

      Like

      • mistermuse 6:00 pm on December 28, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I remember the little Golden records for children — not when I was a kid, but as a record collector, when a few fell into my hands as part of other collections I’d buy. I think that later, there were also 45 rpm Golden records. Record players eventually played at 78, 45 & 33 1/3 rpm, and I still own a few.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Elizabeth 9:17 pm on December 28, 2019 Permalink

          I have many. Never thought of them being part of a collection for sale.

          Like

    • Silver Screenings 3:43 pm on January 19, 2020 Permalink | Reply

      I’m going to be humming “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf” for the rest of the day, and that thought alone makes my entire day. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • mistermuse 12:03 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Bob Crosby, Cozy Cole, , , Johnny Hodges, Jonah Jones, , , Tot Seymour, Vee Lawnhurst   

    WHAT VEE/TOT BEGOT, BE WHAT WE GOT (AND THEN SOME) 

    In a comment to my last post (on composer Kay Swift), a certain mister mused that more posts should follow devoted to women songwriters of the 1920s-30s, of whom there were too few. I’ve since found that two of those few got together to form what was the era’s only successful female songwriting partnership: VEE LAWNHURST (composer) and TOT SEYMOUR (lyricist). We shall proceed accordingly forthwith….or forthwith accordingly. Whatever.

    Let’s start with their biggest hit, a #1 bestseller for 11 weeks in 1935, AND THEN SOME:

    VEE LAWNHURST (1905-92), born in NYC, was a pianist, singer, teacher, and a pioneer in radio broadcasting. She worked with several lyricists before teaming with Tot to write a lot of hits in the mid to late 1930s, including the title song from the 1935 film ACCENT ON YOUTH, played here by the DUKE ELLINGTON Orchestra (Johnny Hodges on alto sax):

    TOT SEYMOUR (1889-1966), also born in NYC, was a multi-talented writer, including special material for such stars of the day as Fannie Brice and Mae West, then turning to popular song writing in 1930, working with various composers until teaming with Vee Lawnhurst. Among their many fine songs is this 1937 Billie Holiday classic featuring such jazz greats as Jonah Jones, Ben Webster, Teddy Wilson and Cozy Cole:

    Apparently Vee and Tot wrote no Christmas songs, which is just as well because you’ve probably already had more than your fill. So I’ll just close by wishing you a Happy Humbug….and then some.

     

     
    • obbverse 1:52 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      So over the bellowing carols and mindless Merry Christmases, roll on blessed silence and boxing day sales!

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:02 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        ….and then some!

        Thanks for the comment, o.b., and may I be the last to wish you a mindless Merry Christmas..

        Liked by 1 person

    • calmkate 4:01 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      do enjoy your posts … is it my hearing, I didn’t catch any words in #2?

      Happy Humbug keep on toe tappin 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:19 am on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Your hearing isn’t failing you, Kate. I posted the Ellington instrumental version because I dig Duke and Johnny Hodges’ gorgeous alto sax solo late in the recording. But never fear –you can hear the words here, in this non-jazz record:

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 5:23 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink

          who doesn’t love the Duke, but as you were talking about her song writing … appreciate the link!

          Like

      • mistermuse 8:19 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Kate, I placed the Duke Ellington instrumental to go with the Vee Lawnhurst paragraph because she wasn’t the lyricist half of the team It fit there better there because the other two links had vocals.

        Liked by 1 person

        • calmkate 11:04 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink

          lol no need to defend yourself, your post!
          But I had expected lyrics so probably didn’t absorb the magic music as much as I should have, my fault entirely 🙂

          Like

    • Elizabeth 6:35 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I love their ambiguous first names which may have allowed them more success.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:44 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        That’s possible, Elizabeth, but I’d like to think that their intelligence and talent had more to do with it. For example, there’s the common name of Dorothy Parker, the famed wit and writer in the 1920s & 30s (who, btw, also wrote the lyrics to a few good songs, such as I WISHED ON THE MOON) .

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 3:01 pm on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I had never heard of Bob Crosby and when I looked him up I see that he had many children one of them called Harry, better known as Bing. (Wow! When I was first reading your post my dear wife was looking over my shoulder and later said something like “that looks very like a young Bing Crosby!” You see we work as a team and usually sort most things out). Have a wonderful Yuletide yourself.

      Like

      • mistermuse 4:31 pm on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Ashley, the Bob Crosby in my first clip was actually Bing’s younger brother. There may have been another Bob somewhere in the Crosby family tree, but this Bob was born in 1913 and looked and sounded somewhat like his older brother. In 1935, he became the front man and vocalist for the band which recorded AND THEN SOME, and which went on to become one the best big bands in the business until 1942, when it disbanded, and Bob served in the military in WW II

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:22 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’ve always loved 20s and 30s tunes! And old films!

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:24 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You got that right, mm….and speaking of 1930s tunes, here’s a Christmas tune from 1934. Enjoy!

        Like

  • mistermuse 7:11 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Fine and Dandy, , Kay Swift, ,   

    SWIFT, UP AMONG THE CHIMNEY POTS 

    chimney pot, a pipe of earthenware or metal fitted on top of a chimney to increase the draft and carry off the smoke. –The World Book Dictionary

    • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Today I’d like to tell you about a classy dame by the name of KAY SWIFT, who was the first woman to write the complete score for an American musical (FINE AND DANDY, in 1930). To be honest, though, that wasn’t what prompted me to write this post — the real trigger was that, although I’ve long been a fan of her music, today I came across a song of hers I hadn’t heard before, and I liked it so much that I’d like to share it with you (along, while I’m at it, with two other Swift favorites).

    The song I hadn’t heard before (with the curious title UP AMONG THE CHIMNEY POTS) is sung here by jazz vocalist Louise Carlyle, with the composer at the piano:

    SWIFT was born in NYC in 1897. She trained as a classical musician and composer at what is now called the Julliard School, but was a great fan of popular songwriter Irving Berlin and, later, George Gershwin, with whom she became intimately involved (for more, go to this link, then click BIOGRAPHY (upper left below the word SWIFT):

    http://www.kayswift.com/

    Swift married her first husband, banker James Warburg, in 1918. A banker might be the last person you think of as a writer of lyrics to romantic songs, but’s that’s exactly what he was (under the name Paul James) to the music of his composer wife….until they divorced in 1934 — the same year he resigned as financial advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt.

    I turn now to the first-written (1929) of my favorite Kay Swift/Paul James songs:

    Let’s close with the title song from the aforementioned 1930 musical FINE AND DANDY:

     
    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:03 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for bringing her to my and other people’s attention. Don’t think I heard of her before.

      Neil Scheinin

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:27 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        My pleasure, Neil. There were relatively few female songwriters in the 1920s & 30s. The most well-known one was Dorothy Fields, and even she has been largely forgotten. I should do a series on them because they wrote some great songs which deserve to be heard again.

        Liked by 2 people

    • calmkate 9:17 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      wow great tunes, great musos and favourite Jazz singers … all hoppin good 🙂

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:40 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Kate. I love sophisticated songs with popular appeal such as those of Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart, Noel Coward and other “Golden Era of Popular Music” song writers. I think the three Kay Swift songs above are in and of that class

        Liked by 2 people

        • calmkate 11:47 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink

          indeed that are classy and talented … a banker writing songs, who’d have guessed 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Rivergirl 10:10 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Video unavailable… but was that Ella? I just saw a documentary on the Apollo Theater in Harlem that told the story of a young Ella Fitzgerald who forgot the words to a song during her first performance. The result? Scat.
      😊

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:18 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Sorry about the unavailable Ella video, Rg (actually, it’s Ella AND Louis Armstrong singing Can’t We Be Friends?). Here’s a different clip of the same singers and song — if this one is also unavailable, let me know, as there are other similar clips.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth 10:15 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      That dreaded line “can’t we be friends?” Great post. Never heard of her or her “long involvement with Gershwin” as that biography puts it. Maybe they should have just been friends!

      Like

      • mistermuse 11:50 pm on December 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        According to Wikipedia’s article on Kay Swift, “Gershwin and Swift’s affair lasted over ten years until his death in 1937. Despite their long relationship, Kay and George never married” — even after Kay’s divorce from Paul Warburg in 1934. So I suppose you could say that they were “just friends!”

        Liked by 1 person

    • masercot 5:32 am on December 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Every time I learn something I did not know before, I become a little stronger and the end of the world draws nearer. Thank you for bringing Armageddon just a little closer.

      Like

      • mistermuse 9:05 am on December 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        I doubt that we’re going to see Armageddon in our lifetime (unless Trump is reelected next year). Nonetheless, I’m happy to take credit for helping make you a little stronger.

        Like

    • Ashley 11:44 am on December 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! I will be listening to these over and over which is fine and dandy! Thanks for posting!

      Like

    • Silver Screenings 7:09 pm on December 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      You always treat us readers to terrific music. Thank you!

      Like

      • mistermuse 12:58 am on December 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        You’re most welcome, SS. I think it’s terrific too, so the old saying must be true that “Great minds think alike”!

        Like

    • magickmermaid 12:17 pm on December 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Love these tunes!

      Like

  • mistermuse 12:00 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Star Is Born, , , , , , , , musicals, ,   

    HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE: END OF THE TRAIL 

    Just as all good things must come to an end, so too must all bad things (even Trump’s evil rule will run out of recourse eventually — e.g., the fat lady’s last aria at the opera seems to go on forever; will it end short of becoming a hoarse opera?). What it all a-mounts to is….

    Meanwhile, back at the ranch , we bid happy trails to “bad” actors not named Trump, and end our HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE series with a roundup of some of the era’s great song & dance stars, starting with this incomparable pair whose magic outlasted their time:

    When it comes to high-energy dancing, no one outshined Gene Kelly. Here he is in THE PIRATE (1948), clowning around with the fabulous Nicholas Brothers:

    I do have one regret about this retrospective: so many musical stars, so little time and wherewithal for them all. Perhaps, as time goes by, I will use a favorite star’s birthday as an occasion to do an occasional post.

    In closing (speaking of when A STAR IS BORN), if ever someone was born to be one, it’s this star-crossed girl/woman with whom we bring down the curtain on this series:

     
    • calmkate 4:07 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      what a joyful collection of viewing, thanks Mr M!

      But Ginger and Fred are just sheer magic … no couple have ever created the ease and charm that they exuded on screen! My forever heros 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • mistermuse 10:54 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        It didn’t hurt (quoting from A SMITHSONIAN SALUTE TO THE AMERICAN MUSICAL) that “Astaire and Rogers worked with the finest composers of their day. Of their ten films together, one featured music by Cole Porter, two by Jerome Kern, one by George and Ira Gershwin, and three by Irvine Berlin.” Throw in great directors and supporting casts, and it’s no wonder there was movie magic!

        Liked by 3 people

        • calmkate 6:15 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink

          that would certainly help and their stage settings add to the majesty but they had class and talent by the ton!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Another Blogger 9:27 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Have you seen the new movie Judy? I liked it very much. It focuses on the final months of her life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 11:01 am on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Haven’t seen it, but saw snippets and an interview with the star on TV. Thanks for your comment.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ashley 1:51 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      This has been a great series and you should be congratulated for putting it all together.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 3:28 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Many thanks, Ashley….and I even managed to cast a few aspersions at Trump in the bargain.

        Like

    • Rosaliene Bacchus 3:39 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I could watch Fred & Ginger and Gene Kelly dance all day long! They brought joy to my tumultous young life.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 6:34 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        To bring joy to a “tumultuous young life” — as Ira Gershwin wrote and Gene Kelly sang (in AN AMERICAN IN PARIS), “Who could ask for anything more?”

        Liked by 2 people

    • Rivergirl 8:52 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      The Nicholas Brothers! That goes back…
      😊

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 11:31 pm on November 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        They go way back, but they lived long — especially the older brother, who died in 2006 at age 91.

        Liked by 2 people

    • mlrover 8:53 am on November 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Ginger spoke in an interview about that particular dance. Fred insisted on perfection, and as usual, doing it in one take. She said that by the time this scene was done as he liked it there was blood in her shoes. She also said, as she had before and would again, that she got paid less and did everything he did in heels and backward.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mistermuse 1:28 pm on November 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Fred was indeed a perfectionist. Quoting from the book I mentioned in my earlier reply to calmkate, “the roller skating sequence in SHALL WE DANCE, for example, was shot 30 times, and the Never Gonna Dance number from SWING TIME was done in forty-eight takes.” As for Ginger, “I had plenty of input in our routines and got to be known as the ‘button finder’….the one who puts the last word or finishing touch on a scene.” So I don’t blame her for complaining “that she got paid less.”

        Although Ginger “did everything he did in heels and backward,” the one thing she didn’t do as well was sing. Irving Berlin said, “I’d rather have Fred Astaire introduce one of my songs than any other singer I know — not because he has a great voice, but because his delivery and diction are so good that he can put over a song like nobody else.”

        Liked by 2 people

        • David Thompson 9:00 pm on December 6, 2019 Permalink

          I grew up, will h my mother’s influence ..with this era. I am richer for the experience.

          Like

    • Elizabeth 1:40 pm on November 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I loved this series. Thanks for all the time and thoughtfulness you put into it.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Silver Screenings 12:22 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Amazing tributes, all, but the one for Judy Garland is amazing. To see all those films in one clip is a little mind-blowing. She was certainly prolific!

      Liked by 2 people

    • mistermuse 1:50 am on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      I’m glad you singled out the Garland clip for special mention — it was an unexpected find, and probably my favorite in this series.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mistermuse 10:12 pm on December 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thank you for the Like, David Thompson. I tried to check out your blog, but when I click the link, I get a blank screen. Before I approve your comment, kindly advise if your blog is not operational for some reason.

        Like

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